78

T h e  R a k e ’ s  P r o g r e s s

an Opera in three Acts, a Fable by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman — Der Wüstling. Oper in drei Akten, eine Fabel von W.[ystan] H.[ugh] Auden und Chester [Simon] Kallman — La Carrière d’un libertin. Opéra en trois actes — Carriera d’un libertino. Favola in tre atti di W. H. Auden e C. Kallman

 

Title: The German title has always given cause for disagreement, as the protagonist may be a rogue, but at heart he is not a bad character. Lichtenberg’s choice of translation was ‘Der Weg des Liederlichen’ (The Dissolute’s Progress). The original translation was ‘Die Geschichte eines Wüstlings’ (the story of a debauchée) which was later reduced to the now common ‘Der Wüstling’ (The Debauchée), although even Rennert was in favour of ‘dissolute’. – The Italian version ‘Carriera d’un Libertino’. based on Prof. Passinetti’s translation which was later adapted to ‘La Carrière d’un Libertin’ in the French version, most succinctly states the case. Whether the name Rakewell is meant as a double-entendre rather than an augmentation and also considering that Thomas, understood from its Hebrew origin, contains the meaning of ‘twin’ and that the names of all other characters represent their part in the action (Shadow, Anna = Grace, Mother Goose, Sellem = ‘Sell’ em’, to sell, Baba = to babble, Trulove = true love, trustworthy) has never been investigated.

 

Scored for: a) First edition (Roles): Trulove (Bass/Baß), Anne, his daughter – seine Tochter (Soprano/Sopran), Tom Rakewell (Tenor), Nick Shadow (Baritone/Bariton), Mother Goose – Mutter Goose (Mezzo-soprano/Mezzosopran), Baba, the Turk – Baba, genannt Türkenbab ((Mezzo-soprano/Mezzosopran), Sellem, auctioneer – Auktionator (Tenor), Keeper of the madhouse – Wärter des Irrenhauses (Bass/Baß), Whores and Roaring Boys – Dirnen und gröhlende Burschen, Citizens – Bürger, Madmen – Irre; ~ (Orchestra Nomenclature): 2 Flauti, 2 Oboi, Corno Inglese, 2 Clarinetti in Sib, 2 Fagotti, 2 Corni in Fa, 2 Trombe in Si, Violini I, Violini II, Viole, Violoncelli, Contrabassi, Cembalo (Piano), Timpani; ~ (Orchestra Legend): 2 flutes (2nd Fl. = Picc.), 2 oboes (2nd ob. = Cor Angl.), 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in F, 2 trumpets in B flat, 1st violins, 2nd violins, Violas°, Violoncellos°, Double basses°, Timpani, Cembalo (Pianoforte) – 2 Flöten (2. Fl. = kl. Fl.), 2 Oboen (2. Ob.= Englisch Hr.), 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 2 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in B, Erste Geigen, Zweite Geigen, Bratschen, Violoncelli, Bässe, Pauken, Cembalo (Klavier); b) Performance requirements: 1 Soprano, 2 Mezzo-sopranos, 2 Tenors, 1 Baritone, 2 Basses, four-part* mixed chorus (Soprano, Alto**, Tenor, Bass), Piccolo Flute (= 2nd Flute), 2 Flutes (2nd Flute = Piccolo Flute), 2 Oboes (2nd Oboe = English horn), English horn (= 2nd Oboe), 2 Clarinets in B flat, 2 Bassoons, 2 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in B flat, Cembalo, Piano***, Timpani, 4 Solo Violins, 3 Solo Violas, 2 Solo Violoncellos, Solo Double Bass, Strings (First Violins****, Second Violins****, Violas**, Violoncellos**, Double Basses)

° Different capitalisation original.

* As the alto part is divided, it is in five parts.

** Divided in two.

*** Piano Graveyard scene only.

**** Divided in three.

 

Voice types (Fach): Trulove: Serious Bass (middle-sized role); Anne: Lyric, or young dramatic Soprano (main role); Tom Rakewell; Young Heldentenor (main role); Nick Shadow: Character baritone (main role); Mother Goose: Character Alto (small role); Baba: dramatic Mezzo-soprano (large role); Sellem: Character Tenor (middle-sized role); Keeper of the Madhouse: character bass (small role)

 

Summary: [l.1:] An afternoon in Spring somewhere in the country outside Trulove’s house. Tom and Anne speak of their love for each other. Trulove has mixed feelings about his daughter’s relationship with Tom. Having sent Anne into the house, he offers Tom a post in a bank which Tom turns down, since he considers himself too superior for such work; his call is for great things and secretly he laughs at Trulove’s small-mindedness, seeing in him a fool who does not know which way happiness lies, namely in his — the Rake’s — way. As soon as Tom is alone again, Nick Shadow appears, enters the house with him and declares in the presence of Anne and Trulove that Tom has come into money. An uncle has left his fortune to him. All are elated by the good news, although a shadow falls on the young lovers. Tom is now forced to leave to attend to his business in London, but he promises to send for Anne as soon as he is settled there. He takes Shadow into his service against an unknown fee and bids Anne and Trulove good-bye. The way of dissolution begins. – [I.2:] A brothel in London. Whores and lads are singing bawdy songs about Venus and Mars. Nick has coached Tom in certain attitudes that he is now producing before the owner of the brothel, mistress Goose: To take all you can get, to avoid prudishness and missionary zealots, to follow nature as well as beauty which has youth, but alas must die, and to live for pleasure only. When he is asked to speak out against love, he is unable to answer. The cuckoo clock strikes one. By means of a magic sign Nick lets the clock run backwards an hour. Tom turns to drinking. Nick addresses the assembly, introducing Tom as a rich man, his employer and friend. Tom praises love. The whores dismiss his singing as too doleful, but they still like him and offer themselves to him. But Mistress Goose claims older rights and secures Tom for herself, while Nick is watching the scene. The whores and lads sing bawdy songs. Nick raises his glass. Tom is to dream his dream to the end. For when he awakens, everything will be over. – [I.3:] The full moon shines on Trulove’s garden. It is autumn. Anne emerges from the house, ready to travel, yet doubtful whether it is a good idea to visit Tom in London. She sings a song about love, the night and the moon. From the house Trulove, innocent of her plans, calls to her. She is on the point of turning back, but then her decision holds firm: Her father is strong, Tom is weak. It is him who needs her help. She kneels and prays for her father, for Tom and for herself. Getting up again, she sings a song of the steadfastness of love that shall not falter. And her love belongs to Tom. – [II.1:] Breakfast room in Rakewell’s London house on a bright sunny morning. Tom is sick to the heart. The noise, the big city, the careless London life take their toll. He is thinking of Anne. Nick enters and hands him a poster of the Baba the Turk. She performs at the London fair and is that ugly with her thick black beard, that even soldiers tried in battle faint at her sight. Nick wants to marry Tom to her. He who wants to be free, says Nick, must keep both lust and conscience at bay. Tom, thinking of the sensation his marriage with Baba the Turk would cause, overcomes his initial resentment and agrees, laughing. – [II. 2:] Anne has realised her decision and is now standing outside Tom’s London residence; it is evening and her heart is beating fast. While she is yet trying to pick up courage to enter, a pompous train of servants bearing a sedan chair appears before the main entrance. The libretto tells us that it is Tom’s and the Turkish Bab’s wedding train. Now Tom Rakewell steps forward into the light. Anne and Tom approach each other confusedly. Anne wants Tom to come home with her. Tom wants Anne to go back alone. She must not sink into the mire of the big city that he himself cannot break free from any more. The dialogue is suddenly interrupted by Baba the Turk sitting in her sedan chair wanting to get out but not able or willing to do so herself. A three-part scene develops between a dumbfounded Anne, an uninterruptedly shouting Baba, breaking into the rests between each phrase and a desperate Tom, who does not want to do what he has been told to do and must not do what he himself wants to do. He finally admits to Anne that he has married the Baba. Anne and Tom enter into monologues, she to get hold of her senses again, he to admit to himself the hopelessness of his situation. Finally, Anne leaves and Tom helps his wife out of the sedan chair. Folks come running from everywhere to see the Baba the Turk. As Tom enters the house, she draws back her veil and reveals her long black beard, throws kisses into the crowd and follows Tom with a theatrical gesture. The scene closes amidst enthusiastic calls for the Baba. – [II.3:] Rakewell’s breakfast room laden with all kinds of exotic and strange objects and stuffed animals. Tom is in a black mood and the Baba keeps chattering meaninglessly to herself. When she approaches Tom to embrace him tenderly, he repulses her. The Baba feels rejected and humiliated and has a wildly jealous fit, beginning to break one object after another. In the end, Tom jumps up and puts his wig on her head, whereupon she falls silent and stays seated. He then falls asleep, desperate and exhausted. Nick appears. He is pushing a large object into the room which he claims is a machine that can turn stones into bread. He shows the audience how he is going to trick Tom into believing this tale — the bread emerging from the machine was put there by Nick himself. Tom wakes up and remembers the scene of stones being turned into bread like a far-away dream. Nick tricks him, as announced, and Tom is enthusiastic. He hopes to win back Anne by a good deed. This machine will help people forget their worries and they will soon return to the paradise they were driven from. Nick shamelessly turns to the audience, full of self-praise and offers them a good deal. To Tom Rakewell he declares that it would be a long way until his dream were fulfilled. He needed capital and business partners. Tom admits that this is true and is grateful to Nick for taking all the work upon himself. Upon Nick’s questioning him about whether he did not wish to inform his wife of his good luck, he answers that he no longer has a wife, that she was buried. – [III.1:] Tom is bankrupt and many innocent people have been ruined by his failure. Even in the most illustrious circles there have been suicides, many families were driven into misery. His personal belongings are being auctioned. His London home is thronged with people who want to see the objects up for auction. Anne enters. She is looking for Tom and receives most contradictory, even ironical, answers to her questions. Maybe he has left London, maybe he is dead. If he were found, he would be imprisoned anyway. Sellem, the auctioneer, loudly, expertly and cleverly calls for bids to sell off the Rakewell’s household, while the excitement among the crowd is growing. Then a particularly strange object crowned with a wig comes up for bidding, which when the wig is pulled off at the last ‘…going!’ turns out to be the Baba. She has been sitting in the same posture all this time and instantly takes up her cantilene where she left off when interrupted by Tom. She then angrily sets about stopping the auction. Anne enters. The Baba, having calmed down somewhat, appears to be in a more gentle mood. The women converse together. Baba the Turk will return to her artistic life. Anne, who still loves Tom and is assured by the Baba that he loves her, is to stay with him, who needs to get a grip on his life again. Anne accuses herself of not having been faithful enough. Tom and Nick may be heard singing a silly song from the street. The crowd suddenly takes Anne’s and Tom’s side. She ought to go to him, otherwise it might be too late. Tom’s and Nick’s voices trail off in the distance. The auction is over. The Baba demands her carriage be called. Her address is of such authority that Sellem obeys and even helps her into it, although he really intended to sell it. The crowd retreats – [III.2:] It is a starless night at the cemetery. Nick, beside a freshly dug grave demands his wages from Tom. Tom wants to pay him once he will have come into money again. But Nick wants Tom’s soul, wants him to realise who it is that he has taken into his service. The bell slowly tolls the hour of twelve midnight which is to be the hour of Tom’s death, when boisterous Nick stops it and proposes a card game to Tom which no human being can win. Three times they deal the cards and three times Tom is able to guess the right card when his desperate thoughts turn to Anne and the help she has given him and before the third dealing the trace of a cloven hoof in the sand tells him who his companion really is. He has saved his life but Nick, who now sinks into the grave in Tom’s stead, destroys his mind with a last malediction. – [III,3] In the lunatic asylum Tom, in a speech to the other inmates announces the imminent arrival of Venus, coming to visit her Adonis. Anne enters the room. The warden having explained to Anne that the crazy Tom was harmless and preferred to be called Adonis, retreats, after Anne has given him some money. She addresses Tom by the name of Adonis. He jumps to his feet and pays his respects to his Venus asking her to forgive him. When she takes him in her arms, he begins to sway and Anne permits his sliding to the ground. Tom lays his head into her lap and asks her to sing him a lullaby. He falls asleep peacefully during her singing. Trulove arrives to take his daughter home. The fairy-tale has ended. Anne follows him after a last good-bye to Tom. When Trulove, Anne and the warden have left, Tom gets up from the ground calling first for his Venus, and then turns on the others accusing them of having robbed her. The lunatics come towards him claiming that nobody has been here at all. Tom senses the approach of death. He calls to Orpheus, the Nymphs and the Shepherds that they might mourn Adonis, loved by Venus [Epilogue:] All soloists appear before the curtain, Tom without his wig, the Baba without her beard and sing the moral of the story: Anne, stating that not every dissolute has an Anne at his side, the Baba, that all men wish for is folly and all else but play, Tom, that one’s youth should not be spent in dreams about acting like Caesar and Vergil, for if you were not careful, you might end up as a rake. Trulove confirms everything yet said. Finally Nick, who says that some folks did not believe he existed, only to wish in the end that it were so. They then join in the final chorus which closes on the notion that the devil always finds ample reward where there is laziness and the fruits of his labours were seated out there in the auditorium.

 

Source: The libretto was written by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman after a series of eight engravings entitled ‘The Rake’s Progress’ which the English painter and engraver William Hogarth (16971764) created between 1732 and 1735. It was that famous, that Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (17421799) published a commentary on it that Goethe praised as one of the three most exciting publications of the year 1795. – Kallman wrote the ending of the first act after the aria ‘Since it is not by Merit’ and the whole of the second scene as well as the first scene of the second act until the end of Tom’s aria ‘Vary the Song’ and the complete second scene following. Parts of the first scene of the third act and the entire card game scene were written by him. The dialogue between Tom and Shadow was contributed by Auden. Primarily a lyrical poet, Auden sought help when it came to the dramatic elements in the opera. Hogarth’s engravings , answering critical issues of the times, were each characterised by a descriptive title and appeared in the original format 32 x 39 cms (Brit. measurements approx. 12.5 x 16 inches) as follows: 1. The Heir; 2. The Levée; 3. The Orgy; 4. The Arrest; 5. The Marriage; 6. The Gambling House; 7. The Prison; 8. The Madhouse. They were made from eight oil paintings (format in cms 62.2 x 75) which today are exhibited in Sir John Soane’s museum in London. Auden could not derive much to interest him from that sequence of engravings, their bourgeois values, with which Strawinsky identified while refusing to be led onto the byways of social criticism, and sought to undercut their message. He thus brought into play elements which are not present in Hogarth and were never originally intended by Strawinsky, such as Satan personified, thus distorting the figure of the Rake as someone who does not act responsibly — in keeping with the neurasthenic tendency so typical of the Twentieth Century of exculpation of the self — but is seen as debauched by the devil’s influence. That same tendency, taking a depth psychological point of view, may be reinterpreted as an entity ‘Tom-Nick’, equal to the Good and the Bad incarnate in the one person within the meaning of Self and Other. Hogarth depicts the Rake as a child grown up in a wealthy family and used to money, thus one could expect of him to know how to deal with it. Yet he senselessly dissipates his inheritance. Auden makes him into a poor devil led astray by the real devil who by some magic lets an unknown uncle bequeath a fortune on him that does not really exist. Auden’s construction of the devil lacks a divine counterpart, wherefore Anne is called in. Notably, Nick is not the devil in person and does not rule over hell and its fiendish inhabitants — he is merely a minor servant answerable to      tructions from hell and who — in the Russian imagination — might even be outwitted. Ingmar Bergman later impressed Strawinsky by giving the later Rakewell the appearance of Jesus Christ and having Anne appear as the Holy Virgin, while stripping the figure of Baba the Turk of all comical extremes in his Stockholm production of the ‘Rake’, which according to Auden belong to her as the contrasting figure of exotic exaltation in opposition to Anne. Auden’s teaching, that one may come to terms with the reality of hell as long as there is a woman like Anne at and on one’s side, was quite en vogue at the time, but it contradicted both Strawinsky’s religious beliefs and Hogarth’s social criticism. The biblical overtones of the libretto, so for example the image of the machine turning stones to bread, which may point to a man who, unlike Jesus, succumbs to the devil’s temptation, the image taken from antiquity, such as having the Seer appear blind or mad, because recognition of the world is only possible if separated from it — are being transformed into their opposite by what is happening on stage. In the end, the little that remains good in Tom is slowly being extinguished in the lunatic asylum; his ‘bad’ self has long been buried and the young woman returns to the small house with the front garden under the guidance of her father. The moral of Auden-Strawinsky is not actually pointing to carelessness but to laziness. Even the happy experience of the dream of alleviating the sorrows of the world by means of the bread-making machine remains an illusion, not just because the machine itself is a hoax but because Tom himself does nothing — neither has he invented the machine nor is he doing anything to make it known. At the end of the opera everyone except Trulove — who characteristically is unable to voice an independent opinion — draws his or her own moral from the story. Not to every man does God give an Anne (Anne); a man falls victim to a hoax and everything he does is only make-believe (Bab); he who dreams of being Vergil or Caesar may well wake up as a Rake (Tom), the devil is lying in wait everywhere, though people like to think he does not exist (Nick). All join together in the end to sing ‘For idle hands and Hearts and Minds the Devil Finds a Work to Do’. – American productions of the opera often strongly emphasise the homosexual relationship between Auden and Kallman, where the latter represented the male element, and follow it through the entire work. Auden’s introduction of the Bab figure, for example, who does not exist in Hogarth’s sequence of engravings, is explained that way. Strawinsky did not tolerate any changes to the libretto which in his thinking combined to represent both lightness and depth. Dylan Thomas, however, criticised the libretto at a meeting with Strawinsky saying there was too much speaking going on and Auden should have arranged, i.e. shortened, the dialogues. Compared with Strawinsky’s oeuvre before and after the ‘Rake’ the opera stands out as a special piece of work and American influence alone cannot fully explain it.

 

Translations: As for translations of the libretto Strawinsky considered only the German translation of Fritz Schröder (‘outstanding and amazingly close’) acceptable and wished for an English/German version only to go into print. In cases where Schröder could not take over English syllabics, Strawinsky composed the vocal part in accordance with German declamatory practice and included the version as usual in minuscule notation in the full score. Slight shifts in meaning had to be accepted. The recreaction of Auden’s poetry in any other language was not intended by Strawinsky.

 

Construction: ‘The Rake’s Progress’ is an atypical contemporary opera seria lacking consistent numbering and having a prelude ordered by alphabetic lettering, three acts divided into numbered individual scenes consisting of recitatives, arias, duets, tercets, quartets and choric extras, where the instrumental music is set for a ‘Mozart’ orchestra.

 

Structure

[1]

Prelude

Tempo Crotchet = 138

            (figure 6A up to the end of figure C5)

(figure C5 curtain # Vorhang

Act I [#] I. Akt

Scene 1 [#] 1. Bild

Garden of Trulove’s house in the country. Afternoon in spring. (House – right, Garden Gate – Centre Back, Arbour – left downstage in which Anne and Tom are seated.) # Garten an Vater Trulove’s Haus auf dem Lande. Frühlingsnachmittag. (Rechts das Haus, im Mittelgrund die Gartenpforte, links vorne eine Laube, in der Ann und Tom sitzen.)

[2]

Duet and Trio [#] Duett und Terzett

 

Crotchet = 76

            (figure 51 up to the end of figure 255 [attacca forward to figure 26])

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 26 [from figure 255 attacca] up to the end of figure 2617)

 [3]

Recitative and Aria [#] Rezitativ und Arie

Crotchet = 88

            (figure 27 up to the end of figure 306 [attacca forward to figure 31])

Aria [#] Arie

Crotchet = 82

            (figure 31 [from figure 306 attacca] up to the end of figure 464)

 [4]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 47 up to the end of figure 506 [attacca forward to figure 51])

Crotchet = 69

            (figure 51 [attacca from figure 506] up to the end of figure 574 [attacca forward to figure 58])

 [5]

Quartet [#] Quartett

dotted Crotchet = 60

            (figure 58 [from figure 574 attacca] up to the end of figure 724)

Quaver = quaver L’istesso tempo ma agitato (figure 73 up to figure 805 [attacca forward to figure 806])

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 806 [attacca from figure 805] up to the end of figure 807 [attacca forward to figure 81])

 [6]

Duettino [#] Duettino

Quaver = 126

            (figure 81 [attacca from figure 807] up to the end of figure 876 [attacca forward to figure 88])

 [7]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 88 [attacca from figure 876] up to the end of figure 8811 [attacca forward to figure 89])

[8]

Arioso and Terzettino[#] Arioso und Terzettino

            (figure 89 [attacca from figure 8811] up to the end of figure 945)

Subito sostenuto e tranquillo

            (figure 95 up to the end of figure 1024 with repetition of the 6 bars + 2 last-time bars in figure

            101)

più lento Quaver = 92

            (figure 1025 up to the end of figure 1044 [attacca forward to figure 105])

                        [figure 1044: Quick curtain — Vorhang rasch]

Scene 2 [#] 2. Bild

Mother Goose’s Brothel, London (At a table, downstage right, sit Tom, Nick and Mother Goose drinking. Backstage left a Cuckoo Clock — Whores, Roaring Boys.)

Mutter Goose’s Freudenhaus in London. (Vorne rechts an einem Tisch sitzen Tom, Nick und Mutter Goose und trinken. Hinten links eine Kuckucksuhr. — Dirnen und grölende Burschen.)

[9]

Chorus [#] Chor

poco pesante Crotchet = 120

            (figure 105 [attacca from figure 1044] up to the end of figure 1305 [attacca forward to figure

131])

[10]

Recitative and Scene [#] Rezitativ und Szene

(Nick, Tom, Mother Goose) [#] (Nick, Tom, Mutter Goose)

            (figure 131 [attacca from figure 1044] up to figure 1313)

Tempo rigoroso Crotchet = 72

            (figure 1314 up to the end of figure 1393)

Agitato in p Crotchet = 132

            (figure 140 up to figure 1413)

meno mosso Crotchet = 100

            (figure 1414 up to figure 1421*)

a tempo

            (figure 1421* up to figure 1422)

Meno mosso Crotchet = 100

            (figure 1423 up to figure 1424*)

a tempo

            (figure 1424* up to figure 1434)

                        [figure 1432: As the Cuckoo Glock coos ONE, Tom rises — Die Kuckucksuhr schlägt

                        Eins. Tom steht auf]

                        [figure 1434: Nick makes a sign and the clock turns backward and coos TWELVE. –

                        Nick macht ein Zeichen, die Kuckucksuhr läuft rückwärts und schlägt Zwölf.]

Meno mosso Crotchet = 76

            (figure 143up to1 up to figure 143up to4)

tranquillo

            (figure 144 up to the end of figure 1445)

[11]

Chorus [#] Chor

Roaring Boys and Whores [#] Dirnen und grölende Burschen

            (figure 145 up to figure 14914 with figure 146 up to the end of figure 148 repeated with a last–

[12]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Poco meno mosso

            (figure 150 up to the end of figure 15013 [attacca forward to figure 151])

 [13]

Cavatina [#] Kavatine

Quaver = 96

            (figure 151 [attacca from figure 15013] up to the end of figure 1594 [attacca forward to figure

1601])

[14]

Chorus [#] Chor

(Whores) [#] (Dirnen)

Crotchet = 76

            (figure 160 [attacca from figure 1594] up to the end of figure 1615)

Meno mosso Quaver = 104

            (figure 162 up to the end of figure 1626)

Chorus [#] Chor

dotted Crotchet = 69

            (figure 163 up to the end of figure 17610

                        [figure 1758: Curtain – Vorhang]

Scene 3 [#] 3. Bild

Same as Scene 1 [#] Wie 1. Bild

Autumn night, full moon. [#] Herbstnacht, Vollmond

Quaver = 72

            (figure 177 up to the end of figure 1798)

                        [figure 1795: Curtain – Vorhang]

 [15]

Recitative and Aria [#] Rezitativ und Arie

L’istesso tempo

            (figure 180 up to the end of figure 1825)

Aria [#] Arie

Quaver = 112108

            (figure 183 up to the end of figure 1886)

molto meno mosso Quaver = 58

            (figure 189 up to the end of figure 1894)

 [16]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Crotchet = 88

            (figure 190 up to the end of figure 1915)

L’istesso tempo

            (figure 192 up to the end of figure 1925 [attacca forward to figure 193])

Cabaletta [#] Kabaletta

Crotchet = 126

            ([attacca von figure 1925 aus] figure 193 up to the end of figure 2125)

                        [2121: Quick curtain – Vorhang rasch]

End of Act I – Ende des I. Aktes]

 

ACT II [#] II. AKT

Scene 1 [#] 1. Bild

The morning room of Tom’s house in a London square. A bright morning sun pours in through the window, also noises from the street.

Frühstückszimmer in Toms Haus in einem VilllenCrotchet in London. Durch das Fenster dringt strahlende Morgensonne herein, ebenso Straßenlärm.

Quaver = 60

[17]

            (figure 11 up to the end of figure 19)

Aria [#] Arie

Quaver = quaver

            (figure 2 up to the end of figure 94)

                        [figure 31: CurtainVorhang]

[18]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Crotchet = 66

            (figure 10 up to the end of figure 114)

Crotchet = 112

            (figure 12 up to the end of figure 183)

Minim = 82

            (figure 19 up to the end of figure 228)

Aria (reprise) [#] Arie (Reprise)

Quaver = 60

            (figure 23 up to the end of figure 265)

 [19]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 27 up to the end of figure 286)

Quaver = 120

            (figure 29 up to the end of figure 345)

poco meno mosso Crotchet = 104

            (figure 3513)

poco rall. Crotchet = 92

            (figure 354 up to the end of figure 355)

[20]

Aria [#] Arie

Quaver = 98

            (figure 36 up to the end of figure 404)

Semiquaver = quaver crotchet = 98

            (figure 41 up to the end of figure 414)

Crotchet = quaver 98

            (figure 41 up to the end of figure 476)

 [21]

Duet-Finale [#] Finale-Duett

dotted Crotchet = 132

            (figure 48 up to the end of figure 786 [attacca forward to figure 79])

                        [figure 781: Quick curtainVorhang rasch]

Scene 2 [#] 2. Bild

Street in front of Tom’s house. London. Autumn. Dusk. The entrance, stage centre, is led up to by a flight of semi-circular steps. Servant’s entrance left.

Straße vor Toms Haus in London. Herbst. Dämmerung. Zum Haupteingang in der Mitte der Bühne führt eine halbkreisförmige Freitreppe. Links der Eingang für die Dienerschaft. Rechts ein Baum.

[22]

Quaver = 72

            (figure 79 [attacca from figure 786] up to the end of figure 805)

                        [figure 804: Curtain – Vorhang]

            (figure 81 up to the end of figure 834)

Recitative and Arioso [#] Rezitativ und Arioso

L’istesso tempo

            (figure 84 up to the end of figure 864)

Crotchet = 84

            (figure 87 up to the end of figure 894)

L’istesso tempo Crotchet = 84

            (figure 90 up to the end of figure 961)

meno mosso Quaver = 116

            (figure 9612)

a tempo Crotchet = 84

            (figure 9635 [attacca forward to figure 97])

Crotchet = 96

            (figure 97 [attacca from figure 975] up to the end of figure 1053)

 [23]

Duet [#] Duett

Minim = 92

            (figure 106 up to the end of figure 1165

Molto meno mosso dotted Crotchet = 58

            (figure 117 up to the end of figure 1223)

Tempo I Minim = 92

            (figure 123 up to the end of figure 1265)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Molto meno Crotchet = 72

            (figure 127 up to the end of figure 1295)

L’istesso tempo Crotchet = 72

            (figure 130 up to the end of figure 1304)

 [24]

Trio [#] Terzett

Quaver = 7274

                (figure 131 up to the end of figure 1414 [attacca forward to figure 142]

 [25]

Finale [#] Finale

Crotchet = 54

            (figure 142 [attacca from figure 1414] up to the end of figure 1494)

            [figure 1494: Curtain — Vorhang]

Tempo I Crotchet = 54

            (figure 15013 [attacca forward to figure 152])

Scene 3 [#] 3. Bild

The same room a Act II, Scene 1, except that now it is cluttered up with every conceivablle kind of object: stuffed animals and birds, cases of minerals, china, glass, etc.

Dasselbe Zimmer wie II. Akt, 1. Bild, nur daß es jetzt überladen ist mit jeder erdenkbaren Art von Gegenständen, wie ausgestopften Tieren und Vögeln, Schaukasten mit Mineralien, Porzellan, Gläsern u.s.w.

[26]

Aria [#] Arie

Quaver = 132

            (figure 152 [attacca from figure 1503] up to the end of figure 1675)

                        [figure 1562: Curtain – Vorhang]

 [27]

Babas Song [#] Babas

Crotchet = crotchet

            (figure 168)

Aria [#] Arie

Crotchet = 144

            (figure 169 up to the end of figure 1694)

Meno mosso Crotchet = 120

            (figure 170 up to the end of figure 1796)

Più mosso Crotchet = 144

            (figure 180 up to the end of figure 1876)

 [28]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Crotchet = 66

            (figure 188 up to the end of figure 1888)

Pantomime [#] Pantomime

Più mosso Crotchet = 92

            (figure 189 up to the end of figure 1927)

Recitative-Arioso-Rezitative [#] Rezitativ-Arioso-Rezitativ

            (figure 193 up to the end of figure 1934)

Agitato Crotchet = 116

            (figure 194 up to the end of figure 1984)

Crotchet = 116

            (figure 199 up to figure 2033)

Lento

            (figure 20334)

Quaver = 69

            (figure 204 up to the end of5 [attacca forward to figure 205])

[29]

Duet [#] Duett

Crotchet = 138

            (figure 205 [attacca from figure 2045] up to the end of figure 2275)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 228118**)

Quaver = 138

            (figure 22819 up to the end of figure 2356)

                        [after figure 2356: End of Act II — Ende des II. Aktes]

 

ACT III [#] III. AKT

Scene 1 [#] 1. Bild

The same as Act II, scene 3, except that everything is covered with cobwebs and dust. Afternoon. Spring.

Wie II. Akt, 3. Bild, nur daß alles mit Spinngewebe und Staub bedeckt ist. Frühlingsnachmittag.

 [30]

Crotchet = 132

            (figure 51 up to the end of figure 385)

                        [figure 61: Curtain. – Vorhang.

Poco meno mosso Crotchet = 120

            (figure 39 up to the end of figure 423)

 [31]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Meno mosso Crotchet = 80

            (figure 43 up to the end of figure 494)

L’istesso tempo Crotchet = 6063

            (figure 50 up to the end of figure 503 [attacca forward to figure 51])

Aria [#] Arie

dotted Crotchet = 126

            (figure 51 [attacca from figure 503] up to the end of figure 617)

dotted Minim = 63

            (figure 62 up to the end of figure 655)

Bidding Scene [#] Steiger-Szene

Crowd and Sellem [#] Menge und Sellem

Meno mosso Crotchet = 144

            (figure 66 up to the end of figure 675)

Sellem’s Aria (continuing) [#] Sellems Arie (Fortsetzung)

dotted Crotchet = 126

            (figure 68 up to the end of figure 788)

dotted Minim = 63

            (figure 79 up to the end of figure 825)

Bidding Scene [#] Steiger-Szene

Crowd and Sellem [#] Menge und Sellem

Meno mosso Crotchet = 144

            (figure 83 up to the end of figure 845)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (figure 85 up to the end of figure 853)

Aria (continued) [#] Arie (Fortsetzung)

Tranquillo Crotchet = 144

            (figure 86 up to the end of figure 904)

Più mosso dotted Minim = 63

            (figure 91 up to the end of figure 945)

Final Bidding Scene [#] Schluß-Steiger-Szene

meno mosso Crotchet = 144

            (figure 95 up to the end of figure 967)

Crotchet = 60

            (figure 97 up to the end of figure 973)

 [32]

Aria [#] Arie

Crotchet = 144

            (figure 98 up to the end of figure 1056)

più mosso Crotchet = 144

            (figure 106 up to the end of figure 1063)

molto meno mosso Crotchet = 60

            (figure 107 up to the end of5 [attacca weiter nach figure 108])

[33]

Recitative and Duet [#] Rezitativ und Duett

with Chorus and Sellem [#] mit Chor und Selllem

Crotchet = 88

            (figure 108 [attacca from figure 1075] up to the end of figure 1116)

Meno mosso Crotchet = 63

            (figure 112 up to the end of figure 1135)

Duet [#] Duett

Anne und Baba with Chorus and Sellem [#] Ann und Baba mit Chor und Sellem

Crotchet = 80

            (figure 114 up to the end of figure 1155)

più mosso Crotchet = 92

            (figure 116 up to the end of figure 1185)

Poco meno mosso / (Tempo I) Crotchet = 80

            (figure 119 up to the end of figure 1214)

Alla breve Minim = 63

            (figure 122 up to the end of figure 1336)

[34]

Ballad Tune [#] Gassenhauer

dotted Crotchet = 56

            (figure 134 up to the end of figure 1366)

Crotchet = 100

            (figure 137 up to the end ofFigure 1373)

Stretto-Finale [#] Stretto-Finale

Anne, Baba and Sellem with Chorus [#] Ann, Baba und Sellem mit Chor

Crotchet = 152

            (figure 138 up to the end of figure 1423)

Poco più mosso dotted Minim = 63

            (figure 143 up to the end of figure 1466)

L’istesso tempo dotted Minim = 63 

            (figure 147 up to the end of figure 1486 [attacca forward to figure 1495])

Ballad Tune (reprise) [#] Gassenhauer (Reprise)

dotted Crotchet = 56

            (figure 149 [attacca from figure 1486] up to the end of figure 1505)

Crotchet = 132

            (figure 151 up to the end of figure 1588)

                        [figure 1582: Curtain – Vorhang]

Scene 2 [[#] 2. Bild

A starless night. A Churchyard. Tombs. Front centre a newly-dug grave. Behind it a flat raised tomb, against which is leaning a sexton’s spade. On the right a yew-tree.

Ein Kirchhof. Gräber. Sternlose Nacht. Vorn in der Mitte ein frisch ausgehobenes Grab. Dahinter ein unbeschrifteter hochgestellter Grabstein, an den ein Totengräberspaten gelehnt ist. Rechts eine Eibe.

[35]

Prelude [#] Vorspiel

Crotchet = 69

            (figure 8159 up to the end of figure 1606 [attacca weiter nach figure 1611)

                        [figure 1606: Curtain – Vorhang]

Duet [#] Duett

Enter Tom and Nick left, the former out of breath, the latter carrying a little black bag.

Quaver = 84

            (figure 161 [attacca from figure 1606] up to the end of figure 1645)

dotted Crotchet = 56

            (figure 165 up to the end of figure 1675)

Quaver = 84

            (figure 168 up to the end of figure 1695)

dotted Crotchet = 56

            (figure 170 up to the end of figure 1734)

Quaver = 84

            (figure 174 up to the end of figure 1753)

Quaver = dotted Crotchet = 84 agitato ma tempo rigoroso

            (figure 176 up to the end of figure 1806)

dotted Crotchet = quaver = 56

            (figure 181 up to the end of figure 1814)

L’istesso Quaver = 84

            (figure 182 up to the end of figure 1833)

Crotchet = 42

            (figure 184 up to the end of figure 1849)

 [36]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

dotted Crotchet = 69 circa

            (figure 185 up to figure 1867)

Duet [#] Duett°

Quaver = 69

            (figure 1868 up to the end of figure 18711)

Crotchet = 112

            (figure 188 up to the end of figure 18912)

Tempo I Quaver = 69

            (figure 190 up to the end of figure 1922)

Tempo I (di Recitativo) Crotchet = 69 circa

            (figure 1923 up to the end of figure 1927)

Quaver = 76

            (figure 193 up to the end of figure 1937)

Crotchet = 126

            (figure 194 up to figure 19517)

Crotchet = quaver = 126

            (figure 196 up to figure 1977)

Quaver = 84 circa

            (figure 1978 up to the end of figure 1979)

Crotchet = 168

            (figure 198 up to the end of figure 2005)

Quaver = 84

            (figure 201 up to the end of figure 2045 [unter Wiederholung der figuren 201 up to 2045 als

            Figure 201up to

            up to 202up to])

Meno mosso Quaver = 66

            (figure 205 up to the end of figure 2058)

Quaver = 138

            (figure 206 up to the end of figure 2125)

                        [figure 2111: Slow curtain – Vorhang (langsam)]

Scene 3 [#] 3. Bild

Bedlam. (Backstage centre on a raised eminence a straw pallet. Tom stands before it facing the chorus of madmen who include a blind man with a broken fiddle, a crippled soldier, a man with a telescope and three old hags.)

Irrenhaus. (Im Mittelgrund auf einer zurechtgemachten Erhöhung ein Strohsack. Tom steht davor, dem Chor der Irren zugewandt, in deren Mitte sich ein blinder Mann mit einer zerbrochenen Geige, ein verkrüppelter Soldat, ein Mann mit einem Fernrohr und drei alte Hexen befinden.)

Quaver = 92

            (figure 213 up to the end of figure 2154)

                        [figure 2151: Curtain – Vorhang]

Arioso [#] Arioso

            (figure 216 up to the end of figure 2195)

Dialogue [#] Zwiegesang

Madmen and Tom [#] Irre und Tom

Più mosso Crotchet = 108

            (figure 220 up to the end of figure 2235)

Chorus — Minuet

Crotchet = 138

            (figure 224 up to the end of figure 2358)

Crotchet = quaver = 138

            (figure 236 up to the end of5)

 [38]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Crotchet = 50

            (figure 237 up to the end of figure 2385)

Arioso [#] Arioso

Più mosso Crotchet = 120

            (figure 239 up to the end of figure 2415)

Minim = 60 tranquillo (ma stesso tempo)

            (figure 241 up to the end of figure 2426)

Duet [#] Duett

Quaver = 60

            (figure 243 up to the end of figure 2484)

L’istesso tempo ma commodo

            (figure 249 up to the end of figure 2516)

 [39]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

(quasi arioso) [#] (quasi arioso)

Quaver = 72

            (figure 252 up to the end of figure 2535)

Lullaby [#] Schlummerlied

Anne and Chorus [#] Ann und Chor

Crotchet = 50

            (figure 254 up to the end of figure 2547)

Poco più mosso Crotchet = 63

            (figure 255 up to the end of figure 2555)

Tempo I Crotchet = 50

            (figure 256 up to the end of figure 2567)

Poco più mosso Crotchet = 63

            (figure 257 up to the end of figure 2575)

Tempo I Crotchet = 50

            (figure 258 up to the end of figure 2587)

Poco più mosso Crotchet = 63

            (figure 259 up to the end of figure 2594)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Crotchet = 56 circa

            (figure 260 up to the end of10)

Duettino [#] Duett

Quaver = 120

            (figure 261 up to the end of figure 2657)

Finale [#] Finale

Recitative and Chorus [#] Rezitativ und Chor

Quaver = 100

            (figure 266 up to the end of figure 2683)

Sempre l’istesso tempo

            (figure 269 up to the end of figure 2725)

Mourning-Chorus [#] Klage-Chor

Crotchet = 69

            (figure 273 up to the end of figure 2805 [attacca forward to figure 281]

                        (figure 2793: Curtain – Vorhang)

[40]

Epilogue [#] Epilog

Before the curtain. House lights up. [#] Vor dem Vorhang. Zuschauerraum hell.

            (figure 281 up to the end of figure 3096)

End of the opera [#] Ende der Oper

* Tempo change in the middle of bar 142.

** Bar 22818 is recitative without regard for the meter of the bar, and the words are emphasized naturally; this singing instruction comes into effect from the fourth quaver notes running to a total value of 5 quavers and 31 semiquavers.

*** The voices from offstage can be sung by Tom, Sellem, Trulove and Nick.

° Without restarting the figures.

°° Misprint >beseite< instead of >beiseite<. Typo in original.

°°° Each of the first four words are in the piano reduction across figure 2235.

 

Corrections / Errata

Full and Pocket scores 787Err

>page

    2 At figure 2, read 2/4 for 3/4 in all parts

  64 1 bar before 115, Cor. I, II last note is A not C

  64 1 bar before and 1 bar after 115, Timp., both notes are C not G

  70 2nd bar after 121, Coro, Tenors, first note is C not E

  70 2nd bar after 121, Timp., delete note D

108 1 bar before 174, all parts, meno ¦, not ¦

140 From 3rd to 5th bar after 20, Cor. I, read one octave higher than Cor. II, not / one third higher

140 At 21 add treble clef to Cor. I

337 4th bar after 174, Trtp. I, last note, add # to A

338 At 175, Trtp. I, first note, add # to A

341 3rd bar after 182, Vl. I, 4st note, add [natural sign] to A

341 4th bar after 182, Trtp. I, last note, add # to A

342 At 183, Trpt., I, first note, add # to A

347 5th bar after 190, Cembalo, left hand, 7th note is E# not D#

371 1 bar before 232, Coro, the rhythm of the bar should read as follows:<

[notes centre]

                        S. treble clef     quaver-d1 – quaver-d2 – quaver-d2 – quaver-b1 – crotchet-e1

                        A. treble clef     quaver-d1 – quaver-d1 – quaver-d1 – quaver-d1 – crotchet-e1

                                                our                   so–       ci–                     e–         ty

                        T. bass clef       quaver-g – quaver-g – quaver-g – quaver-g – crotchet-g

                        B. bass clef      quaver-G – quaver-g – quaver-g – quaver-g – crotchet-g

 

Style: Despite the opera seria setting there are no repetitions, only variations of composed parts. Since Strawinsky’s method of composition emphasised the syllabic, melodic passages have an as it were irregular rhythmic flow, resulting in an abundance of (musical) movement. The play with keys and differing polarisation serves to characterise musically each figure, an effect sometimes achieved by mere minimal alteration of intervals, like seconds. Where arias feature in the opera, the orchestra plays mostly accompagnato, while recitatives allow the orchestra to interpret the action more fully. Transitions to the secco recitative are made traditionally by way of the sixth chord. Mozart’s operas such as ‘Cosí fan tutte’ were Strawinsky’s stylistic models, whose lightness he wished to emulate and ‘Don Giovanni’ the moral epilogue of which returns in the ‘Rake’. Strawinsky was studying Mozart piano reductions at the time. Melismatic movements serves characterisation, and Strawinsky was particularly careful about prosody, as he was not very familiar with the English language. The passing of the Seasons is part of the composition. The story begins in Springtime on a clear sunny day and ends, again in Spring, on a starless night. Time relations of this kind may often be met with in Strawinsky’s work. For textual interpretation Strawinsky used the methods in practice since Mozart’s day: The music underscores the words or runs counter to them, serves to interpret a situation, paints and emphasises moods. Compositional gestures play an important part, a kind of technique of reminiscence is also apparent, and the first bars of certain thematic motifs reappear from various situations where they were used initially; thus there is what we may call an Anne-motif, a Fortuna-motif. The motifs chosen often have pictorial character, as is shown by the harpsichord motif accompanying Nick, appearing much like a shadow or cloud from another world. The play with opposing keys pays witness to opposing interests in the libretto, such as the major/minor third showing a dullness settling on the Tom-Anne relationship and dimming the Springtime mood, or else depicting a brightening in both. Rhythmic changes describe hectic action or else a new development in a given situation. Colour, ambitus, lesser or greater intervals, the use of diatonic or chromatic scales are consciously used to express meaning and receive their extra-musical justification from the libretto. – Strawinsky’s compositional method is a process of ascribing meaning. In the course of the card game scene, for example, the action of the game down even to Nick’s minutest attempt at cheating is represented by compositional means. Every stylistic element, even the inclusion of strains of popular melody (like the pop songs of today) is made subservient to characterisation, and Strawinsky thus manages to set what has reality or substance against the world of lies. By type-casting the figures (also a kind of polarisation) he achieves a kind of intellectual coldness which turns against the exuberance of psychologising in opera but also caused critics to say of the ‘Rake’ that is was ‘intellectual opera seria’ fit only for the concert stage, given its mixture of tragedy and the grotesque, where historicised elements of style are re-arranged in a neo-classicist attitude. Each individual number is set out in a formal classical pattern which is not given up, even during the most ecstatic moments.-

 

Dedication: A dedication is not known.

 

Duration: 2h 2038″ = I = 4209″ [(1. {1956″} : 033″, 440″, 233″, 702″, 508″) (2. {1344″} : 233″, 500″, 344″, 227″) (3. {829″} : 540″, 249″)]; II = 3907″ [(1. {1340″} : 642″, 446″, 212″) (2. {1437″} : 541″, 330″, 526″) (3. {1050″} : 532″, 518″)]; III = 5922″ [(1. {1648″} : 251″, 533″, 628″, 156″) (2. {1907″} : 220″, 441″, 830″, 336″) (3. {2327″} : 346″, 617″, 549″, 501″, 234″)].

 

Date of origin: Hollywood November 1947 up to 7. April 1951.

 

First performance: on 11th September 1951 in the Teatro La Fenice di Venezia with Robert Rounseville (Tom Rakewell), Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (Anne), Otakar Kraus (Nick Shadow), Raffaele Ariè (Trulove), Nell Tangeman (Mother Goose), Jennie Tourel (Türkenbab), Hugues Cuenod (Sellem), Emanuel Menkes (Wärter), the chorus and the orchestra of the Teatro alla Scala in Milan (choirmaster: Vittore Veneziani), the scenery by Ebe Colciaghi, the costumes by Gianni Ratto, the stage direction by Carl Ebert and under the direction of Igor Strawinsky*

* The second and the third performance were conducted by Ferdinand Leitner.

 

Remarks: The idea for a full-length opera came from Strawinsky himself. After he happened on the series of engravings by Hogarth while visiting the Chicago Art Museum in 1947, his plans became concrete and he shared them with his neighbour, Aldous Huxley, who alerted him to Auden, of whom Strawinsky had hitherto read only a commentary on the film ‘Night Train’. After initial enquiries from Ralph Hawkes, Strawinsky first contacted Auden on 6th October 1947. Strawinsky wanted seven solo parts, two acts of five and one act of two scenes and a choreographic interlude in the first act. He planned a number opera with spoken, yet action-tied dialogues in order to evade the traditional practice of recitative and with arias, duets, tercets in free verse supported by a small choir. He did not intend to compose a ‘dramma in musica’ nor to create a work for chamber orchestra. The hero could have been pictured ending his life in an old peoples’ home scratching a fiddle and the libretto should be generally based on Hogarth’s engravings. Auden agreed, whereupon the two artists worked together between 11th and 20th of November 1947 in Strawinksy’s Hollywood home. On 16th January 1948 Auden sent the first act, the second arrived on 24th January, followed by the third on 9th February. Strawinsky’s wishes regarding alterations, additions and rearrangements of verses were met by Auden as long as musical reasons prevailed. Since the statements pertaining to the beginnings and the progress of the ‘Rake’ made by Strawinsky in his book ‘Memories and Commentaries’ are not all correct, Robert Craft wrote an essay on the progression of the libretto and published it in the Appendix to the third volume of his Letters. The genesis of the composition was also minutely reconstructed by Craft, using the surviving sketchbooks from Strawinsky’s Estate. The whole is completed by details gleaned from the Letters. The prologue to the second scene of the third act was completed by Strawinsky on 11th December 1947 and he began the first act (no. 2) on 8th May 1948 and finished it 16th January 1949. The second Act was begun on 1st April 1949 with no. 5 f (Vary the song), in late May 1950 he continued the third act at no. 7 (What curious phenomena). The opera is nearing completion on 17th February 1951, merely the epilogue took until April 1951 to complete. The ‘Rake’ was finished on 14th May 1951, not too long before it was first performed. The première in Venice came about through the good offices of the author Nabokov, who was acquainted with the director of the music department of the Italian radio, Mario Labroca, and prevailed with him to secure the first performance of this work against a fee of twenty thousand dollars. To safeguard the success of his première, Strawinsky allowed no previews. Initially , the work was to have been conducted by Paul Breisach, General Director of Music of the San Francisco Opera House. He died, however, before Strawinsky had finished the ‘Rake’. Another artist much admired by Strawinsky who would have been his choice for the set design, Eugene Berman, relinquished his position beset by intrigues, much to Strawinsky’s regret. The quality of the première leaves room for doubt. Strawinsky was not in good health and passed the baton on to Ferdinand Leitner, who conducted the second performance but was severely criticised by the composer. Strawinsky’s conducting must have been rather problematic and Robert Rounseville, who sang the title role, must have been a failure. Needless to say, Strawinsky was rather unhappy with this first presentation of his work, nor was he any happier with its editor, who until late July 1961 had not published a pocket score. On 28th July 1961 he complained by letter from Santa Fé, stating if it was asking too much if he wished to have a correct pocket score of the ‘Rake’ for his 80th birthday, even if the profit did not exceed the expense. The fact that the recording of his opera was sold ‘only’ 5000 times in eleven years was not seen as a success either, and in 1964 Strawinsky approached the publishers for assistance, since a new production was not justified given the circumstances. The recording in question appeared on Columbia Records in March 1953 and was later replaced by the recording of June 1964. – Strecker found the score, after Strawinsky had played and sung it to him in English for two-and-a-half hours in New York in March 1950 when the work was still incomplete, to be ‘infinitely fine’, ‘clear’ and ‘transparent’, but, with a running time of three hours, risky in terms of its length. Strawinsky replied that it could not have been written any shorter. Strecker describes the enthusiasm with which Strawinsky explained details of the music to him. Exactly what these details were is not specified by Strecker. The latter described the meeting, which was the first time that they had seen one another after a ten-year interruption, as a mutually happy event, as if emigration and the War had never happened. If Strecker, who had a great deal to do in New York, was hoping to pick up their commercial relationship of old where they left off, he was to be disappointed. Ralph Hawkes had got in a long time ahead of him.

 

Significance: The ‘Rake’ is Strawinsky’s only full-length stage work. It ends his neo-classicist period.

 

Productions: 1951 Stuttgart* (Kurt Puhlmann, Ferdinand Leitner); 1951 Hamburg* (Günther Rennert, Wilhelm Schleuning); 1952 Wien (Günther Rennert, Heinrich Hollreiser); 1953 Boston-Universität (Sarah Caldwell, Igor Strawinsky); 1953 New York (George Balanchine, Fritz Reiner); 1953 Paris** (Louis Musy, André Cluytens); 1953 Edinburgh (Carl Ebert, Alfred Wallenstein); 1954 Glyndebourne (Carl Ebert, Paul Sacher); 1957 London; 1958 Frankfurt (Harry Buckwitz, Hermann Scherchen); 1961 Stockholm (Ingmar Bergmann, Michael Gielen); 1962 London (Glen Biam Shaw, Colin Davis); 1964 Dresden-Radebeul; 1967 Boston (Sarah Caldwell).

* Sung text German.

** Sung text French.

 

Corrections: The full score had hardly appeared in print, when Strawinsky’s list of printing errors came in. The radio performance of the work, directed by Paul Collaers, contained diverging tempi, due to faulty transcriptions for orchestra. The piano reduction contained new mistakes, not to be found in the full score. Among others, the first note of page 202 in the R.H. at no. 197 (meaning no. 197 1) should have been a major third higher, an E instead of a C (meaning e 2 instead of c 2). On page 303 the centre note of the first chord of semiquavers in the R.H. (meaning no. 197 1) must read f sharp instead of f natural and the centre note of the last chord e flat instead of e 1.

 

Versions: The publication rights were contracted with Boosey & Hawkes on 19th April 1948. Engraving and printing was done by Sturtz in Würzburg, a decision that was to cause problems which could not have been foreseen from the England or America of the time. On 29th June 1951 Strawinsky had seen all first corrections except for the two last scenes and the epilogue which he asked Stein to have sent to him by 30th July 1951 at the latest, since he intended to travel after that time. The timing at least proved right from then on and Stein presented Strawinsky in Venice with the three-volume printed edition of the full conductor’s score, thereby giving cause for yet another letter of complaint from him. One criticism was, that numerous printing errors had been left uncorrected, but far worse from Strawinsky’s point of view was the poor quality of the paper and printing. Why an English firm contracted out to a German printing works will have to remain speculation; obviously nobody had considered the state of the war-stricken country, where to obtain good quality paper must have been a problem to be solved only by inventive minds with good relations abroad. In his letter to Stein dated 28th July 1952 Strawinsky said the edition could merely be provisional” and wished to know what Stein intended doing: Prepare an errata list or — better — a whole new edition? The paper was so bad that the printing on the back shone through. The plates had moreover been so crowded that quavers appeared almost as semi-quavers, particularly in the recitatives, a condition that could be partly improved by using better quality paper. The preserved copy of the three-volume edition does not make Strawinsky’s criticism appear justified. The London copy (library signature H.78 b.e.) was, however, not printed in Würzburg, but in England in 1951. The London Library bound the three volumes together removing the covers and title pages and replacing them by machine-typed cover leaves reading IGOR STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / ACT I [Act II, Act III] BOOSEY & HAWKES LIMITED. It cannot therefore be the Venetian copy.

 

Version for two recorders: Nothing is known in the Strawinsky literature about the circumstances of the arrangement of the lullaby for two recorders. It is possible, that Strawinsky wanted to do his wife a favour. The contract with Boosey & Hawkes was concluded on 21st June 1960. Strawinsky’s share in the sales proceeds amounted to 7.5%. Strawinsky sent the corrected galley proofs to Rufina Ampenow on 2nd June 1960. The transcription appeared in print in that same year. The London Library notes the receipt of the complimentary copy as 4th November 1960.

 

Historical recordings: New York 1.-10. March 1953 with Hilde Güden (Anne), Martha Lipton (Goose), Blanche Thebom (Türkenbab), Eugene Conley (Tom), Lawrence Davidson (Wärter), Paul Franke (Sellem), Mac Harrell (Nick), Norman Scott (Trulove), the chorus and the orchestra of the Metropolitan Opera New York under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; London 16.-20., 22.-23. June 1964 with Don Garrard (Trulove), Judith Raskin (Anne), Alexander Young (Tom Rakewell), John Reardon (Nick Shadow), Jean Manning (Mother Goose), Regina Sarfaty (Baba the Turk), Kevin Miller (Sellem), Peter Tracey, Colin Tilney (Harfe), the The Sadlers Wells Opera Chorus (Chordirektor: John Barker), the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky. Strawinsky was particularly pleased with the 1953 recording.

 

CD-Edition: IX-1/117, IX-2/115 (recording 1964).

 

Autograph: The autograph of the orchestral score was donated to the University of Southern California in Los Angeles by Strawinsky himself on 9th September 1959.

 

Copyright: 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes; 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes in New York (Vocal Score); 1960 by Boosey & Hawkes London (Recorder arrangement)

 

Editions

a) Overview

781 1951 FuSc [Edition Würzburg]; 3 volumes; unidentified]

782 1951 FuSc; E; Boosey & Hawkes London; 130+119+164 p.; B & H 17853.

783 1951 VoSc; E-D; Boosey & Hawkes London; 240 pp. 4°; B. & H. 17088.

            783Straw1 ibd. [with annotations].

            783Straw2 ibd. [with annotations].

            78370 1970 ibd.

784 1960 Recorder (Lullaby); Boosey & Hawkes London; 3 pp.; B. & H. 18761.

            784[66] [1960] ibd.

785 1962 PoSc; E; Boosey & Hawkes London; 414 pp.; B. & H. 17853; 739.

            78562 1962 ibd.

            78563 1962 ibd.

            78569 1962 ibd.

786 1962 FuSc; E; Boosey & Hawkes London; 414 pp.; B. & H. 17853.

787Err 1966 Errata-List; Boosey & Hawkes London; p. 1; 17853.

b) Characteristic features

781 1951 Full score Edition Würzburg; three volumes; unidentified.

 

782 [missing], [missing],° // (Full score 3.2 x 23.2 x 30.7 (4° [4°]); sung text English; 3 volumes 130 [130] + 119 [119] + 164 [164] pages = [Ist volume] + 2 pages back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Symphonic Music / Modern Composers<* production data >849 No. 531<, page with publisher’s advertisements >Symphonic Music / Soli, Chorus and Orchestra<** production data >No. 537< [#] >8.49<] + [IInd volume:] 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Symphonic Music / Symphonies<*** production data >No. 530.< [#] >8.49.<] without back matter [IIIrd volume]; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified [exclusively 1st volume] 1st. page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< flush right above and next to movement title centred >Music by / Igor Stravinsky / (19481951)<; legal reservations [exclusively 1st volume] below type area flush left >Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York. / Copyright for all countries< flush right below production indication >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st. page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B & H 17853<; without end mark) // (1951)

° The British Library itself bound the three separate volumes together, one for each act, thus removing the title pages and all the inner title pages, and replacing them with typewritten pages. >IGOR STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / ACT I [Act II, Act III] BOOSEY & HAWKES Limited<.

* Compositions are advertised from >Béla Bartók< to >Igor Strawinsky / Le Baiser de la Fée, Ballet-Allegory / Le Chant du Rossignol, Symphonic Poem / Divertimento / Oedipus Rex, Opera Oratorio / Orpheus. Suite from the Ballet / Persephone, Melodrama / Pétrouchka. Suite from the Ballet / Pulcinella. Suite from the Ballet / Le Sacre du Printemps<. The following places of printing are listed: New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Capetown-Toronto-Paris.

** Compositions are advertised from >Béla Bartók< to >Leslie Woodgate<, amongst these >Igor Strawinsky / Mass for Mixed Chorus and Double Wind Quintet / Symphonie de Psaumes (Revised 1948)<. The following places of printing are listed: New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Capetown-Toronto-Paris.

*** Compositions are advertised from >George Antheil< to >Arnold van Wyk<, amongst these >Igor Strawinsky / Symphonies pour instruments à vent<. The following places of printing are listed: New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Capetown-Toronto-Paris.

 

783 IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°] / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / [°] / Vocal Score / Klavierauszug / BOOSEY & HAWKES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / (Der Wüstling) / an Opera in 3 Acts / Oper in 3 Akten / a Fable by [#] eine Fabel von / W. H. AUDEN AND CHESTER KALLMAN / Deutsche Übersetzung / von Fritz Schröder / Vocal Score by [#] Klavierauszug von / Leopold Spinner / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON NEW YORK PARIS BONN SYDNEY CAPE TOWN TORONTO // [Text on spine:] The Rake’s Progress [oblong:] VOCAL // (Vocal score with chant sewn 23.8 x 31 (4° [4°]); sung text English-German; 240 [240] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper brown-red on reseda green cloudy structure [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 5 pages front matter [title page, list of persons >CHARACTERS< English + specification of the location English + legal reservations English >Copyright 1951 in USA by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright for all Countries< / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form / whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete opera or / parts thereof are strictly reserved<, index of rols >PERSONEN< German + specification of the location German + legal reservations >Copyright 1951 in USA by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright for all Countries< / German centred >Alle Rechte der szenischen Aufführung, Rundfunkübertragung, Television, der mecha– / nischen Wiedergabe jedweder Art (einschließlich Film), der Übersetzung des Textbuches, / vollständig oder teilweise, sind vorbehalten<, legend >ORCHESTRATION< English with notes on performance English + legend >ORCHESTERBESETZUNG< German with notes on performance German] without back matter; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by W. H. Auden / and Chester Kallman< flush right centred >Music by Igor Strawinsky / 194851<; translator specified 1st page of the score next to movement title flush left >Deutsche Übersetzung von Fritz Schröder<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1951 in U. S. A. Copyright for all Countries< flush right partly in italics >All rights reserved / Tous droits réservés<; plate number [exclusively 1. page of the score] >B. & H. 17088<; practical note on performance with asterisk p. 137 figure 28818 II. act regarding the first quaver note of the role of Nick [exclusively] German >*) Ohne Rücksicht auf Taktmetrum mit natürlicher Wortbetonung< [without concern for the meter of the bar and with a natural emphasis of the words]; production indications p. 240 below type area flush left >Printed in Germany< flush right as end mark >Stich und Druck der Universitätsdruckerei H. Stürtz A. G., Würzburg.<) // (1951)

° Ornamental dividing horizontal line of 9 cm centrally thickening to 0.1 cm.

 

783Straw1

 

783Straw2

 

78370 IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°] / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / [°] / Vocal Score / Klavierauszug / BOOSEY & HAWKES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / (Der Wüstling) / an Opera in 3 Acts / Oper in 3 Akten / a Fable by [#] eine Fabel von / W. H. AUDEN AND CHESTER KALLMAN / Deutsche Übersetzung / von Fritz Schröder / Vocal Score by [#] Klavierauszug von / Leopold Spinner / BOOSEY & HAWKES / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // [without text on spine] // (Vocal score with chant sewn 1.6 x 23.6 x 31 (4° [4°]); sung text English-German ; 240 [240] pages + 4 cover pages black on orange thicker paper dark beige on light beige darkly grained in a framework [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 4 pages front matter [title page, list of persons >CHARACTERS< + specification of the location English + list of persons with a description of the settings and the names transliterated >PERSONEN< with transliteration of names + specification of the location German, page with (world) premiere data Italian + legal reservations English centred >Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright for all Countries< justified text >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form whatsoever / (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete opera or parts thereof are strictly reserved< German centred >Alle Rechte der szenischen Aufführung, Rundfunkübertragung, Television, der mechanischen Wiedergabe / jedweder Art (einschließlich Film), der Übersetzung des Textbuches, vollständig oder teilweise, / sind vorbehalten<, legend >ORCHESTRATION< English with notes on performance English + legend >ORCHESTERBESETZUNG< German with notes on performance German] without back matter; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1. page of the score paginated p. 1 between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by W. H. Auden / and Chester Kallman< flush right centred >Music by Igor Strawinsky / 194851<; translator specified 1. page of the score below movement title flush left >Deutsche Übersetzung von Fritz Schröder<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York < flush right partly in italics >Tonsättning förbjudes / All rights reserved / Tous droits réservés<; plate number [exclusively 1. page of the score] >B. & H. 17088<; practical note on performance with asterisk p. 137 figure 28818 II. act regarding the first quaver note of the role of Nick [exclusively] German >*) Ohne Rücksicht auf Taktmetrum mit natürlicher Wortbetonung< [without concern for the meter of the bar and with a natural emphasis of the words]; end number p. 240 flush left >3·70 L&B<; production indication p. 240 below type area flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1970)

° Ornamental dividing horizontal line of 9 cm, centrally thickening to 0.2 cm.

 

784 IGOR STRAVINSKY / LULLABY / from / The Rake’s Progress / Recomposed for two Recorders / BOOSEY & HAWKES // (Edition [unsewn] 23.4 x 31 (4° [4°]); 3 [2] pages without cover with title page black on white + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >LULLABY / from “The Rake’s Progress”<; author specified 1. page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right >Igor Stravinsky<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1949, 1950, 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / This arrangement © Copyright 1960 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / All rights reserved<; production indication 1. page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 18761<; without end mark) // (1960)

 

784[66] [°] LULLABY / from “The Rake’s Progress” / IGOR STRAVINSKY / Recomposed for two Recorders / Boosey & Hawkes // IGOR STRAVINSKY / LULLABY / from / “The Rake’s Progress” / Recomposed for two Recorders / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // (Edition unsewn 21.5 x 27.9 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 3 [2] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper [a front cover title page designed with pictorial elements, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production data >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >RECORDER MUSIC<** + production data >No. 12a< [#] >4.66<; title head >LULLABY / from “The Rake’s Progress”<; author specified 1. page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right >Igor Stravinsky<; legal reservations 1. page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1949, 1950, 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / This arrangement © Copyright 1960 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / Sole Sellings Agents: BOOSEY & HAWKES MUSIC PUBLISHERS Ltd.,<°° flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1. page of the score below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 18761<; without end mark) // [1966]

° Flush left 3.6 x 27.9 white stylized piano keyboard flush left and with a side view of a recorder in brown 3.6 x 27.9.

°° Original spelling.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price informations and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

** Compositions are advertised without specification of places of printing from >Holst< to >Yoult/Hunt<, amongst these >Stravinsky / Lullaby, from “The Rake’s / Progress” / descant and treble recorders<.

 

785 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // [text on spine gold tooling oblong:] >STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS< // (Pocket score imitation leather 2.9 x 19.3 [18,3] x 27.2 [26.7] ([Lex 8°]); sung text English; 414 [414] pages + 4 cover pages dark blue black [front cover title as Strawinsky’s intertwined monogramm >I> in >S< 1.8 x 4.0 gold tooling, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page, page with legal reservation centre centred >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< centre not centred italic >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, rols >CHARACTERS< English with specification of the location, legend >ORCHESTRATION< English with notes on performance, page with (world) premiere data >First Performance< Italian, empty page] without back matter; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< above and next to movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; legal reservations 1. page of the score below type area flush left >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right below production indication >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17853<; end number p. 414 flush left >5·62 L & B<; production indications 1. page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush right >Printed in England< p. 414 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1962)

° Dividing horizontal line of 5.8 cm.

 

78562 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // [text on spine gold tooling oblong:] >STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS< // (Pocket score imitation leather 2.9 x 19.3 [18,3] x 27.2 [26.7] ([Lex 8°]); sung text English; 414 [414] pages + 4 cover pages dark blue black [front cover title as Strawinsky’s intertwined monogramm >I> in >S< 1.8 x 4.0 gold tooling, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page, page with legal reservation centre centred >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< centre not centred italic >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, list of persons >CHARACTERS< English with specification of the location, legend >ORCHESTRATION< English with notes on performance, page with (world) premiere data >First Performance< Italian, empty page] without back matter; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< above and next to movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right below production indication >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17853<; end number p. 414 flush left >12·62 L & B<; production indications 1st page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush right >Printed in England< p. 414 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1962)

° Dividing horizontal line of 5.8 cm.

 

78563 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON / [text on spine gold tooling oblong:] >STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS< // (Pocket score imitation leather 18.3 x 26.7 [2.7 x 19 x 27.3] ([Lex 8°]); sung text English; 414 [414] pages + 4 pages dark blue [front cover title as Strawinsky’s intertwined monogramm >I> in >S< 1.8 x 4.0 in gold tooling, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page, legal reservation >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, list of persons >CHARACTERS< English with information on the time periods in the plot , legend >ORCHESTRATION< English with notes on performance English without duration data, (world) premiere data >First Performance< Italian, empty page] without back matter; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< above and next to movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; legal reservations 1. page of the score below type area flush left >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17853<; end number p. 414 flush left >12·63 L & B<; production indications 1. page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush right >Printed in England< p. 414 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1963)

° Dividing horizontal line of 5.8 cm.

 

78569 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // [Text on spine:] STRAVINSKY / [°°] / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS // (Pocket score imitation leather 18.4 x 26.6 [3.6 x 19.1 x 27.3] ([Lex 8°]); sung text English; 414 [414] pages + 4 cover pages dark blue with text on spine gold tooling oblong [front cover title as Strawinsky’s intertwined monogramm >I> in >S< 1.8 x 4.0 in gold tooling, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter (+ 2 binding pages) [title page, legal reservation justified text >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< + legal reservation italic >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, list of persons >CHARACTERS< English with information on the time periods in the plot, legend >ORCHESTRATION< English + notes on performance without headline English without duration data, (world) premiere data >First Performance< Italian, empty page] without back matter (+ 2 binding pages); title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< above and next to movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; legal reservations 1. page of the score below type area flush left >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17853<; end number p. 414 flush left >11·69 L & B<; production indications 1. page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush right >Printed in England< p. 414 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1969)

° Dividing horizontal line of 5.8 cm.

°° Dividing horizontal line of 2.4 cm.

 

786 Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / Full Score / BOOSEY & HAWKES // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // (Full score [library binding] 23.5 x 31 (4° [4°]); sung text English; 414 [414] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper orange-red on green beige grey [front cover title, empty page, [missing], [missing] ] + 6 pages front matter [title page, legal reservation >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, list of persons with a description of the settings >CHARACTERS< English, legend >ORCHESTRATION< English + notes on performance English, (world) premiere data Italian, empty page] without back matter; title head >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; authors specified 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] between title head and movement title >PRELUDE< flush left centred >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< above and next to movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; legal reservations 1. page of the score below type area flush left >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1. page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 17853<; without end marks) // (1962)

 

787Err Igor Stravinsky: THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Errata to Full and Study Scores // (15 corrections listed according to page number in the score and with figure references, the last of which has a musical example; 1 page without page number; 8°; the plate number appears underneath the block of corrections flush left >B. & H. 17853<; the end number is underneath the page of corrections on the same level as the plate number flush right >9.66<) // 1966

 

78

T h e  R a k e ’ s  P r o g r e s s

an Opera in three Acts, a Fable by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman — Der Wüstling. Oper in drei Akten, eine Fabel von W.[ystan] H.[ugh] Auden und Chester [Simon] Kallman — La Carrière d’un libertin. Opéra en trois actes — Carriera d’un libertino. Favola in tre atti di W. H. Auden e C. Kallman

 

Titel: Der deutsche Titel ist immer umstritten gewesen, weil der Titelheld leichtsinnig, aber nicht schlecht ist. Lichtenberg entschied sich für die Übersetzung Der Weg des Liederlichen. Ursprünglich übersetzte man mit Die Geschichte eines Wüstlings und verkürzte dann in den heute an den Bühnen gebräuchlich gewordenen Fehltitel Der Wüstling, obwohl schon Rennert gleichfalls für den Begriff liederlich eintrat. Die italienische Übertragung Carriera d’un Libertino, die auf Professor Passinetti zurückgeht und nach der auch die französische La Carrière d’un libertin gebildet wurde, trifft den Sachverhalt am besten. Ob der Name Rakewell statt als Steigerung doppeldeutig zu verstehen ist, zumal Thomas vom hebräischen Ursprung her Zwilling bedeutet und alle anderen Personennamen Handlungscharakteristika vorstellen (Shadow = Schatten; Anna = Gnade; Goose = Gans; Sellem = Verkäufer; Bab = schwätzen; Trulove = treulieb = bieder), ist nie thematisiert worden.

 

Besetzung: a) Erstausgabe (Rollen): Trulove (Bass/Baß), Anne, his daughter – seine Tochter (Soprano/Sopran), Tom Rakewell (Tenor), Nick Shadow (Baritone/Bariton), Mother Goose – Mutter Goose (Mezzo-soprano/Mezzosopran), Baba, the Turk – Baba, genannt Türkenbab ((Mezzo-soprano/Mezzosopran), Sellem, auctioneer – Auktionator (Tenor), Keeper of the madhouse – Wärter des Irrenhauses (Bass/Baß), Whores and Roaring Boys – Dirnen und gröhlende Burschen, Citizens – Bürger, Madmen – Irre; ~ (Orchester Nomenklatur): 2 Flauti, 2 Oboi, Corno Inglese, 2 Clarinetti in Sib, 2 Fagotti, 2 Corni in Fa, 2 Trombe in Si, Violini I, Violini II, Viole, Violoncelli, Contrabassi, Cembalo (Piano), Timpani; ~ (Orchestra Legend): 2 flutes (2nd Fl. = Picc.), 2 oboes (2nd ob. = Cor Angl.), 2 clarinets in B flat, 2 bassoons, 2 horns in F, 2 trumpets in B flat, 1st violins, 2nd violins, Violas°, Violoncellos°, Double basses°, Timpani, Cembalo (Pianoforte) – 2 Flöten (2. Fl. = kl. Fl.), 2 Oboen (2. Ob.= Englisch Hr.), 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 2 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in B, Erste Geigen, Zweite Geigen, Bratschen, Violoncelli, Bässe, Pauken, Cembalo (Klavier); b) Aufführungsanforderungen: 1 Sopran, 2 Mezzosoprane, 2 Tenöre, 1 Bariton, 2 Bässe, vierstimmig* gemischter Chor (Sopran, Alt**, Tenor, Baß), kleine Flöte (= 2. große Flöte), 2 große Flöten (2. große Flöte = kleine Flöte), 2 Oboen (2. Oboe = Englischhorn), Englischhorn (= 2. Oboe), 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 2 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in B, Cembalo, Klavier***, Pauken, 4 Solo-Violinen, 3 Solo-Bratschen, 2 Solo-Violoncelli, Kontrabaß-Solo, Streicher (Erste Violinen****, Zweite Violinen****, Bratschen**, Violoncelli**, Kontrabässe)

° unterschiedliche Klein– und Großschreibung original.

* bei Alt-Teilung fünfstimmig.

** zweifach geteilt.

*** Klavier nur in der Kirchhofsszene.

**** dreifach geteilt.

 

Fachpartien: Trulove: Seriöser Baß (mittlere Partie); Anne: Lyrischer, auch jugendlich-dramatischer Sopran (große Partie); Tom Rakewell: Jugendlicher Heldentenor (große Partie); Nick Shadow: Charakterbariton (große Partie); Mutter Goose: Spielalt (kleine Partie); Baba: Dramatischer Mezzosopran (große Partie); Sellem: Spieltenor (mittlere Partie); Wärter: Charakterbaß (kleine Partie).

 

Inhalt: [I,1:] Frühlingsnachmittag auf dem Lande irgendwo in England vor Truloves Haus. Tom und Anne sprechen von ihrer Liebe zueinander. Trulove sieht das Verhältnis seiner Tochter mit gemischten Gefühlen. Er schickt Anne ins Haus und bietet Tom eine Stelle in einer Bank an, die dieser aber nicht haben will, weil er sich dafür zu gut, weil zu großen Dingen berufen fühlt und insgeheim in Trulove einen Narren sieht, der nicht weiß, wie man das große Glück macht, auf das er sich verlassen will. Als Tom allein ist, taucht Nick Shadow auf, geht mit ihm ins Haus und verkündet Tom in Anwesenheit der beiden Hausbewohner den eingetretenen Wandel seiner Lebensverhältnisse. Ein Onkel hat Tom sein Vermögen hinterlassen. Alle sind beschwingt, doch fällt auch ein Schatten auf die junge Liebe. Tom muß jetzt selbstverständlich zu seinen Geschäften nach London eilen, verspricht aber, Anne zu holen, sobald er sich eingelebt hat. Er nimmt Shadow für offengelassenen Lohn in seine Dienste und verabschiedet sich von Trulove und Anne. Der Weg eines Liederlichen beginnt. – [I,2:] Ein Bordell in London. Dirnen und Burschen singen und grölen ein Lied auf Venus und Mars. Nick und Tom kommen dazu. Nick hat Tom Verhaltensweisen eingetrichtert, die dieser nun vor der Bordellbesitzerin Goose aufsagt: sich selbst nichts schuldig zu bleiben, Prüde und Bekehrer zu meiden, der Natur gleich der Schönheit zu folgen, die Jugend hat, nur leider stirbt, und dem Genuß zu leben. Als er gegen die Liebe sprechen soll, bleibt ihm die Antwort im Halse stecken. Die Kuckucksuhr schlägt eins. Mit einem Zauberzeichen läßt Nick die Uhr rückwärts auf zwölf laufen. Tom beginnt zu trinken. Nick hält eine Ansprache an die Gesellschaft, in der er Tom als reichen Mann, als Dienstherrn und als Freund vorstellt. Tom preist die Liebe. Die Dirnen finden sein Lied trübsinnig, aber gerade deshalb gefällt er ihnen und sie bieten sich ihm an. Doch die Bordellwirtin pocht auf ältere Rechte und sichert sich Tom, während Nick die Szene beobachtet. Die Dirnen und Burschen singen ein anzügliches Lied. Nick erhebt sein Glas. Tom soll seinen Traum austräumen. Denn wenn er aufwachen wird, ist es mit allem vorbei. – [I,3:] Vollmond-Herbstnacht über Truloves Garten. Anne kommt reiseferig aus dem Haus, mit sich selbst im Zweifel, ob es eine gute Idee ist, Tom in London aufzusuchen. Sie singt ein Lied auf die Liebe, die Nacht und den Mond. Der ahnungslose Trulove ruft nach ihr. Schon will sie sich wieder zum Haus zurückwenden. Doch dann steht ihr Entschluß fest. Der Vater ist stark, Tom ist schwach. Tom ist es, der Hilfe braucht. Sie kniet nieder und betet für den Vater, für Tom und für sich selbst. Sie steht auf und singt ein Lied auf die Unverbrüchlichkeit der Liebe, die nicht wanken darf. Und ihre Liebe gehört Tom. – [II,1:] Frühstückszimmer in Rakewells Londoner Haus an einem strahlend sonnigen Morgen. Tom ist im Herzen krank. Der Lärm, die Großstadt, das leichtfertige Londoner Leben setzen ihm zu. Er denkt an Anne. Nick tritt ein und überreicht ihm ein Plakatbild der Türkenbab. Sie tritt auf dem Jahrmarkt auf und ist mit ihrem Bart so häßlich, daß sogar kampferprobte Soldaten in Ohnmacht fielen, wenn sie sie sahen. Nick will Tom mit ihr verheiraten. Wer frei sein wolle, müsse Lüsternheit und Gewissen von sich fernhalten. Tom denkt an die Sensation, die seine Heirat mit der Türkenbab auslösen wird, und willigt nach einigem Widerstreben schließlich lachend ein. – [II,2:] Anne hat ihren Entschluß wahrgemacht und steht nun zur Zeit der herbstlichen Abenddämmerung mit Herzklopfen vor Toms Haus. Während sie sich noch selbst Mut zuspricht, hält ein pompöser Dienerzug mit einer Sänfte vor dem Haupteingang. Dem Text zufolge muß man vermuten, daß es der Hochzeitstag von Tom und der Türkenbab ist. Jetzt tritt Tom Rakewell ins Licht. Anne und Tom gehen verwirrt aufeinander zu. Anne will, daß Tom mit ihr heimkommt. Tom will, daß Anne wieder zurückgeht. Sie soll nicht im Schmutz der Großstadt untergehen, er kann sich nicht mehr von ihm lösen. Der Dialog wird unvermutet von der Türkenbab unterbrochen, die in ihrer Sänfte sitzt und aussteigen möchte, dies aber ohne fremde Hilfe nicht kann oder nicht will. Es entwickelt sich jetzt eine dreigeteilte Szene zwischen einer fassungslosen Anne, einer im Pausenabstand unentwegt plärrend dazwischenschimpfenden Türkenbab und einem Tom, der das, was er machen soll, nicht will, und das, was er machen möchte, nicht darf. Er muß Anne gestehen, Bab geheiratet zu haben. Anne und Tom monologisieren, die eine, um ihre Fassungslosigkeit zu bewältigen, der andere, um sich die Ausweglosigkeit seiner Situation zu gestehen. Schließlich geht Anne fort, und Tom hilft seiner Frau aus der Sänfte. Von allen Seiten kommen Leute herbeigelaufen, die von der Ankunft der Türkenbab gehört haben und sie sehen wollen. Während Tom ins Haus geht, zieht Bab ihren Schleier zur Seite, zeigt ihren wallenden schwarzen Vollbart, wirft der Menge Kußhändchen zu und folgt Tom mit einer theatralischen Abgangsgeste. Unter verzückten Bab-Rufen schließt die Szene. – [II,3:] Rakes Frühstückszimmer, überladen mit allerlei exotisch-seltsamen Gegenständen und ausgestopften Tieren. Tom ist übler Laune, und Bab plappert pausenlos sinnlose Nichtigkeiten vor sich hin. Als sie auf Tom zugeht, um ihn zärtlich zu umarmen, stößt dieser sie zurück. Bab fühlt sich verschmäht und erniedrigt, bricht in eine wilde Eifersuchtsszene aus und zerschlägt einen Gegenstand nach dem anderen auf dem Boden. Tom springt schließlich auf und stülpt ihr seine Perücke über den Kopf, so daß sie schweigt und still sitzen bleibt. Dann schläft er vor Verzweiflung und Erschöpfung ein. Nick tritt auf. Er schiebt einen großen Gegenstand vor sich her, der angeblich eine Maschine ist, mit der man aus Steinen Brot machen kann. Er zeigt dem Publikum, wie er damit Tom betrügen wird; das Brot, das herauskommt, hat er vorher schon hineingesteckt. Tom wacht auf und hat die Szene der Steine-in-Brot-Verwandlung als angeblichen Traum mitbekommen. Nick betrügt ihn in der angekündigten Weise und Tom ist begeistert. Er hofft, durch eine gute Tat Anne wiedergewinnen zu können. Seine Maschine wird die Menschen ihre Sorgen vergessen machen und sie werden bald dort sein, woraus man sie vertrieb, im Paradies auf Erden. Nick wendet sich dreist an das Publikum, rühmt sich seines Handelns und bietet ihm ein gutes Geschäft an. Tom Rakewell erklärt er, es sei bis zur Erfüllung seines Traumes noch ein weiter Weg. Man brauche Kapital und Partner. Tom sieht das ein und ist voller Dankbarkeit, daß Nick ihm alle Arbeit abnehmen will. Auf Nicks Frage, ob man nicht auch seine Frau von seinem Glück unterrichten solle, antwortet Tom nur, er habe keine Frau mehr, er habe sie begraben. – [III,1:] Tom ist bankrott und hat viele Unschuldige mit in seinen finanziellen Untergang gerissen. Bis in die höchsten Kreise hinein hat es Selbstmorde gegeben, viele Familien sind verelendet. Seine persönliche Habe steht zur Versteigerung an. In seinem Londoner Haus drängen sich Scharen von Leuten, um die Versteigerungsobjekte in Augenschein zu nehmen. Anne tritt auf. Sie sucht Tom und bekommt auf ihre Fragen die widersprüchlichsten, auch ironische, Antworten. Vielleicht ist er geflohen, vielleicht ist er tot. Sollte man seiner habhaft werden, wartet auf ihn das Gefängnis. Der Auktionator Sellem beginnt lautstark, sachkundig und wortgewandt mit der Versteigerung, die nach und nach immer erregter wird. Als er schließlich einen besonders seltsamen, mit einer Perücke versehenen Gegenstand versteigern will und beim Zuschlagruf die Perücke davon abzieht, ist es Bab, die während der ganzen Zeit ihren Platz nicht verlassen hat und jetzt ihre Kantilene an derselben Stelle weitersingt, an der sie durch Tom unterbrochen wurde. Dann widersetzt sie sich wütend der weiteren Versteigerung. Anne tritt auf. Bab, die sich beruhigt hat, wird sichtlich milder gestimmt. Die beiden Frauen sprechen miteinander. Baba wird zu ihrer Kunst zurückkehren. Anne, die Tom weiterhin liebt und der Bab zusichert, von Tom geliebt zu werden, soll bei Tom bleiben, der ein schwankend Rohr im Winde sei. Anne macht sich Vorwürfe, nicht treu genug gewesen zu sein. Man hört Tom und Nick von der Straße her ein dummes Lied singen. Die Menge schlägt sich auf einmal auf Annes und Toms Seite. Sie solle zu ihm gehen, sonst sei es zu spät für ihn. Toms und Nicks Stimmen verklingen in der Ferne. Die Auktion ist vorbei. Bab verlangt von Sellem, ihre Kutsche herbeizurufen. Sie tritt so herrisch auf, daß Sellem gehorcht und ihr sogar in den Wagen hilft, den er eigentlich verkaufen wollte. Die Menge weicht zurück. – [III,2:] Sternenlose Nacht auf dem Friedhof. Nick fordert vor einem offenen Grab von Tom seinen Lohn ein. Tom will ihn bezahlen, wenn er wieder zu Reichtum gekommen ist. Aber Nick will die Seele Toms, der endlich einsehen soll, wen er sich gedungen hat. Schon schlägt die Uhr langsam auf die Zwölf zu, der vorgesehenen Todesstunde Toms, als der übermütig gewordene Nick den Schlag anhält und Tom ein Kartenspiel vorschlägt, das Tom nach menschlichem Ermessen nicht gewinnen kann. Dreimal spielen sie, und dreimal errät Tom in aussichtsloser Lage durch sein Erinnern an Anne und ihre Hilfe die richtige Karte, und vor dem dritten Spiel erkennt er an der gespaltenen Hufspur im Sande, wer sein Begleiter ist. Er hat sein Leben gerettet; aber Nick, der nun an Toms Stelle ins Grab sinken muß, verwüstet ihm mit einem letzten Zauberspruch den Verstand. – [III,3:] Im Irrenhaus hält Tom vor anderen Geisteskranken eine Ansprache über die bevorstehende Ankunft von Venus, die ihren Adonis besuche. Anne tritt ein. Der Wärter, der Anne darüber aufgeklärt hat, daß der irre Tom harmlos sei und am liebsten auf den Namen Adonis höre, zieht sich zurück, nachdem ihm Anne etwas Geld gegeben hat. Sie redet Tom mit Adonis an. Tom springt auf und huldigt seiner Venus, indem er gleichzeitig um Verzeihung bittet. Während sie ihn in ihre Arme nimmt, beginnt er zu taumeln. Anne läßt ihn zu Boden gleiten. Tom bettet sein Haupt in ihren Schoß und bittet, sie möge ihm ein Wiegenlied singen. Unter ihrem Lied schläft er wie ein Kind friedlich ein. Trulove kommt, seine Tochter heimzuholen. Das Märchen sei zu Ende. Anne folgt ihm, nachdem sie sich ein letztes Mal von Tom verabschiedet hat. Als Trulove, Anne und der Wärter gegangen sind, springt Tom auf und ruft nach seiner Venus, dann nach seinem Gefolge, das er beschuldigt, ihm Venus geraubt zu haben. Die Irren kommen herbei und erklären Tom, niemand sei hier gewesen. Tom spürt den Tod nahen. Er ruft Orpheus, die Nymphen und Schäfer an, sie möchten um Adonis weinen, den Venus liebte. – [Epilog:] Alle solistisch Mitwirkenden treten vor den Vorhang, Tom ohne Perücke, Bab ohne Bart, und singen die Moral der Geschichte: Anne, daß nicht jedem liederlichen Mann eine treue Anne zur Seite steht, Bab, daß die Männer nur Narrheiten wollten und alles andere nur Theater sei, Tom, daß man sich in der Jugend nicht zum Cäsar und Vergil träumen und Obacht geben möge, nicht als Rake aufzuwachen, Trulove, daß sich alles so verhalte, wie die vorigen es darstellten, Nick, daß mancher glaube, es gäbe ihn nicht, und sich am Ende wünschte, es wäre so. Dann vereinigen sie sich zum Schlußchor, der mit dem Gedanken schließt, daß der Teufel sein Feld immer bestellt findet, wo Faule auf der Welt sind, und die Früchte seien die Damen und Herren im Zuschauerraum.

 

Vorlage: Das Libretto wurde von Wystan Hugh Auden und Chester Simon Kallman nach der achtteiligen Kupferstich-Serie The Rake’s Progress des englischen Malers und Kupferstechers William Hogarth (16971764) aus dem Jahre 17321735 gearbeitet, die so berühmt war, daß sie schon Georg Christoph Lichtenberg (17421799) mit einem Buchkommentar versah, den Goethe 1795 als eine der drei aufsehenerregendsten Veröffentlichungen auf dem damaligen Buchmarkt bezeichnete. Kallman schrieb den Schluß der ersten Szene des ersten Akts nach der Arie Since it is not by merit sowie die ganze zweite Szene, ferner die erste Szene des zweiten Akts bis zum Ende von Toms Arie Vary the song und wiederum die nachfolgende zweite Szene vollständig. Vom dritten Akt gehen Teile der ersten Szene sowie die vollständige Kartenspielszene auf ihn zurück. Bei dem nicht von Kallman herrührenden Teil der ersten Szene handelt es sich um den Bühnendialog zwischen Tom und Shadow. Auden war vorrangig Lyriker und suchte sich für dramatische Partien der Oper Hilfe. Die einzeln titelcharakterisierten zeitkritischen Kupferstiche Hogarths im Originalformat Breite x Höhe ca. 32 x 39 cm (englisches Maß Breite x Höhe approx. 12,5 x 16 Zoll) [1. The Heir (Der Erbe); 2. The Levee (Der Morgenempfang); 3. The Orgy (Die Orgie); 4. The Arrest (Die Festnahme); 5. The Mariage (Die Heirat); 6. The Gaming Haus (Die Spielhölle); 7. The Prison (Das Gefängnis); 8. The Madhouse (Das Irrenhaus)] wurden nach acht Ölgemälden (Format in Zentimetermessung Breite x Höhe 62,2 x 75) gestochen, die sich heute im Sir John Soane’s Museum in London befinden. Auden konnte mit der Hogarthschen Bilderfolge und ihrer bürgerlichen Moral, mit der sich Strawinsky identifizierte, ohne sich auf sozialkritische Bahnen ableiten zu lassen, nicht viel anfangen und suchte ihre Aussage zu unterlaufen. So brachte er Momente ins Spiel, die bei Hogarth nicht zu finden sind und an die Strawinsky ursprünglich auch nicht gedacht hat, wie etwa den personifizierten Teufel, der das Rake-Bild insofern verschiebt, als der Rake jetzt nicht mehr selbstverantwortlich handelt, sondern passend zur neurasthenischen Selbstentschuldigungstendenz des 20. Jahrhunderts in die Rolle des Verführten eingemessen wird. Sie läßt sich gleichzeitig auch tiefenpsychologisch als Einheit Tom-Nick gleich Gutes und Böses in einer Person im Sinne eines anderen Ich umdeuten. Bei Hogarth ist der Rake ein in eine reiche Familie hineingeborenes Kind, das mit Geld groß geworden ist und von dem man die Fähigkeit des Umgangs mit Geld hätte erwarten können. Was er verpraßt, ist sein Erbe. Bei Auden ist der Rake ursprünglich ein armer Teufel, dem der wirkliche Teufel durch einen Zaubertrick ein unbekanntes Onkel-Erbe zufallen läßt, das es eigentlich nicht gibt. Was der Audenschen Teufelskonstruktion fehlt, ist das göttliche Gegenüber, dessen Rolle daher Anne übernehmen muß. Dabei ist Nick nicht der Teufel persönlich, der über die Hölle herrscht, sondern lediglich einer seiner Abgesandten, der selbst wieder den Weisungen der Hölle unterliegt und der am Ende nach russischer Vorstellung sogar überlistet werden kann. Ingmar Bergmann wird später Strawinsky dadurch beeindrucken, daß er in seiner Stockholmer Inszenierung Tom Rakewell am Ende die Züge von Jesus Christus verleiht und aus Anne eine Art Mutter Gottes macht, dabei der Türkenbab jegliche komische Exaltiertheit nimmt, die bei Auden und Strawinsky als Kontrastfigur des exotisch Übertriebenen Anne gegenübergestellt wird. Audens Lehre, mit der real existierenden Hölle kann der Mensch ganz gut auch ohne Gott auskommen, sofern er eine Frau wie Anne an und auf seiner Seite hat, war durchaus modern, widersprach aber sowohl Strawinskys religiöser wie Hogarths sozialkritischer Denkweise. Die biblischen Anleihen des Textes, wie sie etwa in der Stein-Brot-Maschinen-Szene zum Ausdruck kommen, die auf einen anders als Christus der Teufelsversuchung erlegenen Menschen abzielen mögen, die antiken Vorstellungen, den Sehenden blind oder irr erscheinen zu lassen, weil er erst außerhalb der Welt diese erkennen kann, werden durch die realen Vorgänge in ihr Gegenteil verwandelt. Am Ende verdämmert im Irrenhaus, was an Tom noch gut ist; was schlecht an ihm ist, liegt längst auf dem Friedhof, und die junge Frau reist an der Hand ihres Vaters in ihr Häuschen mit Vorgarten ins Dorf zurück. Dabei zielte Auden-Strawinskys moralische Schlußformel nicht einmal eigentlich auf Leichtsinn, sondern auf Faulheit ab, dessen Opfer der Rake wird. Selbst noch Toms beglückendes Erlebnis, mit der Brotmaschine das Elend der Welt lindern zu können, bleibt eine Illusion, nicht nur, weil die Maschine ein Schwindel ist, sondern weil Tom nicht das mindeste aus eigenem Antrieb unternimmt, weder die Maschine erfunden hat noch irgendetwas zu ihrer Verbreitung zutut. Am Ende der Oper zieht außer Trulove, der charakteristischerweise ebenfalls nichts Selbständiges zu sagen weiß, jede der Theaterfiguren aus dem Spiel ihre eigene Lehre: Nicht jedem Mann gibt Gott eine Anne zur Seite (Anne); ein Mann fällt auf Narretei herein, und was er tut, ist immer nur Theater (Baba); wer Cäsar und Vergil gleichen möchte, wacht nur zu schnell als Rake auf (Tom); der Teufel ist überall, und die Menschen möchten glauben, es gäbe ihn nicht (Nick). Aber alle zusammen vereinigen sich in dem Schlußspruch Wo Faule sind auf dieser Welt, der Teufel find’t sein Feld bestellt (For idle hands And hearts and minds The Devil finds A work to do). In amerikanischen Darstellungen der Oper wird die homosexuelle Beziehung zwischen Auden und Kallman, in der Kallman das männliche Element vertrat, sehr stark herausgestellt und motivisch nachverfolgt. Die Einführung beispielsweise der bei Hogarth ebenfalls nicht vorhandenen Figur der Türkenbab durch Auden wird auf diese Weise erklärt. Strawinsky duldete keine Kritik am Libretto, das er als Verschmelzung von Leichtigkeit und Tiefsinn dachte. Dylan Thomas dagegen hielt Strawinsky bei ihrer Begegnung vor, im Libretto werde zu viel geredet und Auden hätte die Gesprächstiraden bearbeiten, gemeint ist wohl: verändernd kürzen müssen. Verglichen mit dem, was vor dem Rake war, und verglichen mit dem, was nach dem Rake kam, bildet die Oper einen Sonderfall, der mit amerikanischem Einfluß allein nicht zu erklären ist.

 

Übersetzungen: Ausgenommen die deutsche Übersetzung von Fritz Schröder, die Strawinsky als hervorragend und dem Original verblüffend nahegekommen (outstanding and amazingly close) bezeichnete, lehnte er alle anderen Übersetzungen ab und wünschte für den Druck nur eine englisch-deutsche Ausgabe. In den Fällen, in denen Schröder die englische Syllabik nicht übernehmen konnte, komponierte Strawinsky die Singstimme nach deutscher Deklamation im typischen Kleinnotendruck zusätzlich in die Partitur ein. Leichte Sinnverschiebungen mußten hingenommen werden. Auf Wiedergabe der Audenschen Poesie in einer anderen Sprache kam es Strawinsky nicht an.

 

Aufbau: The Rake’s Progress ist eine mit buchstabenbeziffertem Vorspiel versehene, zeitgenössisch atypische, nicht durchnumerierte Nummernoper in drei einzeln bezifferten szenenunterteilten Akten aus Rezitativen, Arien, Duetten, Terzetten, Quartetten und chorischer Statisterie mit einem Mozartorchester.

 

Aufriß

[1]

Prelude

Tempo Viertel = 138

            (Ziffer 6A bis Ende Ziffer C5)

(Ziffer C5 Curtain # Vorhang

Act I [#] I. Akt

Scene 1 [#] 1. Bild

Garden of Trulove’s house in the country. Afternoon in spring. (House – right, Garden Gate – Centre Back, Arbour – left downstage in which Anne and Tom are seated.) # Garten an Vater Trulove’s Haus auf dem Lande. Frühlingsnachmittag. (Rechts das Haus, im Mittelgrund die Gartenpforte, links vorne eine Laube, in der Ann und Tom sitzen.)

[2]

Duet and Trio [#] Duett und Terzett

Viertel = 76

            (Ziffer 51 bis Ende Ziffer 255 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 26])

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 26 [von Ziffer 255 aus attacca] bis Ende Ziffer 2617)

 [3]

Recitative and Aria [#] Rezitativ und Arie

Viertel = 88

            (Ziffer 27 bis Ende Ziffer 306 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 31])

Aria [#] Arie

Viertel = 82

            (Ziffer 31 [von Ziffer 306 aus attacca] bis Ende Ziffer 464)

 [4]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 47 bis Ende Ziffer 506 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 51])

Viertel = 69

            (Ziffer 51 [attacca von Ziffer 506 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 574 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 58])

 [5]

Quartet [#] Quartett

punktierte Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 58 [von Ziffer 574 aus attacca] bis Ende Ziffer 724)

Achtel = Achtel L’istesso tempo ma agitato (Ziffer 73 bis Ziffer 805 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 806])

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 806 [attacca von Ziffer 805 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 807 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 81])

 [6]

Duettino [#] Duettino

Achtel = 126

            (Ziffer 81 [attacca von Ziffer 807 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 876 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 88])

 [7]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 88 [attacca von Ziffer 876 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 8811 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 89])

[8]

Arioso and Terzettino[#] Arioso und Terzettino

            (Ziffer 89 [attacca von Ziffer 8811 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 945)

Subito sostenuto e tranquillo

            (Ziffer 95 bis Ende Ziffer 1024 unter Wiederholung der 6 Takte + 2 Klauselfinaltakte von Ziffer

            101)

più lento Achtel = 92

            (Ziffer 1025 bis Ende Ziffer 1044 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 105])

                        [Ziffer 1044: Quick curtain - Vorhang rasch]

Scene 2 [#] 2. Bild

Mother Goose’s Brothel, London (At a table, downstage right, sit Tom, Nick and Mother Goose drinking. Backstage left a Cuckoo Clock — Whores, Roaring Boys.)

Mutter Goose’s Freudenhaus in London. (Vorne rechts an einem Tisch sitzen Tom, Nick und Mutter Goose und trinken. Hinten links eine Kuckucksuhr. — Dirnen und grölende Burschen.)

[9]

Chorus [#] Chor

poco pesante Viertel = 120

            (Ziffer 105 [attacca von Ziffer 1044 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1305 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 131])

[10]

Recitative and Scene [#] Rezitativ und Szene

(Nick, Tom, Mother Goose) [#] (Nick, Tom, Mutter Goose)

            (Ziffer 131 [attacca von Ziffer 1044 aus] bis Ziffer 1313)

Tempo rigoroso Viertel = 72

            (Ziffer 1314 bis Ende Ziffer 1393)

Agitato in p Viertel = 132

            (Ziffer 140 bis Ziffer 1413)

meno mosso Viertel = 100

            (Ziffer 1414 bis Ziffer 1421*)

a tempo

            (Ziffer 1421* bis Ziffer 1422)

Meno mosso Viertel = 100

            (Ziffer 1423 bis Ziffer 1424*)

a tempo

            (Ziffer 1424* bis Ziffer 1434)

Meno mosso Viertel = 76

            (Ziffer 143up to1 bis Ziffer 143up to4)

tranquillo

            (Ziffer 144 bis Ende Ziffer 1445)

[11]

Chorus [#] Chor

Roaring Boys and Whores [#] Dirnen und grölende Burschen

            (Ziffer 145 bis Ziffer 14914 unter Wiederholung von Ziffer 146 bis Ende Ziffer 148 mit

            Finalklausel Ziffer 149b14)

[12]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Poco meno mosso

            (Ziffer 150 bis Ende Ziffer 15013 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 151])

[13]

Cavatina [#] Kavatine

Achtel = 96

            (Ziffer 151 [attacca von Ziffer 15013 her] bis Ende Ziffer 1594 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 1601])

[14]

Chorus [#] Chor

(Whores) [#] (Dirnen)

Viertel = 76

            (Ziffer 160 [attacca von Ziffer 1594 her] bis Ende Ziffer 1615)

Meno mosso Achtel = 104

            (Ziffer 162 bis Ende Ziffer 1626)

Chorus [#] Chor

punktierte Viertel = 69

            (Ziffer 163 bis Ende Ziffer 17610

                        [Ziffer 1758: Curtain – Vorhang]

Scene 3 [#] 3. Bild

Same as Scene 1 [#] Wie 1. Bild

Autumn night, full moon. [#] Herbstnacht, Vollmond

Achtel = 72

            (Ziffer 177 bis Ende Ziffer 1798)

                        [Ziffer 1795: Curtain – Vorhang]

 [15]

Recitative and Aria [#] Rezitativ und Arie

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 180 bis Ende Ziffer 1825)

Aria [#] Arie

Achtel = 112108

            (Ziffer 183 bis Ende Ziffer 1886)

molto meno mosso Achtel = 58

            (Ziffer 189 bis Ende Ziffer 1894)

 [16]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Viertel = 88

            (Ziffer 190 bis Ende Ziffer 1915)

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 192 bis Ende Ziffer 1925 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 193])

Cabaletta [#] Kabaletta

Viertel = 126

            ([attacca von Ziffer 1925 aus] Ziffer 193 bis Ende Ziffer 2125)

                        [2121: Quick curtain – Vorhang rasch]

End of Act I – Ende des I. Aktes]

 

ACT II [#] II. AKT

Scene 1 [#] 1. Bild

The morning room of Tom’s house in a London square. A bright morning sun pours in through the window, also noises from the street.

Frühstückszimmer in Toms Haus in einem Villlenviertel in London. Durch das Fenster dringt strahlende Morgensonne herein, ebenso Straßenlärm.

Achtel = 60

[17]

            (Ziffer 11 bis Ende Ziffer 19)

Aria [#] Arie

Achtel = Achtel

            (Ziffer 2 bis Ende Ziffer 94)

                        [Ziffer 31: CurtainVorhang]

[18]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Viertel = 66

            (Ziffer 10 bis Ende Ziffer 114)

Viertel = 112

            (Ziffer 12 bis Ende Ziffer 183)

Halbe = 82

            (Ziffer 19 bis Ende Ziffer 228)

Aria (reprise) [#] Arie (Reprise)

Achtel = 60

            (Ziffer 23 bis Ende Ziffer 265)

 [19]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 27 bis Ende Ziffer 286)

Achtel = 120

            (Ziffer 29 bis Ende Ziffer 345)

poco meno mosso Viertel = 104

            (Ziffer 3513)

poco rall. Viertel = 92

            (Ziffer 354 bis Ende Ziffer 355)

[20]

Aria [#] Arie

Achtel = 98

            (Ziffer 36 bis Ende Ziffer 404)

Sechzehntel = Achtel Viertel = 98

            (Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 414)

Viertel = Achtel 98

            (Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 476)

 [21]

Duet-Finale [#] Finale-Duett

punktierte Viertel = 132

            (Ziffer 48 bis Ende Ziffer 786 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 79])

                        [Ziffer 781: Quick curtainVorhang rasch]

Scene 2 [#] 2. Bild

Street in front of Tom’s house. London. Autumn. Dusk. The entrance, stage centre, is led up to by a flight of semi-circular steps. Servant’s entrance left.

Straße vor Toms Haus in London. Herbst. Dämmerung. Zum Haupteingang in der Mitte der Bühne führt eine halbkreisförmige Freitreppe. Links der Eingang für die Dienerschaft. Rechts ein Baum.

[22]

Achtel = 72

            (Ziffer 79 [attacca von Ziffer 786 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 805)

                        [Ziffer 804: Curtain – Vorhang]

            (Ziffer 81 bis Ende Ziffer 834)

Recitative and Arioso [#] Rezitativ und Arioso

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 84 bis Ende Ziffer 864)

Viertel = 84

            (Ziffer 87 bis Ende Ziffer 894)

L’istesso tempo Viertel = 84

            (Ziffer 90 bis Ende Ziffer 961)

meno mosso Achtel = 116

            (Ziffer 9612)

a tempo Viertel = 84

            (Ziffer 9635 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 97])

Viertel = 96

            (Ziffer 97 [attacca von Ziffer 975 her] bis Ende Ziffer 1053)

                       

[23]

Duet [#] Duett

Halbe = 92

            (Ziffer 106 bis Ende Ziffer 1165

Molto meno mosso punktierte Viertel = 58

            (Ziffer 117 bis Ende Ziffer 1223)

Tempo I Halbe = 92

            (Ziffer 123 bis Ende Ziffer 1265)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Molto meno Viertel = 72

            (Ziffer 127 bis Ende Ziffer 1295)

L’istesso tempo Viertel = 72

            (Ziffer 130 bis Ende Ziffer 1304)

 [24]

Trio [#] Terzett

Achtel = 7274

                (Ziffer 131 bis Ende Ziffer 1414 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 142]

 [25]

Finale [#] Finale

Viertel = 54

            (Ziffer 142 [attacca von Ziffer 1414 her] bis Ende Ziffer 1494)

            [Ziffer 1494: Curtain — Vorhang]

Tempo I Viertel = 54

            (Ziffer 15013 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 152])

Scene 3 [#] 3. Bild

The same room a Act II, Scene 1, except that now it is cluttered up with every conceivablle kind of object: stuffed animals and birds, cases of minerals, china, glass, etc.

Dasselbe Zimmer wie II. Akt, 1. Bild, nur daß es jetzt überladen ist mit jeder erdenkbaren Art von Gegenständen, wie ausgestopften Tieren und Vögeln, Schaukasten mit Mineralien, Porzellan, Gläsern u.s.w.

[26]

Aria [#] Arie

Achtel = 132

            (Ziffer 152 [attacca von Ziffer 1503 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1675)

 [27]

Babas Song [#] Babas

Viertel = Viertel

            (Ziffer 168)

Aria [#] Arie

Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 169 bis Ende Ziffer 1694)

Meno mosso Viertel = 120

            (Ziffer 170 bis Ende Ziffer 1796)

Più mosso Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 180 bis Ende Ziffer 1876)

 [28]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Viertel = 66

            (Ziffer 188 bis Ende Ziffer 1888)

Pantomime [#] Pantomime

Più mosso Viertel = 92

            (Ziffer 189 bis Ende Ziffer 1927)

Recitative-Arioso-Rezitative [#] Rezitativ-Arioso-Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 193 bis Ende Ziffer 1934)

Agitato Viertel = 116

            (Ziffer 194 bis Ende Ziffer 1984)

Viertel = 116

            (Ziffer 199 bis Ziffer 2033)

Lento

            (Ziffer 20334)

Achtel = 69

            (Ziffer 204 bis Ende5 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 205])

[29]

Duet [#] Duett

Viertel = 138

            (Ziffer 205 [attacca von Ziffer 2045 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 2275)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 228118**)

Achtel = 138

            (Ziffer 22819 bis Ende Ziffer 2356)

                        [Ziffer 2333: Quick curtain — Vorhang rasch]

                        [nach Ziffer 2356: End of Act II — Ende des II. Aktes]

 

ACT III [#] III. AKT

Scene 1 [#] 1. Bild

The same as Act II, scene 3, except that everything is covered with cobwebs and dust. Afternoon. Spring.

Wie II. Akt, 3. Bild, nur daß alles mit Spinngewebe und Staub bedeckt ist. Frühlingsnachmittag.

Baba is still seated motionless at the table, the wig still covering her face.

Baba sitzt noch immer unbeweglich am Tisch mit der Perücke über dem Gesicht.

[30]

Viertel = 132

            (Ziffer 51 bis Ende Ziffer 385)

Poco meno mosso Viertel = 120

            (Ziffer 39 bis Ende Ziffer 423)

 [31]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Meno mosso Viertel = 80

            (Ziffer 43 bis Ende Ziffer 494)

L’istesso tempo Viertel = 6063

            (Ziffer 50 bis Ende Ziffer 503 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 51])

Aria [#] Arie

punktierte Viertel = 126

            (Ziffer 51 [attacca von Ziffer 503 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 617)

punktierte Halbe = 63

            (Ziffer 62 bis Ende Ziffer 655)

Bidding Scene [#] Steiger-Szene

Crowd and Sellem [#] Menge und Sellem

Meno mosso Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 66 bis Ende Ziffer 675)

Sellem’s Aria (continuing) [#] Sellems Arie (Fortsetzung)

punktierte Viertel = 126

            (Ziffer 68 bis Ende Ziffer 788)

punktierte Halbe = 63

            (Ziffer 79 bis Ende Ziffer 825)

                        [Ziffer 792: The crowd bids as before. – Die Menge bietet wie vorher.]

Bidding Scene [#] Steiger-Szene

Crowd and Sellem [#] Menge und Sellem

Meno mosso Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 83 bis Ende Ziffer 845)

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

            (Ziffer 85 bis Ende Ziffer 853)

Aria (continued) [#] Arie (Fortsetzung)

Tranquillo Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 86 bis Ende Ziffer 904)

Più mosso punktierte Halbe = 63

            (Ziffer 91 bis Ende Ziffer 945)

Final Bidding Scene [#] Schluß-Steiger-Szene

meno mosso Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 95 bis Ende Ziffer 967)

Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 97 bis Ende Ziffer 973)

 [32]

Aria [#] Arie

Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 98 bis Ende Ziffer 1056)

più mosso Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 106 bis Ende Ziffer 1063)

molto meno mosso Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 107 bis Ende5 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 108])

[33]

Recitative and Duet [#] Rezitativ und Duett

with Chorus and Sellem [#] mit Chor und Selllem

Viertel = 88

            (Ziffer 108 [attacca von Ziffer 1075 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1116)

Meno mosso Viertel = 63

            (Ziffer 112 bis Ende Ziffer 1135)

Duet [#] Duett

Anne und Baba with Chorus and Sellem [#] Ann und Baba mit Chor und Sellem

Viertel = 80

            (Ziffer 114 bis Ende Ziffer 1155)

più mosso Viertel = 92

            (Ziffer 116 bis Ende Ziffer 1185)

Poco meno mosso / (Tempo I) Viertel = 80

            (Ziffer 119 bis Ende Ziffer 1214)

Alla breve Halbe = 63

            (Ziffer 122 bis Ende Ziffer 1336)

 [34]

Ballad Tune [#] Gassenhauer

punktierte Viertel = 56

            (Ziffer 134 bis Ende Ziffer 1366)

Viertel = 100

            (Ziffer 137 bis EndeZiffer 1373)

Stretto-Finale [#] Stretto-Finale

Anne, Baba and Sellem with Chorus [#] Ann, Baba und Sellem mit Chor

Viertel = 152

            (Ziffer 138 bis Ende Ziffer 1423)

Poco più mosso punktierte Halbe = 63

            (Ziffer 143 bis Ende Ziffer 1466)

L’istesso tempo punktierte Halbe = 63 

            (Ziffer 147 bis Ende Ziffer 1486 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 1495])

punktierte Viertel = 56

            (Ziffer 149 [attacca von Ziffer 1486 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1505)

Viertel = 132

            (Ziffer 151 bis Ende Ziffer 1588)

                        [Ziffer 1582: Curtain – Vorhang]

Scene 2 [[#] 2. Bild

A starless night. A Churchyard. Tombs. Front centre a newly-dug grave. Behind it a flat raised tomb, against which is leaning a sexton’s spade. On the right a yew-tree.

Ein Kirchhof. Gräber. Sternlose Nacht. Vorn in der Mitte ein frisch ausgehobenes Grab. Dahinter ein unbeschrifteter hochgestellter Grabstein, an den ein Totengräberspaten gelehnt ist. Rechts eine Eibe.

[35]

Prelude [#] Vorspiel

Viertel = 69

            (Ziffer 8159 bis Ende Ziffer 1606 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 1611)

                        [Ziffer 1606: Curtain – Vorhang]

Duet [#] Duett

Achtel = 84

            (Ziffer 161 [attacca von Ziffer 1606 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1645)

punktierte Viertel = 56

            (Ziffer 165 bis Ende Ziffer 1675)

Achtel = 84

            (Ziffer 168 bis Ende Ziffer 1695)

punktierte Viertel = 56

            (Ziffer 170 bis Ende Ziffer 1734)

Achtel = 84

            (Ziffer 174 bis Ende Ziffer 1753)

Achtel = punktierte Viertel = 84 agitato ma tempo rigoroso

            (Ziffer 176 bis Ende Ziffer 1806)

punktierte Viertel = Achtel = 56

            (Ziffer 181 bis Ende Ziffer 1814)

L’istesso Achtel = 84

            (Ziffer 182 bis Ende Ziffer 1833)

Viertel = 42

            (Ziffer 184 bis Ende Ziffer 1849)

 [36]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

punktierte Viertel = 69 circa

            (Ziffer 185 bis Ziffer 1867)

Duet [#] Duett°

Achtel = 69

            (Ziffer 1868 bis Ende Ziffer 18711)

Viertel = 112

            (Ziffer 188 bis Ende Ziffer 18912)

Tempo I Achtel = 69

            (Ziffer 190 bis Ende Ziffer 1922)

Tempo I (di Recitativo) Viertel = 69 circa

            (Ziffer 1923 bis Ende Ziffer 1927)

                        [Ziffer 1923: changing his tone – den Ton ändernd]

Achtel = 76

            (Ziffer 193 bis Ende Ziffer 1937)

Viertel = 126

            (Ziffer 194 bis Ziffer 19517)

Viertel = Achtel = 126

            (Ziffer 196 bis Ziffer 1977)

Achtel = 84 circa

            (Ziffer 1978 bis Ende Ziffer 1979)

Viertel = 168

            (Ziffer 198 bis Ende Ziffer 2005)

Achtel = 84

            (Ziffer 201 bis Ende Ziffer 2045 [unter Wiederholung der Ziffern 201 bis 2045 als Ziffer 201bis

            bis 202bis])

Meno mosso Achtel = 66

            (Ziffer 205 bis Ende Ziffer 2058)

                        [Ziffer 2051: Blackout – Völlige Dunkelheit]

Achtel = 138

            (Ziffer 206 bis Ende Ziffer 2125)

                        [Ziffer 2111: Slow curtain – Vorhang (langsam)]

Scene 3 [#] 3. Bild

Bedlam. (Backstage centre on a raised eminence a straw pallet. Tom stands before it facing the chorus of madmen who include a blind man with a broken fiddle, a crippled soldier, a man with a telescope and three old hags.)

Irrenhaus. (Im Mittelgrund auf einer zurechtgemachten Erhöhung ein Strohsack. Tom steht davor, dem Chor der Irren zugewandt, in deren Mitte sich ein blinder Mann mit einer zerbrochenen Geige, ein verkrüppelter Soldat, ein Mann mit einem Fernrohr und drei alte Hexen befinden.)

Achtel = 92

            (Ziffer 213 bis Ende Ziffer 2154)

                        [Ziffer 2151: Curtain – Vorhang]

Arioso [#] Arioso

            (Ziffer 216 bis Ende Ziffer 2195)

Dialogue [#] Zwiegesang

Madmen and Tom [#] Irre und Tom

Più mosso Viertel = 108

            (Ziffer 220 bis Ende Ziffer 2235)

Chorus — Minuet

Viertel = 138

            (Ziffer 224 bis Ende Ziffer 2358)

Viertel = Achtel = 138

            (Ziffer 236 bis Ende5)

 [38]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Viertel = 50

            (Ziffer 237 bis Ende Ziffer 2385)

Arioso [#] Arioso

Più mosso Viertel = 120

            (Ziffer 239 bis Ende Ziffer 2415)

Halbe = 60 tranquillo (ma stesso tempo)

            (Ziffer 241 bis Ende Ziffer 2426)

Duet [#] Duett

Achtel = 60

            (Ziffer 243 bis Ende Ziffer 2484)

L’istesso tempo ma commodo

            (Ziffer 249 bis Ende Ziffer 2516)

 [39]

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

(quasi arioso) [#] (quasi arioso)

Achtel = 72

            (Ziffer 252 bis Ende Ziffer 2535)

Lullaby [#] Schlummerlied

Anne and Chorus [#] Ann und Chor

Viertel = 50

            (Ziffer 254 bis Ende Ziffer 2547)

Poco più mosso Viertel = 63

            (Ziffer 255 bis Ende Ziffer 2555)

Tempo I Viertel = 50

            (Ziffer 256 bis Ende Ziffer 2567)

Poco più mosso Viertel = 63

            (Ziffer 257 bis Ende Ziffer 2575)

Tempo I Viertel = 50

            (Ziffer 258 bis Ende Ziffer 2587)

Poco più mosso Viertel = 63

            (Ziffer 259 bis Ende Ziffer 2594)

Enter Keeper with Trulove. – Der Wärter tritt ein mit Trulove.

Recitative [#] Rezitativ

Viertel = 56 circa

            (Ziffer 260 bis Ende10)

Duettino [#] Duett

Achtel = 120

            (Ziffer 261 bis Ende Ziffer 2657)

Finale [#] Finale

Recitative and Chorus [#] Rezitativ und Chor

Achtel = 100

            (Ziffer 266 bis Ende Ziffer 2683)

Sempre l’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 269 bis Ende Ziffer 2725)

Mourning-Chorus [#] Klage-Chor

Viertel = 69

            (Ziffer 273 bis Ende Ziffer 2805 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 281]

                        (Ziffer 2793: Curtain – Vorhang)

[40]

Epilogue [#] Epilog

Before the curtain. House lights up. [#] Vor dem Vorhang. Zuschauerraum hell.

            (Ziffer 281 bis Ende Ziffer 3096)

End of the opera [#] Ende der Oper

* Tempowechsel in der Mitte von Takt 142.

** Takt 22818 Rezitativ ohne Rücksicht auf Taktmetrum mit natürlicher Wortbetonbung; betroffen sind von dieser Singanweisung ab viertem Achtel Noten mit der Wertstellung 5 Achtel und 31 Sechzehntel.

*** die Stimmen hinter der Szene können von Tom, Sellem, Trulove und Nick gesungen werden.

° ohne neuen Ziffernbeginn.

°° im Original Druckfehler: beseite.

°°° die jeweils ersten vier Wörter stehen im Klavierauszug noch über Ziffer 2235.

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Dirigier– und Taschenpartituren 787Err

Seite

    2 Ziffer 2, es muß durchgehend Zwei– und nicht Dreiviertel-Takt lauten

  64 Ziffer 1115, 1. und 2. Horn, die letzte Note ist A und nicht C zu lesen

  64 Ziffer 1115 + 1151, in der Paukenstimme sind beide Noten C und nicht G zu lesen

  70 Ziffer 1212, die 1. Note der Chortenorstimme ist C und nicht E zu lesen

  70 Ziffer 1212, in der Paukenstimme ist das D zu entfernen

108 Ziffer 1174, es ist durchgehend >meno ¦< und nicht >¦< zu spielen

140 Ziffer 2035, das 1. Horn ist statt eine Terz höher eine Oktave höher als das 2. Horn zu spielen

140 Ziffer 21, vor der Stimme des 1. Horns ist ein Violinschlüssel anzubringen

337 Ziffer 1744, die letzte Note A der 1. Trompete ist mit einem Erhöhungszeichen [#] zu versehen

338 Ziffer 175, die erste Note A der 1. Trompete ist mit einem Erhöhungszeichen [#] zu versehen

341 Ziffer 1823, die 4. Note A der 1. Violinstimme ist mit einem Auflösungszeichen zu versehen

341 Ziffer 1824, die letzte Note A der 1. Trompete ist mit einem Erhöhungszeichen [#] zu versehen A

342 Ziffer 183, die erste Note A der 1. Trompete ist mit einem Erhöhungszeichen [#] zu versehen

347 Ziffer 1905, Cembalo, linke Hand, die 7. Note ist E# und nicht D# zu lesen

371 Ziffer 1232, Chorstimmen: der Rhythmus ist wie nachfolgend zu lesen:<

 [mittig gesetzt in Noten geschrieben]

            Sopranstimme   Violinschlüssel  Achtel-d1 – Achtel-d2 – Achtel-d2 – Achtel-h1 – Viertel-e1

            Altstimme         Violinschlüssel  Achtel-d1 – Achtel-d1 – Achtel-d1 – Achtel-d1 – Viertel-e1

                                                            our                   so–       ci–                     e–         ty

            Tenorstimme     Baßschlüssel    Achtel-g – Achtel-g – Achtel-g – Achtel-g – Viertel-g

            Baßstimme       Baßschlüssel    Achtel-G – Achtel-g – Achtel-g – Achtel-g – Viertel-g

 

Stilistik: Trotz Nummernopernstil gibt es keine Wiederholungsteile, sondern nur variierte Teilstücke. Weil Strawinsky syllabisch komponiert, erfolgt der Melodienfluß unregelmäßig und damit bewegungsreich. Das Spiel mit den Tonarten und den unterschiedlichen Polarisationen dient der Charakterisierung, die mitunter schon durch minimale Sekundbewegungen offengelegt wird. Das Orchester hat in den Arien überwiegend Begleitfunktion, während es in den Rezitativen interpretierend eingesetzt wird; die Übergänge zum Secco-Rezitativ erfolgen herkömmlich über Sextakkorde. Strawinskys kompositionsstilistisches Vorbild waren Mozartopern wie Cosí fan tutte, dessen leichten Stil er aufzugreifen wünschte, und Don Giovanni, dessen moralischer Epilog bei Strawinsky wiederkehrt, wobei er damals Mozart nach Klavierauszügen studierte. Melismatik dient der Charakterisierung. Strawinsky achtete diesmal besonders auf die Richtigkeit der Prosodie, weil er sich in der englischen Sprache noch nicht gut genug auskannte. Der Ablauf der Jahreszeiten ist Bestandteil der Komposition. Die Geschichte beginnt im Frühling bei strahlendem Sonnenschein und endet im Frühling in einer sternenlosen Nacht. Zeitbeziehungen dieser Art sind bei Strawinsky häufig anzutreffen. Bei der Textdeutung bediente sich Strawinsky der seit Mozart bekannten Auslegungsmethoden. Die Musik unterstreicht Gesagtes oder hält dagegen, deutet Sachverhalte aus, malt und betont. Die kompositorische Gestik spielt eine bedeutende Rolle, auch eine Art von Erinnerungsmotivik läßt sich nachweisen, so wie er bestimmte Themenköpfe aus den verschiedenen Situationen wiederkehren läßt, etwa eine Art von Annen-Motiv, Fortuna-Motiv. Die gewählten Motive sind mitunter sehr bildhaft, wie die Nick begleitende Cembalo-Figur zeigt, die wie ein Schatten oder eine Wolke aus einer anderen Welt einherhuscht. Das Spiel mit gegeneinander gesetzten Tonarten bezeugt gegeneinander gerichtete Interessen im Text, etwa die Reibungen von Dur– und Mollterz, die im Verhältnis Tom-Anne die Eintrübung der Frühlingsstimmung oder ihre Aufhellung darstellen. Rhythmusveränderungen stehen für Hektik oder für die Veränderung einer eben noch beherrschenden Situation. Klangfarbe, Ambitus, kleine oder große Intervalle, Diatonik und Chromatik sind bewußt eingesetzte Gestaltungsmittel, die vom Libretto her ihre auch außermusikalische Sinngebung erfahren. Strawinskys Komposition ist ein Deutungsvorgang. In der Kartenspielszene beispielsweise wird der Spielvorgang bis in die einzelnen Täuschungsmanöver Nicks hinein kompositorisch nachvollzogen. Noch die Einarbeitung eines Gassenhauers im Sinne eines populärmusikalischen Schlagers dient der Charakterisierung, durch die Strawinsky der Welt der Echtheit die Welt der äußerlichen Verlogenheit entgegensetzen kann. Durch die Typisierung erfolgt eine intellektuelle Unterkühlung, die sich gegen den Überschwang der psychologisierenden Oper wendet, rake in seiner Mischung aus Tragik und Groteske aber auch in den Ruf brachte, eine intellektuelle konzertante Nummernoper zu sein, in der historisierende Stilmomente neoklassizistisch umgebaut wurden. Alle Einzelnummern erfahren eine klare formale Gliederung, die selbst in Augenblicken höchster Erregung nicht aufgegeben wird.

 

Widmung: Es ist keine Widmung bekannt.

 

Duration: 2h 2038″ = I = 4209″ [(1. {1956″} : 033″, 440″, 233″, 702″, 508″) (2. {1344″} : 233″, 500″, 344″, 227″) (3. {829″} : 540″, 249″)]; II = 3907″ [(1. {1340″} : 642″, 446″, 212″) (2. {1437″} : 541″, 330″, 526″) (3. {1050″} : 532″, 518″)]; III = 5922″ [(1. {1648″} : 251″, 533″, 628″, 156″) (2. {1907″} : 220″, 441″, 830″, 336″) (3. {2327″} : 346″, 617″, 549″, 501″, 234″)].

 

Entstehungszeit: Hollywood November 1947 bis 7. April 1951.

 

Uraufführung: am 11. September 1951 im Teatro La Fenice di Venezia mit Robert Rounseville (Tom Rakewell), Elisabeth Schwarzkopf (Anne), Otakar Kraus (Nick Shadow), Raffaele Ariè (Trulove), Nell Tangeman (Mother Goose), Jennie Tourel (Türkenbab), Hugues Cuenod (Sellem), Emanuel Menkes (Wärter), dem Chor und Orchester der Mailänder Scala (Chorleiter: Vittore Veneziani), dem Bühnenbild von Ebe Colciaghi, den Kostümen von Gianni Ratto, in der Regie von Carl Ebert und unter der Musikalischen Leitung von Igor Strawinsky*.

* die 2. und 3. Vorstellung dirigierte Ferdinand Leitner

 

Bemerkungen: Die Idee, eine abendfüllende Oper schreiben zu sollen, kam von Strawinsky selbst. Nachdem er 1947 zufällig im Art Museum von Chicago die Hogarthsche Kupferstichfolge gesehen hatte, verdichteten sich seine Pläne zu konkreten Vorstellungen, die er seinem Nachbarn Aldous Huxley vortrug, der ihn daraufhin an Auden verwies, von dem Strawinsky bislang außer dessen Kommentar zu dem Film Night Train noch nichts gehört hatte. Er nahm nach Voranfragen bei Ralph Hawkes mit Auden am 6. Oktober 1947 Kontakt auf. Strawinsky wollte sieben Rollen haben, zwei Akte mit fünf und einen mit zwei Szenen und eine choreographische Einlage im ersten Akt. Strawinsky plante eine Nummernoper mit gesprochenen, aber eingebundenen Zwischentexten, um der herkömmlichen Rezitativpraxis auszuweichen, mit Arien, Duetten, Terzetten in freien Versen, mit einem kleinen Chor. Er wünschte kein Musikdrama zu komponieren und wollte auch nicht für eine Kammermusikbesetzung schreiben. Der Held (hero) sollte womöglich eine Fiedel kratzend sein Leben in einem Heim beschließen und der Gesamttext auf die Hogarthsche Bildfolge abgestimmt sein. Auden stimmte zu, woraufhin die Künstler vom 11. bis zum 20. November 1947 in Strawinskys Hollywooder Haus miteinander arbeiteten. Am 16. Januar 1948 schickte Auden den ersten, am 24. Januar 1948 den zweiten, am 9. Februar den dritten Akt an Strawinsky. Auden nahm auf Wunsch Strawinskys im nachhinein noch Einfügungen, Veränderungen, Versumstellungen vor, wenn Strawinsky aus Gründen der musikalischen Gestaltung darum bat. Da die von Strawinsky in seinem 1960 erschienenen Buch Memories and Commentaries zur Entstehung des Librettos gemachten Äußerungen Unrichtigkeiten enthalten, verfaßte Robert Craft einen eigenen Aufsatz über die Entwicklung des Librettos, den er im Anhang des dritten Bandes seiner Briefausgabe veröffentlichte. Auch die Entstehungsgeschichte der Komposition hat Craft nach den erhaltenen Strawinskyschen Skizzenbüchern minutiös aufgelistet. Zu seinen Daten kommen weitere, die sich aus den Briefen ergeben. Strawinsky beendete am 11. Dezember 1947 das Vorspiel zum 2. Bild des III. Aktes (Ziffer v159f) und begann am 8. Mai 1948 mit dem I. Akt (Ziffer 2), der am 16. Januar 1949 beendet wurde, am 1. April 1949 mit dem II. Akt bei Ziffer 5f (Vary the song), Ende Mai 1950 mit dem III. Akt bei Ziffer 7 (What curious phenomena). Die Oper war am 17. Februar 1951 weitgehend fertig gestellt, lediglich der Epilog brauchte noch Zeit bis zum 7. April 1951. Endgültig schloß er das Werk am 14. Mai 1951 ab, nicht allzulange vor der Uraufführung. Die Uraufführung in Venedig kam dank Nabokow zustande, der Verbindung zum für Musikangelegenheiten zuständigen Direktor des Italienischen Rundfunks, Mario Labroca, hatte und diesen bewog, sich die Uraufführung gegen ein Honorar von zwanzigtausend Dollar zu sichern. Zur Stärkung des Uraufführungserfolges ließ Strawinsky keine Voraufführungen zu. Uraufführungsdirigent sollte eigentlich Paul Breisach sein, der Kapellmeister der Oper von San Francisco. Er verstarb, bevor Strawinskys Oper fertiggestellt war. Ein anderer Künstler, den Strawinsky sehr schätzte und den er sich als Bühnenausstatter wünschte, Eugene Berman, gab zum großen Bedauern Strawinskys als Opfer von Intrigen seine Position auf. Die Uraufführungsqualität wurde sehr in Zweifel gezogen. Strawinsky befand sich in keiner guten Verfassung und gab den Dirigentenstab schon bei der zweiten Aufführung an Ferdinand Leitner ab, den er später kritisierte. Strawinskys Orchesterleitung muß sehr problematisch gewesen sein und der Titeldarsteller Robert Rounseville geradezu versagt haben. Mit dem Erfolg seiner Oper war Strawinsky nicht besonders zufrieden, mit seinem Verleger, der bis Ende Juli 1961 noch keine Taschenpartitur herausgebracht hatte, ebenfalls nicht. Strawinsky beschwerte sich am 28. Juli 1961 mit einem Brief aus Santa Fé, ob es zuviel verlangt sei, wenn er sich zu seinem achtzigsten Geburtstag eine fehlerfreie Taschenpartitur vom Rake wünsche, auch wenn der Gewinn an dieser Partitur die Ausgaben nicht überschreite. Daß er von der Oper in elf Jahren „nur“ fünftausend Platten abgesetzt hatte, empfand er ebenfalls nicht als Erfolg und bat 1964 um Verlagshilfe, weil unter diesen Umständen keine Neueinstudierung gerechtfertigt sei. Gemeint ist die Columbia-Aufnahme vom März 1953, die dann aber doch durch die Juni-Aufnahme 1964 ersetzt wurde. – Strecker fand die Partitur, als Strawinsky sie ihm im März 1950, noch unvollendet, in New York auf englisch zweieinhalb Stunden lang vorspielte und vorsang, zwar ‚unendlich fein’, ‚klar’ und ‚durchsichtig’ gearbeitet, aber mit drei Stunden Gesamtdauer zeitlich bedenklich. Strawinsky entgegnete, sie ließe sich nicht kürzer fassen. Strecker beschreibt die Begeisterung, mit der ihn Strawinsky über Einzelheiten der Komposition unterrichtete. Um was für Einzelheiten es sich handelte, hat Strecker nicht überliefert. Strecker schildert die Begegnung des erstmaligen Wiedersehens nach zehn Jahren Unterbrechung als beiderseitig beglückendes Ereignis wie folgenlos trotz Emigration und Krieg. Wenn er, der in New York sehr viel zu besorgen hatte, sich allerdings mit der Hoffnung trug, die Geschäftsbeziehungen nach alter Art wieder aufnehmen zu können, mußte er enttäuscht werden. Ralph Hawkes war ihm längst zuvorgekommen.

 

Bedeutung: Rake ist Strawinskys einziges abendfüllendes Bühnenwerk. Mit ihm endet seine neoklassizistische Stilperiode.

 

Produktionen: 1951 Stuttgart* (Kurt Puhlmann, Ferdinand Leitner); 1951 Hamburg* (Günther Rennert, Wilhelm Schleuning); 1952 Wien (Günther Rennert, Heinrich Hollreiser); 1953 Boston-Universität (Sarah Caldwell, Igor Strawinsky); 1953 New York (George Balanchine, Fritz Reiner); 1953 Paris** (Louis Musy, André Cluytens); 1953 Edinburgh (Carl Ebert, Alfred Wallenstein); 1954 Glyndebourne (Carl Ebert, Paul Sacher); 1957 London; 1958 Frankfurt (Harry Buckwitz, Hermann Scherchen); 1961 Stockholm (Ingmar Bergmann, Michael Gielen); 1962 London (Glen Biam Shaw, Colin Davis); 1964 Dresden-Radebeul; 1967 Boston (Sarah Caldwell)

* Singsprache Deutsch.

** Singsprache Französisch.

 

Korrekturen: Sofort nach den erfolgten Drucken gingen beim Verlag die von Strawinsky festgestellten Druckfehler in Liste ein. In Paul Collaers Rundfunkkonzert stellte Strawinsky streckenweise falsche Tempi fest, die auf geliefertes Stimmenmaterial zurückgingen. Der Klavierauszug enthielt fehlerhafte, in der Orchesterpartitur richtig geschriebene Stellen. Unter anderem mußte die erste Note auf Seite 202 der rechten Hand bei Ziffer 197 [gemeint ist Ziffer 1971] nicht C, sondern eine Terz höher E heißen [gemeint ist e2 statt c2]; auf Seite 303 muß die Mittelnote des ersten Sechzehntelakkordes der rechten Hand [gemeint ist Ziffer 1977] fis1 statt f1 und die Mittelnote des letzten Akkordes es1 statt e1 heißen.

 

Fassungen: Der Verlagsvertrag mit Boosey & Hawkes wurde am 19. April 1948 geschlossen. Stich und Druck erfolgten bei Sturtz in Würzburg, was zu dieser Zeit Probleme aufwarf, die man von England oder Amerika aus vorher gar nicht einzuschätzen vermochte, die aber prompt eintraten. Am 29. Juni 1951 hatte Strawinsky wohl alle Grünkorrekturen erhalten, ausgenommen die der letzten beiden Szenen und des Epilogs, die er bis spätestens 30. Juli 1951 zu erhalten bei Stein anmahnte, weil er dann wieder verreist sei. Zeitlich jedenfalls lief dann alles richtig, und Stein überreichte Strawinsky in Venedig die dreibändige Druckausgabe der Dirigierpartitur, was den nächsten Beschwerdebrief Strawinskys an Stein auslöste. Daß zahlreiche Druckfehler stehengeblieben waren, war das eine; viel schlimmer wirkte auf Strawinsky die schlechte Papierqualität des Druckes. Warum der Auftrag einer englischen Firma an eine deutsche Druckerei erging, läßt sich nur vermuten; was man offensichtlich nicht bedacht hatte, war der Zustand des kriegsverwüsteten Landes, in dem gutes Papier aufzutreiben noch ein Problem darstellte, das nur findige Köpfe mit guten Auslandsbeziehungen lösen konnten. In seinem Brief an Stein vom 28. Juli 1952 nannte Strawinsky die Ausgabe schlichtweg “provisorisch” (provisional) und fragte an, was Stein denn nun machen wolle: eine Errataliste herstellen oder gleich eine neue, korrekte Ausgabe. Das Papier sei so schlecht, daß der Druck der einen Seite durch die andere durchscheine. Der Stich sei außerdem so dicht vorgenommen worden, daß besonders in den Rezitativteilen die Achtel-Noten wie Sechzehntel-Noten erschienen, was durch eine bessere Papierqualität teilweise beseitigt werden könne. Die erhaltene dreibändige Ausgabe rechtfertigt die Kritik Strawinskys nicht. Allerdings ist das Londoner Exemplar H.786.e. nicht in Würzburg gedruckt, sondern 1951 in England. Das Belegexemplar ging am 22. August 1951 bei der British Library ein. Die Londoner Bibliothek hat die drei selbständigen Aktbände bibliotheksseits zusammengebunden und dabei die Titelblätter und alle Vorspannseiten entfernt und durch Schreibmaschinenaufschriften IGOR STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / ACT I [Act II, Act III] BOOSEY & HAWKES LIMITED ersetzt. Es handelt sich hierbei also nicht um das venetianische Exemplar.

 

Blockflöten-Arrangement: Über die Umstände des Arrangements des Wiegenliedes für zwei Blockflöten ist in der Strawinsky-Literatur nichts bekannt. Möglicherweise wollte er seiner Frau einen Gefallen erweisen. Den Vertrag mit Boosey & Hawkes schloß Strawinsky am 21. Juni 1960. Sein Anteil am Ladenverkaufspreis betrug 7,5 Prozent. Strawinsky schickte die Korrekturen am 2. Juni 1960 an Rufina Ampenow. Die Transkription erschien noch in demselben Jahr. Die Londoner Bibliothek verzeichnet den Eingang des Belegexemplars mit Datum 4. November 1960.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: New York 1. bis 10. März 1953 mit Hilde Güden (Anne), Martha Lipton (Goose), Blanche Thebom (Türkenbab), Eugene Conley (Tom), Lawrence Davidson (Wärter), Paul Franke (Sellem), Mac Harrell (Nick), Norman Scott (Trulove), dem Chor und dem Orchester der metropolitan opera New York unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; London 16.-20., 22.-23. Juni 1964 mit Don Garrard (Trulove), Judith Raskin (Anne), Alexander Young (Tom Rakewell), John Reardon (Nick Shadow), Jean Manning (Mother Goose), Regina Sarfaty (Baba the Turk), Kevin Miller (Sellem), Peter Tracey, Colin Tilney (Harfe), dem The Sadlers Wells Opera Chorus (Chordirektor: John Barker), dem Royal Philharmonic Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky. Die Aufnahme 1953 hielt Strawinsky für besonders geglückt.

 

CD-Edition: IX-1/117, IX-2/115 (Aufnahme 1964).

 

Autograph: Das Autograph der Orchesterpartitur überreichte Strawinsky am 9. September 1959 der Universität von Südkalifornien in Los Angeles.

 

Copyright: 1949 durch Boosey & Hawkes; 1951 durch Boosey & Hawkes in New York (Klavierauszug); 1960 durch Boosey & Hawkes London (Blockflöten-Transkription).

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

781 1951 Dp [Würzburger Ausgabe]; dreibändig; nicht identifiziert]

782 1951 Dp; e; Boosey & Hawkes London; 130+119+164 S.; B & H 17853.

783 1951 KlA; e-d; Boosey & Hawkes London; 240 S.; B. & H. 17088.

            783Straw1 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            783Straw2 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            78370 1970 ebd.

784 1960 Blockfl. (Wiegenlied); Boosey & Hawkes London; 3 S.; B. & H. 18761.

            784[66] [1960] ibd.

785 1962 Tp; e; Boosey & Hawkes London; 414 S.; B. & H. 17853; 739.

            78563 1962 ibd.

            78569 1962 ibd.

786 1962 Dp; e; Boosey & Hawkes London; 414 S.; B. & H. 17853.

787Err 1966 Errata-Liste; Boosey & Hawkes London; 1 S.; 17853.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

781 1951 Dirigierpartitur Würzburger Ausgabe; dreibändig; nicht identifiziert

 

782 ° // (Dirigierpartitur 3,2 x 23,2 x 30,7 (4° [4°]); Singtext englisch; 3 Bände 130 [130] + 119 [119] + 164 [164] Seiten = [I. Band:] + 2 Seiten Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Symphonic Music / Modern Composers<* Stand >849 No. 531<, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Symphonic Music / Soli, Chorus and Orchestra<** Stand >No. 537< [#] >8.49<] + [II. Band] 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Symphonic Music / Symphonies<*** Stand >No. 530.< [#] >8.49.<] ohne Nachspann [III. Band; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangabe [nur 1. Band] 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< rechtsbündig oberhalb und neben Satzbezeichnung zentriert >Music by / Igor Stravinsky / (19481951)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalte [nur 1. Band] unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York. / Copyright for all countries< rechtsbümdig unterhalb Herstellungshinweis >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B & H 17853<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1951)

° die British Library hat die drei selbständigen Aktbände bibliotheksseits zusammengebunden und dabei die Titelblätter und alle Vorspannseiten entfernt und durch Schreibmaschinenaufschriften IGOR STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / ACT I [Act II, Act III] BOOSEY & HAWKES LIMITED ersetzt.

* Angezeigt weden Kompositionen von >Béla Bartók< bis >Igor Strawinsky / Le Baiser de la Fée, Ballet-Allegory / Le Chant du Rossignol, Symphonic Poem / Divertimento / Oedipus Rex, Opera Oratorio / Orpheus. Suite from the Ballet / Persephone, Melodrama / Pétrouchka. Suite from the Ballet / Pulcinella. Suite from the Ballet / Le Sacre du Printemps<. Als Niederlassungsfolge wird New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Capetown-Toronto-Paris angegeben.

** Angezeigt werden Kompositionen von >Béla Bartók< bis >Leslie Woodgate<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Igor Strawinsky / Mass for Mixed Chorus and Double Wind Quintet / Symphonie de Psaumes (Revised 1948)<. Als Niederlassungsfolge wird New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Capetown-Toronto-Paris angegeben.

*** Angezeigt werden Kompositionen von >George Antheil< bis >Arnold van Wyk<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Igor Strawinsky / Symphonies pour instruments à vent<. Als Niederlassungsfolge wird New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Capetown-Toronto-Paris angegeben.

 

783 IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°] / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / [°] / Vocal Score / Klavierauszug / BOOSEY & HAWKES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / (Der Wüstling) / an Opera in 3 Acts / Oper in 3 Akten / a Fable by [#] eine Fabel von / W. H. AUDEN AND CHESTER KALLMAN / Deutsche Übersetzung / von Fritz Schröder / Vocal Score by [#] Klavierauszug von / Leopold Spinner / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON  NEW YORK  PARIS  BONN SYDNEY  CAPE TOWN  TORONTO // [Rückendeckel] The Rake’s Progress [quer:] VOCAL // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang fadengeheftet 23,8 x 31 (4° [4°]); Singtext englisch-deutsch ; 240 [240] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier braunrot auf resedagrün gewölkt [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 5 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Personenverzeichnis >CHARACTERS< englisch + Ortslegende englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt englisch >Copyright 1951 in USA by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright for all Countries< / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form / whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete opera or / parts thereof are strictly reserved<, Personenverzeichnis >PERSONEN< deutsch + Ortslegende deutsch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt >Copyright 1951 in USA by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright for all Countries< / deutsch zentriert >Alle Rechte der szenischen Aufführung, Rundfunkübertragung, Television, der mecha– / nischen Wiedergabe jedweder Art (einschließlich Film), der Übersetzung des Textbuches, / vollständig oder teilweise, sind vorbehalten<, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch mit Anweisungen zur Aufführungspraxis englisch + Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTERBESETZUNG< deutsch mit Anweisungen zur Aufführungspraxis deutsch] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by W. H. Auden / and Chester Kallman< rechtsbündig zentriert >Music by Igor Strawinsky / 194851<; Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite neben Satzbezeichnung linksbündig >Deutsche Übersetzung von Fritz Schröder<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1951 in U. S. A. Copyright for all Countries< rechtsbündig teilkursiv >All rights reserved / Tous droits réservés<; Platten-Nummer [nur 1. Notentextseite] >B. & H. 17088<; Hinweis zur Aufführungspraxis S. 137 [nur] deutsch mit Asterisk als Anmerkung bei Ziffer 28818 II. Akt über erste Achtelnote Gesangsstimme Partie Nick >*) Ohne Rücksicht auf Taktmetrum mit natürlicher Wortbetonung<; Herstellungshinweis S.240 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Printed in Germany< rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck der Universitätsdruckerei H. Stürtz A. G., Würzburg.<) // (1951)

° Ziertrennstrich 9cm zur Mitte hin auf 0,1 cm verdickend zulaufend

 

783Straw1

 

783Straw2

 

78370 IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°] / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / [°] / Vocal Score / Klavierauszug / BOOSEY & HAWKES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / (Der Wüstling) / an Opera in 3 Acts / Oper in 3 Akten / a Fable by [#] eine Fabel von / W. H. AUDEN AND CHESTER KALLMAN / Deutsche Übersetzung / von Fritz Schröder / Vocal Score by [#] Klavierauszug von / Leopold Spinner / BOOSEY & HAWKES / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // [ohne Rückendeckeltext] // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang fadengebunden 1,6 x 23,6 x 31 (4° [4°]); Singtext englisch-deutsch ; 240 [240] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf orange stärkeres Papier dunkelbeige auf hellbeige dunkel schwalbenmustergemasert [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 4 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Personenverzeichnis >CHARACTERS< + Ortslegende englisch + Personenverzeichnis >PERSONEN< mit Namenstransliteration + Ortslegende deutsch, Seite mit Uraufführungslegende italienisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalte englisch zentriert >Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright for all Countries< geblockt >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form whatsoever / (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete opera or parts thereof are strictly reserved< deutsch zentriert >Alle Rechte der szenischen Aufführung, Rundfunkübertragung, Television, der mechanischen Wiedergabe / jedweder Art (einschließlich Film), der Übersetzung des Textbuches, vollständig oder teilweise, / sind vorbehalten<, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch mit Anweisungen zur Aufführungspraxis englisch + Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTERBESETZUNG< deutsch mit Anweisungen zur Aufführungspraxis deutsch] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by W. H. Auden / and Chester Kallman< rechtsbündig zentriert >Music by Igor Strawinsky / 194851<; Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Satzbezeichnung linksbündig >Deutsche Übersetzung von Fritz Schröder<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York / Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. New York < rechtsbündig teilkursiv >Tonsättning förbjudes / All rights reserved / Tous droits réservés<; Platten-Nummer [nur 1. Notentextseite] >B. & H. 17088<; Hinweis zur Aufführungspraxis S. 137 [nur] deutsch mit Asterisk als Anmerkung bei Ziffer 28818 II. Akt über erste Achtelnote Gesangsstimme Partie Nick >*) Ohne Rücksicht auf Taktmetrum mit natürlicher Wortbetonung<; Endenommer S. 240 linksbündig >3·70 L&B<; Herstellungshinweis S. 240 unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1970)

° sich mittig auf 0,2 cm verdickender 9 cm Trennstrich.

 

784 IGOR STRAVINSKY / LULLABY / from / The Rake’s Progress / Recomposed for two Recorders / BOOSEY & HAWKES // (Spielausgabe für zwei Blockflöten [ungeheftet] 23,4 x 31 (4° [4°]); 3 [2] Seiten ohne Umschlag mit Titelseite schwarz auf weiß + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >LULLABY / from “The Rake’s Progress”<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >Igor Stravinsky<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1949, 1950, 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / This arrangement © Copyright 1960 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 18761<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1960)

 

784[66] [°] LULLABY / from “The Rake’s Progress” / IGOR STRAVINSKY / Recomposed for two Recorders / Boosey & Hawkes // IGOR STRAVINSKY / LULLABY / from / “The Rake’s Progress” / Recomposed for two Recorders / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limite / London · Paris · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // (Spielausgabe für zwei Blockflöten ungeheftet 21,5 x 27,9 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 3 [2] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier [mit Bildelementen aufgemachte Außentitelei, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky<* Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >RECORDER MUSIC<** + Stand >No. 12a< [#] >4.66<; Kopftitel >LULLABY / from “The Rake’s Progress”<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >Igor Stravinsky<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1949, 1950, 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / This arrangement © Copyright 1960 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. / Sole Sellings Agents: BOOSEY & HAWKES MUSIC PUBLISHERS Ltd.,<°° rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 18761<; ohne Endevermerk) // [1966]

° linksbündig 3,6 x 27,9 weiß stilisierte Klaviertastatur mit Blockflötenseitenansicht braun 3,6 x 27,9.

°° Schreibweise original.

* Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

** Angezeigt werden Arbeiten von >Holst< bis >Yoult/Hunt<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Stravinsky / Lullaby, from “The Rake’s / Progress” / descant and treble recorders<. Es ist keine Niederlassungsfolge angegeben.

 

785 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // [Rückendeckelbeschriftung in Goldprägung quer] >STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS< // (Taschenpartitur Kunstledereinband 2,9 x 19,3 [18,3] x 27,2 [26,7] ([Lex. 8°]); Singtext englisch; 414 [414] Seiten + 4 Seiten Einband dunkelblauschwarz [Außentitelei als verschlungenes Strawinsky-Monogramm >I> in >S< 1,8 x 4,0 in Goldprägung, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalt mittig zentriert >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< mittig nicht zentriert kursiv >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, Besetzungsliste >CHARACTERS< englisch mit Spielortsangabe, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch mit aufführungspraktischen Angaben, Seite mit Uraufführungsangaben >First Performance< italienisch, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< oberhalb und neben Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; Rechtsvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig unterhalb Herstellungshinweis >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17853<; Ende-Nummer S. 414 linksbündig >5·62 L & B<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel oberhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England< S. 414 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1962)

° Trennstrich 5,8 cm waagerecht.

 

78562 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // [Rückendeckelbeschriftung in Goldprägung quer] >STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS< // (Taschenpartitur Kunstledereinband 2,9 x 19,3 [18,3] x 27,2 [26,7] ([Lex. 8°]); Singtext englisch; 414 [414] Seiten + 4 Seiten Einband dunkelblauschwarz [Außentitelei als verschlungenes Strawinsky-Monogramm >I> in >S< 1,8 x 4,0 in Goldprägung, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalt mittenzentriert >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< mittig nicht zentriert kursiv >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, Besetzungsliste >CHARACTERS< englisch mit Spielortsangabe, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch mit aufführungspraktischen Angaben, Seite mit Uraufführungsangaben >First Performance< italienisch, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< oberhalb und neben Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; Rechtsvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig unterhalb Herstellungshinweis >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17853<; Ende-Nummer S. 414 linksbündig >12·62 L & B<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel oberhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England< S. 414 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1962)

° Trennstrich 5,8 cm waagerecht.

 

78563 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // (Taschenpartitur Kunstledereinband 18,3 x 26,7 [2,7 x 19 x 27,3]; Singtext englisch; 414 [414] Seiten + 4 Seiten Einband dunkelblau mit Rückendeckelbeschriftung Goldprägung quer >STRAVINSKY / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS< [Außentitelei als verschlungenes Strawinsky-Monogramm I in S 1,8 x 4,0 in Goldprägung, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Rechtsschutzvorbehalt >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, Besetzungsliste >CHARACTERS< englisch mit Angabe zur Handlungszeit, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch mit Angaben zur Aufführungspraxis englisch ohne Spieldauerangabe, Uraufführungsangaben >First Performance< italienisch, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< oberhalb und neben Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17853<; Ende-Nummer S. 414 linksbündig >12·63 L & B<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel oberhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England< S. 414 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1963)

° Trennstrich 5,8 cm waagerecht.

 

78569 I S // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / HPS 739 / [°] / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON // [Rückendeckeltext] STRAVINSKY / [°°] / THE RAKE’S / PROGRESS // (Taschenpartitur Kunstledereinband 18,4 x 26,6 [3,6 x 19,1 x 27,3] ([Lex. 8°]); Singtext englisch; 414 [414] Seiten + 4 Seiten Einband dunkelblau mit Rückendeckelbeschriftung Goldprägung quer [Außentitelei als verschlungenes Strawinsky-Monogramm I in S 1,8 x 4,0 in Goldprägung, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann (+ 2 Einbandseiten) [Innentitelei, Rechtsschutzvorbehalt Blocksatz >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt kursiv >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, Besetzungsliste >CHARACTERS< englisch mit Angabe zur Handlungszeit, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch + überschriftslose Angaben zur Aufführungspraxis englisch ohne Spieldauerangabe, Uraufführungsangaben >First Performance< italienisch, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann (+ 2 Einbandseiten); Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] zwischen Kopftitel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< oberhalb und neben Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17853<; Ende-Nummer S. 414 linksbündig >11·69 L & B<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel oberhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England< S. 414 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1963)

° Trennstrich 5,8 cm waagerecht.

°° Trennstrich 2,4 cm waagerecht.

 

786 Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / Full Score / BOOSEY & HAWKES // Igor Stravinsky / The Rake’s Progress / An Opera in Three Acts / by W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // (Dirigierpartitur [X] 23,5 x 31 (4° [4°]); Singtext englisch; 414 [414] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier orangerot auf grünbeigegrau [Außentitelei, Leerseite, [X], [X] ] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Rechtsschutzvorbehalt >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical re– / production in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the / libretto, of the complete opera or parts there of are strictly reserved.<, Rollenlegende >CHARACTERS< englisch, Orchesterlegende >ORCHESTRATION< englisch + Hinweise zur Aufführungspraxis englisch, Uraufführungsangaben italienisch, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Opera in three acts<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] zwischen Titel und Satzbezeichnung >PRELUDE< linksbündig zentriert >Libretto by / W. H. Auden and Chester Kallman< oberhalb und neben Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 19481951<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Copyright 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / © Copyright 1950 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. © Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel oberhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17853<; ohne Endevermerke) // (1962)

 

787Err Igor Stravinsky: THE RAKE’S PROGRESS / Errata to Full and Study Scores // (15 nach Partiturseiten mit Ziffernangabe geordnete Korrekturen, darunter die letzte mit einem Notenbeispiel; 1 Seite unpaginiert 8°; Plattennummer unterhalb Korrekturblock linksbündig >B. & H. 17853<; Ende-Nummer unterhalb Korrekturblatt auf gleicher Höhe mit Plattennummer rechtsbündig >9.66<) // 1966

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM
 | PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS OF USE