K041 Octet

deutsch K041 Oktett

K41 Octuor

pour instruments à vent – Oktett für Bläser – Octet for wind instruments – Октет для духовых инструментов– Ottetto per istrumenti a fiato

Scored for: a) First edition: Flauto, Clarinetto in Si b e La, 2 Fagotti, Tromba in Do, Tromba in La, Trombone Tenore, Trombone Basso [Flute, Clarinet in B and A, 2 Bassoons, Trumpet in C, Trumpet in A, Tenor trombone, Bass trombone]; b) Performance requirements: = a)

Title: According to Strawinsky's original conception, the piece should be called >OTTETTO / Per stromenti / da fiato<.

Performance practice: While in a rage in August 1963, Strawinsky called an Englishman ' a completely idiotic person ' who had made the offer of playing the Octet in a concert which otherwise contained only works for large Symphony Orchestra, Chorus and Soloists. Presumably, past experiences of bad programme combinations and pieces being out of place in concerts from his time in France, from which he had suffered so much, were boiling up in the 81-year-old Strawinsky: as 'poor Mavra' was pulverised between Petrushka and Sacre, or as his eight wind players for the première of the Octet were lost in the giant Paris Opera.

Construction: The Octet is a three-movement chamber work for wind with an opening in the style of a French Overture (Fast - Slow), a middle movement in variations which are figured with letters; there are five variations including a fugal variation and a twice-repeated reprise of the first variation as well as an attacca transition into the final section. As in the stage works Histoire de Soldat, Les Noces, Renard and Pulcinella, the Octet for Winds is also not unequivocally related to one genre. The sonata form of the first movement is not a sonata form, the overture is not an overture, and the divertimento is not a divertimento. The variations are not variations on a stated theme, but a sort of theme on a stated variation. All possible formal conceptions are worked into the piece, and they are interwoven in a cubistic style with one another. As Strawinsky repeats the variation section A several times, the whole variation movement becomes a Rondo. As he constructs the Rondo interludes as modern dances, the Rondo becomes a Suite. As he works the Suite into variations, the Suite becomes a Variation form. The movement is therefore a Variation form, a Rondo and a Suite all at the same time. Since he constructs the movements from tone rows, he allows (ergographically questionable) references to his later row technique. –

The first movement is rudimentarily constructed using elements of a first-movement Sonata movement structure, but can also be seen just as much as a French Overture Slow-Fast as an imitation of a sonata form with an introduction. This account of such a movement is identical with its technical analysis. –

The second movement is a mixture of a variation structure, Rondo form and different movement types, as is possible in a modern Suite. It was in fact not originally conceived as a variation form, but came out of a movement that was previously composed, which ended up being Variation C. Strawinsky reconstructed a theme from this section of a movement which was then connected to the other variations. Since Strawinsky's conception of variations basically demands the retention of the melody line of the theme, the course of the thematic material of the variation can be seen punctually in every single variation. The theme becomes a store of material from which tone rows are extracted without the entire musical inventory necessarily being used in each subsequent variation. In this way, changing sections of the theme appear in each of the variations which are differently characterised by means of the flow of the variation. If one were to number the individual notes of the theme from 1 to 33 (analytical process Nelson), a clear picture of the constructional process appears, despite the removal of 8 structural notes included for the purpose of style, which Strawinsky incidentally at least partly makes clear by means of his style of indications in the composition. The asymmetrical theme is made up of a two-bar head of the theme 1-8, which is developed from a composed-out major third, and a two-bar response 9-10 in the same intervallic framework. The structurally repeating continuation 11-14 and 15-19 is achieved through contrary motion, exchange of intervals and extension of the range. The head of the theme is transposed up a third (20-24), responded to combinatorially (25-28), and completed with a coda-like endphrase (29-33) which is structurally identical to the 2nd response to the head of the theme of the continuation, 15-19. The A variation, which has the function of a Rondo, uses the first 19 notes raised by a semitone, and the following 5 notes raised by a whole tone. The next notes, 25-28, are crossed with 29-32, and the final note, 33, is inserted into the first chord of the B variation, which is characterised as a March. Variations C is the waltz from which the entire movement develops, Variation D is a Gallop and variation E is a Fugato which takes the place of the traditional fugal ending of the variation form with which the composers of the preceding generation took care to crown their variation movements. –

The third movement, which only bears the title Finale, was presumably not considered by Strawinsky as a self-standing third movement, but as a coda extended from the second, with which it is connected without a rest. This could be the reason why this movement has no movement number. Strawinsky often wrote similarly later on, such as in the Septet, which gives the outward appearance of a three-movement form, but is in reality in two movements, especially as the two-movement structure clearly suits Strawinsky's compositional process better. The movement anticipates the motoristic and mechanistic ostinati of the coming pieces.

Structure

I

SINFONIA

Lento Quaver = 76 figure ( 41 up to the end of figure 5 5)

Allegro Moderato Crotchet = 104 (figure 6 up to the end of figure 23 9)

II TEMA CON VARIAZIONE*

Andantino Crotchet* = 92 (figure 24 up to the end of figure 25 6)

A Quaver = 126 (figure 26 up to the end of figure 27 8)

B Crotchet = 120-126 (figure 28 up to figure 30 11[attacca subita towards to figure 31])

A Quaver = 126 (figure 31 [attacca from figure 30 11] up to the end of figure 32 7)

C Crotchet = dotted crotchet = 63 quaver = 126 (figure 33 up to the end of figure 37 5)

Quaver = quaver 189 environ (figure 37 14)

D Tempo giusto Quaver = crotchet (figure 38 up to the end of figure 48 8)

A Quaver = 126 (figure 49 up to the end of figure 50 7)

E Fugato Quaver = 84 (figure 51 up to the end of figure 55 14)

Moderato Crotchet = 116 (figure 56 up to the end of figure 57 16)

FINALE**

Sempre Crotchet = 116 Tempo giusto (figure 58 up to the end of figure 72 15with the repetition of figure

58 up to figure 59 9, with the omission of the first last-time bar, at figure 59 9up to figure 62 6)

* Originally, but corrected in the later editions.

** Without numbering; the second movement runs directly into the third movement.

Corrections / Errata

Full score 41-5

1.) p. 1, figure 11, Bassoon: g1 instead of g.°

2.) p. 26, figure 45 6, Clarinet: > p < instead of > mf <.°°

3.) p. 31, figure 56 3, Flute: natural has to be added 1. quaver (b2).°°

° Also Pocket score.

°° Not Pocket score

Pocket score 41-6

1.) p. 1, figure 11, Bassoon: g1 instead of g.

Style: Without the aid of a a programmatic conception as in the previous ballets, operas, songs, symphonic poems and works of chamber music bound to a programmatic conception, the Wind Octet is exposed as to lay open the compositional technique in the Classical sense for its own sake. The adoption of rudimentary forms like the Sonata or Variation or Waltz or Fugue is only a smokescreen because Strawinsky's composition, better construction is always based on the same process, namely interchanging small intervallic combinations according to the rules, but without the obligation of expanding and varying it, changing them combinatorially and constructing the composition in such a manner that the smaller fragment is consistently found in the larger, and the larger is made up of a montage of several smaller ones. This leads from work to work to a crucial technical problem which is a side-issue in one piece but becomes dominant in another. Even the handling of the instruments is dependent upon it, for which the technical ideas are very well expressed in several ways, it can even have a retrospective effect on an earlier for a later revision, just as the instrumentation serves the formal implication and even creates other solutions. The struggle between tonal and non-tonal music disappears from the compositional process because it does not play a role any more. Strawinsky's Octet for Winds is neither tonal nor atonal, neither freely tonal nor non-tonal. It is based on polarising central notes around which the variational constructions are formed. Styles are mixed together here, such as repeating ostinato figures with accents that continuously change from repetition to repetition, with the introduction of the central contradiction between rhythm and meter, by means of which Strawinsky's composition creates its inner sense of movement. In this respect, Strawinsky's works cannot be grouped together but only reflected with the result that the compositional solution found is always only one of many. Into this process Strawinsky supplies all the musical dimensions called 'parameters' by his successors. He does not use his later serial technique much differently. Since the compositions or sections of the composition were occasionally not created as a result of constructed rows but intervallic combinations were controlled with reference to the row formations, and the rows were extracted and connected to one another. This compositional event explains Strawinsky's occasional refusal to name the rows at all, the division of which was a constructional principle in his opinion (which Schoenberg incidentally also shared for his own serial compositions) and which brings no clarity to the musical issue. This inverted formal process becomes clear from the Octet for Winds onwards, in which a variation is created from a Waltz and then used as the basis of further variations.

Dedication: According to a later statement, the work is dedicated to Vera de Bosset (>The Octuor was composed for and is dedicated to Vera de Bosset<); the printed editions have no dedication.

Duration: 14' 35"

Date of origin: Biarritz late autumn 1922 up to Paris 20th Mai 1923, with preparatory work since springtime 1919 and interruption of work from the end of 1922 to the beginning of April 1923.

First performance: 20th Mai 1923, at the Opéra in Paris as part of the Kussewitzky concerts under the direction of Igor Strawinsky, Marcel Moyse (Flute), G. Hamelin (Clarinet), Fernand Oubradous and Albert Rible (Bassoons), Pierre Vignal and Lucien Body (Trumpets), Victor Hudier and Emile Lauga (Trombones).

Remarks: At the beginning of the Twenties, the function of the orchestra was being newly defined. Piano and wind sounds were regarded as cooler and more distant, and as a result experimentally more effective for the form as well as being easier to handle. Schönberg's trailblazing work that used twelve-tone technique, which was written at the same time, was a quintet for winds. Taking into account the interruption from Winter 1922/23, which was due to the completion of the orchestration of Les Noces, the Octet was written very quickly. The variation theme, which at this point had not yet become a variation, was developed during the composition of the waltz variation and then became the basis of the other variations. Incidentally, the compositional process can be reconstructed quite accurately from the surviving sketches, dates and letters. Strawinsky started the composition early in 1919 with 12 bars of what later became the Valse in the second movement (variation C), while still working on the Piano-Rag-Music. It is therefore questionable as to whether Strawinsky already had in mind the composition of an Octet, since all the indications point towards a piece for piano, and the sequence of bars also appears amongst the early sketches from July 1920 in connection with the composition of the Symphonies of Wind Instruments. It is more probable that Strawinsky originally wrote this sequence of bars, which ended up in the Octet at figure 35 3, as one idea among many, as he often did, so that he could use it at some point, but not in the Piano-Rag-Music, for which it was perhaps first conceived, nor in the Symphonies of Wind Instruments, but in the Octet. The first fully composed section was the fugal variation, which was written in January 1921 and was taken from the sketches for a composition that remained uncompleted, Pour les 5 Pièces monométriques, a name which was also in consideration for the variation sequence in the Octet for a long time (Thème avec variations monométriques). The next sketch, which can be narrowed down to coming from material written in a one-year period, in the time around Mavra, is only connected with the first movement. It can be seen from this sketch that Strawinsky had a piece for piano, winds and timpani in mind. He was working on it intensively from 12th July 1922. The sketches to be ordered chronologically are those for the final bars of the first movement, to which the other pre-sketches refer, final figures 14, 15, 6, 9, 8. At this point in time, Strawinsky was clearly not yet clear about the style of the movement. The section of the final movement from the current figures 19 to 21 bear the date 8th August 1922. Under difficult conditions for work, being constantly disturbed by a screeching parrot, he completed the first movement in particell form with the addition of other bars on 16th August 1922. In the meanwhile, the Octet began to gain its instrumental shape and he formulated the material into a map with the title 'Concepts' (brouillons), which proves that he was working on a specific piece. Work proceeded on the augmented waltz fragment, which contains the first four notes of the fugato. On 23rd August, Strawinsky gave the movement its monometric title and split up the eight-bar theme asymmetrically. He then interrupted his work for concerts and other sorts of private commitments and returned to it in mid-November. On 18th November, he completed what is now variation D, on 1st December variation A, on 6th December variation B and on 9th December variation C. January and February 1923 saw him completely occupied with his work on the Octet. The Finale, and with it the entire composition, was completed on 20th May 1923 in Paris. On 22nd May, Strawinsky sent this complete version to Ernest Ansermet, whom he had been keeping up-to-date with the progress of the work. The first person to investigate the connections between the sketches was Robert Craft.

The Octet for Winds became an unpleasant test for the friendships between Ansermet and Strawinsky, Strawinsky and Diaghilev, and Diaghilev and Ansermet; it was one of the many small sparking points which collect themselves over the course of the years leading up to the explosive break of 1936. Strawinsky had shown the Octet to Ansermet. Ansermet reported the sensational new work to Diaghilev at the next meeting and thus forgot that he had promised the composer to keep absolute silence about the piece towards anyone and everyone. This was nothing new, since Strawinsky as good as quarantined all of his not-yet-completed works in this way. Diaghilev, who was not privy to this, discussed the issue at the next opportunity and expressed his enthusiasm about Ansermet's utterances while Strawinsky rescued himself with the excuse that he did not understand Ansermet and that the conductor had not even heard the piece yet. There upon, Diaghilev described Ansermet as a liar to Strawinsky. Strawinsky could not write quickly enough to Ansermet about the episode on 15th January 1923 with argument and counterargument and to accuse him of having made him, Strawinsky, a liar to Diaghilev against his will ('Vous m'avez mis mon vieux dans une triste situation en faisant de moi un menteur bien involontair.'). Ansermet justified himself by return of post with a letter from Geneva of 23rd January 1923. The matter now appears all at once quite differently. Diaghilev apparently thought that Strawinsky would not be in touch again because he had writer's block and Diaghilev wanted to have it confirmed by Ansermet. Ansermet however defended Strawinsky. He said that he was not experiencing writer's block but entirely the opposite, was occupied with a large matter. He should be left in peace and he would write again in good time.

Significance: The Octet heralds a new stylistic direction which spread worldwide under the name Neo-Classicism. This mainly referred back to the comparison that called Schoenberg a Neo-Gothic composer and Strawinsky a Neo-Classical composer. What appeared to many contemporaries at first as a further joke by the unpredictable Strawinsky, proved to be the most decisive change since 1911 of a part of the modern musical language, and brought to an end decades of experimental composition. Neo-Classicism does not view music history as a limitation, but could also incorporate the row techniques of Schoenberg and Webern. The term Neo-Classicism therefore functioned as a term for a stylistic culture as well as a term of relation as opposed to that which was experimental or a spin-off or even different, never as a term for itself, whether one mockingly discriminates against it or values it apologetically.

Situationsgeschichte. Neoklassizismuns and Renouveau catholique: The new style was developed out of a religious movement around the French philosopher, Jacques Maritain, which was called Renouveau Catholique and to which Lourié, Cocteau, Satie and the translator of Oedipus and later Cardinal Danièlou belonged, as did Strawinsky, who returned to being a practising Christian in 1924. Maritain, who became an Ambassador to the Apostolic See in Rome after the Second World War, had become the leading representative of New-Thomism (New Scholasticism); by reference to Thomas of Aquinas, who combined the teachings of Augustine and Aristotle, this movement separated Philosophy from Theology and recognised Natural Science as a self-standing and equally worthy scientific discipline, but by the establishment of its limits in the Finite and the Worldly, asserted the fulfilment of Man in the Endless and Transcendent World to be the function of religion, and defined human life as an image for the order of God. In this way, the Thomist philosophy transforms into a philosophy of order which penetrates structural method of perceiving composition as order, and through order to forge a connection to God. Against the background of this thinking, Strawinsky developed his conceptions of music for its own sake, of music which is nothing as order (as it is divine), as well as his conceptions of the function of music as a method of establishing a connection between Man and God. According to Strawinsky, music is given to us for the purpose of creating order between things. If order is attained, then everything is said. Neo-Classicism is therefore a style of music based on a philosophy of living of a certain religious orientation of historical origin, which is associated very closely, perhaps almost exclusively, with the name of Strawinsky. When it comes up against militant Marxist atheism, which recognises its religious substance, it will be demonised or ridiculed and will fall prey to an ideologically defined virtual philosophy of new music which no longer draws on reality, even at the price of the artistic impoverishment of the world. An inherent part of order is that nothing can be excluded from it . In this respect there are no stylistic exclusions, as there are in Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. The composer works according to rules which he has adopted or even invented and which he later avoids if he has used them once. The process of a composition based on constantly changing methods was theorised by Ferruccio Busoni when he postulated a music on the other side from absolute and programmatic music which includes all types of music in itself, when each self-developed rule however goes on to become an unrepeatable exception and this was passed on to Strawinsky, whose own disposition to him was open, by Busoni's pupil Lourié, when Schoenberg rejected him after Busoni's death. In Neo-Classicism, Strawinsky was able to develop computer-like combinational technique of the montage of intervallic formations which copy and vary themselves further. Strawinsky's process could not be imitated because the force of the change of methods prevented any imitation. It was however being reformulated among different omens by German composition in the Cologne electronic studio since 1952. Many technical processes and problems that were not solved at the time can be found once again in the early and middle music of Karlheinz Stockhausen. The work that stylistically preceded the Octet and which came directly before it was the opera Mavra, which suggested that Strawinsky's compositional style was not only changing gradually.“Busoni (of whom it was said that he did not like Strawinsky’s music, which is not correct in this form), was very open in his only encounter with Strawinsky in 1923 on the occasion of a performance of the Soldier’s Tale in Weimar. Since Busoni died in 1924, the theorist of ‘young classicism’ would never experience its realisation in Strawinsky’s Neoclassicism.

From a religious point of view, Strawinsky was highly sensitive at the time. It was at this time in which he started taking confession once again, in which he wrote letters of apology, in which everything he did came out of religion , in which he even wanted to destroy certain masterworks because they posed him problems. The Octet was written in this atmosphere, the first work of the new time, in which the theologically postulated event of the mirroring of divine ordering in the earthly circle of meaning becomes a musical piece, and the monometer becomes nothing more than an interpretation necessary to the aesthetic programme. Ability and Belief are joined together and will not, in Strawinsky's case, be apart any longer. At the same time, the break for Strawinsky with the Enlightenment tradition of the artist as creator is realised. The artist only rework with materials that are available. He is no longer the creator ex nihilo, which Bodmer and Breitinger made him once. God retrieves his creation which Man only may administer. The fact that he finally used the title 'Poetics' for his university lectures, (which were essentially developed for him by others), was only consistent. Strawinsky was with this decades ahead of his time.

Dream interpretation: In 1935 (Chronique de ma vie), he seems to have begun composing the Octet without knowing which instrumental form it was to have. He first decided on this after the first section was complete and he was in the situation to decide which ensemble would best suit the counterpoint, the character and the structure of the composition. This idea corresponds just as much with the historical situation as with what appears in the sketches. Decades later, Strawinsky had Craft to publish in the programme notes to the Octet that the work was written as the result to a dream in which he saw and even heard eight musicians with bassoons, trombones, trumpets, a flute and a clarinet, even if he later, despite his best efforts, could not remember the music. He also apparently awoke from this small concert with great delight and anticipation and began the composition the next morning, even though he had not even considered it in the days before apart from in the wish to write an instrumental sonata. The work was therefore first written without an instrumental concept behind it, grew out of the seed of a piece for piano, was been reworked as a piece for winds and finally as a piano concerto. In the end, it became an octet for wind instruments. It was only decades later that the dream version followed. It has now become clear that the Octet for Winds ushered in a new epoch of music history, something which was only a few people suspected in 1924. Strawinsky also finally became aware of this, and he felt guided. He did not shelter a deception or conceit which became so realistic that dream and reality gradually overlap. Rudolf Heinz, who formally investigated the dream, finds no indications for the one nor the other, but asserts that the dream version described by Strawinsky is not different from the scientifically empirical precedents of investigated dreams. If the Octet, as the work of the century, led to a change in the musico-historical situation, then the dream revealed decades later by Strawinsky , which seems to stand against the compositional history made public or spread by him himself, could explain the change in style as the result of a directive which Strawinsky exalted to the position of a prophecy. In actual fact, the experience shows that he was working hard, but solutions that cannot be found to problems occupy those concerned even while sleeping, since the brain is not switched off 'while asleep'. The solution found is the result of this incessant continual occupation which is calmed down in dreams. In the current case, the great problem in Strawinsky's attempt from the musico-historical situation of 1923 was of developing a piece of instrumental music valid for the future that was not related to events on a stage. Both of Strawinsky's versions of the compositional history do not contradict one another but rather reinforce one another, and the dream version testifies to the difficulties which Strawinsky had with the work before it became the final version of the Octet.

Versions: The conducting and pocket score were published in 1924 by the Russian publishers, and the parts were available to hire. This was also probably true for the conducting score which did not appear in the accounts, although some copies of it have survived in the libraries. The sales results of the pocket score at first appeared to be good. In the year of publication, there were 58 copies which the publishers sold, and 259 in the following year. The market was then clearly already saturated. For such a historically meaningful piece, approximately 650 copies were sold in the 15 years up to 1938 worldwide. Two years later, the piano reduction completed by Arthur Lourié was published. Lourié’s edition is in two versions, of which the one which is certainly later caused the printed (not stamped) addition to the inner title to have been taken up under the number 8638 in the Universal Edition. One such edition that was later bound is stored in London (>h.3942.o<, acquired on 15th August 1959). There is no copy in Strawinsky’s estate for obvious reasons. The pocket score and piano reduction were printed later after the transfer of Strawinsky's assets from the Russian publishers to Boosey & Hawkes publishers in 1948 and 1952 with a new plate number. The printing of the Lourié edition for two-handed piano in 1952 is identical to the original of 1926. Regarding the, from a publishing point of view, catastrophic sales figures of the piano edition (up to 1938, approximately 200 copies were printed, of which 30 copies went to Russia in 1927), Boosey presumably did not receive only the printing stocks when the new publishing contract for the revised version was signed on 6th November 1950 with Strawinsky, but all the remainder of the newly designed stock which was being brought onto the market as well, probably in order not to have them been pulped. Neither the printing errors nor the incorrect Italian plural form 'variazione' on page 11 were removed. Depending on the publishers, the outer and inner titles as well as the statement of ownership reservation were brought up-to-date and anglicised, while the original plate number statement R.M.V. 421 in B.&H. 17270 was changed. Additionally, there were also the advertising pages which were missing from the original edition. Lourié however, on Strawinsky's instructions, in 1926 metronome error in the metronome mark in the original score at figure 24 1removed and in the transition from figure 25 to 26, an attacca subito was inserted that is missing in the original. Lourié’s piano reduction was republished in December 1952, a time by which Strawinsky had already completed and published the revised version, which had been published as a conducting and as a pocket score prior to the new printing of the Louriés edition. The British Library registers the entry date of the conducting score as 31st October 1952 and the pocket score as 6th December 1952. The Edidit sign in the piano reduction bears the date December 1952, an almost unique case in Strawinsky’s ergography of an overtaking publication. The set of parts was clearly produced for the American region, as the rights reservation shows. It was presumably only available to hire in Europe. The dating can currently only be inferred from the plate number. The only complete copy is stored under the signature >95/280273< in the Munich Music Library and entered the inventory in 1975. It bears no dating from the first owner of any kind. The revised version of the pocket score was published with a new plate number, but an identical edition number. London (>b.211<) differentiates between it and the earlier edition by the addition of an asterisk (630*) behind the edition reference. Another such asterisk was also added into Strawinsky’s copy in his estate by hand. In 1971, the Octet was published together with Dumbarton Oaks in a Russian reprinting.

The 1952 revised version: Strawinsky removed an obvious printing error and made a series of smaller changes to improve the emphasis. In the title of the second movement, he replaced the linguistically incorrect plural form ‘ variazione ’ with the correct Italian form ‘ variazioni ’ and corrected the incorrect metronome marking for the fourth variation to crotchet = 160, instead of the unusual and unlikely crotchet = 189; he also raised three notes in the clarinet part one bar before the entry of the Fugato. The change in metronome marking from the incorrect crotchet = 92 of the Andantino theme to quaver = 92 had already been adopted in Lourié’s piano edition of 1926. He reassigns the bar lines in the flute part that bridges the transition from the Fugato to the Finale, which White called ‘ a doubtful improvement ’. Further changes are listed in the table. Strawinsky avoided the use of numbering for the movements in the new version, likewise he avoided markings in French, such as très sec or très court , throughout. Strawinsky placed much value in the removal of the French term ‘Octuor’ in the title, replacing it with the English ‘Octet’. When Strawinsky reached an agreement with Hawkes at the end of 1950 regarding the contractual arrangements for every one of the pieces transferred from the Russian Music Publishers to Boosey & Hawkes, he wrote on 30th August 1950 that ‘Octet’ was an international word and required no translation into French. He added fortepiano markings at many places. The alteration with the biggest impact, because it resulted in a change in the figuring, was the writing out of a repeated section of 16 bars in the Finale at figure 62. Strawinsky’s cosmetic adjustment leads to the figure numbers being increased by 2 from this point in comparison with the figuring in the original version. The length of the work is not affected as a result. Lastly, Albert Spalding’s name was no longer required. Strawinsky marked his corrections in the original pocket score produced by the Russian Music Publishers.

Historical Recordings: Paris 1932 Marcel Moyse (Flute), Emile Godeau (Clarinet), Gustave Dherin (Bassoon), Piard (Bassoon), Eugène Foveau (Trumpet), Pierre Vignal (Trumpet), Lafosse (Trombone), Delbos (Trombone); New York 26th January 1954 Julius Baker (Flute), David Oppenheim (Clarinet), Loren Glickman (Bassoon), Sylvia Deutscher (Bassoon), Robert Nagel (Trumpet), Ted Weis (Trumpet), Erwin Price (Trombone), Richard Hixon (Trombone); Hollywood 5th January 1961 James Pellerite (Flute), David Oppenheim (Clarinet), Loren Glickman (Bassoon), Arthur Weisberg (Bassoon), Robert Nagel (Trumpet), Ted Weis (Trumpet), Keith Brown (Trombone), Richard Hixon (Trombone) [ columbia Chamber Ensemble] under the Direction of Igor Strawinsky.

CD-Edition: VII-1/3-5 (Recording 1961).

Autograph: The handwritten copy ended up in the Rychenberg Foundation in Wintherthur via its first owner, Werner Reinhart; the sketch material passed from Strawinsky’s estate into the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel.

Copyright: 1924 (Pocket score) by Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 1926 (Vocal score Lourié) by Russischer Musikverlag in Berlin (Édition Russe de Musique); 1947 assigned to Boosey & Hawkes London; 1952 (Revised editions) by Boosey & Hawkes London.

Editions

a) Overview

41-1 1924 FuSc; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 53 pp.; R. M. V. 415.

    41-1Straw1 ibd. [with annotations]

    41-1Straw2 ibd. [with annotations]

41-2 1924 PoSc; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 53 pp.; R. M. V. 415.

    41-2Straw [with annotations].

41-3 1926 PiRe [Lourié]; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 32 pp.; Pl.-Nr. R. M. V. 421.

41-4 (1948) PoSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 40 pp.; B. & H. 17231, 630.

41-5 1952 FuSc rev.; Boosey & Hawkes London / Russischer Musikverlag; 40 pp. 4°; B. & H. 17231.

    41-552-Straw 1952 ibd. [annotations]

41-6 1952 PoSc rev.; Boosey & Hawkes London; 40 pp.; B. & H. 17231; 630*.

    41-6Straw ibd. [with annotations]

41-6 59 ibd.

41-7 1952 PiRe [Lourié]; Russ. Musikverlag / Boosey & Hawkes London; 32 pp.; B. & H. 17270.

41-8St [1952] Set of parts, Boosey & Hawkes London; B. & H. 17272.

41-9Alb 1971 PoSc;ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО „МУЗЫКА“ ; 40 pp.; 6385

b) Characteristic features

41-1 IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTUOR / POUR / INSTRUMENTS A VENT / (G deFlûte, Clarinette Si b, 2 Bassons, 2 Trompettes, 2 Trombones) / Partition / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L'ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS. / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW YORK LONDRES BRUXELLES BARCELONE MADRID / PARIS / 22, RUE D'ANJOU / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES // [title page = front cover title] // (Full score [library binding] 26.4 x 34.2 (2° [4°]); 53 [53] pages + 4 cover pages black dark grey on beige [front cover title, empty page, [missing], [missing]**] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >OCTUOR / Pour instruments à vent<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] below title head next to 2. line movement title numbered in Roman numerals (without dot) > I / SINFONIA< flush right >Igor STRAWINSKY<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to subtitle flush left italic >Edited by Albert Spalding / New- York<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1924 by Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin< flush right centred >Propriété de l'éditeur / DROITS D'EXÉCUTION ET DE REPRO- / DUCTION RÉSERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS;<; plate number >R, M, V, 415<; production indication p. 53 as end mark >Imp. Delanchy-Dupré – Paris-Asnières.<) // (1924)

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

** It can be assumed that these were empty pages.

41-1Straw1

Strawinsky’s copy from the estate is signed on the outer title above name flush right >Igor Strawinsky< and contains corrections; the two back cover pages are missing.

41-1Straw2

In this copy Strawinsky entered his corrections for the revised edition. Cover, front, and back pages are missing.

41-2 IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTUOR / POUR / INSTRUMENTS A VENT / (G deFlûte, Clarinette Si b, 2 Bassons, 2 Trompettes, 2 Trombones) / Partition / [vignette] / PROPRIÉ tÉ DE L'EDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS. / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW-YORK LONDRES BRUXELLES BARCELONE MADRID / PARIS / 22, RUE D'ANJOU. / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES // [title page = front cover title] // (Pocket score sewn 13.6 x 18.2 (8° [kl. 8°]); 53 [53] pages + 4 cover pages black on light grey beige [front cover title with vignette 0.5 x 0.5 a graphically stylized four-leaf clover, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >LES ŒUVRES / d’IGOR STRAWINSKY<** without production data] + 4 pages front matter [2 empty pages, title page, empty page] + 3 pages back matter [3 empty pages]; title head >OCTUOR / Pour Instruments à vent<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] below title head next to 2. line movement title numbered in Roman numeral (without dot) > I / SINFONIA< flush right >Igor STRAWINSKY<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score above up to below 2. line of the title head flush left centred italic > Edited by Albert Spalding / New- York <; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1924 by Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin< flush right centred >Propriete de l'éditeur / DROITS D'EXÉCUTION ET DE REPRO- / DUCTION RÉSERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS<; plate number*** >R, M, V, 415<; production indication p. 53 flush right as end mark >Imp. Delanchy-Dupré – Paris-Asnières<) // (1924)

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

** Compositions are advertised >PÉTROUCHKA (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO SOLO PAR L’AUTEUR / rossignol(CONTE LYRIQUE) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / [#] (textes russe et français) / INTRODUCTION, CHANT DU PÊCHEUR et AIR DU ROSSIGNOL / [#] (tirés du I eracte). / MARCHE CHINOISE, TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO SOLO / [#] par THÉODORE SZANTO / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL (POÈME SYMPHONIQUE) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A DEUX MAINS PAR J. LARMANJAT / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / TROIS PIÈCES POUR QUATUOR A CORDES / PARTIES / PARTITION DE POCHE / OCTUOR POUR INSTRUMENTS A VENT / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A DEUX MAINS PAR A. LOURIÉ / CONCERTO pour Piano et Orchestre d’Harmonie / RÉDUCTION POUR DEUX PIANOS A 4 MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / MAVRA OPÉRA EN 1 ACTE / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / (avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand) / sur DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand. / sur TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe, français et anglais. / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (Souvenir de mon enfance) / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe et français, russe et anglais.<

*** The use of commas instead of full Stops is original.

41-2Straw

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate is signed and dated on the front cover page above (1st line) and below (2nd and 3rd line) name flush right >IStrawinsky / Amsterdam / Nov. 1924< and contains no corrections.

41-3 IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTUOR / pour Instruments à Vent / arrangé pour Piano seul par / ARTHUR LOURIÉ / [vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTUOR / pour Instruments à Vent / arrangé pour Piano seul / par ARTHUR LOURIÉ / [vignette] / Propriété de l'Éditeur pour tous pays / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H.) BERLIN / Fondée par S. et N. KOUSSEVITZKY. / Dépôts: LEIPZIG, NEW-YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONE, VIENNE. / A PARIS: / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / 22, Rue d'Anjou, 22 // (Reduction pour piano for two hands sewn in blue 26.5 x 34.5 (2° [4°]); 32 [32] pages + 4 cover pages black on dark grey [grey blue] linen structured horizontal [front cover title with vignette 2 x 0.5 tendril, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page with vignette 2,7 x 0,5 tendril, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [2 empty pages]; title head in connection with author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 centre centred >OCTUOR / Pour INSTRUMENTS à VENT / de / Igor STRAWINSKY<; arranger specified 1st page of the score between author specified and movement title flush right centred >Pour PIANO à 2 mains par / Arthur LOURIÉ<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left centred partly in italics > Copyright 1926 by Russicher* Musikverlag G. M. B. H. Berlin / Russicher* Musikverlag G.M.B.H. Berlin / Edition Russe de Musique / PROPRIETE DE L'EDITEUR< flush right >DROITS D'EXÉCUTION ET DE REPRO- / DUCTION RÉSERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS<; plate number >R.M.V. 421<; without end of score dated; production indication as end mark p. 32 flush left >Imp. CHAFFANGE, 36, rue des Panoyaux. Paris<) // (1926)

* Misprint original.

41-4 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTUOR / POUR INSTRUMENTS À VENT^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 630 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTUOR / POUR INSTRUMENTS À VENT / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON · NEW YORK · LOS ANGELES · SYDNEY · CAPE TOWN · TORONTO · PARIS / NET PRICE / Made in England // (Pocket score stapled 13.7 x 18.5 (8° [kl. 8° / 8°]); 53 [53] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on grey beige [front cover title with frame 9,4 x 4 grey beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The Standard Classical and Outstanding Modern Works. / Primera edición española de partituras de bolsillo de las obras / del repertorio clásico y moderno .<* without production data] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >OCTUOR / Pour Instruments à vent<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to movement title unnumbered >SINFONIA< flush right >Igor STRAWINSKY<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score above and below subtitle flush left centred italic > Edited by Albert Spalding / New York <; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1924 by Edition Russe le** Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.< flush right >Propriété de l'éditeur / DROITS D'EXÉCUTION ET DE REPRO- / DUCTION RÉSERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS<; plate number >B. & H. 16306<; end number p. 53 flush right >H.P. B105.148.<) // (1948)

^ ^ Text in frame.

* Classical editions from >J. S. BACH< to >WEBER< are listed including the titles of their works in three columns under the headline > classical WORKs<, Strawinsky not mentioned; under the headline >MODERN WORKS< the names of contemporary composers are listed without any titles in four columns from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >R. VAUGHAN WILLIAMS<, Strawinsky not mentioned. The following places of printing are listed: London -New York-Sydney-Toronto-Capetown.

** misprint original.

41-5 igor strawinsky / octet / for wind instruments / full score / édition russe de musique · boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Octet / for Wind Instruments / Full Score / revised 1952 version / Édition Russe de Musique (S. et N. Koussewitzky) · Boosey & Hawkes / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Capetown · Buenos Aires · Paris · Bonn // (Full score [library binding] 22.7 x 30.4 (4° [4°]); 40 [40] pages + 4 cover pages dark red on light grey veined [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production data >No. 453<] + 4 pages front matter [title page, empty page, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + duration data [16’] English, empty page] without back matter; title head >OCTET / for Wind Instruments<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 above and next to movement title unnumbered >Sinfonia< flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1923 – New version – 1952<; legal reservations 1st page of the score next to title head flush left >“THIS COPY MAY NOT BE SOLD OR / USED FOR PERFORMANCE OUTSIDE / THE U.S.A. FOR ALL TERRITORY OUT- / SIDE THE U.S.A. APPLICATION MUST BE MADE TO BOOSEY AND HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS Limited, - 295 / REGENT STREET, LONDON, W.1.“< below type area flush left >Copyright 1924 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Revised version Copyright 1952 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. New York.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17231<; end number p. 40 flush right >10. 52 E<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in U.S.A.<) // (1952)

* In French compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations > Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: with London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires<.

41-5Straw

The copy from Stravinsky’s estate is signed right on the front cover page above >igor strawinsky< with >IStravinsky<, with a substantially elongated tail of the letter ‘y’. The copy contains annotations.

41-6 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTET / FOR WIND INSTRUMENTS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 630* // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTET / FOR WIND INSTRUMENTS / Revised 1952 version / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / LONDON · NEW YORK · TORONTO · SYDNEY · CAPE TOWN · PARIS · BONN / NET PRICE / MADE IN ENGLAND // (Pocket score stapled 13.6 x 18.5 (8° [kl. 8° / 4°]); 40 [40] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on grey beige [front cover title with frame 9.4 x 3.7 greybeige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A selection of outstanding modern works / from this famous library of classical and contemporary Miniature Scores .<** production data >No. 582< [#] >6.50] + 4 pages front matter [title page, empty page, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + duration data [16’] English, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >OCTET / for Wind Instruments<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] above and next to movement title unnumbered >Sinfonia< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1923 – New version 1952<; without fictitious editor specified ; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1924 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Revised version Copyright 1952 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York. < flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17231<; end number p. 40 flush right >11·52 L. & B.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England< p. 53 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone Compositions are advertised(Printers) Limited, London<) // (1952)

^ ^ = Text in frame.

* Straw insky’s copy from his estate contains an asterisk entered by hand at this point.

** Compositions are advertised in thre columns without edition numbers from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >R. VAUGHAN WILLIAMS<, by Strawinsky >IGOR STRAWINSKY / Apollon Musagète (Revised 1947) / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Chant du Rossignol / Concerto in D for String Orchestra / Divertimento (Revised 1949) / Mass for Chorus and Wind instr.° / Octet for Wind Instruments° / Œdipus Rex (Revised 1948) / Orpheus / Perséphone (Revised 1947) / Pétrouchka (Revised 1947) / Piano Concerto / Pulcinella Suite (Revised 1949) / Four Studies for Orchestra / The Rite of Spring (Revised 1947) / Symphony of Psalms / Symphonies for°° Wind Instruments° / Three Pieces for String Quartet<. The following places of printing are listed: London-Toronto-New York-Sydney-Capetown-Buenos Aires-Paris-Bonn angegeben [° original spelling; °° original mistake in the title].

41-659 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTET / FOR WIND INSTRUMENTS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 630 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / OCTET / FOR WIND INSTRUMENTS / Revised 1952 version / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / LONDON · PARIS · BONN · CAPE TOWN · SYDNEY · TORONTO · BUENOS AIRES · NEW YORK / NET PRICE / MADE IN ENGLAND // (Pocket score stapled 13.7 x 18.6 (8° [8°]); 40 [40] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on grey beige [front cover title with frame 9.4 x 3.7 grey beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements > HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A selection of outstanding modern works / from this famous library of classical and contemporary Miniature Scores.<* production data >No. 792< [#] >I.56] + 4 pages front matter [title page, empty page, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + duration data [16’] English, empty page] + without back matter; title head >OCTET / for Wind Instruments<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] above and next to movement title unnumbered >Sinfonia< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1923 – New version 1952<; without fictitious editor specified ; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1924 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Revised version Copyright 1952 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York. < flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17231<; end number p. 40 flush right >8·59 L. & B.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England< p. 53 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone Compositions are advertised(Printers) Limited, London<) // (1959)

^ ^ = Text in frame.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns with edition numbers from >Béla Bartók< to >R. Vaughan Williams<, amonst these >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 610 Capriccio ( Revised 1949 edition ) / 611 Apollon Musagète ( Revised 1947 edition ) / 630 Octet for Wind Instruments ( Revised 1952 edition ) / 632 Pulcinella Suite ( Revised 1949 edition ) / 637 Symphony of Psalms / 638 The Rite of Spring ( Revised 1947 edition ) / 639 Pétrouchka ( Revised 1947 edition ) / 640 Orpheus / 651 Œdipus Rex (Revised 1948) / 652 Perséphone / 655 Mass / 666 Cantata / 672 Symphonies of Wind Instruments [#] ( Revised 1947 edition ) / 679 The Fairy’s Kiss / 682 Septet (1953) / 688 In Memoriam Dylan Thomas (1954)<. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Syney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

41-6Straw

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate is below 1st line above frame right with >IStr Dec/52< [slash original] signed and dated and bears below the frame right the annotation >and edition / corrected / in 1952<. The pocket score contains many corrections.

41-7 igor strawinsky / octet / for wind instruments / piano solo / édition russe de musique · boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Octet / for Wind Instruments / Arranged for Piano solo / by / Arthur Lourié / Édition Russe de Musique (S. et N. Koussewitzky) · Boosey & Hawkes / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Capetown · Buenos Aires · Paris · Bonn // (Klavierauszug zweihändig redsewn 23,3 x 30,9 (2° [4°]); 32 [32] pages + 4 cover pages tomato red on grey [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production data >No. 453<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [page with publisher’s >Édition Russse de Musique (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cap Town · Paris · Buenos Aires< advertisements >Serge Prokofieff< production data >No. 454<, page with publisher’s >Édition A. Gutheil (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cap Town · Paris · Buenos Aires< advertisements >Serge Rachmaninoff< production data >No. 461<]; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 in connection with title head centre centred >OCTUOR / Pour INSTRUMENTS à VENT / de / Igor STRAWINSKY<; arranger specified 1st page of the score between title head and movement title flush right centred >Pour PIANO à 2 mains par / Arthur LOURIÉ<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1926 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russicher** Musikverlag) for all countries / Printed by arrangement Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area above flush right plate number >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 17270<; end number p. 32 flush right >12. 52. E<) // (1952)

* In French compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations > Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires<.

41-8St igor strawinsky / octet / for wind instruments / boosey & hawkes // set of parts 22,7 x 30,1 (2° [4°]); 4 cover pages light red on beige [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + enclosed [library binding] set of parts 7 [7] pages Flute without front matter with 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* without production data], 8 [8] pages Clarinet without front matter and without back matter, 8 [8] pages 1. Bassoon without front matter and without back matter, 7 [7] pages 2. Bassoon without front matter with 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* without production data], 7 [6] pages 1. Trumpet with 1 page front matter [title page >OCTET / for Wind Instruments / [#] IGOR STRAWINSKY / Tromba I in La [#] / [#] 1923 – New version 1952<] with 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* without production data], 7 [6] pages 2. Trumpet with 1 page front matter [title page >OCTET / for Wind Instruments / [#] IGOR STRAWINSKY / Tromba II in La [#] / [#] 1923 – New version 1952<] with 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* without production data], 4 [4] pages tenor Trombone without front matter and without back matter, 4 [4] pages bass Trombone without front matter and without back matter; title head >OCTET / for Wind Instruments<; author specified 1st page of the score Flute, Clarinet, Bassoon I, Bassoon II, tenor Trombone, bass Trombone paginated p. 1 (Trumpet I and TrumpetII p. 2) above movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1923 – New version 1952<; names of the instruments each above movement title flush left 1st page of the score p. 1 >Flauto< >Clarinetto in Sb< >Fagotto I< >Fagotto II< >Trombone I Tenore< >Trombone I Basso< p. 2 >Tromba I in Do< >Tromba II; legal reservations 1st page of the score above, next to und below title head flush left geblockt >“THIS COPY MAY NOT BE SOLD OR / USED FOR PERFORMANCE OUTSIDE / THE U.S.A. FOR ALL TERRITORY OUT- / SIDE THE U.S.A. APPLICATION MUST BE MADE TO BOOSEY AND HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS Limited, - 295 / REGENT STREET, LONDON, W.1.“< below type area flush left >Copyright 1924 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Revised version Copyright 1952 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17272<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in U.S.A.<; without end marks) // ()

41-9 Alb [Reprint in:] И. СТРАВИНСКИЙ / I. STRAVINSKY / КАМЕРНЫЕ / АНСАМБЛИ / CHAMBER / ENSEMBLES / ПАРТИТУРА / SCORE / [vignette] / МУЗЫКА ·MUSIC / МОСКВА · 1971 · MOSCOW // И. СТРАВИНСКИЙ / I. STRAVINSKY / КАМЕРНЫЕ / АНСАМБЛИ / CHAMBER / ENSEMBLES / ПАРТИТУРА / SCORE / ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО „МУЗЫКА“ / STATE PUBLISHERS "MUSIC" / Москва [#] 1971 [#] Moscow // (Pocket score-collected volume [library binding] [Octet + Dumbarton Oaks] 12.8 x 20.3 [8° [8°]]; 94 [91] pages + 4 cover pages black on grey-white [decorative front cover title with a curved black frame and a miniature lyre centrally formatted and in the middle at the head of the page + vignette 0.9 x 1 initiale >M< in treble clef, 3 empty pages] + 3 pages front matter [title page, introductory Russian anonym without headline, introductory English anonym without headline] + 2 pages back matter [summary Russian-English partly in italics >СОДЕРЖАНИЕ / CONTENTS <, imprint >Индекс 9–6–I< with billing of names >Редактор А. Мынов / Техн. редактор Т. Лапшина / Корректор А. Барискин< and itemized statements of format and origin]; reprint p. 4-43; title head Russian-English >ОКТЕТ [#] OCTET / (1923, 1952) / для духовых инструментов [#] for Wind Instruments<; movement numbers in Roman numerals (without dot) p. 4 (>I Sinfonia<), p. 16 (>II Tema con Variazioni<), p. 35 (>III Finale<); author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 4 between title head and movement title flush right centred >И. СТРАВИНСКИЙ / I. STRAVINSKY<; duration data p. 43 below type area flush right as end mark >Durata: 16 minuti< Italian; without legal reservation; plate number >6385<) // 1971


K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer.
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
https://kcatalog.org and https://kcatalog.net

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