K011 Two Songs (Poetry of Paul Verlaine)

deutsch K011 Verlaine-Lieder

K11

Душу сковали …, Где в лунном свете … для голоса с фортепиано. Слова П. Верлена — Deux Poèmes [Deux Mélodies] de Paul Verlaine, Op. 9 — Two Poems [Songs] by Paul Verlaine, Op. 9 — Zwei Gedichte von Paul Verlaine, für eine Singstimme (Bariton) und Klavier, Op. 9 – Due poesie di Paul Verlaine per voce e pianoforte, op. 9

Title: There is no historically authentic title for the original piano version of the Verlaine Lieder because the first print-run, as is also the case with the Gorodetzky Lieder, was carried out as single prints in two split numbers, but exclusively under the Russian (Jurgenson) and French (Jurgenson-Forberg) openings to the poem. The title Deux Poèmes de Paul Verlaine or Deux Mélodies was translated; in German it has the title Verlaine-Lieder. In the first printing of the orchestral edition of 1953, both songs were grouped together under the English title ‘Two Songs’ in reverse order, but both the poems had the French title of the series of poems from which they were taken. This title refers back to a letter from Strawinsky to Erwin Stein from 1st December 1952, in which he writes that the two songs must in fact (in order to answer a query in the publication) have an overall title and he said that it should be ‘Two Songs (Poetry of Paul Verlaine), Orchestral Version 1951’. From this original, the publishers took only the first two words for the printed edition. The title ‘Deux Poèmes’ appears to have been discarded in the literature perhaps in an appeal to Strawinsky regarding the analogous situation with the Balmont-Lieder (Deux Poèsies) and the Gorodetzky-Lieder (Deux Mélodies). The titles ‘Deux Mélodies’ and ‘Deux Poèmes’ stand next to each other nowadays, although there is no justification for either of these titles in the print history. The order of the songs comes from the original Opus numbers.

Opus Numbering: The Verlaine songs were Strawinsky’s final composition with an opus number. He had started the numbering with the Symphony in E flat major as Opus 1. Fawn and Shepherdess , although it had been finished before the Symphony, followed as Opus 2. Scherzo fantastique and Feu d’artifice received the numbers 3 and 4, and the Funeral Song, which was lost for a time, the number 5. The Gorodetzky songs, composed before the two Scherzi, was published as Opus 6, and the Piano Etudes as Opus 7. Opus number 8 was never assigned. It can be presumed that this is because Strawinsky wanted to keep it free for a composition that he was working on at the time. Regardless of what the situation may have been, it is a matter of some dispute. Serious experts believe the work to have been Le Rossignol . If one reviews which official compositions were completed before the Verlaine songs and have no Opus number, then this gives us the Pastorale and Firebird , and both of them, mysteriously, were published without Opus number in 1910, so before the publication of the Verlaine songs. There is no logic in the numbering if one considers that the Funeral Song , which remained unknown during Strawinsky’s lifetime, received an Opus number.

Scored for: a) First editions (Original version): Baritone, Piano – (Orchestrated version Nomenclature): Flauto I. II, Clarinetti I. II in Si b, Corni I. II in Fa, Canto, Violini I, Violini II, Viole, Violoncelli, Contrabassi [Flutes I und II, Clarinets I and II in B, Horns I and II in F, Gesang, First Violins, Second Violins, Violas, Violoncellos, Double basses]; b) Performance requirements: = Baritone, 2 Flutes, 2 Clarinets in B, 2 Horns in F, First Violins*, Second Violins*, Violas, Violoncellos, Double basses.

* Divided in three.

Source: The two Lieder are taken from different sets of poems by Paul Verlaine, whose verses were greatly esteemed by contemporary composers and were often set to music. La Lune Blanche is the sixth poem of the collection, La Bonne Chanson(The Simple Song) of 1869/70, and Un Grand Sommeil Noiris the third song of the collection Sagesse (Wisdom), which appeared on 1881 and is regarded nowadays i n the opinion of the Romance scholars as one of the highpoints of Catholic-inspired lyric poetry. Both poems are detached from the others in their own ways, which Strawinsky obviously noticed and exploited programmatically. The collection La Bonne Chansonoriginally consisted of 21 poems, which all come from the one-year engagement period of the twenty-five-year-old Verlaine (born Metz 30/3/1844) with the sixteen-year-old Matilde Mauté, and concern themselves thematically with the feelings, emotions and thoughts of an excited and hopeful engaged man. – La Lune Blanchewas written in August 1869 in Lecluse and contains in its songlike character, its musicality, its symbolic emotional journey and depiction of nature a meaningful contrast to the rhetorical style of the other poems in this collection. Verlaine describes a scene from nature in short four-syllable verses in a developing form without repetition with a rhyme scheme A-B-A-B-C-C for all three verses and a significant line-scheme of 5 + 1.He uses simple words without stylistic adornment and without any more than alluding to the Beloved. – Un Grand Sommeil Noircomes from a completely different world of pessimism and resignation. In 1873, Verlaine was condemned to twelve years in prison in the Walloon provincial city of Mons, because he injured his friend, Arthur Rimbaud, with two pistol shots in a private conflict. In prison, he converted to Catholicism and wrote the largest part of the poems of Sagesse. The verses selected by Strawinsky show the poet, who had not recovered from the events and died at the age of 52 in 1896, tortured by life, and later alcohol problems. Un grand sommeil noir is a testament to the waste of hope and joie de vivre, to the inability to differentiate between good and evil any longer, for the great, black sleep, described in the first line, which surrounds his existence and brings it to silence. When the poetry collection was published in 1881, Rimbaud was still alive (he died in 1891); he had created his greatest poetic achievements before the age of 20, then discontinued poetic production after the quarrel with Verlaine and occupied himself with a more adventurous life grounded in reality, ending up as an arms dealer for Abyssinians.

Translations: Even the first editions by Jurgenson appeared in four languages (French, Russian, German and English). The German and English translations were produced by M.-D. Calvocoressi and the Russian translation was by Strawinsky’s friend, Stepan Mitussow.

Construction: The two songs are not numbered in the first printing of the Piano-Baritone edition, the song La Bonne Chanson follows Sagesse, but for the orchestral songs, Strawinsky reversed the order.

Structure

a) Original

[1.]

[Sagesse]

[Мудрость]

[Weisheit]

Weisheit

Un grand sommeil noir Tombe sur ma vie: . . .

Душу сковали мрачные сны . . .

Sleep and black shadow weigh on my conscience . . .

Ein düstrer Schlummer umhüllt mein Leben . . .

Largo assai (14 bars)

[2.]

[La Bonne Chanson]

[Добрая песенка]

[Ein schlichtes Lied]

La lune blanche Luit dans le boit; . . .

Где в лунном свете стоят леса . . .

A moonlight pallid Gleams through the woods . . .

Glimmernder Mondschein leuchtet im Wald . . .

Tranquillo assai (20 bars)

b) Orchestrated version

[1.] La Bonne Chanson

La lune blanche Luit dans le boit . . .

Quaver = 86-84 (20 bars = figure 5A up to the end of figure B 4)

[2.] Sagesse

Un grand sommeil noir Tombe sur ma vie . . .

Crotchet = 50 (14 bars = figure 4A up to the end of figure B 5)

Corrections / Errata

Un grand sommeil 11-3

1.) p. 3, bar 2 [bar 9] (red)) voice: In the score under a triplet bracket, there are three self-standing quavers barred upwards with the first quaver barred downwards as a crotchet and a slur mark upwards to the second quaver triplet. In the English text, this group of triplet quavers is written as 2 + 1, but not in the German text. This is how the difference between the rhythms of the English and German texts is handled (change of the declamation).

La lune blanche 11-4*

(with pencil)

2.) p. 3, bar 7 [bar 7], Piano treble: 2. chord of the 2. quaver ligature g1-e b2-g2 instead of g1-e b2- g b2; the natural before g b2 in the 4. chord has to be removed.

3.) p. 4, bar 1 [bar 8], Piano bass: the last three-note chord minim e b-g b-b binstead minim of e-g b-b b.

4.) p. 4, bar 2 [bar 9], Piano treble: 1. chord (bass clef) d-f instead of d-a b.

5.) p. 4, bar 3 [bar 10], Piano treble: the 2. note f2 in the four-note chord has to be removed, the same applies to the lower note d b1 in the 3rd chord, the same applies to the f1 in the 1st four- note chord Piano bass written in treble clef.

6.) p. 4, bar 4 [bar 11], Piano bass: the flat in the 1st two-note chord has to be removed.

7.) p. 5, bar 6 [bar 19], Piano treble: 1st chord two-note chord e1-b b1 instead of three-note chord 1-b b1-e2, 2nd chord three-note chord b b1-e b2-b b2 instead of three-note chord b b1-e2-b b2 [correction in red].

* Vocal part without corrections.

Style: As with the introduction to the opera Le Rossignol, the two songs owe much to Debussy and Ravel, especially in the accompaniment, and are infused with a slow melodic and chordal flow, a lack of contrast, and the use of whole-tone scales, polytonal deviations, parallel chords and other typical stylistic hallmarks of the French music of the time. The intended array of colours is too much for a single keyboard instrument. The originally intended orchestration, which Strawinsky never abandoned throughout the years, has its own stylistic justification. Against that is the sung line, which is spartan and sparse and does not employ whole-tone or polytonal elements.

La lune blanche

La lune blanche is a miniature, clearly modelled on the Verlaine text, consisting of constant six-crotchet length bars with an atmospheric peace. The first three bars make up the orchestral introduction, bar 20 is the coda. Bars 4 until the first half of bar 8 set the first verse, bars 10-13 the second verse, and bars 15-19 the third verse. From the second half of bar 8 and bar 9 is the first small interlude, and bar 14 is the second interlude. The word-setting is almost exclusively syllabic. The sung melody, in the range of the octave e flat – e flat1, is almost entirely in stepwise motion, so that the only leap of a fifth in bar 13 is the exception. The metrical arrangement of bar lengths in the work is of a formal nature, as Strawinsky practically abolishes metrical stresses. All the rhythmical groupings are soft and flowing, so that the line between the instruments seems to float freely. The derivation of rhythmic motifs from speech and the technique of setting metrically predetermined accents on unaccented syllables are used as a stylistic process. The motific construction of the sung line is basically different from that of the Gorodetsky-Lieder. Aside from the first four song-bars, the melodic and rhythmic formulae do not match up with the number of syllables or rhyme schemes of the texts, and there is no repetition or transposition. Strawinsky works much more with the method of rhythmic variation of form, which takes different forms from bar to bar and is yet another method that Strawinsky uses to create the impression of ‘floating’. In this way, the word-setting comes out of the flow of the music with a sense of superior importance beyond all the programmatic elements to the true image of the text, which itself plays with the poetical device of development which is never static. Strawinsky however does not abandon the use of small, implied elements of speech and motif: the whispering through the roof of greenery in bar 7, the reasonably long note-values of a minim tied to a quaver in the ‘vast’ (expanded) bar 15, the narrow glissando ascending from b to f on ‘Semble’ in bar 17, the ascending chromatic movement which stands as a gestural reference to the iridescent star in bar 18, which is synchronised with the deciding hour, and other similar figures which are come into consideration, without overplaying the emotional consonance with Verlaine’s poem. The individual verses are arranged by Strawinsky according to their content and meaning, and interpreted orchestrally. He develops new instrumental groups leading over from one in to the other in each bar. The poem is also so brief, that the length of the rhythmic and orchestral development, without any repeats, makes its own cosmos out of the miniature. The short introduction (bars 1-3) is built on the basis of the held horn octaves like an antiphon from the strings to the brass and then back to the strings. The white moon, which shines through the bushes (bars 4-5), receives an embracing accompaniment from the flutes and strings in all three registers: high, middle and low; the susurration, which presses through the roof of greenery (bars 6-7), carries the constant quaver-movement, which up to this point has only been in the upper strings, into the flutes, where the violas and double-basses provide a counterbalance with syncopations; in the sixth line of the verse with the final call (the first half of bar 8), the clarinets enter for the first time, Strawinsky has the other instruments fall silent and the double-basses carry a countermelody to the first clarinet, which gives transparency to the moment and is simultaneously antithetical to what has gone before, without damaging the equilibrium of the whole. The first interlude (second half of bar 8-bar 9) is in the brass and lower strings only. The same is true for the setting of the first and second lines of the second verse (bar 10), this time however without the double basses. For the rest of the second verse (bars 11-13), Strawinsky uses strings and horns as the predominant tone-colour, with the clarinets in the low register. For the second interlude (bar 14), the strings argue with their widespread quaver movement, to which the brass respond antiphonally in bar 15. When the text speaks of the peace which comes down from heaven, Strawinsky writes in contrary motion between the brass and the strings. In the orchestra, which plays tutti up to the moment where the double-basses fall silent, the bright flutes and the violins, which are only at this point divided into three parts, create a chordal descending movement, which the clarinets, the second horn and the ‘celli and violas confront with an upwards movement (bar 16). Strawinsky’s meaning is unequivocal. Heaven sends peace, and mankind on the Earth receive it with open arms. All the registers are involved. The violas play tremolando with joy for this event and become, like the baritone melody, a symbol of the twinkling of the stars (bars 17-18). It is a special hour, announces the poet, and Strawinsky sets the baritone voice over a light violin and viola accompaniment so that the announcement cannot be missed (bar 19). The ending is a play-out consisting of three brass chords, sounding as if in the spheres (bar 20).

Un grand sommeil

Un grand sommeil is also in three verses, but strongly symmetrical. With its 14 bars it is objectively shorter, but with its somewhat quicker Tempo it is also subjectively shorter. The movement is also flowing, the mood mystical, the word-setting syllabic and the dynamic level stays inside piano. The metrical structure is not obscured in any way. There is no repetition of motives, rather motific correspondences with small additional rhythmic changes, a technique which Strawinsky had already mastered in The Faun and the Shepherdess and the Gorodetsky-Lieder. In response to the text, he constructs a three-part form consisting of an orchestral introduction (bars 1-2), the setting of the first verse (bars 3-6), the second verse (bars 7-9) and the third verse (bars 10-13) and a resonating final chord (bar 14), but there is however no coda, rather an instrumental ending to the third verse. There are also no interludes. The love poem offers space for reflection and justifies the instrumental sections which swing in and out. The distressed poem, with its three verses and three levels of development rolling downward into silence, strives against contemplative reflection. Although the range of the sung line, including all the sung notes, stretches from E flat to D flat1, it scarcely moves out of the region of the diminished fifth, F-C flat 1. The melody-line is in quite small steps and only uses nine notes of the eleven possible from the above range; A flat and C1 are not used. Since the song portrays through its textual ambiguity of the end of certainty and knowledge and the aimlessness of the person, Strawinsky, unlike the previous song, abandons tonal stability and clarity, and leaves the music floating between B-flat major and B-flat minor. The nine notes which are used can be interpreted as a phrygian model with chromatic dislocation. Notes are often repeated, and large leaps only occur when indicated by the text in bars 6 and 9. The baritone voice, with only one exception at the end of bar 7, moves only in crotchets, quavers and triplet quavers and, unlike the first song, does not work against the metrical structure. Sometimes, the voice comes together in unison with the accompaniment. The rhythm is constructed on a basic pattern of crotchet-quaver-quaver-crotchet-crotchet and therefore retrogradeable; Strawinsky gives it to the horns in the first bar and uses it in five further permutations. This rhythmic model in turn is derived from the first line of the poem, which is also the title for the work. The function of the introduction is to build anticipation for two bars, at which point Strawinsky combines the melodies as he is wont to do, and even begins a small piece of imitation, while the baritone entry in the third bar of the song repeats the same rhythmic model that is played twice by the horns previously. This model once again is derived from the first line of the poem, which also becomes the title of the piece. In the orchestral version, the orchestra is used substantially more sparingly in comparison with the other song. In doing this, Strawinsky conveys something of the underlying message of the text. The openness of the feeling of love, which includes everything in the world in its own hope, stands in opposition to the spiritual impoverishment of those who only experience the world as a black caricature and know no other solution than the final, great sleep, whatever that may mean. Strawinsky responds to this by using sparse instrumentation, a sparing, constricted melodic line, a rhythm which turns on itself over a stiff basic rhythmic pattern, an ambiguous set of tonal relationships and a rigidity of form, which seems to be in opposition to Verlaine’s love-song. All of these techniques give as deeply meaningful an answer to the body of the text as a motific interpretation of a traditional manner could ever do, without ever needing to resort to literally defining the motives themselves. After the introduction (bars 1-2) in the low clarinets, horns and pizzicato lower strings including violas, the clarinets take over the main motif in the middle register, and the horns enter in imitation with the upper strings, who take up the main motif over a violoncello bass (bars 3-4). The self-accompanying, conspicuous sounds of the brass and lower string section (bars 5-6) in the middle and low register are used for the verses which discuss Sleep, Forgetting and Peace. As soon as the text in lines 5-7 talks of the fact that the poet can no longer see or know what is good and what is bad, Strawinsky suggests uncertainty, nervousness and fear; these display in this avowal feelings which occupies one’s whole being, his whole world, his whole thoughts and doings. At this point (bars 7-8), the composer uses grand polyphonic, rhythmic and, in the orchestral version, instrumental density. Only in these two bars does the rhythm change into chains of triplets. The poet’s distress displays insecurity, and both of these display his sadness. The text speaks of a ‘triste histoire’. In Strawinsky’s orchestral version, the music comes to a standstill (bar 9). The clarinets enter with a static two-note chord, the strings are silent and in the close harmonic density, the baritone voice is more exposed than at any other point so that the text is consciously audible. The ‘triste histoire’ is recited monotonously over B-flat major and B-flat minor, virtually resigning with four quavers onto the note e. The poet then compares himself to a cradle, which in the end meaninglessly moves back and forth constantly. The flutes, supported by the strings, play a rhythm like this rocking for two bars, in the manner of a cradle-song (bars 10-11). The bright strings are now silent, when everything is concerned with darkness (bar 12); the brass accompany the baritone with rhythmically unchanged stiff crotchets, and the singer announces his final life’s knowledge of the darkness like a fanfare, with calls based on a third, and the bright strings announce themselves out of the double silence (bar 13). The rest (bar 14) is in fact silence, but the musician can additionally interpret this poetic silence in different ways. The instrumental silence resembles a dying-away rather than a cessation. Shortly after the middle of bar 12, the first flute stops playing, as does the second horn at the end of the bar. The second flute extends into bar 13 by a quaver. Then even that is silent. The baritone stops a quaver before end of bar 13, and the first violin at the end of the bar. Both clarinets stop after the first crotchet beat of the final bar; then follow the first horn and viola after the second crotchet beat, and finally the second violins after the third crochet beat. With held semibreves the lower parts, ‘celli and double-basses, continue alone and in addition, they gain fermatas in order that they might point beyond themselves in time. The end of the music is like the end of Paul Verlaine’s poem; it reflects the feeling of being swallowed up by eternal darkness.

Treatment of the language: One of Strawinsky’s greatest personal experiences was his discovery that his mother tongue, Russian, receives different accents when sung and when spoken. The matter of transferring this effect to different languages for which that is not the case was not of concern to Strawinsky, but it caused huge reaction with the native speakers of these languages, especially the French. The French situation was first inflamed to greater proportions after the première of Perséphone. His contemporaries felt that the two songs were not weighty enough to make them the centrepoint of this conflict, so the Strawinsky literature mostly passes over these songs or only mention a few inconsequential details. The short Verlaine-Lieder however demonstrate Strawinsky’s basic technique of word-setting and often prompt academics to feel that the Verlaine-Lieder work more successfully in Mitussov’s Russian translation, rather than the original language.

Dedication: A mon frère Goury [To my brother Gury] – [Моему брату Гурию Стравинскому]. The publishing houses Jurgenson, Forberg and Boosey & Hawkes only give the French dedication, not the Russian; the Russian dedication has been taken from the reprint of 1968.

Duration: about 3' 40" and 1' 35".

Date of origin: a) Original: La Baule August [July] 1910; b) Orchestrated version: (after preparatory work in La Baule in Summer 1910 and 1914) restarted in Hollywood 1951, completed in spring [Autumn] 1952.

First performance: Probably on 13th January 1911 by G. Bosse* in St. Petersburg.

* According to Goubault.

Remarks: After the end of the follow-up performances of The Firebird in 1910, Strawinsky went to the sea and there found time to compose the two Verlaine-Lieder. At the end of August, he returned to Switzerland with his family. It can be assumed that he set the work for baritone because he had his younger brother Gury in mind, to whom the work is also dedicated. Gury Strawinsky was a singer, like his father, and was a baritone. He died of typhoid in 1917 at the age of 33, and was unable to sing the songs, which were first available in 1911. In the Fifties, Strawinsky had a shortage of his own works for chamber-music concerts which he was conducting. He therefore orchestrated a whole sequence of his earlier works, which were suited to and had been intended for that purpose. The Verlaine-Lieder, belonged to this sequence and was orchestrated at the same time as the Concertino. Craft assumes that the choice of brass instruments looks back to the instrumentation of the Octet and the Mass, and speaks of ten brass instruments. If one compares the brass forces of the Verlaine-Lieder, the Concertino, the Octet and the Mass, it is not possible to accumulate a definite chamber orchestra, rather a full symphony orchestra with double or triple woodwind and brass, but without tuba, harp and percussion, and in which the second flute, the second clarinet, the two horns and the three-part division of the violins is only required for the Verlaine-Lieder. From the dates of his letters to Roth (March 10th, 1952) and Stein (December 1st, 1952), we can conclude that the work was ready for printing in the autumn; Strawinsky however caused the matter of the publication to break down completely. The conversion of the pencil original into the fair copy of the score must have been carried out under great time pressure, as he missed out six bars of one of the songs, the lack of which was noticed by the attentive Erwin Stein. Strawinsky thanked him in a letter of 1st November, and admonished himself for his carelessness and on 4th November, he sent the missing 6 bars, not without pointing out that he had made alterations to the sung line. The final completion of the orchestral version of the work must therefore be this date. Strawinsky himself did not seem to be very happy with his orchestration of the Verlaine-Lieder. He declared that one day he wanted rewrite the songs, but for the moment, he had no time for it.

Significance: The Verlaine-Lieder were Strawinsky’s last compositions with opus numbers (‘Op. 9’), which he began with the E-flat-major Symphony , and he never allocated an Opus number 8. Furthermore, he was setting French texts for the first time. Their order, in the 1910 version as well as in the altered 1952 version, displays a programme that allows us to cast biographical inferences on his individual historical situation.

Situationsgeschichte: The Russian avant-garde, which together with the rather moderate intellectual circles following Rimsky-Korsakov had taken a significant part in the Russian Revolution, and thus, intentionally or unintentionally, opened up the way for Lenin and Stalin, but in the years running up to the Dreyfus affair, they encountered in France a related mood of scepticism, noble irony, hostility towards the church, shaming of citizens, art-as-religion, moralistic polemic and a lack of community, all of which was classified under the term “culte du moi”. Now it was one thing to demonstrate against the church, bourgeoisie and state and to relegate them to ridicule – but another thing to answer the question as to how life and the world should be understood when church, religion, morality and bourgeoisie had been dismantled. In Russia, millions of people paid for this with their lives and their human happiness. Strawinsky lost his home, property and fortune. In 1907, Strawinsky, probably under the patriarchal pressure of the atheist Rimsky-Korsakov and his circle, had left the Russian-Orthodox Church but without being able to forget his fundamental religious attitude, which his very pious wife, Yekaterina, certainly kept alive, so that for Strawinsky, being distanced from the church did not also mean being distanced from faith.In the time until his return to being a practising Christian at the beginning of the 1920’s, Strawinsky’s compositions display a quasi-religious theme. He found himself in 1910 on the eve of events which showed him the downside of having an aristocratic line of ancestors, and at the same time, in Verlaine’s mood of 1869 and 1881, being joyfully hopeful in having been married young and being at the beginning of a promising career, yet already worrying that the way might be false and end in an impasse. Otherwise, it cannot be explained why Strawinsky, especially given the several dozens of poems to choose from, sought out these two which suited his situation so well, and also gave the composition its own Opus number*. The fact that he also only orchestrated the second poem at the time of the weakening of his feeling for love poetry and as his distressing situation intensified for the first time in the run-up to 1914. As regards the programmatic element of his choice, he may have been intellectually in the clear at that time, like in 1953. When he had to think through the textual issues anew for the orchestral version, he came to the programmatically different conclusion of making the first song (Sagesse) the second. Both versions are appropriate for his personal and the wider situation at the respective times when they were created i.e. before the First and after the Second World War. The Opus number is therefore dispensed with, and with it the numbering, but the songs, as the rehearsal letters show, are regarded as individual works. The original conflict of happiness in love and intellectual suffering, which Strawinsky ended in Russia by the triumph of his love, he now allowed to continue in America during a period of insoluble irreconcilability: Love does not triumph, but is rather crushed by the conflict. The explanation, if it can be explained at all, can not come from earthly matters. A very short time later, Strawinsky began the development of a new old-fashioned style of serial composition, beginning with the Septet , and with it the turn towards exclusively religiously motivated works.

* Unless he has used an anthology.

Versions: The >Verlaine-Lieder >were published in 1911 by Jurgenson in Moscow in its own edition and without a main title, rather with the opening line of the poem, ‘Un grand sommeil noir’ as opus 9, Nr. 1 and ‘La lune blanche’ as Op. 9, Nr. 2. Forberg dealt with the situation in the same way, and the rights had been written over to him/them by Jurgenson. Over thirty years later, when the works were obtained by Boosey & Hawkes, the order was reversed. The possibility can be ruled out that the older numbering could have been a publishing error. Stravinsky did not make any indicative corrections in his copy and did not issue reprints with the original numbering until the Boosey edition after 1945. Strawinsky gave up the Opus numbers and gave both songs the main title, ‘Two Songs’, in the new edition of the orchestral version of 1953 as well as in the piano version of 1954. The order of the languages is also inconsistent: Strawinsky set the French text, not the Russian text which Mitussov had translated from Verlaine’s original. The Moscow Jurgenson edition is in two separate versions. It consists of the baritone-piano version with Russian and French text and a page with it, which does not set the English and German text together under the sung line, but gives the English text in upper part and the German text in the lower part. This is the case for each of the two songs designated Op.9, Nr. 1 & 2. The Leipzig Forberg edition of 1922, a simple and unembellished edition, which incidentally overtook the Jurgenson edition, deals with this problem differently. It sets the main part in Russian and French and puts the English and German underneath the voice part. This edition was published by 22nd August 1922 at the latest. The London orchestral edition by Boosey & Hawkes of 1953 only uses the original French text and omits all other translations, also keeping both songs together. It does not split them into their own publications, as is the case for the Boosey & Hawkes piano edition of 1954, which omits the Russian text, but keeps Calvocoressi’s English and German translations. The Russian edition of 1968 reverts to the Russian-French combination. Strawinsky began with the ‘part-orchestration’ by his own declaration in 1910 in La Baule. The expression ‘partly orchestrated’ is in the documentation of his estate so that he did not work on both pieces, rather only on one. The report makes the suggestion that work on the piece had dragged on too long; for the retrieved orchestration of the original first song (second in the orchestral version) from Sagesse bears the date Salvan 27th July 1914. This version was not published during Strawinsky’s lifetime. At least the American arrangement for bassoon and piano by the New York edition, Musicus, can be verified, and which, as usual, came from Quinto Maganini.

Orchestrated version: The most important programmatic difference between the original piano edition and the later orchestration is the reversal of the order of the songs. The Moscow edition gives Sagesse as Op.9/1, La Bonne Chanson as Op.9/2. In the orchestral edition, which brings the two songs together, he reverses the order of the pieces.

Historical recording: Hollywood 26th September 1966* (La lune blanche) and 11th December 1964 (Un grand sommeil) with Donald Gramm (Baritone) and the Columbia Symphony Orchestra under the dicetion of Igor Strawinsky.

* According to CD-Edition. An error has occurred here. For that day Goubauld doesn’t name any vinyl recordings, but for the period between the 11th and the 14th December 1964 including the Verlaine-Lieder . Probably the recording also took place on 11th December 1964.

CD-Edition: VIII-2/4-5 (Sung text French).

Autographs: The autographs of the piano versions are presumed missing. The scores of the orchestrated versions 1910 (Sagesse) and 1951/52 and sketches are in the Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel.

Copyright: 1953 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York (Orchestrated version).

Editions

a) Overview

11-1 1911 Душу сковали Voice-Piano; R-F + E-G; Jurgenson Moskau; 3 pp.; 34547.

11-1St 1911; E-G; Jurgenson Moskau; 1. p.; 34547.

11-2 1911 Где в лунном свете Voice-Piano; R-F + E-G; Jurgenson Moskau; 5 pp.; 34548.

11-2St 1911; E-G; Jurgenson Moskau; 1. p.; 34548.

11-3 1922 Un grand sommeil Voice-Piano; R-F + E-G; Forberg Leipzig; 3 pp.; 34547.

    11-3Straw ibd. [with annotations].

11-4 1922 La lune blanche Voice-Piano; R-F + E-G; Forberg Leipzig; 5 pp.; 34548.

    11-4Straw ibd. [with corrections].

11-5 1942 Pallid Moonlight Bassoon-Piano (Maganini); Edition Musicus New York; [unidentified].

11-6 1942 Pallid Moonlight Trombone-Piano (Maganini); Edition Musicus New York; 5 pp.; 454.

11-7 1953 Two Songs FuSc; F; Boosey & Hawkes London; 7 pp.; B. & H. 17276.

11-7[71] [1971] ibd.

11-8 1954 La lune blanche Voice-Piano; F-E-G; Boosey & Hawkes 1954; 4 pp.; 17408.

11-9 1954 Un grand sommeil Voice-Piano; F-E-G; Boosey & Hawkes 1954; 4 pp.; 17409.

11-10 1955 La lune blanche Voice-Piano [U.S. Edition]; F-E-G; Boosey & Hawkes; 4 pp.; 17408.

11-11 1955 Un grand sommeil Voice-Piano [U.S. Edition]; F-E-G; Boosey & Hawkes; 4 pp.; 17409.

11-12Alb 1968 Voice-Piano; R-F; Musika Moskau; 5 pp.; 5823.

b) Characteristic features

11-1 Un grand Sommeil noir* / Paul Verlaine / Textes: Française** [#] Igor Strawinsky.* / Russe** / Anglais / Allemand // (Edition as loose double sheet in the cover 27 x 34.5 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French + English-German; 4 [2] pages + enclosed page with voice part English + German + 1 page front matter [titles page tomato red on creme white] + 1 page back matter [page with legal reservation after publisher’s emblem spanning four lines at the bottom flush left >Propriété de l'éditeur / P. Jurgenson* / Moscou - Leipzig / Prix -60 k.< flush right >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten<]; dedication 1st page of the score >A mon frère Goury Strawinsky<; authors specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 3] below title centre centred >English words by M. D. Calvocoressi / Deutsche Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocoressi Un grand sommeil noir / (SAGESSE) flush left >Texte russe de / S. Mitoussoff.< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / Op. 9, No 1.<; legal reservation without Copyright 1st page of the score above type area flush left >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten< below type area flush left >Propriété de l'éditeur< >Собственнсть издателя [#] П. Юргенсона въ Москвђ< ; plate number >34547<; production indication p. 4 as end mark [#***] юргенсона иъ МОСКВЂ. <) // (1911)

* Printed in red.

** In a line with the name >Igor Strawinsky< printed with a substantially larger point size.

*** Vignette.

11-1St page of the score paginated p. 1; centre >Sleep and black shadow . . . .< / flush left underlined >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten.< / flush right >(English words by M. D. Calvocoressi)< / [4 staffs English] / >Ein düsterer Schlummer . . . .< / flush right >(Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocoressi)< / [4 staffs German] / flush left-centre-flush right >Propriété de l’éditeur< [#] >34547< [#] >P. Jurgenson à Moscou.<

11-2 La lune blanche* / Paul Verlaine / Textes: Français** [#] Igor Strawinsky.* / Russe** / Anglais / Allemand*** // (Edition 27 x 34.5 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French + English-German; 5 [3] pages + enclosed page voice part English-German + 2 pages front matter [title page red on white, empty page] + 3 pages back matter [voice part English + German****, page mit legal reservation after publisher’s emblem spanning four lines at the bottom flush left >Propriété de l'éditeur / P. Jurgenson* / Moscou - Leipzig / Prix -60 k.< flush right >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten<]; dedication 1st page of the score >A mon frère Goury Strawinsky<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 3] below title centre centred >English words by M. D. Calvocoressi / Deutsche Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocoressi Un grand sommeil noir / (SAGESSE) flush left >Texte russe de / S. Mitoussoff.< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / Op. 9, No 2.<; legal reservation without Copyright 1st page of the score above type area flush left >Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten< below type area flush left >Propriété de l'éditeur< >Собственнсть издателя [#] П. Юргенсона въ Москвђ< ; plate number >34548<; production indication S. 4 as end mark [#***] юргенсона иъ МОСКВЂ.< ) // (1911)

* Printed in red.

** In a line with the name >Igor Strawinsky< printed with a substantially larger point size.

*** The London copy >H.786.d.(9.)< contains a stamp >2/-Net CASH<.

**** In the London copy of the Hirsch collection, the voice part is bound in after the title page.

11-3 Un grand sommeil noir . . . . / Paul Verlaine/ Textes: Français* [#] Igor Strawinsky. / Russe* / Anglais / Allemand / P. JURGENSON [#] Rob. FORBERG / MOSCOU [#] LEIPZIG / Neglinny pr. 14. [#] Talstr. 19. // (Edition piano and voice unbound 27 x 35 (2° [4° / gr. 4°]); sung text Russian-French + English-German; 3 [2] pages + 1 page front matter [title page black on cream] + 1 page back matter [empty page] + 1 page enclosed voise part English + German [1 page empty page]; song title >Un grand sommeil noir. . . . / (SAGESSE)< as title head [voice part: >Sleep and black shadow. . . .<** >Ein düsterer Schlummer. . . .<**]; dedication above title head centre italic > A mon frère Goury Strawinsky<; author specified [exclusively score] 1st page of the score without pagination [p. 2] below title head flush left centred >Texte russe de / S. MITOUSSOFF.< flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / Op. 9, № 1.<; legal reservation without Copyright next to main title [part: between English song title and translator specified] flush left underlined > Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten.< 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Собственнсть издателя [#] П. Юргенсона въ Москвђ< voice below type area flush left >Propriété de l'éditeur< flush right >P. Jurgenson à Leipsic et Moscou.<; translator specified below English song title >(English words by M. D. Calvocoressi)< below German song title >(Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocoressi)<; plate number >34547<; end of score dated [exclusively score] p. 3 >La Baule 1910.<; without production indication; without end mark) // (1922)

* In a line with the name >Igor Strawinsky< printed with a substantially larger point size.

** The English and German sung texts are separated on half pages and have their own separate main titles and translator acknowledgements.

11-3Straw

Strawinsky’s copy of his estate is nor signed neither dated. It contains a correction. At the bottom of the title page right are located two stamp marks >1 F 25< / >Majoration temporaire / 150 %<.

11-4 La lune blanche. . . . / Paul Verlaine/ Textes: Français* [#] Igor Strawinsky.* / Russe* / Anglais / Allemand / P. JURGENSON [#] ROB. FORBERG / MOSCOU [#] LEIPZIG / Neglinny pr. 14. [#] Talstr. 19. [**] // (Edition piano and chant [library binding] 27 x 34.4 (2°[4°]); sung text Russian-French + English-German; Score Russian-French 5 [2] pages + 2 pages front matter [title page black on cream (brown yellow), empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page] + 1 [1] page enclosed voice part*** English-German [page of the score paginated p. 1, empty page]; title head score >La lune blanche . . . . / (LA BONNE CHANSON)< voice >A moonlight pallid. . . . [#] Glimmernder Mondschein. . . .<; dedication [only] score above title head centre italic > A mon frère Goury Strawinsky<; author specified [only] score 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / Op. 9, № 2.< flush left >Texte russe de / S. MITOUSSOFF.<; translator specified [only] voice part below title head >(English words by M. D. Calvocoressi)< [#] >Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocoressi<; legal reservation without Copyright [score:] 1st page of the score above type area next to 1. line title head flush left underlined > Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten.< below type area flush left >Собственнсть издателя< [voice:] page of the score above title head flush left underlined > Aufführungsrecht vorbehalten.< below type area flush left >Propriété de l'éditeur<; plate number >34548<; production indicatione score 1st page of the score below type area flush right >П. Юргенсона въ Москвђ< voice part below type area flush right >P. Jurgenson à Leipsic et Moscou.<; end of score dated [only] Partitur S. 5 >La Baule 1910.<; without end marks) // (1922)

* In a line with the name >Igor Strawinsky< printed with a substantially larger point size.

** The Basel copy >62 / STRAW / 213< contains at the bottom of the page two stamps >Majoration temporaire / 500%< and >1 Fr. 50<.

*** Unlike in Op. 9.1, the English-German voice parts for this work are not separated into two blocks of music with one for each translation, rather both appear under only one system of music. Both translations fit the melodic line so precisely that there is only a single discrepancy in the rhythm (in bar 18 in the English text) between the two translations.

11-4Straw

Strawinsky’s copy of his estate is nor signed neither dated. It contains corrections. At the bottom of the title page right are located two [blurred] stamp marks >1 F 25< / >Majoration temporaire / 150 %<.

11-5 1942 Pallid Moonlight Bassoon-Piano-Arrangement (Quinto Maganini); Edition Musicus New York [unidentified]

11-6 New Modern Editions / of / Russian Masterpieces / for / SOLO AND ENSEMBLE WIND INSTRUMENTS / [#*] / >STRAVINSKY [#] Pastorale for Flute and Piano** .50 / STRAVINSKY [#] Pastorale for Oboe and Piano** .50 / STRAVINSKY [#] Pastorale for Clarinet in Bb and Piano** .50< / [#*] / >STRAVINSKY [#] Dance of the Princesses form The Fire-Bird / Flute and Piano** .75 / Oboe and Piano** .75 / Oboe, Bb Clarinet and Piano** .90 / Oboe, Basson*** and Piano** .90 / Flute, Bb Clarinet and Piano** .90 / Flute, Bassoon and Piano** .90< / [#*] / >STRAVINSKY [#] Pallid Moonlight for Trombone and Piano** .50 / STRAVINSKY [#] Pallid Moonlight for Bassoon and Piano** .50< / EDITION MUSICUS NEW YORK**** // (Edition for trombone and piano [library binding] 23.5 x 31 (4° [4°]); 5 [3] pages***** + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >pallid moonlight<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head centre centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / Op. 9, № 2.< / flush right italic >arranged / by Quinto Maganini<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area >COPYRIGHT 1945 [#] ALL RIGHTS RESERVED INCLUDING / BY QUINTO MAGANINI [#] PUBLIC PERFORMANCE FOR PROFIT / INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT SECURED<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area above legal reservation centre centred >EDITION MUSICUS NEW YORK< below legal reservation right >PRINTED IN U. S. A.; plate number >454<, without end mark) // (1942)

* List of repertoire with prices.

** Fill character (dotted line).

*** Mistake original.

**** The publisher information on the original is pasted over and thus only partly readable.

***** A surviving copy in the >LIBRARY OF / DALE L.HARPHAM< is without a cover. According to the label, it was bought by Alonzo Leach in Des Moines, Iowa.

11-7 igor strawinsky / two songs / (paul verlaine) / la bonne chanson / sagesse / for / baritone and orchestra / full score / boosey & hawkes // (Full score 23 x 30.5 (4° [4°]); sung text French; 7 [7] pages + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend] + back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements production date >Nr. 453<]; dedication 1st page of the score above title centre centred >A mon frère Goury<; authors specified below song title [pp. 1, 5:] flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY.< [exclusively p. 1:] flush left >VERLAINE<; legal reservations [pp. 1, 5:] below type area flush left >Copyright 1953 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York<; plate number >B. & H. 17276<) // (1953)

11-7[65] igor strawinsky / two songs / (paul verlaine) / la bonne chanson / sagesse / for / baritone and orchestra / full score / Boosey & Hawkes // igor strawinsky / two songs / (paul verlaine) / la bonne chanson / sagesse / for/ baritone and orchestra/ full score/ Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York// (Full score [library binding] 23.2 x 30.7 (4° [4°]); sung text French; 7 [7] pages + 4 pages cover orange red on grey green beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production date >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + duration data > approx. 4 minutes< English] + 3 pages back matter [2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >SYMPHONIC MUSIC<** production date >No. 8a< [#] >2/°71<]; title head [only] 1st page of the score >TWO SONGS<; dedication above title head centre italic > A mon frère Goury< authors specified [only] 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below song title >La Bonne Chanson<flush left >PAUL VERLAINE< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations below type area S. 1, 5 flush left >Copyright 1953 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York< [only] p. 1 flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17276<; production indication1. page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England<; without end of score dated; without end marks // [1971]

° Slash original.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price information and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

** Compositions are advertised in two columns without specification of places of printing from >LEES< to >WILLIAMSON<, amongst these >STRAVINSKY / Agon / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Concerto for Piano and Wind Instruments / Divertimento from The Fairy’s Kiss/ Orpheus / Petrouchka / The Rite of Spring / Variations<.

11-8 Igor Strawinsky / Two Songs / Deux Mélodies / Zwei Lieder / (Paul Verlaine) [Asterisk] Sagesse · Sleep / Ein düsterer Schlummer / La bonne chanson · A Moonlight Pallid / Glimmernder Mondschein / Baritone and Piano / [°] / Boosey & Hawkes // (Edition 23.4 x 30.7 (4° [4°]); sung text French-English-German; 4 [2] pages + 1 page front matter [title page ink blue on cream white] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production date >No. 693< [#] >12.53<]; without opus numbering; song title as title head French-English-German >Sagesse / Sleep · Ein düsterer Schlummer<; dedication above title head centre italic > A mon frère Goury<; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush left in connection with translator specified partly in italics >Poème de PAUL VERLAINE / English words by M. D. Calvocoressi/ Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocoressi<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1954 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 17408<; end of score dated p. 3 >La Baule, 1910<; > end number S. 3 flush left >7. 54. E<) // (1954)

° At this point in the copy in the Music Library of Munich >95/104019<, entered in 1955, there is a price stamp centred in the middle >CURRENT PRICE / 2/6 NET / BOOSEY & HAWKES<.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns in part multi-lingual without edition numbers and without price information >Pocket Scores° / Partitions de Poche · Taschenpartituren° / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy’s Kiss) / Cantata / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Le Chant du Rossignol (The Song of the / Nightingale) / Concerto in D for String Orchestra / Divertimento / Messe°° / Octet for Wind Instruments / Oedipus Rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Pulcinella Suite / Four Studies for Orchestra / Quatre Etudes pour Orchestre / Vier Etüden für Orchester / Le Sacre du Primtemps°° (The Rite of Spring) / Septet 1953 / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphony of Psalms / Psalmensymphonie / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vents°°° / Symphonies of Wind Instruments / Symphonien für Blasinstrumente / Piano Solo° / Piano Seul · Klavier zweihändig° / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy’s Kiss) / Le Chant du Rossignol (The Song of the Nightingale) / Marche Chinoise de ”°° Chant du Rossignol ” / Mavra Overture°° / Octet for Wind Instruments (arr. A. Lourié) / Orpheus (arr. L. Spinner) / Serenade en la / Sonate / Symphonies pour instruments à vents<°° / Trois Mouvements de “ Pétrouchka ” / Piano Duets° / Piano à Quatre Mains · Klavier vierhändig° / Pétrouchka / Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) / Two Pianos° / Deux Pianos · Zwei Klaviere° / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Concerto / Madrid / Septet 1953 / Trois Mouvements de “ Pétrouchka ” (Babin) // Violin and Piano° / Violon et Piano · Violine und Klavier° / Airs du Rossignol and Marche Chinoise (Le / Chant du Rossignol) / Ballad (Le Baiser de la Fée) / Divertimento (Le Baiser de la Fée) / Duo Concertant / Danse Russe (Pétrouchka) / Russian Maiden’s Song / Suite after Pergolesi / Violoncello and Piano° / Violoncelle et Piano · Violoncello und Klavier° / Suite italienne (Piatigorsky) / Russian Maiden’s Song (Markevitch) / Chamber Music° / Musique de Chambre · Kammermusik° / Octet for Wind Instruments / Septet 1953 / Three pieces for String Quartet / Vocal Scores° / Partitions Chant et Piano · Klavierauszüge° / Cantata / Le Rossignol / Mavra / Messe°° / Oedipus Rex / Perséphone / Symphonie de Psaumes / The Rake’s Progress / Voice and Piano° / Chant et Piano · Gesang und Klavier° / The Mother’s Song (Mavra) / Le Rossignol / Introduction . Chant du Pedieur° . Air du Rossignol / Paracha’s Song (Mavra) / Russian Maiden’s Song / Two Poems of Balmont / Blue Forget-me-not . The Dove / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Akahito . Mazatzuum°° . Tsarajuki°° / Trois petites chansons / La petite . Le Corbeau . Tchitcher-tatcher / Choral Music° / Musique Chorale · Chormusik° / Ave Maria (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella / Pater noster (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella / Credo (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella< [° centre; °° original spelling]. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

11-9 Igor Strawinsky / Two Songs / Deux Mélodies / Zwei Lieder / (Paul Verlaine) / Sagesse · Sleep / Ein düsterer Schlummer / [Asterisk] La bonne chanson · A Moonlight Pallid / Glimmernder Mondschein / Baritone and Piano [without stamp mark] / Boosey & Hawkes // (Edition 23.4 x 30.7 (4° [4°]); sung text French-English-German; 4 [3] pages + 1 page front matter [title page ink blue on cream white] without back matter; without opus numbering; song title French-English-German >La Bonne Chanson / A Moonlight Pallid · Glimmernder Mondschein< als title head; dedication above title head song title centre italic > A mon frère Goury<; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush left in connection with translator specified partly in italics >Poème de PAUL VERLAINE / English words by M. D. Calvocoressi/ Übersetzung von M. D. Calvocorressi<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1953 by Boosey & Co., Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 17409<; end of score dated p. 4 >La Baule, 1910<; end number S. 4 flush right as end mark >7. 54. E<) // (1954)

11-10 Igor Strawinsky / Two Songs / (Paul Verlaine) / C Sagesse · Sleep / La bonne chanson · A Moonlight Pallid / Baritone and Piano / 75 CENTS / Boosey & Hawkes // (Edition 23.3 x 30.8 (4° [4°]); sung text French-English-German; 4 [2] pages + title page black on beige + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >New and Popular Songs<* production date >No. 514<]; without opus numbering; song title French-English-German >Sagesse / Sleep · Ein düsterer Schlummer< instead of title head; dedication 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 above song title centre italic > A mon frère Goury<; author amd translator specified 1st page of the score below song title flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush left partly in italics >Poème de PAUL VERLAINE / English words by M. D. Calvocoressi<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1954 by Boosey & Co., Ltd. / U. S. Edition 1955< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside rights >Printed in U.S.A.<; plate number >B. & H. 17408<; end of score dated p. 3 >La Baule, 1910<; > end number p. 3 flush left >7. 54.<) // 1955

* Strawinsky not mentioned.

11-11 Igor Strawinsky / Two Songs / (Paul Verlaine) / Sagesse · Sleep / C La bonne chanson · A Moonlight Pallid / Baritone and Piano / 75 CENTS / Boosey & Hawkes // (Edition 23.3 x 30.8 (4° [4°]); sung text French-English-German; 4 [3] pages + title page black on beige]; without opus numbering; song title three-lingual >La Bonne Chanson / A Moonlight Pallid · Glimmernder Mondschein< instead of title head; dedication 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 above song title centre centre italic > A mon frère Goury<; author and translator specified 1st page of the score below title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush left partly in italics >Poème de PAUL VERLAINE / English words by M. D. Calvocoressi<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1954 by Boosey & Co., L. t. d. / U. S. Edition 1955< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area inside right >Printed in U.S.A.<; plate number >B. & H. 17409<; end of score dated p. 4 >La Baule, 1910<; >end number p. 4 flush right als end mark >7. 54.<) // (1955)

11-12Alb И. СТРАВИНСКИЙ / ИЗБРАННЫЕ / ВОКАЛЬНЫЕ / СОЧИНЕНИЯ / [vignette] / · МУЗЫКА · / МОСКВА · 1968 / И. СТРАВИНСКИЙ / ИЗБРАННЫЕ / ВОКАЛЬНЫЕ / СОЧИНЕНИЯ / для голоса с фортепиано / ИЗДАТЕЛЬСТВО МУЗЫКА МОСКВА 1968 // (Album 21.7 x 28.8 (4° [Lex 8°]); 54 [52] pages + 4 cover pages cardboard [front cover title decorative coloured frame with Lyre vignette in the section of the frame on the upper part of the page + vignette initial >M< with a stylized treble clef form italic, 2 empty pages, page with statement of the price above flush left Russian >70 к.<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 2 pages back matter without pagination [index Russian-French >СОДЕРЖАНИЕ / INDEX<, imprint Russian >Индекс 9—3—2< with billing of names >Редактор Н. Бобанова [#] Литературный редактор А. Тарасова / Технический редактор Е. Кручинина [#] Корректор А. Лавренюк< and itemized statements of format and origin]; reprint pp. 13-14 (I), 15-17 (II); title head as song title Russian-French S. 13 >ДУ У СКОВАЛИ…< [#] >UN GRAND SOMMEIL NOIR…< / p. 15 >ГДЕ В ЛУННОМ СВЕТЕ…< [#] >LA LUNE BLANCHE…< / dedications above title head centre pp. 13, 15 >Моему браму Гурию Стравинскому< [#] >A mon frère Goury Strawinsky<; author specified Russian-French flush left S. 13 >Слова П. ВЕРЛЕНА (из цикла „МУДРОСТЬ“) / Paroles de P. VERLAINE (de „SAGESSE“) / Перевод С. Митусова< S. 15 >Слова П. ВЕРЛЕНА (из цикла „ДОБАю ПЕСЕНКА“) / Paroles de P. VERLAINE (de „LA BONNE CHANSON“) / Перевод С. Митусова<; Opus numbering flush right between 2. and 3. line author specified p. 13 >Op. 9, № 1< below author specified p. 15 >Op. 9, № 2<; end of score dated p.14 >(1907 г. )< p. 17 >(1910 г.)<; plate number >5823<; without legal reservations; without acknowledgement of the original publishers on the pages of the score, without end marks) // 1968


K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer.
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
https://kcatalog.org and https://kcatalog.net

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Das zeitgenössische Wagner-Bild, Siebter Band: Dokumente 1853

aus: Situationsgeschichte der Musikkritik und des musikalischen Pressewesens in Deutschland dargestellt vom Ausgange des 18. bis zum Beginn des 20. Jahrhunderts


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