K095 A Sermon, a Narrative and a Prayer

deutsch K095 Eine Predigt, eine Erzählung und ein Gebet.

K95 A Sermon, a Narrative and a Prayer

Cantata for alto and tenor soli, speaker, chorus and orchestra – Eine Predigt, eine Erzählung und ein Gebet. Kantate für Alt– und Tenor-Solo, Sprecher, Chor und Orchester – Un Sermon, un Récit et une Prière. Cantate pour des solistes vocaux, un narrateur, choir et orchestre – Un Sermone, una Narrazione e una Preghiera. Cantata per contralto e tenore solisti, recitante, coro ed orchestra

Scored for: a) First edition* :Flute, Alto Flute in G, 2 Oboes, Clarinet in B b, Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 3 Trumpets in B b, 2 Tenor Trombones, Bass Trombone, Tuba, Percussion (Tam-tam), Piano, Harp, Strings (8, 7, 6, 5, 4); b) Performance requirements: Solo Alto, Solo Soprano, Speaker, eight-part mixed chorus (Soprano, Alto, Tenor, Bass, each divided into two parts), Flute, Alto Flute in G*, 2 Oboes, Clarinet in B b*, Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F*, 3 Trumpets in B b, 2 Tenor Trombones, Bass Trombone, Tuba, 3 Tam-tams (high Tam-tam, middle Tam-tam, low Tam-tam) ), Piano, Harp, 4 Solo Violins, 2 Solo Violas, 4 Solo Violoncellos, Solo Double bass, Strings (8 First Violins***, 7 Second Violins***, 6 Violas****, 5 Violoncellos*****, 4 Double basses.

* The instructions are according to the orchestral list in the score, which follow the autograph score; the score itself, which has Italian nomenclature, is not a transposing score, and the parts sound as written.

** 1 player.

*** Solo Instrument(s) included;; without division.

**** Solo Instrument(s) included; divided in two.

***** Solo Instrument(s) included;; divided in three.

Score: The cantata is constructed as a reformed score in modern score layout consisting of separate blocks with systems reduced to incorporate only the necessary parts; all the instruments are written in C and sound as written. There is no single key signature supplied for when a subsequent system is in the same key as the previous one, instead vertical lines are used which are carried through until the next system in which the key changes. The bar numbers, which are counted in groups of five, are given by Strawinsky and are also found in the autograph score; the same also stands for the key notes of the transposing instruments which are given despite the fact that the score is non-transposing.

Summary: The first movement consists of text excerpts on the theme of Christian hope which are taken from the letters of Saint Paul. – The second movement sets the story of the protomartyr Stephen who was stoned by the Jews in accordance under the testimony of witness by Saul, who later became the apostle Paul. – The third movement is a prayer by Thomas Dekker, that we be allowed to enter Heaven after death by the grace of God in order to sing the rejoicing hallelujah there. The Christian “Pax” does not mean a peace in terms of an absence of war, but a peace in terms of rest in the lap of God.

Source: The source for the text of the first movement is the letter of Saint Paul the Apostle to the Romans, chapter 8.24,25; the text of the second movement is from the Acts of the Apostles in the New Testament, chapter 6.2,5*.7-12,15 and 7.1,51*,52*,54-58,59*; the text of the third movement is ‘ Four birds from Noah’s Ark’ by Thomas Dekker. The three texts that were compiled by Strawinsky form a recognisable, confessional and religious statement. Christianity does not exist from lamentation over the Vale of Tears of this world, but rather from hope. It was exactly this that Strawinsky wanted to express when he followed his lamentation cantata of the Old Testament, Threni, with this cantata of hope and joy from the New Testament and specified the three steps that make up the title. He chose the characteristic sections about Christian hope, which is a belief without seeing, and on redemption through death as a gate to life from the letter of Saint Paul to the Romans. With it, the path to God lies through Death. Consequently, Strawinsky connects this with the martyrdom which derives belief from hope and faith from belief. The fact that he used a text from the protomartyr Stephen, the first in a long line of martyrs who from then on were to be a part of the history of the Christian Church throughout the world and whose name day was intentionally put on the second day of Christmas by the Catholic Church, has a dialectical background. Stephen was lynched for his testimony of his faith and for his drastic statements before the Jewish high council. Of the 74 verses of the two chapters 6 and 7, Strawinsky uses only 14 verses in their entirety and 4 in part, restricting himself to the actual drama of Stephen himself, but there remains a part of allegations which Stephen gave to the High Council, to the horror of those concerned, in which he accused the Jewish rulers of all the misdeeds of their entire history to prophets and religious leaders and their obeisance to false Gods, at the end of which the crucifixion of Christ stood as the final step. Stephen’s conclusion (which is correct from a historical point of view) that his disciples were being assaulted, and his claims, which were blasphemous in the eyes of Judaism of the time, of a heaven standing open with Jesus (who has just been executed as a blasphemer) at the side of God, led to his being lynched. The final sentence of the last verse of the chapter is also omitted by Strawinsky. It contains the name of the young man who authorised his killing, but who was presumably also responsible for it: Saul, who was later the apostle Paul. He plays the deciding role in the eighth chapter of the Acts of the Apostles. Here are described the wave of arrests of Christians of both sexes in Jerusalem and the destruction of the Christian church there, which was controlled by Saul and which then spread out of Jerusalem. Saul is the man who was associated with the stoning of Stephen and is also the man who, in his later letter to the Romans, advocates belief and hope, and whose words Strawinsky incorporated into the first movement. All Christians now die in hope, if not by violence. Strawinsky therefore finishes with the prayer by Dekker, which features a man who stands directly before death and through it links hope to resurrection in God’s kingdom, a prayer that Strawinsky, who was almost eighty years old and not in good health, certainly empathised with. Apart from Dekker’s prayer, the first two movements are in translation. Strawinsky always referred to the King James Bible, the early translation of the Vulgata into English from the year 1611, and praised its beautiful linguistic construction. He also took the short text for Babel from the old King James Bible.*

* This bible retained its validity until into the 19th century but was revised in 1870. The subsequent version was the New or Revised Version, which up to the present day remains the definitive version for England. The Revised Version translates the text as word-for-word as possible, unlike the freer and more pictorial original. Elsewhere, the development of the source text continued in the United States of North America. The American edition, the American Standard Version, had been there since 1900. While there was no further official version published in England, the Americans produced a Revised Standard Version in 1946.

Construction: The Sermon is a narrated plot centred on the killing of St. Stephen, framed by two shorter, proportionally balanced outer movements. The first movement (71 bars = bars 1-71) is a 7-section repeating form with an 11-bar instrumental introduction (1-11 = A) performed by soloists and choir without a narrator. The 2nd movement (144 bars = bars 72-215) is a 10-section melodrama with a 7-bar instrumental introduction and an 8-bar instrumental postlude for soloists including narrator but without choir. The 3rd movement (69 bars = bars 216-275) is a one-section, rather lyrical, chorale-like prayer including solo parts without narrator.

Structure

I

A Sermon

(from St. Paul)

Crotchet = 72

    (bar 1-2)

Quaver = 144

    (bar 3-11 [double line after bar 11])

Quaver = 72

    (bar 12-26 [double line after bar 26])

poco più mosso Quaver = 100

    (bar 27-30 [double line after bar 30])

Tempo Io Quaver = 72

    (bar 31-34 [double line after bar 34])

Crotchet = 72 quaver = 144

    (bar 35-44 [double line after bar 44])

Quaver = 72

    (bar 45-63 [double line after bar 26])

poco più mosso quaver = 100

    (bar 64-67 [double line after bar 67])

Tempo Io Quaver = 72

    (bar 68-71)

II

A Narrative

(from the "Acte")

Quaver = 88

    (bar 72-101 [double line after bar 101])

Quaver = crotchet 88

    (bar 102-105 [double line after bar 105])

Crotchet = quaver 88

    (bar 106-112 [double line after bar 112])

Quaver = 192

    (bar 113-129 [double line after bar 129])

Quaver = 96

    (bar 130-137 [double line after bar 137])

Crotchet = 63

    (bar 138-141 [double line after bar 141])

Crotchet = 80

    (bar 142-162 [double line after bar 162])

stesso tempo Crotchet = 80

    (bar 163-186 [double line after bar 186])

poco meno Quaver = 69

    (bar 187-207)

Crotchet = 60

    (bar 208-215)

III

A Prayer

(from Thomas Dekker)

In memoriam the Reverend

James McLane († 1960)

Crotchet = 69

    (bar 216*-275)

* Unconventional bar numbering; the alto part begins with a 4/4 bar at bar 216. It is accompanied by violas and ‘celli. The two string groups open with a crotchet, which comes before the bar, and this has neither a meter nor is it counted as a bar, above which however the metronome mark appears.

Row: e b2-e2-c2-d2-d b2-b b1-b1-f#1-g1-a1-a b-f1.

Style: Sermon is a freely handled work that uses hexachords and twelve-tone technique, but which is also of a diatonic nature. The three movements are differently characterised so that operatic moments are present in the piece. The lyricism of the first movement is followed by the melodrama of the second, which in turn proceeds to the choral style of the third. Strawinsky avoids explicit pictorial text setting. He does not portray the throwing of stones when Stephen is killed and nor is there a single stone hitting him. There are however his typical text-setting processes which use rhythm and melisma for important figures, the repetition of words, which serves for emphasis, ties that reach over the barline, which are used to disturb the usual flow of the voice or introduce a different flow, a choice of instruments which allows conclusions to be drawn, as well as the division of voices to add significance to a moment of constructional and technical importance. For example, the word “hope” in bars 13-14 in the soprano and alto is not only extended by two bars, but the split text “we are saved (by hope)” in the tenors and basses is bedded into the sung word “hope”, so that a graphic picture of the assurance of life and death through and in hope is created; the event is also repeated several times in the text. The word “Lord” in bar 32 is not only emphasised but also sung in division, and when Stephen cries out shortly before his execution, a sextuplet-semiquaver connected to the word “cried” represents the event. There are probably numerically symbolic as well as cryptographic elements contained in Sermon. They become quite clear at a prominent moment such as bars 80-81, where the bass clarinet plays the same note, C, twelve times as a triplet semiquaver with two subsequent quintuplet semiquavers at the mention of the twelve disciples. It would perhaps be too much to speak of this as symbolism, but it is worth noting that Strawinsky’s works concerning thoughts about death use at least one or more tam-tams. In Sermon, there are three, in high, middle and lower registers, which are played by one player; they are only used in the third movement. From observation, the allocation of triplets is likewise to an eventual Trinitarian Holy Ghost setting; these can also be based on language constructions.

Dedication: > to Paul Sacher<; the third movement bears an additional dedication > In memoriam the Reverend James McLane (+ 1960)<.

Duration: 15' 11" (3' 58", 7' 26", 3' 47").

Date of origin: Hollywood 1960 up to 31st January 1961.

History of origin: The history of the composition of Sermon was kept under wraps by Strawinsky to a quite exceptional level and even more than usual, apart from the few, scarce messages in his often quoted letter to Paul Sacher of 7th August 1961. The date of completion comes from the usual date marking at the end of the score, and further production dates from the correspondance with Boosey & Hawkes, in this case with Ernst Roth. Up to 29th October 1960, Strawinsky had sent the first 22 pages of his manuscript to Roth and the publishers had started work on the movement, because he sent a further 15 pages (manuscript pages 23 to 37 of the orchestral score) on this day and asked about the progress of the print. In a letter, he was considering the instrumental postlude to the second section which he had, contrary to his own predictions, been able to compose before his departure to Venice, so that the first and second movements were complete by the end of October. Since he was able to get himself out of his Palermitan concert commitment, Strawinsky found himself once again in New York on 6th December 1960. Work on the Sermon was only really suspended for the month of November.According to the date on the score, he was able to complete the work on 31st January 1961. On 6th February 1961, he sent to Roth the completed third movement with pages 40 to 50 of the manuscript and asked in this letter expressly that Paul Sacher, who was being advised of the progress of the composition, not be informed of its completion and that the notes not at all be sent to him. Strawinsky wanted to inform Sacher himself, as he conveyed to Roth on 27th February 1961. He said that once he had written to Sacher, the material could be sent on to him. The dedicatee should not hear of the completion of the composition or receive the music from a third party; because, after all, the third movement bore a separate dedication. The publishers were so efficient that by 11th April 1961, Strawinsky already had all the corrections in his possession including the piano reduction by Spinner.

First performance: 23rd February 1962 in Basel, Derrik Olsen (Speaker), Jeanne Deroubaix (Alto), Hugues Cuénod (Tenor), the BASLER KAMMERCHOR and the BASLER KAMMERORCHESTER with reinforcements under the Direction of Paul Sacher. The première, which was preceded by an open general rehearsal the day before (22th February 1962) took place under the auspices of the fourth concert by the Basel Chamber Orchestra, which was completely dedicated to Strawinsky’s music. The programme opened with the Greeting Prelude for the Eightieth Birthday of Pierre Monteux, followed by the Babel cantata. It then continued with the Monumentum pro Gesualdo di Venosa ad DC annum. The concert concluded with the Symphony in Three Movements. The premièred work had to be repeated.

Remarks: The letter to Sacher of 7th August 1961 was first printed in the newsletters of the Basel Chamber Orchestra as an excerpt and since then forms the only authentic source. Out of this letter comes the theological viewpoint which Strawinsky followed, and also his forthright opinion, that the audience of his music does not need to know any more as that what he has written (as a cantata from the New Testament, the opposite to the cantata from the Old Testament, Threni; belief and pity as a virtue of hope and the way of truth bring the first martyr Stephen to pray for his executioners; text excerpt from the King James Bible). – Sermon is a relatively simple piece to analyze insofar as one is not disturbed by Strawinsky’s unorthodox repeats, part-crossings, segment formations and manipulations of row sections.

Historical analyses: Even before the première in Basel, Boosey & Hawkes published an analysis essay by Colin Mason in the autumn 1961 edition of its house magazine Tempo under the title ‘Stravinsky’s New Work’, which became the starting point for White in his analytical ideas. The first German-language analysis that went further may have been the description in the report of the première, ‘Die Kantate des Neuen Testaments von Igor Strawinsky’ by Hans Oesch in the April 1962 issue of Melos magazine. This article was used by Roman Vlad. White and Vlad lead towards Mason and Oesch. Whether Oesch knew Mason can only be guessed at taking into account Oesch’s scientific stature, especially as he would have been able to undertake the analysis of the work himself; the printed score was available to him. For his sources, Oesch only cites Strawinsky’s letter to Sacher.

Significance: Sermon stands as a cantata of the New Testament, as the opposite a cantata of the Old Testament, Threni . Both are works of religious avowal and form a musical and theological unity.

Versions: The conductor’s score of Sermon was published in 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes in London; the piano reduction by Leopold Spinner (August) was delayed due to queries and the pocket score (September), which was (for the first time) reprinted in July 1962. The British Library received its contributory copy of the conducting score on 8th September and the copy of the pocket score on 14th November 1961, while Strawinsky’s copy of the pocket score was received in December 1961. A separate chorus score was published at the end of 1963. The British Library received its contributory copy on 12th December 1963. The parts were available to hire. The publishing contract with Boosey & Hawkes was signed on 27th July 1960.

Historical Record: Toronto 29th April 1962, John Horton (Speaker), Shirley Verrett (Mezzo Soprano), Loren Driscoll (Tenor), Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra under the Direction of Igor Strawinsky.

CD edition: XI-2/8-10.

Autograph: The autograph score, which is written in pencil, went from among Paul Sacher’s assets into the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel. There can also be found the surviving sketches.

Copyright: 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, London.

Editions

a) Overview

95-1 1961 FuSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 37 pp.; 18784.

    95-1Strawibd. [with annotations].

95-2 1961 VoSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 28 pp.; 18874.

95-3 1961 PoSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 37 pp.; 18784; 733.

95-3621961 ibd.

95-3[66][1966] ibd.

95-4 1963 ChSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 10 pp.; 18893.

b) Characteristic features

95-1 Igor Stravinsky / A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / Cantata / for Alto and Tenor Soli, Speaker, / Chorus and Orchestra / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / Cantata / for Alto and Tenor Soli, Speaker, / Chorus and Orchestra / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Ltd. / London, New York, Paris, Bonn, Johannesburg, Sydney, Toronto // (Full score sewn in red 22.9 x 30.6 (4° [4°]); sung text English, speaking text English; 37 [37] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper tomato red on green beige [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Orchestra< Italian + note on performance italic > All transposing instruments are written in C< + duration data [>circa 16 minutes<] English] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head in connection with dedication centre centred italic >A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PLAYER / to Paul Sacher<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to 2. line of the movement title numbered in Roman numeral [without dot] >I / A Sermon / (from St. Paul)< flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1961 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved< p. 37 below type area centre in the text box contained >Please include full details of title, author, composer, arranger, and publisher of this work (where / applicable) on THE PERFORMING RIGHT SOCIETY’S returns whenever it is publicly performed.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England <; plate number >B. & H. 18784<; end of score is dated on p. 37 next to last bar oblong in the centre at right angles and in italics without a line break > Hollywood, Jan. 31/° 61<; end number p. 37 flush left as end mark >8. 61. E<) // (1961)

° Slash original.

95-1Straw

The front cover title of Strawinsky’s copy is initialed and dated >IStra / 1962< flush right between >PRAYER< and >Speaker< . On the front title page, between title and >Full score< , it has the annotation >I conduct it on Toronto / with alto – Shirley Verretti-Carter / tenor – Loren Driscoll / narrator the actor John Harton / CBC Chorus & Orch. / April 29, 1962 / IStr<. To this day (2013) the copy has a strong odor.

95-2 A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / [picture] / by / IGOR STRAVINSKY / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / Cantata/ for Alto and Tenor Soli, Speaker,/ Chorus and Orchestra/ Vocal Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Ltd. / London, New York, Paris, Bonn, Johannesburg, Sydney, Toronto // (Vocal score with chant sewn in black 23.4 x 31.1 (4° [4°]) ; sung text English, speaking text English; 28 [28] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on white [ornamental front cover title laid out ornamental front cover laid out with a picture 15.3 x 20.2 of a glass window >The Stoning of St. Stephen< >Westminster Abbey XIII century<, 3 empty pages] + 4 pages front matter [title page, empty page, legend >Orchestra< Italian, empty page] without back matter; title head with dedication partly in italics >A SERMON, A NARRATIVE, / AND A PRAYER / to Paul Sacher<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 above and below 3rd line movement title >I / A Sermon / (from St. Paul)< numbered in Roman numerals [without dot] flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush right >All rights reserved< [/] flush left >© 1961 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< p. 28 below type area centre in the text box contained >Please include full details of title, author, composer, arranger and publisher of this work (where / applicable) on THE PERFORMING RIGHT SOCIETY’S returns whenever it is publicly performed.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England <; plate number >B. & H. 18874<; without end of score dated; end number p. 28 flush right as end mark >8. 61. E.<) // (1961)

95-3 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ^A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 733 // IGOR STRAVINSKY / A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / Cantata/ for Alto and Tenor Soli, Speaker,/ Chorus and Orchestra/ Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Ltd. / London, New York, Paris, Bonn, Johannesburg, Sydney, Toronto // (Pocket score stapled 13.6 x 18.8 (8° [8°]); sung text English, speaking text English; 37 [37] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper olive-green on grey beige [front cover title with frame 9.4 x 3.7 grey beige on olive-green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical works / and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* production data >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Orchestra< Italian + note on performing > All transposing instruments are written in C.< + duration data > circa 16 minutes<] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER<; dedication below title head centre italic > to Paul Sacher<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [S. 1] next to and below 2nd line movement title >I / Sermon / (from St. Paul)< numbered in Roman numerals [without dot] flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1961 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 18784<; end of score dated p. 37 next to last bar oblong centre italic > Hollywood, Jan. 31 /° 61<; end number p. 37 flush left >9·61 L & B<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre centred >Printed in England< p. 37 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) / Limited, London<) // (1961)

^ ^ = Text in frame.

° Slash original.

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Wagner, Richard<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni<. After London t he following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

95-362 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ^A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 733 // Igor Stravinsky / A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / Cantata/ for Alto and Tenor Soli, Speaker,/ Chorus and Orchestra/ Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Ltd. / London, New York, Paris, Bonn, Johannesburg, Sydney, Toronto // (Pocket score stapled 13.6 x 18.8 (8° [8°]); sung text English, speaking text English; 37 [37] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper olive-green on grey beige [front cover title with frame 9.4 x 3.7 grey beige on olive-green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical works / and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* production data >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Orchestra< Italian + note on performance italic > All transposing instruments are written in C< + duration data > circa 16 minutes< English] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER<; dedication below title head centre italic > to Paul Sacher<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to and below 2nd line movement title numbered in Roman numeral (without dot) >I / A Sermon / (from St. Paul)< flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61<; legal reservations 1st page of the score, p. 13, p. 30 below type area flush left >© 1961 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< below type area 1st page of the score flush right, p. 13, p. 30 centre >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 18784<; end of score dated p. 37 next to last bar oblong centre italic > Hollywood, Jan. 31 /° 61<; end number p. 37 flush left >7·62 L & B<; production indications 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England< p. 37 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1962)

^ ^= Text in frame.

° Slash original.

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Wagner, Richard<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni<. After London t he following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

95-3[66] HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ^A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 733 // Igor Stravinsky / A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / Cantata/ for Alto and Tenor Soli, Speaker,/ Chorus and Orchestra/ Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Ltd. / London, New York, Paris, Bonn, Johannesburg, Sydney, Toronto // (Pocket score stapled 13.9 x 18.9 (8° [8°]); sung text English, speaking text English; 37 [37] pages + cover pages thicker paper olive-green on grey beige [front cover title with frame 9.6 x 3.7 grey beige on olive-green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following list is but a selection of the many items included in this extensive library of miniature scores / containing both classical works and an ever increasing collection of outstanding modern compositions. A / complete catalogue of Hawkes Pocket Scores is available on request.<* Stand >No. 16< [#] >1.66<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Orchestra< Italian + note on performance italic > All transposing instruments are written in C< + duration data > circa 16 minutes< English] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER<; dedication below title head centre italic > to Paul Sacher<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to and below 2nd line movement title numbered in Roman numeral (without dot) >I / A Sermon / (from St. Paul)< flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61<; legal reservations 1st page of the score, p. 13, p. 30 below type area flush left >© 1961 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< below type area 1st page of the score flush right, p. 13, p. 30 centre >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 18784<; end of score dated p. 37 next to last bar oblong centre italic > Hollywood, Jan. 31 /° 61<; without end number; production indications 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England< p. 37 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // [1966]

^ ^= Text in frame.

° Slash original.

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers and without specification of places of printing from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Tchaikovsky, Peter<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Abraham and Isaac / Agon / Apollon musagète / Concerto in D / The flood / Introitus / Oedipus rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Piano concerto / Pulcinella suite / The rake’s progress / The rite of spring / Le rossignol / A sermon, a narrative and a prayer / Symphonie de psaumes / Symphonies of wind instruments / Threni / Variations<.

95-4 A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER / To Paul Sacher/ IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61 / BOOSEY & HAWKES // (Choral score >CHORAL SCORE< with the solo voices without speaking text [library binding] 18 x 25.6 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text English; 10 [10] pages black on white without cover pages + 2 pages front matter [front cover title, empty page] without back matter; title head >A SERMON, A NARRATIVE / AND A PRAYER<; score type between movement number in Roman numerals (without dot) >I< and movement title flush left >CHORAL SCORE<; dedication below title head centred italic > To Paul Sacher; author specified 1st page of the score without pagination [p. 1] above and below movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1960-61<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1961 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 18893<; without end mark) // (1963)


K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer.
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
https://kcatalog.org and https://kcatalog.net

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