K020 Pribaoutki

deutsch K020 Pribautki

K20 Pribaoutki

Chansons plaisantes pour une voix accompagnée par huit instruments – Pribaoutki. Song games for Medium Voice and 8 Instruments – Pribautki. Scherzlieder (Sing-Spiele) für Singstimme und acht Instrumente – Прибаутки для голоса и восьми инструментовъ – Pribautki. Canzoni piacevoli per voce ed otto strumenti

Title: Pribaoutki (pronounced priba-útki) is the plural form of the Russian (the) Pribaoutka (прибаутка) and means something like ‘joke word’ or ‘joky phrase’. In Russian literature, it forms a discrete much loved genre of small, folk-like joke rhymes consisting of a few lines, sometimes with a nonsensical character.

Scored for : a) First editions: Canto, Flauto grande, Oboe, Corno Inglese, Clarinetto in La / A*, Clarinetto in Si b / B*, Fagotto, Violino, Viola, Violoncello, Contrabasso – Flute, Oboe (Cor Anglais), Clarinet in A / B flat, Bassoon, Violin, Viola, Cello, Bass; b) Performance requirements: middle voice; Flute, Oboe (changing to English horn), Clarinet (A and B), Bassoon, Violin, Viola, Violoncello, Double bass.

* Original spelling.

Performance practice: Strawinsky conceived this composition with a male voice in mind.

Summary: In the first song, Uncle Kornilo, who is drunk and staggering around, is advised to pull himself together and drive to the tavern in order to clear his head through further drinking, an advice which the uncle gladly follows. The uncle then receives a calling to drown his sorrows, which he fulfills just as gladly. He lifts the bottle to his mouth and drinks the rest of it. – The second song concerns a girl, Natasha, who is summoned for a futile reason and is gabbled at with all types of banalities. There are nonsense rhymes here. – The third song originally consists of twenty-two words, of which twenty-one begin with the letter P. Some of the P words also contain P syllables and presumably the plosive sounds represent the nonsense plot of a colonel who always shoots at everything possible but always misses. The text is untranslatable. – The fourth song concerns an old man sitting on the floor (Hoffmann reworks this as an old man squatting on a Sambucus tree) and cooking soup for himself; a hare requires the soup for himself, to which the old man speaks a nonsense rhyme which says that the hunchback must stand upright, the one-armed man must reach out his arm and the mute must talk quietly.

Translation: Pribaoutki, which may only live from their sound and association rather than their plots, are exceptionally difficult, almost impossible, to translate from their originals. What especially applies for the almost incomprehensible Pribaoutki from Renard also stands for the relatively simple four Pribaoutki from 1914. The first foreign-language translation is by Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz, who received 100 Francs for it; he translated it into French under Strawinsky’s supervision for the Russian-French Henn edition of 1917. This translation is witty when seen in its own right but does not correspond to the original, while the German translation by R. St. Hoffmann, which was produced for the Russian-French-German text in the Austrian Philharmonia pocket-score edition of 1925, satisfies the declamatory style and partly corresponds to the original plot, insofar as there is one. A printed edition with an English text was never produced during Strawinsky’s lifetime. The official CD edition gives a new German translation alongside the English translation which misses the sense of the original because it was clearly produced using as its basis the English version, and this had been translated from the French and not the original Russian text. For example, in the Russian original, the uncle is named Kornilo. Ramuz turns this into Armand while Hoffmann calls him Peter. Both the (later) English and the German translations keep the name Armand after the French precedent; in doing so however, the joke of the section is destroyed. Strawinsky’s setting includes a stylized stammering section. He sets four quavers A flat-G-E flat-F and B flat-A flat-E flat- F one after the other and repeats the ‘I’ vowel of the second syllable, in Russian pronounced ‘ni’, and directly after it the vowel A, so: [Кор]-ни-(и-и)­ло, За-(а -а)­пря = [Kor]-ni-(i-i)-lo, Sa-(a-a)-pria. Hoffmann follows this in the German translation, in that he rhymes O-o-on-kel / Pe-e-e-ter. Ramuz on the other hand, because he must emphasise ‘Ar-mánd’, begins with the second syllable of Armand, stretching it over three quavers and allowing the ‘tu’ to follow over two quavers; he sets the final two quavers with “t’fais” and “bien”, i.e.: ‘[Ar]-mand - - - / tu – t’fais-bien’, which does not correspond to the original. The English translation distorts the connection even further because it emphasises the name on the first syllable for pronunciation reasons. In his copy of the score, Strawinsky significantly crossed out the French and German names (Armand, Peter) and replaced them with the Russian name. For the Henn edition, Strawinsky felt it necessary to adjust his Russian declamation to the French in certain places and where Ramuz needed or inverted two syllables instead of the one in the original, to write into the score in small notes the correct way that it should be sung. Strawinsky finally accepted the translation of Ramuz, found even enthusiastic words about it to Princess Polignac, for there was no-one in his close circles who could have done this better at the time. A few years later however, when he had to have new translations made from the Russian into French, he did not ask Ramuz, preferring to find other translators.

Treatment of the language: Strawinsky marveled at the possibility of a different pronunciation than the normal one in the Russian for the Pribaoutki, as the accent of the more softly spoken Russian language shifts or even disappears when it is sung, so that the accentuations for words and sung texts do not necessarily fall together. Strawinsky, when he first learnt of this, exploited the effect not only for his Russian compositions, but he carried it over to other languages and in doing so, as in the case of Perséphone, caused much disapproval.

Construction: The Pribaoutki make up a cycle of four unconnected and separately titled, short songs for chamber orchestra, each with Roman numerals.

Structure

I*

КОРНИЛО – L'oncle ArmandOnkel Peter – (Uncle Armand)

Moderato Crotchet = 92 (bars 1-12)

Нутко, дядюшка . . . – Console toi, vieil oncle Armand; tu t`fais bien . . . Mach doch kein Gezeter, O(o-o)nkel Pe(e-e)ter . . . – (Console yourself, old Uncle Armand)

Poco meno mosso Crotchet = 84 (bars 13-22)

Cтоитъ бражка въ туяску . . . Là est un joli vin clair . . . Schäumt im Kruge hell das Bier . . . – (There you will find a white wine . . .)

* Tutti; Oboe, Clarinet in A.

II*

НАТАШКА Le FourMarianne – (The Oven)

Allegro dotted Crotchet = 100 (bars 1-10 [without including the upbeat in the numbering]

Наташка, Наташка . . . Louise, viens vite, viens vite, ma fille; Marianne, Marianne, kein Teig in der Pfanne, . . . – (Louise, come quickly . . .)

Dotted Crotchet = Crotchet Meno mosso Crotchet = 100 (bars 11-19)

За игграли утки въ дудки, . . . Les canards commencent à souffler . . . Entlein muß Schalmeien blasen . . . – (The ducks begin to blow. . .)

* Tutti; English horn, Clarinet in A.

III*

ПОЛКОВНИКЪ – Le colonelDer Oberst – (The Colonel)

Allegretto Crotchet = 116-120 (bars 1-32)

Пошелъ полковникъ погулять, . . . Le colonel part pour la chasse, . . . Der Oberst ging heut über Land . . . – (The colonel goes hunting . . .)

Doppio movimento Crotchet = 60 (bars 33-34)

Попа поповича, . . . femm’ l'a battu . . . Pope Popowitsch, . . . – (. . . the dog . . .)

* Tutti; Oboe, Clarinet in B.

IV*

CТАРЕЦЪ И ЗАЯЦЪ – Le vieux et le lièvreDer Greis und der Hase – (The old man and the hare)

Lento Quaver = 66 (bars 1-13)

Cтоитъ градъпустъ, . . . Dans un' ville en l'air . . . In der Stadt im Traum . . . – (In a town in the air . . .)

Semiquaver = Semiquaver (bars 14-29)

Въкустђ сидитъ . . . – Et puis voilà . . . – ein Greis sitzt . . .

Con moto Crotchet = 66 (bars 30-49)

И приказалъ старецъ . . . Et l’vieux a dit comm’ ça, . . . Der Greis dann gesagt hat . . . – (The old man speaks thus . . .)

Tempo I Quaver = 166** (bars 50-57)

* Tutti; English horn, Clarinet in A.

** C learly a printing error, which should read 66.

Corrections / Errata

1st Song

Bar 1 (p. 2, bar 1) Canto: Pronunciation comment 1. Russian word Нy-тко in >Noo-tko< # Bar 2 (p.2 bar 2): an >mf< sign should be added to the bassoon part # B ar 8 (p.3, bar 4): a viola clef should be added at the end of the bar in the viola part # Bar 10 (p. 4, bar 1): the treble clef at the beginning of the system in the viola should be an alto clef; the treble clef should be moved to the end of the bar # Bar 10 (p.4, bar 1) Viola system: a viola clef should be inserted between the quaver rest and the first two-note chord (f1-g2) # Bar 11 (p.4, bar 1) viola system: a treble clef should be inserted between the quaver rest and the first two-note chord g-a2 # Bars 19-20 (p.6, bar 2-3): in the clarinet part, the performance marking >qua | si trillo< should be inserted.

2nd Song

Bars 4+6 (p.7, bars 4+6): in the flute and clarinet parts, the bar’s rests are missing # Bar 15 (p. 9, bar 1): in the flute part, the phrasing marking is incorrect. Instead of being over the last five main notes E flat 3 to B flat 2, it should only cover the last three main notes (c3 – b b 2).

3rd Song

Bars 6 [+7] (p. 10, bar 6 and p. 7, bar 1): between the viola and the violoncello, the >pizz. e sempre sf< should have a left-facing bracket added to it (the >pizz. e sempre sf< under the violoncello system thus becomes superfluous). Under the double bass system should be added >sempre arco | e staccato< # Bar 30 (p.10, bar 2) violin part: the missing second quaver rest at the end of the bar should be inserted to complete the bar # Bars 15 + 16 (p.12, bar 3+4) Viola-Violoncello should have a left curly bracket # Bar 22 (p. 13, bar 4): Viola-Violoncello should have a left curly bracket # Bar 24 (p. 14, bar 2): Viola-Violoncello should have a left curly bracket # Bar 33 (p. 15, bar 5) Viola system: the c1 and g1 in the semiquaver chord c1-g1-g2, should both have bracketed accidental signs inserted.

4th Song

Bar 9 (p.16, bar 9) Canto: accent signs > should be added over the first triplet note (d2), and the sixth note in the bar (d2) # Bar 17/18 (p. 17, bar 4/5): [written indistinctly] Tempo marking semiquaver = | semiquaver # End of bar 18 (p.17 bars 2+3): next to the Flute and Cor Anglais systems, there is the entry >Sul / Flute< in the margin of the voice part # Bars 24-25 (p.18, bar 6-7) Canto: the final note of bar 24 (dotted quaver a1) should be tied over to a (missing) dotted crotchet in bar 25. The bar’s rest in bar 25 should be removed and replaced by the (missing) crotchet # Bar 30 (p.19, bar 1): the metronome marking crotchet = 66 should be replaced by minim = 60* # Bar 35 (p. 19 bar 6) Bassoon: The four demisemiquaver tails should be removed and replaced by three semiquaver tails under a single phrasing mark; these are to be read as a group of triplets with a total value of two crotchets (a2-g2-f2-e2 / a2-g2-f2-e2 / g2-f2-e2-d2); as a result, the last note of the bar, d2, should be tied over to the note in the next bar (p. 20, 1st bar = 4th song bar 36) # Bar 42 and 43 (p. 20, bar 7 with p. 21, bar 1): The whole system of bar 42 should be turned back from a 3/4 bar to a 2/4 bar. In the voice part, a dotted minim, d1, should be changed into a minim without a dot. The bassoon part should be altered according to correction. The bar line between bars 42 and 43 (p. 20, bar 7 + p. 21, bar 1) should be taken back to behind the second crotchet beat and the crotchet beat cut out by this should be added to the next bar (43), which should as a result be changed from a 2/4 bar into a 3/4 bar. A crotchet d1 should be inserted into the voice part, which should be tied from the note in the preceding bar. As well as this, what were previously the last quaver notes in the violin and viola parts of what was previously bar 42 and what are now the second notes of what is now bar 43 should have a sharp sign added and be read as g#1, while the two sharp signs before the last notes in the bar should be removed. # Bar 44 (p. 21, bar 2) should have the time signature 2/4 added # Bar 50 (p.22) above the system: the metronome marking should be >(quaver = 66)< instead of the incorrect >(quaver = 166)<*. # the metronome marking after >Tempo I< quaver = 166 should be replaced by quaver = 66*.

* A comparison of the metronome markings in the corrected versions at this point, Con moto, shows the discrepancies: the original has crotchet = 68, the 1st corrected version has minim = 60, the ensemble edition from 1917 has minim = 60, the main corrected version from 1964 has minim = 66, and Strawinsky’s declaration >correct!< refers to minim = 66. All the corrections for the pocket-score specify this tempo.

Style: The pieces correspond to a melodically high style of recitation as can be recognized from realistic settings of Russian song. Each of the four songs is differently constructed from a technical perspective. –

The first song consists of four basic models which are differently arranged in collage but without being altered themselves, so that the scheme 1-2-3-4-2-3-1-2-3-4-2-3 arises. The two stammering bars previously mentioned form frameworks 3 and 4. They appear six times in total, each time when it is being communicated that Uncle Kornilo is already so drunk before his journey to the tavern that he can no longer speak properly. Onomatopoeia was presumably also the reason why he was named Uncle Kornilo, since with the second syllable ‘ni’, the first stuttering bar is sung as if it is a hiccough. The dry, contrasting block-like instrumentation graphically describes the uncle’s staggering around as he tries to harnesst the horse. In the second section of the song, the French uncle, Armand (according to Ramuz), drinks white wine while the German uncle, Peter, drinks light beer according to Hoffmann. The Russian uncle, Kornilo, however does not drink, as one would expect from a Russian, the Russian’s favourite drink, Vodka, but apparently Kvass, a drink similar to lemonade made from rye or white bread or fruit. This orchestral section underneath is written to describe neither wine, which is slow to drink, nor a foaming beer, freely flowing, but rather a drink that is drunk in sips from a glass or ‘downed’ directly from the bottle. It is made up of a soloistic two-quaver clarinet motif, g#-d# or a-d or f#-c# or b-e which is varied in four different ways and which rotates in upon itself in an upward direction; this depicts the lifting motion of the drinker’s arm for 7 bars but also implies the dull monotony of his action. The number of times that the uncle ‘knocks one back’, either from the glass or from the bottle, can be counted: in total, he drinks fifteen times of a glass which implies approximately three-quarters of a litre of liquid at least. On top of this, he sings naturally, better: he makes noises which can barely be described as singing for a man in his state. The sung melody is a sort of simple, repeated rolling flourish downwards over a fourth or a third. He cannot manage anything more than such a wailing at this advanced point in time. The uncle then receives the call (bar 8) to drown his sorrows, which he naturally fulfils; he lifts the bottle to his mouth and lets the rest of the liquid flow ‘into his throat’, which the cello comments on with pleasure by means of a glissando from a tied-over f b 1 over two octaves downwards to a bottom D b . The orchestra is silent now as the bottle is as good as empty. He still sings for one more bar. He then lifts the bottle again; there are still a few more drops in it. The following one-bar combination invented by Strawinsky of melismatic and melodic oboe and A clarinet imitates the gurgeling noise of the bottle that is going to be empty is an onomatopoetic masterstroke. Prokofiev was so impressed with this song and especially this oboe and clarinet cadenza that he spontaneously wrote a letter to Strawinsky a day after the American première on 8th December 1919 in Chicago with Vera Janakopoulos, which was when he heard the piece for the first time, in which he conveyed to him that the four songs were received with much laughter and had to be repeated. Prokofiev praised the imitation of the noise of the gurgling of the bottle being emptied among other things. It can be seen extrapolated from this remark that, according to Prokofiev’s perception, the drink was being drunk out of a bottle and not out of a glass. The event shows Strawinsky’s double joke at this point. Of course the uncle is not drinking Kvass, that is only simulation – who would get so drunk from that? -. In his opinion, it is something much better, and given the fact that the Strawinskys belonged to the largest Whiskey producers in Russia until 1917, it certainly wasn’t vodka. –

The second song is the shortest in the cycle at barely 20 seconds. It concerns a girl, Natasha, whom Ramuz calls Luise and Hoffmann Marianne, who is summoned for an inane reason and has all types of nonsense talked to her. There are nonsense rhymes here. The work is divided instrumentally into two larger sections of 10 and 9 bars, each in 3/4 and 2/4 time signatures, and vocally into three sections of 10, 4 and 5 bars. The voice, which makes slight variations on a basic framework, does not go past a downwards fourth E flat-B flat, in doing so conveying the vacuity of all domestic life. In the second instrumental section, the orchestra has constantly rotating figures and takes on the only literal reference to the text, where ducks play shawms (flutes, mirlitons), roosters answer and hens run around. The onomatopoeia is played by the cor anglais, clarinet and flute. –

In the third, untranslatable song, the clarinet and bassoon comment on the scenes with hunting call-like fanfares. The 34 bars with their overriding motoristic process show their structural differentiation by means of the regular changes in time signature. For the first time, Strawinsky uses the instruments for a prelude and two interludes, and he works with the device of creating climaxes which leads to a cantata division on a miniature scale: 5 bars Introduction / 3 bars song and start of the Interlude / 6 bars Interlude / 3 bars Song and start of the 2nd Interlude / 4 bars 2nd Interlude / 11 bars Song with recitative on C sharp from bar 5 / 2 bars slow coda. In this song, there is no motific repetition in the voice part, only relationships of material with structural manipulation and changes of combination. The song is based on the construction of the syllables and has programmatic motific processes in one case, in a conflict of walking, shooting, falling, flying and in the end finding. Strawinsky’s gesture best embodies the final bowing gesture of Pope Petrovitch, as he retrieves his small animal from the water. –

The fourth song is the longest of the cycle at 57 bars in length and lasts the same length as the other 3 pieces put together. The song is divided instrumentally into three parts and vocally into two by means of the structural use of tempo, which indicates texturally specified changes of expression and character. In the voice part, there is no repetition of motifs, rather very small variations of the melodic material of three different motifs, from which the entire piece is constructed and which appear in bars 2-4, 14-16 and 40-42 in their basic forms. The sparse instrumental accompaniment, which functions to define the structure with its interludes, portrays the dream-like quality of the scene, with its restrained, mystic and iridescent instrumental veil, especially by means of the 34-bar solo-violin accompaniment of the voice, played sul ponticello. Only the bassoon is assigned to the motific material in the upper register in bars 37 and 38.

Dedication: > Моей жене / A ma femme< [To my wife].

Duration: about 0 ’ 48“ + 0’ 22“ + 0’ 42“ + 1’ 48“.

Date of origin: Salvan summer-autumn 1914 (end of score dated = 1st piece: 13rd August, 2nd piece: 18th August, 3rd piece: 16th./29th August, 4th piece: 29th./16th September).

History of Origin: Almost nothing is known about the short history of the composition of the Pribaoutki . According to his memoirs of 1935, he was looking for texts relating to marriage rituals from Russian anthologies for Les Noces in Kiev in Autumn 1914, two weeks before the outbreak of the First World War. From this collected material, he selected a few folk songs and split them between the three compositions: Pribaoutki , the Berceuse du chat songs and the four a cappella Russian peasant songs for female voices ‘ Unterschale’ . Many years later, he explained that in not one of his Russian songs did he borrow from Russian folk music, and he expressly cited the Pribaoutki and the Berceuses du chat . During the writing of the work, he had in mind his brother Gury and therefore had a man’s voice in his ear, which is the only type that actually suits the text, although the recording made under Strawinsky’s responsibility into his series of vinyl records was of a lady, Cathy Berberian, and the American première was also sung by a lady, Vera Janakopoulos. The compositional history of a work by Strawinsky is normally only sparsely known if it is not a commissioned chamber-music work, as no correspondance was necessary because he only had himself to deal with. This is also true for the Pribaoutki.

First performances: 22nd February 1918 in the Aeolian Hall of London by Olga Haley with an instrumental ensemble conducted by Eugene Goossens; the frist American performance took place on 8th December 1919 in Chicago with Vera Janoucopoulos.

Remarks: In his biographical depiction, Strawinsky appears much more often as an egoistical family tyrant, moody and contrary, hostile and indifferent, someone who joked at the expense of other people, ironic and cynical, unforgiving and quick to influence negatively, as well as being greedy for money. Nowadays, he is, like Richard Wagner, subjected to the fate of shameless character analysis. His letters, which have long been published, several hundred in number, do more to confirm this picture than to dispel it. The first to assert that these letters do not depict the real Strawinsky as he was known to those in his close circles, was Robert Craft. This real Strawinsky combined in himself numerous contradictions. He was able to be agreeable and rude at the same time, but all his contemporaries, insofar as they did not meet him in the capacity of intendant, representative, director, journalist and artist with a mentality of inconsiderate self-interest, paint a completely different picture of him. He was praised for his hospitality, his spirited and witty conversation, his overflowing bon mots, his high level of education, his knowledge of literature , his sharp insight for the strengths and weaknesses of people and works, his exceptional empathy with children and his devout religiosity. His loneliness has also been recognised along with his doubt and homelesness caused by the global political events of the time, which, with his adopted aristocratic bearing which never allowed people to see into there thoughts, he greatly played down and never expressed in his correspondance. It was always his cutting turn of phrase that people feared him for and the wit which he was known for and which was reflected in many of his most meaningful works. The Pribaoutki do not have any special position in history, but there are certain moments of an almost child-like disposition which he never lost even into his old age and without which the large stage-works would never have been conceivable. Strawinsky enjoyed joke songs of all types, nonsense rhymes, onomatopoetic word games for his entire lifetime. The wrong-headed richness of the relationships between rhymes, lines, verses, words, emphases outside the sphere of rational comprehension which then lead to an entirely new meaning, must always have fascinated him. This was presumably because rotating rhyme and verse processes corresponded to his own compositional devices which he had entered into his sketch books in such an abundant way in 1914 and which he used for many years afterwards. Many of the Pribaoutki were drawn up by Strawinsky himself and his handwriting is also certainly found in the joke songs of 1914.

Situationsgeschichte: Strawinsky sourced texts for “Les Noces” from Russian anthologies referring to marriage rituals, in Kiev in August 1914, 2 weeks before the beginning of the First World War. From this collected material, he chose certain folk songs, as can be read in his “memoirs”, which were not written by Strawinsky, and divided them into 3 compositions, Pribautki, the “Cat’s Lullabies” and the 4 female choruses (Saucers). This sounds vague and unlikely. One can incorporate folk songs in a way in which one leaves out the text and incorporates the melody thematically into an instrumental work. It is however less conceivable to put an original folksong, written in a declamatory style over a text, over a different text without changing it in essence, which would certainly contradict Strawinsky’s well known care for detail. He also explained years later that in not a single one of his Russian songs did he borrow from Russian folk music, and he specifically named the Pribautki and the “Cat’s Lullabies”. We therefore still know little of the compositional history of this Strawinsky composition since no correspondence was necessary for its completion. This is the case for the Pribautki, which had to do with his family. He dedicated them to his wife and had in mind his brother Gury, in terms of the voice-type; he, therefore used a male voice for the pieces, which in fact also suited the texts best. In spite of this, the pieces were sung by a woman, Cathy Berberian, for the vinyl series that was created under his oversight. In the correspondence, the Pribautki again appear in connection with Ramuz, who completed the translation and received 100 Swiss francs for it. Ramuz enquired of Strawinsky on 11th December 1919 as to whether he had given the permission for the printing of the Berceuse and “Pribautki” in the “Littérateur”; this was because his texts had been printed incorrectly.

Versions: The Pribaoutki were published in 1917 by Adolphe Henn in Geneva along with the orchestral score and the piano reduction, which was completed by Strawinsky himself. Both were produced in very simple designs and in the Octave oblong format, which was typical for Henn’s editions of Strawinsky’s music, and had Russian and French versions of the text. Henn also supplied the parts, which were available to buy, and their price was 10 Swiss Francs while the pocket score costed 8 and the piano reduction 4. The print run was carried out on a small scale and the sales according to the European economic situation was therefore not worth naming. Henn printed 500 copies of the piano reduction, 150 of the score and only 50 sets of parts, and even these were based on expectations that were too high. Up to the takeover by Chester Publishers of Otto Kling in London at the end of 1919, 155 copies of the piano reduction, 18 scores and only 6 sets of parts were sold. 49 copies of the piano reduction, 22 scores (i.e. more than were sold) but no sets of parts were given away for free. In its acquisitions package consisting of the two piano series of the trois and cinq pieces faciles, the Berceuses du chat , Pribaoutki and Renard which brought Strawinsky the corresponding arrangement of 10,000 Francs on 7th December 1919, Kling received 280 copies of the piano reduction, 110 scores and 40 sets of parts from Henn. The discrepancies can be attributed to the commission system that was already in part at Chester in London. The edition of the set of parts is very rare. Not one copy could be located in the German copyright libraries. The Library of Congress in Washington has a copy under the signature > M1613 .3 S93 P6 1917< (control-number >62037363<) – After the takeover by Chester, there were new editions whose paths are not easy to trace. Chester took out a copyright in 1924 and printed the piano reduction and score, but apparently no parts. The piano reduction was published, as can be judged from the library copies, in two different designs as was the manner for the Chester Library, decorated with tendrils and not in the straight octave-crossbeam format, but in the normal quarto format which almost borders on Senio. Hence Chester had sold the rest of the assets of Henn publishers by this point. The fact that it then published the pocket score in three languages is thanks to the interest of the Austrian Philarmonic Publishing House, which was keen to use the Pribaoutki for its own series of scores and (gradually, along with other of Strawinsky’s compositions) to incorporate it into a beautifully designed edition, completed with an introduction and portrait. The fact that the Viennese publishers added in the Chester plate number, included the Austrian German text by R. St. Hoffmann and that both scores are identical excluding the introduction and title pages, is attested to in mutual agreements. The pocket score produced exclusively by Chester runs to only 14 pages of musical text and has a plainly printed, fashionably coloured gold and beige cover which could also be found at the ‘Russischem Musikverlag’ consisting of a title page, two empty pages and an adverts page. This simpler edition was published in Germany by Schott in Mainz under the Edition number 3465.

Historical recording: New York City 11th December 1964, sung text Russian, Cathy Berberian (Mezzo soprano) and the Columbia Chamber Ensemble under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

CD edition: VIII-2/14-17.

Autograph: The whereabouts of the autograph score appears to be unknown ; copies from the holdings of Chester stores in der British library London, sheets in the Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel.

Copyright: 1917 by Adolphe Henn in Geneva; 1924 by J. & W. Chester in London.

Editions

a) Overview

20-1 1917 VoSc; R-F; Henn Genf; 14 pp.; A. 70 H.

    20-1Straw1ibd.

    20-1Straw2ibd.

20-2 1917 Sc; R-F; Henn Genf; 22 pp.; A. 71 H.

    20-2Strawibd.

20-3St 1917 Set of parts; Henn Genf.

20-4 [1924] VS; R-F; Chester London; 14 pp.; J. W. C. 3825 1-4; 125.

20-5

20-6 1925 PS; R-F-G; Philharmonia Wien; 14 pp.; W.Ph.V. 293 J. W. C. 15 a; Ed.-Nr. 293.

20-7 [1925] PoSc; R-F-G; J. &. W. Chester London; 14 pp.; W.Ph.V. 293 J. W. C. 15 a; Ed.-Nr. 293.

    20-7Straw1 ibd.

    20-7Straw2ibd.

20-8 PoSc; R-F-G ; Chester London; 14 p.; J.W.C.15 a ; – .

b) Characteristic features

20-1 IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLA ISANTES) / POUR UNE VOIX ET HUIT INSTRUMENTS / MISES EN FRANÇAIS PAR / C. F. RAMUZ / (TEXTE RUSSE ET FRANÇAIX) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L'AUTEUR / [°] / Edition AD. HENN, Genève. / Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / Partition d'ensemble [#*] Net Fr. 8. — / Parties d'ensemble [#*] " " 10. — / Réduction pour piano et chant. [#*] " " 4.— / Propriété de l'auteur / pour tous pays. / Tous droits d'exécution, de reproduction / et d'arrangement réservés pour tous / pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède / et la Norvège. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / L'ONCLE ARMAND / LE FOUR / LE COLONEL / LE VIEUX ET LE LIÈVRE / POUR UNE VOIX ET HUIT INSTRUMENTS / TEXTES POPULAIRES RUSSES MIS EN FRANÇXAIS PAR / C. F. RAMUZ / Edition AD. HENN, Genève. / Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / Partition d'ensemble [#*] Net Fr. 8. — / Parties d'ensemble [#*] " " 10. — / Réduction pour piano et chant [#*] " " 4.— / Propriété de l'auteur / pour tous pays. / Tous droits d'exécution, de reproduction / et d'arrangement réservés pour tous / pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède / et la Norvège. // (Vocal score not sewn 27.7 x 19 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); sung textes Russian-French; 14 [12] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on middle beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements > du mÊme auteur: <** without production date] + 4 pages front matter [title page, empty page, dedication manually written printed in line etching Russian-French centre > Моей жене / A ma femme<, empty page] without back matter; without author specified; legal reservation below type area flush left 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 >Edition Ad. Henn, Genève (Suisse) / Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn.< p. 5, 7, 10 >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn, Genève.< 1st page of the score flush right >Propriété de l’auteur. / Tous droits d’exécution, de traduction, d’arrangement et de reproduction / réservés pour tous pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède et la Norvège.<; plate number >A. 70 H.<; end of score dated p. 14 >SALVAN 1914<; production indication p. 14 flush left as end mark >H. Jarrys, Genève<) // (1917)

° a seal-like red stamp mark 1 x 2.1 centre; the same overprint can also be found again underneath the final dating of the composition.

* Fill character (dotted line).

** Compositions are advertised >TROIS PIÈCES FACILES pour PIANO A QUATRE MAINS. / (MAIN GAUCHE FACILE.) / CINQ PIÈCES FACILES POUR PIANO A QUATRE MAINS. / (MAIN DROITE FACILE.) / BERCEUSES DU CHAT, SUITE DE CHANTS pour une voix de femme et trois clarinettes, / mises en français par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / RENARD, HISTOIRE BURLESQUE EN UN ACTE, pour quatre voix d'hommes et orchestre de / chambre, mise en français par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / Edition AD. HENN — GENÈVE. [#] Propriété de l'auteur pour tous pays. / H. Jarrys, Genève°°< [° the curly bracket, which is two-lines tall, encompasses the lines beginning with a) and b)] .

20-1Straw1

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate is signed >IStr< in black on the right of the outer title page above the name, and contains between the name and the title of the work in red the entry >IV [number circled] corrected Oct. 20/ °64 / This copy has an English / translation in pencil.<. The English translation >Cheer up, dear old un-cle Pet---er. . .< is written in an almost calligraphic script [° slash original]. Corrections: [3rd song, bar 14: the metre should be changed to 3/8; 4th song, p. 12, bar 1: instead of crotchet 66, it should read >minim = 60<; bar 6 (2nd system, bar 2) piano upper stave: change to the bassoon passage; bar 8 should be cut; p. 13, 2nd system, bar 1: 3/4 time signature should be removed, and the notes in the bassoon part should be moved into the piano part; bar 2: time signature 3/4, the bar line should be removed, voice part: crotchet d1 + 2 crotchet rests, the d1 note at the beginning of the bar should be tied over from the minim d1 in the preceding bar; bar 3 gains a 2/4 time signature; p. 14, bar 4: instead of quaver = 166, it should read >(quaver = 66)<.

20-1Straw2

The copy is signed in blue >IStr< on the outer title page above and next to the name, but it is not dated, and it contains the entry >IV [circled] corrected< in red between the name and the title of the work. The two stamps have subsequently become bluer. It appears as if they were engraved or traced over in another colour. On the outer title page, part of the title of the work >CHANT ET PIANO< is underlined in bold and in blue. Corrections in red: [p. 12 >minim = 66<; the grouping in the bassoon part on p.12; the cut bar; the same bassoon correction on p. 13 bar 5; as well as this, the 3/4 time signature in bar 5 is crossed out, and bar 6 has no correction of time signature. Here, the held note, d1, is followed by 2 crotchet rests; p. 14 (quaver = 166) is corrected to >(quaver = 66)<].

20-2 IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / L'ONCLE ARMAND / LE FOUR / LE COLONEL / LE VIEUX ET LE LIÈVRE / POUR UNE VOIX ACCOMPAGNÉE DE / FLUTE, HAUTBOIS (COR ANGLAIS), CLARINETTE (La et Si bémol), BASSON, / VIOLON, ALTO, VIOLONCELLE et CONTREBASSE. / TEXTES POPULAIRES RUSSES MIS EN FRANÇAIS PAR / C. F. RAMUZ / [°] / Edition AD. HENN, Genève. / Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn. / Partition d'ensemble [#*] Net Fr. 8. —/ Parties d'ensemble [#*] " " 10. — / Réduction pour piano et chant. [#*] " " 4. — / Propriété de l'auteur / pour tous pays. / Tous droits d'exécution, de reproduction / et d'arrangement réservés pour tous / pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède / et la Norvège. // [title page = front cover title without Sigel] // (Score not sewn 27.8 x 19 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°]); sung text Russian-French; 22 [21] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on dark beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements > du mÊme auteur: <** without production date] + 3 pages front matter [title page, empty page, page with dedication handwritten printed in line etching [exclusively] French >A ma femme<, without back matter; song number in Roman numeral (with dot) centre above song title Russian-French as title head; without author specified; legal reservation 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below type area flush left >Edition Ad. Henn, Genève (Suisse) / Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn< flush right >Propriété de l'auteur. / Tous droits d'exécution, de traduction, d'arrangement et de reproduction / réservés pour tous pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède et la Norvège<, Genève.< p. 7 [nicht p. 10] below type area flush left >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn <; plate number >A. 71 H.<; end of score dated p. 22 >SALVAN 1914<; production indication p. 22 flush left as end mark >H. Jarrys, Genève<) // (1917)

° a seal-like red stamp mark 1 x 2.1 centre; the same overprint can also be found again underneath the final dating of the composition.

* Fill character (dotted line).

** Compositions are advertised >TROIS PIÈCES FACILES pour PIANO A QUATRE MAINS. / (MAIN GAUCHE FACILE.) / CINQ PIÈCES FACILES POUR PIANO A QUATRE MAINS. / (MAIN DROITE FACILE.) / BERCEUSES DU CHAT, SUITE DE CHANTS pour une voix de femme et trois clarinettes, / mises en français par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / RENARD, HISTOIRE BURLESQUE EN UN ACTE, pour quatre voix d'hommes et orchestre de / chambre, mise en français par C.-F. RAMUZ. / a) PARTITION D'ENSEMBLE et PARTIES. }° Avec textes / b) RÉDUCTION pour CHANT et PIANO par l'AUTEUR. }° russe et français. / Edition AD. HENN — GENÈVE. [#] Propriété de l'auteur pour tous pays. / H. Jarrys, Genève°°< [° the curly bracket, which is two-lines tall, encompasses the lines beginning with a) and b)].

20-2Straw

20-3 IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / PARTIES D’ENSEMBLE / ÉDITION AD. HENN. — GENÉVE* [#] / [#] Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction** / Copyright 1917 by AD. HENN°* / [#] et d’arrangements°°, réservés pour tous** / [#] pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède** / Net : Fr. 10. — * [#] et la Norvège°** / H. JARRIS, GENÈVE*** // (Set of parts not sewn 26.4 x 21.9 oblong (obl. 8° [quer Lex. 8°] ) in 4 cover pages dark grey on grey beige veined [front cover title in ornamental frame, 3 empty pages]; piece title Russian-French below Roman numeral (with dot); 4 [2] pages + 1 page front matter [empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page], title head >PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES)<, name of the instruments quasi-handwritten centre below 1. piece title; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 belowname of instrument flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<, legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Edition AD. HENN, GENÈVE. / Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn.< flush right centred >Propriété de l’auteur / pour tous pays.< justified text >Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction / et d’arrangement°°, réservés pour tous / pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède / et la Norvège.<, plate numbers°°° >Violino.< >A. 98(1) H,<, >Viola.< >A. 98(2) H, [.]<, >Violoncello.< >A. 98(3) H.<, >Contrabasso.< >A. 98(4) H.<, >Flauto grande.< >A [A.] 98(5) H.<, >Oboe.< >A. 98(6) H.<, >Clarinetto.< >A.98(7) H. [H.] <, >Fagotto.< >A.98(8)H. [A. 98 (8) H.]; production indication [exclusively] violin part [exclusively] p. 2 below type area [am Ende des 2. Stücks] above legal reservation flush right 3 circles arranged in a triangular form, each containing a capital letter (the two upper circles contain the letters >C< and >G< respectively and the lower circle the letter >R<) ;without end marks) // (1917)

° Fill character (dots in groups of two).

°° Original spelling.

°°° The plate numbers are intentionally printed inconsistently in the same part.

* On the left side.

** On the right side.

*** Centre.

**** On the Washington copy >M1613 .3S93 P6 1917 = 62037363<, there is a centred stamp >COPYRIGHT / for all Countries. / [wavy dividing line] / J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd. / LONDON, W. 1.< at the bottom of the page on the left next to the printers’ name, and in the middle under the printers’ name the stamp >NET 10/ — <.

20-4 EDITION CHESTER / No 125 / IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / [°] / CHANT ET PIANO. / PRICE 3/- NET. / J. & W. Chester LTD // IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°°] / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / L'ONCLE ARMAND / LE FOUR / LE COLONEL / LE VIEUX ET LE LIÈVRE / POUR UNE VOIX ET HUIT INSTRUMENTS / TEXTES POPULAIRES RUSSES MIS EN FRANÇAIS PAR / C. F. RAMUZ / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L'AUTEUR / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD., / LONDON: II, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W.I. / [°°°] / SEULS DÉPOSITAIRES POUR LA FRANCE. [#*] SEULS DÉPOSITAIRES POUR LA BELGIQUE. / ROUART, LEROLLE ET CIE., [#*] MAISON CHESTER, / 29, RUE D'ASTORG, [#*] 86, RUE DE LA MONTAGNE, / PARIS. [#*] BRUXELLES. // (Vocal score [library binding] 23.9 x 30.4 (4° [4°]); sung text Russian-French; 14 [12] pages + 4 cover pages black on light brown [a full-page Chester Lyre surrounded by a coat of arms black on white with (presumably) the artist’s signature >H J M< # >1914< entered left and flush right at the bottom of the frame, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >ŒUVRES DE / IGOR STRAWINSKY / PUBLIÉES PAR / J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd. LONDRES.<** without production date] + 2 pages front matter [ornamental title page in framed floral design, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [empty pages]; song title below piece number in Roman numeral (with dot) I. to IV. Russian-French as title head; without dedication; author specified below song titles [p. 3, 5, 7, 10] flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below type area flush left >Copyright MCMXXIV by J. & W. Chester Ltd< flush right >Tous droits d'exécution, de traduction, d'arrangement et de reproduction / réservés pour tous pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède et la Norvège<.; plate numbers: [I = p. 3-4:] >J.W.C. 38251< [II = p. 5-6:] >J.W.C. 38252< [III = p. 7-9:] >J.W.C. 38253< [IV = p. 10-14:] >J.W.C. 38254<; end of score dated p. 12 >SALVAN 1914<; without end marks) // (1924)

° D ividing horizontal line of 0.6 cm.

°° D ividing horizontal double line of 6.2 cm.

°°° D ividing horizontal line of 4.5 cm.

* Ornamental dividing vertical line of 1.6 cm, spanning four lines.

** All works for sale with Chester are advertised in alphabetical order with edition and net price behind dots in groups of three as well as with self-arrangements by Strawinsky marked in bold type >Berceuses du chat, suite de chants pour voix de femme et trois clarinettes: / Partition d’ensemble° 6/- net.+ / Parties° 6/- „ / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur*° 2/- „ / BERCEUSE ET FINALE (“ L’Oiseau de Feu ”): / Arrangement pour orgue de Maurice Besley° 2/- „ / CHANT DES BATELIERS SUR LE VOLGA, pour instruments à vent: / Partition et parties° 5/- „ / LES CINQ DOIGTS, huit pièces faciles pour piano° 3/- „ / CINQ PIECES°° FACILES pour piano à quatre mains (main droite facile)° 3/- „ / L’HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT, grande suite: / Arrangement pour piano par l’auteur*° 10/- „ / Suite pour clarinette, violon et piano, arrangement par l’auteur*°°° 20/- „ / LES NOCES, scènes chorégraphiques russes avec chant: / Réduction pour piano et chant par l’auteur*° 20/- „ / L’OISEAU DE FEU, nouvelle suite pour orchestre moyen: / Partition° 40/- „ / Parties° 50/- „ / PIANO RAG MUSIC pour piano seul° 3/- „ / PRIBAOUTKI, chansons plaisantes pour une voix et huit instruments: / Partition° 8/- „ / Parties° 10/- „ / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur*° 4/- „ PULCINELLA, ballet d’après Pergolesi: / Réduction pour piano par l’auteur*° 15/- „ / QUATRE CHANTS RUSSES, chant et piano° 3/- „ / RAG-TIME pour petit orchestre: / Partition° 7/- „ / Réduction pour piano par l’auteur*° 4/- „ / RENARD. Histoire burlesque en un acte: / Réduction pour piano et chant par l’auteur*° 15/- „ / RONDE DES PRINCESSES (“ L’Oiseau de Feu ”): / Arrangement pour orgue de Maurice Besley° 2/- „ / TROIS HISTOIRES POUR ENFANTS, chant et piano° 2/6 „ / TROIS PIÈCES°° FACILES pour piano à quatre mains (main gauche facile)° 2/6 „ / TROIS PIÈCES pour clarinette seul° 3/- „ [+ only behind this first statement of the price and after the original oblique does the abbreviation >net.< appear, and behind all further ones the abbreviation double quotation >„<; ° fill character (dots in groups of three); °° different accents original; °°° without fill character (dots in groups of three); * bold print].

20-5 EDITION CHESTER / 125 / IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / [°] / CHANT ET PIANO. / [°] / PRICE 3/. NET. / J. & W. Chester L TD// IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°°] / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / L'ONCLE ARMAND / LE FOUR / LE COLONEL / LE VIEUX ET LE LIÈVRE / POUR UNE VOIX ET HUIT INSTRUMENTS / TEXTES POPULAIRES RUSSES MIS EN FRANÇAIS PAR / C. F. RAMUZ / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L'AUTEUR / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD., / LONDON: II, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W. I. / FRANCE. [#] BELGIUM. [#] SWITZERLAND. [#] ITALY. / ROUART, LEROLLE ET CIE., [#] LES EDITIONS MODERNES, [#] REDSCHY FRERES, [#] PIZZI UMBERTO, / PARIS. [#] BRUXELLES. [#] GENÈVE. [#] BOLOGNA. / GERMANY. [#] HOLLAND. [#] CZECHO-SLOVAKIA. [#] SOUTH AMERICA. / HUG & CO., [#] BROEKMANS & VAN POPPEL, [#] HUDEBNI MATICE, [#] IRIBERRI, BELLOCQ & CIA. [*] // (Vocal score sewn 24.2 x 30.7 (4° [4°]); sung text Russian-French; 14 [12] pages + 4 cover pages black on light brown [ornamental front cover full-page Chester Lyre surrounded by a coat of arms with (presumably) the artist’s signature >H J M< # >1914< entered left and flush right at the bottom of the frame, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements > ŒUVRES DE / IGOR STRAWINSKY / PUBLIÉES PAR / J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd. LONDRES. <**] + 4 pages front matter [ornamental title page in framed floral design with (presumably) the artist’s signature >H J M< # >1922< entered left and flush right at the bottom of the frame, empty page, page with dedication manually written printed in line etching Russian-French > Моей жене / A ma femme<] + 2 pages back matter [empty pages]; song title below piece numbers in Roman numeral (without dot) I to IV Russian-French as title head; author specified below song titles [pp. 3, 5, 7, 10] flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below type area flush left >Copyright MCMXXIV by J. & W. Chester L td< flush right >Tous droits d'exécution, de traduction,d'arrangement et de reproduction / réservés pour tous pays, y compris le Danemark, la Suède et la Norvège.<.; plate numbers : [I = pp. 3-4:] >J.W.C. 3825 1< [II = pp. 5-6:] >J.W.C. 3825 2< [III = pp. 7-9:] >J.W.C. 3825 3< [IV = pp. 10-14:] >J.W.C. 3825 4<; end of score dated p. 12 >SALVAN 1914<; without end marks) // (1924)

° Dividing horizontal line of 0.6 cm.

°° Double dividing horizontal line of 6.2 cm.

°°° Dividing horizontal line of 4.6 cm.

* The copy of the Städtische Musikbibliothek Leipzig >5:17368< contains a stamp mark at this point >B. SCHOTT'S SÖHNE, MAINZ<.

** All works for sale with Chester are advertised in alphabetical order with edition and net price behind fill character (dots in groups of three) as well as with self-arrangements by Strawinsky marked in bold type >Berceuses du chat, suite de chants pour voix de femme et trois clarinettes: / Partition d’ensemble° 6/- net.+ / Parties° 6/- „ / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur*° 2/- „ / BERCEUSE ET FINALE (“ L’Oiseau de Feu ”): / Arrangement pour orgue de Maurice Besley° 2/- „ / CHANT DES BATELIERS SUR LE VOLGA, pour instruments à vent: / Partition et parties° 5/- „ / LES CINQ DOIGTS, huit pièces faciles pour piano° 3/- „ / CINQ PIECES°° FACILES pour piano à quatre mains (main droite facile)° 3/- „ / L’HISTOIRE DU SOLDAT, grande suite: / Arrangement pour piano par l’auteur*° 10/- „ / Suite pour clarinette, violon et piano, arrangement par l’auteur*°°° 20/- „ / LES NOCES, scènes chorégraphiques russes avec chant: / Réduction pour piano et chant par l’auteur*° 20/- „ / L’OISEAU DE FEU, nouvelle suite pour orchestre moyen: / Partition° 40/- „ / Parties° 50/- „ / PIANO RAG MUSIC pour piano seul° 3/- „ / PRIBAOUTKI, chansons plaisantes pour une voix et huit instruments: / Partition° 8/- „ / Parties° 10/- „ / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur*° 4/- „ PULCINELLA, ballet d’après Pergolesi: / Réduction pour piano par l’auteur*° 15/- „ / QUATRE CHANTS RUSSES, chant et piano° 3/- „ / RAG-TIME pour petit orchestre: / Partition° 7/- „ / Réduction pour piano par l’auteur*° 4/- „ / RENARD. Histoire burlesque en un acte: / Réduction pour piano et chant par l’auteur*° 15/- „ / RONDE DES PRINCESSES (“ L’Oiseau de Feu ”): / Arrangement pour orgue de Maurice Besley° 2/- „ / TROIS HISTOIRES POUR ENFANTS, chant et piano° 2/6 „ / TROIS PIÈCES°° FACILES pour piano à quatre mains (main gauche facile)° 2/6 „ / TROIS PIÈCES pour clarinette seul° 3/- „ [only before this first statement of the price and after the original oblique does the abbreviation >net.< appear, and after all further ones the double quotation >„<; ° fill character (dots in groups of three); °° different accents original; °°° without fill character (dots in groups of three); * bold print].

20-6 PHILHARMONIA / PARTITUREN · SCORES · PARTITIONS / [°] / STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / CHANSONS PLAISANTES / SCHERZLIEDER / No. 293 / [°°] / WIENER PHILHARMONISCHER VERLAG // PHILHARMONIA / PARTITUREN · SCORES · PARTITIONS / IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / SCHERZLIEDER /* CHANSONS PLAISANTES / Russische Volkslieder, ins Deutsche übertragen von / R. St. Hoffmann / Textes populaires russes mis en Français par C. F. Ramuz / [Vignette] / Eigentum des Verlags / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. LONDON / and with dessen Genehmigung in die / ,,PHILHARMONIA''-Partiturensammlung aufgenommen / [Asterisk] / Copyright 1917 by AD. Henn , Genève / Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten – Performing rights reserved – Droits d'exécution réservés / No. 293 / WIENER PHILHARMONISCHER VERLAG A. G. / WIEN 1925 // (Pocket score stapled 13.3 x 18.5 (8° [kl. 8° / 8°]); sung text Russian-French-German; 14 [14] pages + 4 cover pages black on grey [front cover title in a decorative circular, ornamental frame, with a circular vignette ø 1.7 cm of plucked instruments and a stylized face as the middle point in a rounded, centred triangular frame like a coat of arms 3 x 3 at the centre of the ornament at the bottom, and the initials >W< >PH< >V< arranged at the points of a star shape, 3 pages with publisher’s advertisements >PHILHARMONIA / Taschen-Partituren / miniature scores /* paRTITIONS DE POCHE <** without production date, >PHILHARMONIA / Taschen-Partituren / miniature scores /* paRTITIONS DE POCHE <*** without production date, >PHILHARMONIA / Taschen-Partituren / miniature scores /* paRTITIONS DE POCHE <**** with production date >Gesellschaft für graphische Industrie. Wien VI.<] + 4 pages front matter [empty page, a picture page based around an >Originalzeichnung< (original drawing)< by N. Gontcharova [Three Women on a chariot-like, two-wheeled cart with a horse rearing up in front of a wolf (dog?)] > N. Gontscharova fec. < title page with a rounded vignette ø 2 cm of plucked instruments and a stylized face as the middle point, introductory text in three columns German-English-French without reference to the author + picture acknowledgment with granting of a permit German-English-French + legend >Orchestra< Italian] without back matter; title head = song title numbered in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< to >IV< Russian-French-German; dedication 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 above song title number centre centred >A ma femme<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below song title flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / (* 1882)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score above type area next to song number flush left partly in italics >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten / Performing rights reserved / Droits d'exécution réservés< below type area flush left >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn, Genève< flush right >Propriété de J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London<; Editionshinweis 1st page of the score below type area centre centred between legal reservationsn and plate number >In die „Philharmonia“ Partiturensammlung aufgenommen<; plate numbers [text:] >W.Ph.V. 293< [notes:] >W.Ph.V. 293 J.W.C. 15 a<; without end marks p. 14) // 1925

° Dividing horizontal line of 9 cm , i.e., text width, centrally thickening to 0.10 cm (1 mm).

°° Dividing horizontal line of 8.8 cm, i.e., text width, centrally thickening to 0.10 cm (1 mm) .

* Slash original.

** Compositions are advertised in two columns with edition numbers from >J. S. BACH< to >FLOTOW<; Strawinsky not mentioned.

*** Compositions are advertised in two columns with edition numbers from >HAYDN< to >RIMSKY-KORSAKOW<; Strawinsky not mentioned.

**** Compositions are advertised in two columns with edition numbers from >ROSSINI< to >WEBER<, a mongst these >STRAWINSKY / 291 Ragtime / 292 Berceuses du chat (in Vorb.) / 293 Pribautki (in Vorb.)<.

20-7 MINIATURE SCORE / CHESTER / LIBRARY / IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / PRICE 2/– NET* / J** & W. CHESTER, L TD/ LONDON: 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET. W. 1. / [°] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / L'ONCLE ARMAND / LE FOUR / LE COLONEL / LE VIEUX ET LE LIÈVRE / POUR UNE VOIX ACCOMPAGNÉE DE FLUTE, / HAUTBOIS (COR ANGLAIS), CLARINETTE (La et Si bémol), / BASSON, VIOLON, ALTEO, VIOLONCELLE et CONTREBASSE / J.** & W. CHESTER, Ltd. / LONDON: 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W. 1 / Printed in Austria / [°°] // (Pocket score sewn 13.4 x 18.3 (8° [kl. 8°]); sung text Russian-French-German; 14 [14] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements > Handbook of Miniature / Orchestral and Chamber / MUSIC SCORES< without production date] + 4 pages front matter [empty page, a picture page based around an >Originalzeichnung< ( original drawing) < by N. Gontcharova [Three Women on a chariot-like, two-wheeled cart with a horse rearing up in front of a wolf (dog?)] > N. Gontscharova fec. <, title page, introductory text in three columns German-English-French without reference to the author + picture acknowledgment with granting of a permit German-English-French + legend >Orchestra< Italian] without back matter; title head as song title with song number in Roman numeral (without dot) > Корнило — L’ONCLE ARMAND / ONKEL PETER< Russian-French-German; dedication 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 centre centred above piece number >A ma femme<; author specified 1st page of the score below song title flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / (* 1882)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score above type area next to Roman number flush left partly in italics >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten / Performing rights reserved / Droits d’exécution réservés< below type area flush left >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn, Genève< flush right >Propriété de J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London<; plate number [text:] >W. Ph. V. 293< [n otes :] > W. Ph. V. 293 J.W.C.15 a<; production indication p.14 below type area flush right as end mark >Weag< // [1925]

° Blue stamp at the bottom of the page flush left >Printed in England <.

* The copy Darmstadt >L / 13313/59< is pasted over with > 6/6 < .

** Original spelling.

20-7Straw1

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate contains neither corrections nor performance instructions. There are entries on the outer title page inside the frame above the lyre on the right in red >Natastcha<, on p. 1 flush right in red next to >I< >Kornillo<, on p. 4 next to >II< on the right going upwards >Natatscha<.

20-7Straw2

The copy contains no further corrections apart from the change in metronome marking on p.12 (last song) after Con moto, >minim = 66 / IStr< instead of crotchet = 66. The passage in the bassoon part is not corrected. The blue stamp on the outer title page is missing. The stamp inside is red and easier to read.

20-8 PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / IGOR STRAWINSKY / MINIATURE SCORE / PRICE 5.- [°] NET / J. & W. CHESTER, Ltd., LONDON / [°°] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / PRIBAOUTKI / (CHANSONS PLAISANTES) / L'ONCLE ARMAND / LE FOUR / LE COLONEL / LE VIEUX ET LE LIÈVRE / for / Medium Voice and 8 Instruments / German Text by R. St. HOFFMANN / French Text by C. F. RAMUZ / Copyright for all countries / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. / II Great Marlborough Street / London, W.I // (Pocket score sewn in brown°°° 13.6 x 19 (8° [8°]); sung text Russian-French-German; 14 [14] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on yellow beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRAL WORKS / AVAILABLE IN MINIATURE SCORE FORM<** without production date] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Instrumentation< English] without back matter; title head as song title with song number in Roman numeral (without dot) >Корнило — L’ONCLE ARMAND / ONKEL PETER< Russian-French-German; dedication centre above title head >A ma femme<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below title head flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / ( * 1882)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1917 by Ad. Henn, Genève / Copyright for all Countries / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. London< flush right >All rights reserved.<; plate number >J.W.C.15a<; production indication 1st page of the score below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England.<; without end mark p. 14) //

° In consulted copies pasted over with >6/6<.

°° In the consulted copies [with numbering stamp] >EDITION SCHOTT No. 3465<.

°°° There are also editions with sheets inserted without stitching, but with holes prepared for the stitching.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers from >BERNERS, LORD< to >STRAVINSKY,I. / Histoire du Soldat. / Les Noces. / Ragtime. / Renard. / Suite from L'Oiseau de / Feu (1919). / Suite No. I° for Small / Orchestra. / Suite Nr. 2 for Small / Orchestra. [° original spelling].


K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer.
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
https://kcatalog.org and https://kcatalog.net

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Das zeitgenössische Wagner-Bild, Siebter Band: Dokumente 1853

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