K019 Three Pieces for String Quartet

deutsch K019 Drei Stücke für Streichquartett

K19 Trois pièces

pour quatuor à cordes – Drei Stücke für Streichquartett – Three Pieces for String Quartet – Три пьесы для двух скрипок, альта и виолончели — Tre pezzi per quartetto d’archi

Construction: A short three-movement piece with no movement headings or tempo markings in the title, but with each movement numbered in roman and provided with its own metronome marking (I: 3/4 alternating with 2/4 throughout the movement, but with a uniform metre; II: changing time-signatures with a frequently changing metre and many performance markings; III: 3/2 alternating with 5/4 and 2/2, but with a uniform metre).

Structure

I

Crotchet = 126 (bar 1 up to 48)

II

Crotchet = 76 (bar 1 up to 15)

Allegro dotted Crotchet = 76 (bar 16 up to 17)

Tempo I Crotchet = 76 (bar 18 up to 20)

Allegro dotted Crotchet = 76 (bar 21 up to 22)

dotted Crotchet = 76; Crotchet = 112 up to 116 (bar 23)

dotted Crotchet = 76 (bar 24 up to 25)

Crotchet = 112-116 (bar 26 up to 31)

Tempo I Crotchet = 76 (bar 32 up to 53)

Allegro dotted Crotchet = 76 (bar 54)

Tempo I Crotchet = 76 (bar 55 up to 60)

Allegro dotted Crotchet = 76 (bar 61 up to 62)

III

Minim = 40

Style: The Three Pieces for String Quartetwere unsuccessful when first performed, eliciting head-shaking incomprehension rather than any real attempt to engage with them, so comprehensively did they confound the expectations of European audiences at this time. Listeners were used to a unified string sound, not a type of playing in which each of the four voices seemed to be at odds with the others. The movements were also felt to be too short, with no sense of a coherent form. The unorthodox way of playing the instruments even invited the suspicion that the audience was being insulted. The second of the three pieces includes unusual performance markings such as ‘donnez une sonorité très fine et douce’ (‘produce a very refined and gentle sound’) and ‘donnez un son étranglé’ (‘produce a strangled sound’), but it was above all the oft-quoted instruction in bar 34 for the second violin and viola to turn their instruments upside down and hold them like a cello to play three pizzicato notes >Renversez vite l’instrument (tenez-le comme on tient un violoncelle) afin de pouvoir exécuter ce pizz., qui équivaut à l’arpège renversé< [‘Turn the instrument quickly upside down (hold it as one holds a cello)] in order to be able to play this pizz., which is the equivalent of an inverted arpeggio’] that raised questions about the whole meaning of the exercise, quite apart from which the virtuosity demanded of the players and the difficulties posed by the work seemed almost intentionally extreme. There is no motivic writing, the melody is not divided up among the different voices, and there is no development. Each voice remains a prisoner within its own space. Still being unfamiliar with the idea of music as an expression of the grotesque, listeners did not know what to make of the apparent muddle of the second piece and mistakenly saw in it the end of the string quartet as an art form. Only the subsequent pieces for piano duet provided an explanation. The link between the pieces was their contrast. The folklike tone and colour of the first piece were followed by the clownishness of the second and, in the third, by the dirge of a fragmentary three-note Dies irae with a brief postlude. The religious aspect of this final piece is easily to hear. Strawinsky later gave it the title Cantique , a word which in French means both ‘hymn of praise’ and ‘canticle’. All three pieces evoke images, and it was only logical, therefore, that when he added a fourth movement in 1929, Strawinsky again used an image to describe it, this time an image of Spanish derivation. Strawinsky himself admitted that the musical substance of all three string quartets was thin.

Dedication: The unpublished piano score of 1914 was dedicated to Alexandre Cingria, the 1918 full score to Ernest Ansermet*.

*The second piece was originally to have been dedicated to Alfred Pochon, who suggested the idea for all three pieces, but Strawinsky subsequently changed his mind and deleted the dedication before the works went to press.

Duration: about 8 ¢ .

Date of origin: Begun in March, possibly even February, 1914 in Leysin and completed at Salvan on 26 July 1914; revised at Morges between 2 and 16 December 1918 and at Anglet in September 1921; Strawinsky used older sketch material and precomposed models from other projects that he was planning.

History of origin: In January 1914, while he was still working on The Nightingale, Misia Sert approached Strawinsky and asked him if he would write a piece for her Chinese Room in Paris. By March, rumours were already circulating that Strawinsky had written one or more dances, with the result that on 14 March, Pierre Monteux wrote to him to ask if he could conduct the first performance of what he called the composer’s Trois Danses. Monteux’ misunderstanding was presumably based on the first of the Three Pieces: in the version for string quartet it had been untitled, but in the version for orchestra it was headed ‘Danse’ and was indeed conceived of as a dance. Strawinsky perhaps really had in mind a sequence of dances at first and probably conveyed this to his friends; how otherwise should the rumour of three dances have reached Monteux? At the time of the letter to Monteux, sketches had certainly already been produced for the first piece. However, it must have been completed by April because the piano reduction, which was in the possession of Ansermet, is dated April 1914. The second of the Three Pieces was inspired by the comedian Little Tich (or also Little Tichborne*) – the stage name of Harry Relph (1867–1928) – whom Strawinsky saw in London while attending the English première of The Nightingaleon 19 June 1914 and whose jerky movements so impressed him that he sought to capture them in it. He originally planned to write five pieces but in the end settled for three. His publisher gave each of the three its own separate number (R.M.V. 272, R.M.V. 273 and R.M.V. 274), sending the manuscripts to be engraved in Leipzig. He completed these three punctually after his summer trip toEngland before his short visit to Ustilug andKiev , sending them as score and parts on26th July 1914 to Erich Zingel inBerlin . Along with this, he asked for the copies to be produced especially quickly for the “famous” Lausanne Quartet before 20th August at the latest (Flonzaley Quartet), who were, as they were every year, on a world tour to Berlin, London, Paris, New York, Boston, Chicago, Philadelphia, Washington and many other cities, and were thinking of playing his pieces there. It can be seen from the letter that the Russian music publishers had long been informed of Strawinsky’s intentions for the compositions, had agreed the matter of the fee and the number of pieces at 5; otherwise Strawinsky would not have been able to ask Zingel to ask Mr. von Struve for a very quick transfer of 200 rubles per piece, or 1000 for all of them together, and to confirm this urgent request again for the fee required “from now on”. The request for payment however shows that Strawinsky at this point had in mind a work of 5 pieces.By this date the First World War had already begun, and it was not long before the publisher was forced to break off work on the project. As a result of the isolation entered into by Germany and the drastically reduced long-term possibilities for performance as a result, the publishers were presumably not expecting a result that would satisfy them commercially, especially with a piece that was so unusual and, according to their knowledge at the time, also incomplete, which would have justified the work being continued, and so they returned the manuscript to Strawinsky, who received it on 23 December 1914. It was presumably this that persuaded him not to write the remaining pieces or to send to Berlin the piano reduction that he had completed in August 1914. Until the end of 1918 the pieces were performed from handwritten parts that included a number of changes that Strawinsky had made for reasons of performing practice. When the London-based Philharmonic Quartet announced three performances on 13 February, 27 March and 9 April 1919, Strawinsky took out the score again and revised it between 2 and 16 December 1918: he sent the revised – and now definitive – version of the score and parts to London on 16 December 1918, and it was this version that was performed here for the first time two months later. But when the Berlin-based Russischer Musikverlag published this version in 1922, Strawinsky dated it ‘Salvan 1914’, a date that does not entirely reflect the true facts of the matter. Unlike many of his later editions of other works, in which the revisions often consist in little more than the removal of printing errors and a handful of other comparatively cosmetic changes, the revised version of the Three Pieces contains such deep-seated alterations, especially in terms of their performing practice, that he was no longer able to use his old piano reduction, which therefore remained unpublished. In the new version there is a tendency for the individual notes to be articulated with a greater degree of separation. When the Russischer Musikverlag published all three pieces in Berlin in 1922, it sought to protect its right of ownership by using the name of a fictitious editor, F. H. Schneider. When the Philharmonic Quartet performed the Three Pieces in London in 1919, it included in the published programme an introduction by Ernest Ansermet that turned all three pieces – which had been conceived in terms of formal technique – into examples of the sort of programme music that was then preponderant in the concert halls of the period. According to Ansermet, the first piece depicted a group of singing and dancing peasants on the featureless steppes. The second was said to portray an unhappy juggler forced to conceal his private grief from his audience while performing his circus tricks. And the third piece, finally, described a priest singing an ordinary cantus planus in church, followed by an allusion to the Dies irae. The version for string quartet was inspired by a suggestion of Alfred Pochon, who did not, however, offer Strawinsky a fee to write it. This may explain why Strawinsky toyed with the idea of inscribing the second work to Pochon, but then removed his name from the dedication.

* Little Tich, also Little Tichborne, real name Harry Relph(1868-1928). Little Tich had developed a particular way of moving his body in a wrenching manner. For this reason, the piece characterising him gained the word “Excentrique”, a word which is an adjective meaning “eccentric”, but from its original meaning, suggests the loss of the middle = lifted from the middle. With this example, Strawinsky answered the question put to him as to whether external images of music could be translated into music, with which he absolutely agreed. At this point, he spoke of the “wit of this music” and produced himself the link to the 3 Easy Pieces for piano which he wrote a year later, and continued spinning the thread towards Neoclassicism. Strawinsky at the same time hoped with this defection to cast off the Schönberg ideologues, who wanted to prove a definite influence in his music from Schönberg and even Webern, an influence of which he himself was not conscious. According to the state of knowledge today, Strawinsky in 1914 did not know a single work by Webern, and by Schönberg, only the melodrama Pierrot Lunaire, which he regarded very highly.

First performance: 1914 version:* 13 (possibly 19) May 1915** in the Salle des Agriculteursin Paris. The soloists were Yvonne Astruc, Darius Milhaud, Jurgensen and Félix Delgrange; and on 8 November 1915 the four members of the Flonzaley*** Quartet – Adolfo Betti, Alfred Pochon, Ugo Ara and Iwan d’Archambeau – performed this version in Chicago. The 1918 version received its first performance by the Philharmonic Quartet of London on 13 February 1919. Its members were Frederic**** Holding, Marjorie Bentwich*****, Raymond Jeremy and Cedric Sharpe.

* The sets of parts were repeatedly corrected.

** Our dating of the first performance derives in the main from a letter from Alfredo Casella, who not only mistook the month, writing April instead of May, but whose scribbled date could just as well be 13 as 19.

*** Le Flonzaley was the name of an estate on Lake Geneva that was used as a summer retreat by the American banker of Swiss extraction, Edward J. De Coppet (b New York, 28 May 1855; d New York, 30 April 1916). From 1902 onwards he invited a group of Vaudois musicians to perform quartets within the privacy of his own home. These players soon formed the Flonzaley Quartet, also known as the Lausanne Quartet, and by 1904 they were already undertaking concert tours, impressing their audiences with their beautiful, brilliant tone. The group was of some importance for the young Strawinsky, not least because it commissioned his String Concertino in 1920. The Flonzaley Quartet gave its last concert at London’s Wigmore Hall on 14 April 1928. Two weeks later it was officially disbanded.

**** Al so written as Frederick.

***** St ood in for the actual second violin of the Quartet, Thomas Peatfield, who was away in the War.

The Lowell poems: After the London premiere, Amy Lowell sought to “reproduce the sound and the movement of the music as far as is possible in another medium” in several poems. She saw colours in the first piece, appearances of Pierrot in the second, and the Requiem aeternamin the third. They were published in 1916 in “Some imagist Poets” in London. Such a program was, given the situation at the time, certainly effective for the public, and deviated somewhat from the constructivist novelties of the Quartet, but it certainly did not sit right with him artistically.

Remarks: André Gide took Jean Cocteau 1916 to an event of Darius Milhaud’s at which the Quartet pieces were played. Cocteau went on to write a letter to Strawinsky on11th August 1916 in which he linked the three pieces to the Bible and to Rimbaud. According to him, the first piece excited him like certain sections in the Bible (he was referring to the Leysin Jewish wedding, which became one of the models for Les Noces ; in the second, he recognised “Cauchemare de Chinoises” and in the third “Après le Deluge” by Rimbaud, for which he apologised for comparing to the incomparable. It is not known whether Stravinsky was impressed by Cocteau's flower image* and above all by the Rimbaudian idea of an earth that was blooming again after the deluge.

* Not to be confused with Madame Pompadour's "After Us the Flood" (Après nous le deluge) expression, in 1757 after the news of the lost Battle of Rossbach against Frederick the Great of Prussia interrupted the festivities.

Significance: In the wake of the events surrounding The Rite of Spring and the almost demonstrative success of Schönberg’s Pierrot lunaire, composers had reached an impasse and for the present were unsure how to proceed. The years between 1912 and 1923 were years of a quest for a new stylistic language: without the possibilities of electronic music that was not to be discovered until forty years later, composers were unable to go beyond the arte dei rumori of The Rite of Spring on the one hand and Pierrot lunaire, with its exploration of border sonorities, on the other. The fact that in writing his Three Pieces, Strawinsky had already moved close to Webern without knowing of Webern’s existence indicates, at best, his predisposition to this type of music. While Schönberg was developing his note-rows, Strawinsky created a model of order that in Germany and elsewhere became known as neo-classicism. Had it not been for the headline-seeking ideologues who turned them into politico-cultural opposites, contemporaries would have realized at a much earlier date that the two movements were bound to meet. Schönberg was already dead by the time that Strawinsky embarked on a conscious study of his works.

Productions: Along with the Concertino, the 3 Pieces for String Quartet were used in 1955 for the ballet The Antagonists which was choreographed by Ruth Currier and performed at the American Dance Festival inNew London inConnecticut ,USA .

Versions: The 1914 version of the Three Pieces for String Quartet remained unpublished during the composer’s lifetime. Not even the version for piano four hands that he prepared in August 1914 after the first version was already complete found its way into print as the revisions of 1918 had left the original too far behind them. Both the original version and the piano reduction of the original were preserved among the composer’s unpublished papers. It would seem that no piano reduction of the definitive version of the Three Pieces was ever prepared. The Russischer Musikverlag published both the pocket score and the parts in 1922. The turnover was regular, if modest: by 1938 some 600 copies of the score had been sold and around 500 sets of parts. In 1948 Boosey & Hawkes, who had in the meantime acquired the rights to the work, brought out a pocket score that was produced in England. This edition was reprinted at least twice – in March 1953 and January 1966 – with an identical title but with the names of the firm’s offices differently ordered and with details of the later imprints. A further set of parts went on sale in September 1959: the British Library noted that its own set had arrived on 11 September. All three pieces were orchestrated by Strawinsky after 1918 and combined with Madrid, the 1917 Pianola Study that Strawinsky also orchestrated, to produce the Four Studies for Orchestra of 1929. It was at this date that the Three Pieces received their programmatical titles: I. Dance; 2. Eccentric; and 3. Canticle.

Revised version: Since the 1914 version has survived, Robert Craft was able to bring the revisions together in a single study. It provided information on Strawinsky’s changed ideas of sound and structure between 1914 and 1918, which led to a separate articulation of single notes. In the first piece in the original version, the phrase markings are generally specified with legato or sul ponticello or sul Ré or similar; in the final version, these markings go directly onto the separate notes. He also swapped the notes between the 2nd violin and viola. The note D for example, which is held on throughout the entire piece and which is played by the viola in the final version, was originally given to the 2nd violin in the original version, and against this the groups of 4 quavers in bars 7, 11-13, 16/17, 20-22, 25, 29-31, 34, 38-40 and 43, which are in the 2nd violin part in the final version, were originally to be played by the viola. Four up- and down-bows, which are marked one after the other note for note, appear only in the final version. There is therefore not a single bar of the first piece that is untouched in the revised version. This is also true to a certain extent for the other 2 pieces. The opening triplet in the 2nd piece was a combination of 2 quavers in the 1914 version without the crescendo marking that appears in the final version. The motif played by all 4 string instruments in bars 4-5 was given to the 1st violin and cello in the original edition, and spanned only 2 octaves, instead of 3 in the final version. This motif gives rise to all sorts of speculation. In Strawinsky’s sketchbook, it appears at first as a signal given to the trumpet (cornet) and accompanied by the bassoon, for which Strawinsky notated in a single sketch the image of a “female dancer on horseback”. Craft, whom we have to thank for the knowledge of these connections, warns against concluding too quickly that this is a visit to the circus, as the same motif is labeled as a Breton song in another sketch, for which he thanked Alexander Benois. Benois visited Strawinsky in August 1910 in La Baule, and brought with him a folksong which a clarinettist sitting in the pouring rain had played while people danced to the music. Strawinsky transcribed this song. The motif labeled in the sketchbook as a trumpet melody, which was then included in the 2nd string quartet piece, is an excerpt from this melody. (The matter later caused bother because Benois in a Russian newspaper interview on 21 March 1930 mixed up the August visit in La Baule with a November visit in St Petersburg, and the first sketches of Petrushka with the trumpet melody of the 2nd quartet piece, which at the time – 1910 – had not even been written.) He also changed the beginning of the 3rd piece. The first 2 bars correspond in both versions, but in the original version, only the violin and viola play from bar 3. The cello only enters later. To judge from the sketches, the first 2 bars and those of the refrain were the last that he composed. The compositional history of the revised final version is written in September 1921 inParis . In it, he shares in a postscript that he had just finished the revisions of the 3 string quartet pieces that were dedicated to him, Ansermet. With an eye to the publication of the pieces in 1922, this section of text refers to the sets of the publishers’ corrections.

Historical recording: Quatuor Krettly (Robert Krettly, René Costard violin • François Broos viola • André Navarra cello), French Columbia D 15182, matrix WLX 674-1, 675-1, Recorded: 7.XII.1928, Paris.

CD edition: Only in the version as Four Studies for Orchestra.

Autograph: Both the original versions are held by the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel. A facsimile limited edition of both manuscripts was published by Amadeus Verlag in 1994. It included a critical commentary, a reprint of the 1922 edition and, as an appendix, the version for piano duet that had remained unpublished throughout the composer’s lifetime: >Igor Strawinsky / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Skizzen, Fassungen, Dokumente, Essays / Festgabe für Albi Rosenthal zum 80. Geburtstag / herausgegeben von Hermann Danuser / in Verbindung mit Felix Meyer und Ulrich Mosch.< This edition is 174pp. long and measured 25 x 38 cm. (The appendix was 21.5 x 29.7 cm.) The ISBN is 3-7957-0398-0.

Copyright: 1922 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag); transferred to Boosey & Hawkes in 1947.

Editions

a ) Overview

19-1 1922 PoSc; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 8 pp.; R. M. V. 401.

19-2 St 1922 Set of parts; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 4 x 4 pp.; R. M. V. 402.

19-3 1948 PoSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 8 pp.; B. & H. 16313; 634.

19-3 53 1953 ibd.

19-3 65 1965 ibd.

19-4 St 1959 Set of parts; Boosey & Hawkes London; 4 x 4 pp.; B. & H. 18444.

19-4 St[65] [1965] ibd.

19-5 Alb 1968 PoSc [Sc]; State Publishers Music Москва; 30 pp.; 4546.

19-6 Alb-St 1969 Set of parts; Музыка Москва ; 5114.

b) Characteristic features

19-1 IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR / QUATUOR À CORDES / (2 VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE) / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L'ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H. *) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW-YORK PARIS LONDRES BRUXELLES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR / QUATUOR À CORDES / (2 VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE) / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L'ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H. *) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW-YORK PARIS LONDRES BRUXELLES // (Pocket score stapled 15.4 x 20.9 (8° [8°]); 8 [8] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on patterned ochre yellow [front cover title without ornamental feather frame with publisher’s emblem 0.6 x 0.9 sitting woman playing cymbalom, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >LES ŒUVRES / D’IGOR STRAWINSKY<*+ without production date] + 2 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame with vignette black on white 0.7 x 0.9 sitting woman playing cymbalom, 1 empty page] + 2 pages back matter [empty pages]; title head >Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes<; dedication above title head centre >A Ernest Ansermet<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 next to piece number numbered in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to and below dedication flush left centred italic > Edited by / F. H. Schneider<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H., Berlin, Leipzig, Moskau / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1922 by Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H., Berlin< ragged alignment flush right >Propriété de l'éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d'exécution réservés<; plate number >R. M. V. 401<; end of score dated p. 8 > Salvan / 1914<; without end number; without production indication) // (1922)

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

** Compositions are advertised laid out >PÉTROUCHKA (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / „TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA“. / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO-SOLO PAR L’AUTEUR / ROSSIGNOL (CONTE LYRIQUE) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / „MARCHE CHINOISE“. TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO-SOLO / PAR THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / „CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL“. (POÈME SYMPHONIQUE) / PARTITION DE POCHE / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPTS (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / [°] / TROIS PIÈCES POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / PARTITION DE POCHE / [°] / POUR CHANT ET PIANO: / DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE, FRANÇAIS, ANGLAIS ET ALLEMAND / TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE, FRANÇAIS ET ANGLAIS / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (SOUVENIR DE MON ENFANCE) / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE ET FRANÇAIS, RUSSE ET ANGLAIS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE< [° dividing horizontal line of 2.8 cm. ].

19-2 IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR / QUATUOR À CORDES / (2 VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE) / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L'ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW-YORK PARIS LONDRES BRUXELLES // [title page = front cover page // (Set of parts 26 x 33.2 (2° [4°]); 3 [3] pages + 4 cover pages [for part 1st violin] thicker paper black on grey-green-beige [front cover title without ornamental feather frame with vignette 1.1 x 1.2 publisher’s emblem sitting woman playing cymbalom, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame, empty page] + 3 pages back matter [empty pages] + enclosed 3 x 3 [3] pages parts [2. violin, viola, violoncello] with 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes<; name of the instruments below title head centre >1 er Violon< [Stimmen: >2 m eViolon< >Alto< >Violoncelle<]; dedication above title head centre >A Ernest Ansermet<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below piece number numbered in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to dedication flush left >Edited by F. H. Schneider<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H., Berlin, Leipzig, Moskau / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1922 by Russischer MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H., Berlin< flush right >Propriété de l'éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d'execution réservés<; plate number [for all parts] >R. M. V. 402<; without end marks // (1922)

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

19-3 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 634 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / LONDON · NEW YORK · LOS ANGELES · SYDNEY · CAPE TOWN · TORONTO · PARIS / NET PRICE / Made in England // (Pocket score stapled 13.5 x 18.7 (8° [8°]); 8 [8] pages + 4 cover pages olive-green on green-beige [front cover title with frame 9.4 x 4 green-beige on olive-green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The standard Classical and Outstanding Modern Works/ Primera edición española de partituras de bolsillo de las obras / del repertorio clásico y moderno.<* without production date] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [empty pages]; title head >Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes<; dedication above title head centre >A Ernest Ansermet<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 next to piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to and below dedication flush left italic centred > Edited by / F. H. Schneider<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1922 by Édition Russe le** Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.< / flush right >Propriété de l'éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d'exécution réservés<; plate number >B. & H. 16313<; end of score dated p. 8 centred >Salvan / 1914<; without end marks) // (1948)

^ ^ Text in frame.

* Classical editions from >J. S. BACH< to >WEBER< are listed including the titles of their works in three columns under the heading > classical editions<, under the heading >MODERN EDITIONS< the names of contemporary composers are listed without any titles in four columns from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >R. VAUGHAN WILLIAMS<, Strawinsky not mentioned. T he following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Capetown.

** Misprint original.

19-3 53 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 634 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / LONDON NEW YORK TORONTO · SYDNEY · CAPETOWN · PARIS BONN / NET PRICE / Made in England// (Pocket score stapled 13.8 x 18.7 (8° [8°]); 8 [8] pages + 4 cover pages olive-green on grey-beige [front cover title with frame 9.4 x 4 grey-beige on olive-green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A selection of outstanding modern works / from this famous library of classical and contemporary Miniature Scores.<* production date >No. 582< [#] >6.50<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A comprehensive library of Miniature Scores containing the best-known classical / works, as well as a representative selection of outstanding modern compositions.<** production date >No. 520< [#] >1.49<, page with publisher’s advertisements >OPERAS / by/ Igor Strawinsky<*** production date >No. 655< [#] >2.52<]; title head >Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes<; dedication above title head centre >A Ernest Ansermet<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 next to piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to and below dedication flush left centred italic > Edited by / F. H. Schneider<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1922 by Édition Russe le**** Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) for all countries. / Printed by arrangement Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; plate number >B. & H. 16313<; end of score dated p. 8 centred >Salvan / 1914<; end number p. 8 flush left >3·53 L. & B<; production indication p. 8 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limithed, London<) // (1953)

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >R. VAUGHAN WILLIAMS<, amongst these >IGOR STRAWINSKY / Apollon Musagète ( Revised1947) / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Chant du Rossignol / Concerto in D for String Orchestra / Divertimento ( Revised1949) / Mass for Chorus and Wind instr.° / Octet for Wind Instruments° / Œdipus Rex ( Revised1948) / Orpheus / Perséphone ( Revised1947) / Pétrouchka ( Revised1947) / Piano Concerto / Pulcinella Suite ( Revised1949) / Four Studies for Orchestra / The Rite of Spring ( Revised1947) / Symphony of Psalms / Symphonies for°° Wind Instruments° / Three Pieces for String Quartet<. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Toronto-Sydney-Capetown-Buenos Aires-Paris-Bonn [° original spelling; °° original mistake in the title].

** Classical editions from >J. S. BACH< to >WEBER< are listed including the titles of their works in four columns under the heading > classical editions<, under the heading >MODERN EDITIONS< the names of contemporary composers are listed without any titles in four columns from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >ARNOLD VAN WYK<, amongst these >IGOR STRAWINSKY<. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Toronto-Sydney-Capetown-Buenos Aires-Paris-Bonn.

*** Compositions are advertised centre centred partly in italics >LE ROSSIGNOL / Lyric Tale in three acts / after the fairy tale by Hans Anderson / Words by Igor Strawinsky and S. Mitousoff / Vocal Score published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ MAVRA / Opera buffa in one act / after the story by Pushkin / Words by Boris Kochno / Vocal Score in Russian, French, German and English published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ OEDIPUS REX / ( Revised 1948 version) / Opera-Oratorio in two acts / after the tragedy by Sophocles / Words by Igor Strawinsky and Jean Cocteau / Latin translation by J. Danielou / Full Score and Vocal Score, with English translation of the speakers’ text, published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ PERSÉPHONE / ( Revised 1949 version) / Melodrama in three parts / Poem by André Gide / Full Score and Vocal Score ( by Sviatoslav Strawinsky) published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts / Words by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / Full Score°, Vocal Score ( by Leopold Spinner) English-German version/ and Libretti in English or German published/ Full Score° and Parts for hire< [° gemeint ist wohl einmal die (käufliche) Taschenpartitur und die (nicht käufliche) Dirigierpartitur]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Toronto-Sydney-Capetown-Buenos Aires-Paris-Bonn.

**** Misprint original.

19-3 65 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 634 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIWITHED / LONDON · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · SYDNEY · TORONTO · NEW YORK / NET PRICE / MADE IN ENGLAND // (Pocket score [library binding] 13.7 x 18.7 (8° [8°]); 8 [8] pages + 4 cover pages olive-green on green-beige [front cover title with frame 9,4 x 4 green-beige on olive-green, 2 empty pages, page publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical works/ and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* production date >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] without production date] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A comprehensive library of Miniature Scores containing the best-known classical / works, as well as a representative selection of outstanding modern compositions.<** production date >No. 520< [#] >1.49], page with publisher’s advertisements >OPERAS / by / Igor Strawinsky<*** production date >No. 655< [#] >2.52<]; title head >Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes<; dedication above title head centre centred >A Ernest Ansermet<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 next to piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<; fictitious editor specified next to dedication flush left centred italic > Edited by / F. H. Schneider<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1922 Edition Russe le° Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) for all countries. / Printed by arrangement Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; plate number >B. & H. 16313; end number p. 8 flush left >1 · 65 L & B<; production indication p. 8 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Liwithed, London<) // (1965)

^ ^ Text in frame.

° Misprint original.

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Wagner, Richard<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni<. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

** Classical editions from >J. S. BACH< to >WEBER< are listed including the titles of their works in four columns under the heading > classical editions<, under the heading >MODERN EDITIONS< the names of contemporary composers are listed without any titles in four columns from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >ARNOLD VAN WYK<, amongst these >IGOR STRAWINSKY<. The following places of printing are listed: London-Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

*** Compositions are advertised centre centred partly in italics >LE ROSSIGNOL / Lyric Tale in three acts / after the fairy tale by Hans Anderson / Words by Igor Strawinsky and S. Mitousoff / Vocal Score published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ MAVRA / Opera buffa in one act / after the story by Pushkin / Words by Boris Kochno / Vocal Score in Russian, French, German and English published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ OEDIPUS REX / ( Revised 1948 version) / Opera-Oratorio in two acts / after the tragedy by Sophocles / Words by Igor Strawinsky and Jean Cocteau / Latin translation by J. Danielou / Full Score and Vocal Score, with English translation of the speakers’ text, published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ PERSÉPHONE / ( Revised 1949 version) / Melodrama in three parts / Poem by André Gide / Full Score and Vocal Score ( by Sviatoslav Strawinsky) published/ Full Score and Parts for hire/ THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts / Words by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / Full Score°, Vocal Score ( by Leopold Spinner) English-German version/ and Libretti in English or German published/ Full Score° and Parts for hire< [° probably refers to the (purchased) pocket score and the (not purchased) full score]. The following places of printing are listed: London-Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York [without Buenos Aires].

**** Misprint original.

19-4 St

(Set of parts 23.5 x 30.8 (2° [4°]); 4 cover pages black on greygreen [front cover title with publisher’s advertisements >Symphonic Music / String Orchestra<* production date >No. 739< [#] >2.55<, page with publisher’s advertisements >String Orchestra / Popular Music<** production date >No. 696< [#] >5.53<, page with publisher’s advertisements >String Orchestra / Popular Music<*** production date >No. 695< [#] >5.53<, page with publisher’s advertisements >String Orchestra / with / Solo Instruments<**** production date > No. 709< [#] >5.53<] + enclosed four times 4 [3] pages each + one page of credits each [empty page] parts >1er Violon< >2me Violon< >Alto< >Violoncelle<; title head >TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES<; author specified first pages of the score unpaginated [pp. 1] below title head above and next to piece number >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<; without dedication; name of the instruments first pages of the score flush left (1st Violin next, 2nd Violin and Viola, Violoncelle above and next), following pages centre above piece number; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1922 Edition Russe de Musique for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.< flush right between plate number and production indication >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 18444<; production indication first pages of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England; without end marks) // (1959)


* Compositions are advertised in two columns from >Tommaso Albinoni< to >Ian Whyte<, among those on the second advertising column >Igor Strawinsky / Apollon Musagète (Revised 1947 version) / Concerto in D<. After London the following places of printing are listed: London Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.
** Compositions are advertised in two columns from >Dermot Macmurrough< to >C. Woods<, Strawinsky not mentioned. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.
*** Compositions are advertised in two columns from >Stephen Adams< to >Adolf Lotter<, Strawinsky not mentioned. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.
**** Compositions are advertised under various headings from >C. Armstrong Gibbs< to >J. Weinzweig<, Strawinsky not mentioned. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

19-4St[65] Igor Strawinsky / TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / Parties/ Boosey & Hawkes // (Set of parts 23.4 x 31 (2° [4°]); 4 cover pages dark red on green-beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production date >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] + enclosed four times 3 [3] pages with 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production date >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; title head >TROIS PIÈCES / POUR QUATUOR À CORDES<; name of the instruments flush left >1 er Violon< next to piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I<, >2 me Violon< >Alto< >Violoncelle< between title head and piece number; without dedication; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< next to 2nd line title head and piece number (1st and 2nd Violin) above and next to piece number (Viola und Violoncello); legal reservations 1st page of the score above title head flush left in a text box containing >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< below type area flush left >Copyright 1922 Edition Russe de Musique for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.< flush right between plate number and production indication >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 18444<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; without end marks) // [1965]

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price information and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum sSacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

19-5 Alb [Reprint in connection with Concertino, in:] Игорь СТРАВИНСКИЙ / Igor STRAVINSKY / ПЬЕСЫ / PIECES / ДЛЯ ДВУХ СКРИПОК, / АЛЬТА И ВИОЛОНЧЕЛИ / FOR TWO VIOLINS, / VIOLA AND VIOLONCELLO / ПАРТИТУРА / SCORE / [vignette] / МУЗЫКА MUSIC / МОСКВА · 1968 · MOSCOW // Игорь СТРАВИНСКИЙ / Igor STRAVINSKY / ТРИ ПЬЕСЫ / И СОНЦЕРТИНО / THREE PIECES / and CONCERTINO / ДЛЯ ДВУХ СКРИПОК, / АЛЬТА И ВИОЛОНЧЕЛИ / FOR TWO VIOLINS, / VIOLA AND VIOLONCELLO / Партитура / Score / ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО МУЗЫКА / STATE PUBLISHERS MUSIC / Москва · 1968 · Moscow // (Score [library binding] 12.9 x 19.7 ([8° [8°]]); 30 [28] pages + 4 cover pages [front cover title in ornamental frame black on white with in a text box containing publisher’s emblem 1 x 1.1 initial >M< with a stylized treble clef form , 2 empty pages, page with price at the top of the page left >25 к.<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, page with one-column introductory text folding inwards without headline by > В. Киселев<] + 2 pages back matter [page with a Russian translation of the original French playing instructions >ПЕРЕВОД ИСПОЛНИТЕЛЬСКИХ УКАЗАНИЙ<, imprint >Индекс 9–6–I< with billing of names >Редактор Ю. оленев [#] Техн. редактор Н. Корунова / Корректор И. Миронович< and itemized statements of format and origin]; reprint pp. 3-13; title head Russian-English >ТРИ ПЬЕСЫ [#] THREE PIECES<; dedication above title head centre Russian-English italic > Эрнесту Ансерме[#] To Ernest Ansermet<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right >Игорь СТРАВИНСКИЙ / Igor STRAVINSKY<; plate number >4546<; end of score dated below title head above piece number numbered in Arabic numeral (without dot) centre >(1914)<; end of score dated p. 13 centred >Салван / Salvan / 1914<; without end marks) // 1968

19-6 Alb-St [[Set of part reprint in connection with Concertino, in:] Игорь СТРАВИНСКИЙ / Igor STRAVINSKY / ПЬЕСЫ / PIECES / ДЛЯ ДВУХ СКРИПОК, АЛЬТА / И ВИОЛОНЧЕЛИ / FOR TWO VIOLINS, VIOLA / AND VIOLONCELLO / ГОЛОСА / PARTS / [vignette] / МУЗЫКА MUSIC / МОСКВА · 1969 · MOSCOW // (Set of parts 21,8 x 28,1 22,5 x 29 (2° [Lex 8°]) not sewn enclosed in 4 cover pages black on creme-white [title page in ornamental frame with in a text box containing publisher’s emblem 1.5 x 1.6 initial >M< with a stylized treble clef form , 2 empty pages, pages with price at the top of the page flush left >88 к.< + imprint >Индекс 9–6–I< with billing of names >Редактор Ю. оленев [#] Лит. редактор А. Землякова / Техн. редактор В. Соловьева [#] Корректор А. Лавренюк< and itemized statements of format and origin + introductory text folding inwards >ПРеДИСЛоВИе< by > В. Киселев<]; pages paginated; reprint >Violino I< pp. 1-4, >Violino II< pp. 1-5[½], >Viola< pp. 1-5, >Violoncello< pp. 1-5]; title head Russian-English for each 1st pages of the score >ТРИ ПЬЕСЫ [#] THREE PIECES<; dedication [exclusively part 1st Violin] above title head centre Russian-English italic > Эрнесту Ансерме [#] To Ernest Ansermet<; date of completion below title head above piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) centre [exclusively parts 1st Violin, Viola] >(1914)<; author specified 1st pages of the score paginated p. 1 above and next to piece number flush right >Игорь СТРАВИНСКИЙ / Igor STRAVINSKY<; plate number >5114<; production indications 1st pages of the score below type area flush left 1st Violin >(1)-4< 2. Violin >(2)< Viola >(3) Violoncello >(4), p. 3 below type area flush left 1st Violin >2. Стравинский (Violono I)< 2. Violin >2. Стравинский (Violono II)< Viola >2. Стравинский (Viola)< Violoncello >2. Стравинский Violoncello)<, p. 5 below type area flush left Viola- and Violoncello-part >2*<; without end marks) // 1969


K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer.
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
https://kcatalog.org and https://kcatalog.net

Print Email

Further Reading

weitere Online-Dokumente von Helmut Kirchmeyer

Das zeitgenössische Wagner-Bild, Siebter Band: Dokumente 1853

aus: Situationsgeschichte der Musikkritik und des musikalischen Pressewesens in Deutschland dargestellt vom Ausgange des 18. bis zum Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts


Copyright © 2021 Procateo KG