76

O r p h e u s

Ballet in three scenes – Orphée. Ballet en trois tableaux –Orpheus. Ballett in drei Bildern – Îðôåé. Áàëåò â òðåõ ñöåíàõOrfeo. Balletto in tre quadri

 

 

Scored for: a) [(roles): Orpheus, Eurydice, Angel of Death, Apollo, Pluto, Satyr, Leader of the Furies, Leader of the Bacchantes, 4 Friends of Orpheus, 4 Wood spirits, 9 Furies, 8 Bacchantes, 7 Tormented souls (male)] – First edition (Orchestra): Flauti I. II, Arpa, Violini I, Violini II, Viole, Violoncelli, Contabassi – Piccolo, 2 Flutes. 2 Oboes (2nd doubling Cor Anglais), 2 Clarinets in Bb, 2 Bassoons, 2 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets, 2 Trombones (2nd doubling Bass Trombone), Timpani, Harp, String Quintet; b) Performance requirements (orchestra)*: Piccolo Flute, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes (2nd Oboe = English horn), English horn (= 2nd Oboe), 2 Clarinets in Bb, 2 Bassoons, 2 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in Bb, 2 Trombones (2. Trombone = Bass Trombone), Bass Trombone (= 2nd Trombone), Timpani, Harp, 2 Solo Violins, Solo Viola, 4 Solo Violoncellos, Solo Double bass, Strings ([6 = Minimum forces required] First Violins**, [6 = Minimum forces required] Second Violins**, [5 = Minimum forces required] Violas, [4 = Minimum forces required] Violoncellos***, [3 = Minimum forces required] Double basses)

* 43 players.

** Divided in three.

*** Divided in two.

 

Performance practice: 43 musicians are required. Strawinsky originally had in mind a symphony orchestra of standard size, i.e. 60 musicians, for the new ballet. There was however only one stage in New York on which such an orchestra could be supported, the Metropolitan Opera House. The hire fee for this venue at that time was $15,000 for the evening, a sum of money which was too large for Kirstein. He therefore suggested to Strawinsky in a letter of 20th May 1947 that he use a smaller orchestra and alluded to Balanchine, who was thinking along the lines of Apollon. Strawinsky telegraphed back five days later, pacifying Kirstein by remarking that Orpheus only required 43 musicians, of which 24 were strings, while Apollon required 36 strings and therefore even more musicians had to be engaged and put into the pit.

 

Summary

a) Ballet content according to Strawinsky

[I:] The Thracian singer, Orpheus, mourns the death of his wife, Eurydice. His friends come with gifts of condolence and convey their sympathy to him. – [II:] Orpheus expresses his grief by playing the lyre. – [III:] The Angel of Death appears. He is deeply moved by pity and promises the mourning Orpheus that he will take him to Hades and help him seek Eurydice there. He escorts Orpheus through the gloomy fog between the worlds to the Underworld (Tartarus, Hades). – [IV:] The pair emerges from the fields of fog and enter the darkness of the Underworld. – [V:] The Furies obstruct Orpheus’s path, dance around him with nonsense gestures and threaten him. – [VI:] Orpheus calms them with his song. – [VII:] The tortured ghosts of the Underworld implore him to continue singing because his song of mourning is solace to them. – [VIII:] Orpheus complies, and sings his song to the end, and it puts the lost souls to sleep. – [IX:] Orpheus has succeeded in making the Underworld happy with his song and calming the Furies. Even Hades (Pluto), the god of the Underworld, is touched and is prepared to give Eurydice back to him. The Furies surround him, bind his eyes and bring Eurydice to him. – [X:] Eurydice follows the blind Orpheus through the shadows of the worlds between the worlds. Orpheus cannot look around him nor look at his wife. Eurydice pleads with him so imploringly that Orpheus cannot bear it any more and he tears the blindfold from his eyes. At that moment, Eurydice slips from his arms and falls down dead at his feet. – [XI:] Orpheus appears again in the Overworld. The Angel of Death has taken his lyre from him and in doing so has removed his instrument with which he was able to enchant and give solace to man and beast, the Living and the Dead, as well as to protect himself. – [XII:] In his ceaseless search for his disappeared wife, he offends the female Bacchantes. They fall on him vengefully, kill him and tear him to pieces. – [XIII:] Orpheus is dead but his song lives on. The god Apollo appears in rays of sunlight. He holds Orpheus’s lyre in his hands, lifts it up and thus raises up Orpheus’s immortal song to Heaven.

 b) Ballet content for the premiere according to Balanchine and Strawinsky

Sets: First Scene (I-IV): Eurydice’s grave: 2nd Scene (V-XII): in Hades; 3rd Scene (XII): Orpheus’s grave.

Course: [I:] like a; in addition: Orpheus mourns at Eurydice’s grave. He has let his lyre fall to the floor. He also stays with his friends, unmoving. [II:] like a; in addition: When his friends have gone, he picks up his lyre and plays. He then takes the instrument to the grave so that his song might reach Eurydice. A satyr and four forest spirits try in vain to console him. [III:] like a; in addition: The gods have compassion for him, and so the Angel of Death appears. He puts a golden mask on Orpheus before going down to the underworld with him so that Orpheus can neither see nor recognise anything, and it also makes him invulnerable. [IV to VIII:] like a; without additions. [IX:] like a; in addition: Pluto appears with Eurydice, who cannot be seen by Orpheus due to his mask. Pluto forbids him from looking at his wife before they both reach the light of day. [X:] like a; in addition: In the same way as the Angel leads him down, he also leads him out of Hades again. This time however the lyre is not carried by Orpheus but by the Angel of Death. When Orpheus tears the mask from his face as a result of the pair’s mutual desire and Eurydice dies, Orpheus tries in vain to get back his lyre while Eurydice is snatched away by hundred hands. The lyre has disappeared. [XI:] The leader of the Bacchants, who has red hair, followed by a further eight Bacchants, tears the now removed mask away from Orpheus. Orpheus is therefore delivered to the Thracian women defenceless. [XII:] They fall on him and behead him. [XIII:] Apollo kneels at Orpheus’s grave and summons his spirit, and the lyre rises up from the grave wreathed in flowers.

 

Plot according to Balanchine: Balanchine’s choreography departed from this plot on several counts. It introduced in [II] a satyr and four wood spirits who tried to bring solace to Orpheus in vain. In [III], the Angel of Death must put a golden mask on Orpheus which prevents Orpheus from seeing or recognising anything, but effectively becomes a symbol of his invulnerability. In the same way as the Angel leads him down, he also leads him out of Hades again. This time however the lyre is not carried by Orpheus but by the Angel of Death. When Orpheus tears the mask from his face as a result of the pair’s mutual desire and Eurydice dies, Orpheus tries in vain to get back his lyre while Eurydice is snatched away by a hundred hands. Apollo kneels at Orpheus’s grave and summons his spirit, and the lyre rises up from the grave wreathed in flowers.

 

Source: The original idea to Orpheus came from Balanchine, and the divisions of the plot was a collaboration between Balanchine and Strawinsky, while the movement titles were created by Strawinsky. The sources used for libretto were a sofar not known classical lexicon and book ten of the Metamorphoses of Publius Ovidius Naso, lines 1177 for the depiction of the second tragedy of Orpheus and Eurydice, and book eleven, verses 160 for the portrayal of Orpheus’s murder by the Maenads, referred to in Ovid’s text as [Zikone] (nurus Ciconum; nurus = young woman) as well as the head and lyre being washed up on Lesbos and their subsequent rescue by Phoebus/Apollo. The backstory (Eurydice’s death from a fatal accident, a snakebite [Ovid X, 110], which she incurred, as can be seen in other sources, when she fled from the unwanted pestering of her neighbour, the beekeeper Aristaios, as well as the terrible punishment of the Maenads from the God Dionysos, who then left the area), leaves the scenario of the ballet open. In Ovid’s original, the stories about Orpheus from his marriage up to his being reunited with Eurydice again, are scattered across several books. The murder of Orpheus follows the narration of his reunion with Eurydice in Hades (XI, 6166) and the description of the punishment of the Maenads by Dionysos/Bacchus, who banishes them and transforms them into trees (XI, 6784) and who subsequently leaves the area with his better people. In Ovid’s original, the story of Midas follows this, because Midas was indebted by the friendly incorporation of Silenus to the god Dionysos. – Strawinsky adapted the original story of Orpheus but adopted incorrect elements, however on a smaller scale than elsewhere in other works with plots of Greek mythology. The coarsest is the temporal connection of the Maenad story, which is in Ovid’s version self-standing, with the story of Eurydice and the appearance of the Furies in the Underworld. The result is that the ancient classical mythology gains a skewed sense and loses its logic. The Maenads are young women obsessed with carnality, who only hate Orpheus because after the events with Eurydice, he travels through Thrace and introduces pederasty. The Maenads as a result feel disregarded as women and take their revenge. The Furies on the other hand (in Latin: furiae = the Frenzied) are actually called Erinyes (Greek: the resentful; the Latin term furia comes from the beginning of the 17th Century), and they are pitiless goddesses of revenge. They rise up from Hades and mercilessly follow all transgressors who have committed terrible crimes and have not been discovered as doing so. They are depicted as having torches in their hands and snakes in their hair, and with serious, but rarely ugly faces. Over the course of time, their number was restricted to three. In the later Greek world, they were converted, through a cult of reconciliation to the Eumenides (Greek: the kindly). The Furies, as the voices of inner conscience, in ancient times, were the souls of the murdered who appear to their murderers so that they can no longer find any peace, and thus have no reason, according to their function, to torture Orpheus, as Orpheus had done nothing bad by ancient values. As a result, Strawinsky turns the Furies into the guardians of the Underworld who fight against Orpheus in observing their task of protection, so that he may not break through to the spirits. This again is contrary to the original, as the guardian of the Underworld is not the assembled ranks of Furies but the hellhound Cerberus. Even more contrary to the original is the comparison of the Furies with the Secret Police of the National Socialists, like the Gestapo of Hell, as Strawinsky is said to have described them to the Los Angeles Times (21st September 1947), because the Furies only concerned themselves with those who had committed capital crimes and not with men of a different mentality. One escapes the main misrepresentations of the classical mythology most easily if one understands Balanchine and Strawinsky’s scenario for Orpheus as an Orphic allegory of the present in Greek garb, and does not try to derive from it Classical mythology or late-Roman literature themes. If Tchelitshev had accomplished his identification of Orpheus with Apollo and Dionysos, there would have been nothing left of the myth other than a couple of interchangeable Greek-sounding names. The other remaining differences between the plot based on Ovid and the mythological original are secondary, for instance Orpheus goes down alone, according to the Greek conception, into the realm of Hades, while Strawinsky invents the Angel of Death, whom the Ancient Greeks did not have at all who leads Orpheus down into Hades. In doing so, the Angel of Death has him wear a golden mask before he enters the Underworld, while the original Orpheus does not wear a mask while he descends to the Underworld. After Eurydice is lost, the lyre plays no further role, while in Strawinsky’s version Orpheus loses his lyre to the Angel of Death. Apollo rescues the head of Orpheus and unites it with Eurydice in Hades, while according to the ballet scenario, Orpheus is raised up to God by Apollo. Between the return of Orpheus to the Overworld and his murder by the Maenads, three years pass according to Ovid, in which Orpheus, who is now physically sought after, abstains from any contact with a woman, while according to Strawinsky and Balanchine, Orpheus is killed soon after he comes back to the Overworld.

 

Orpheus myth: Observations on the Orpheus myth: Orpheus is not in fact one of the sagas of classical antiquity, although he was one of the Argonauts and it was his counter song which overpowered the song of the Sirens, thus saving his friends from death. He is however a mythical figure reaching back into prehistory and is specified as a Thracian singer. The son of the god Apollo and the muse of poets, Calliope, he travelled to Greece where he could soothe and enchant men, beasts, trees and stones with his wonderful song. He gained permission to go into the Underworld in order to win back his dead wife, Eurydice. Since he broke the terms of the agreement, that he was not allowed to look at his wife, who was following him, before they had both reached the light of day, he lost her again. The singer later struggles against the Bacchantes (Maenads, frenzied women that followed Dionysos), who gruesomely tore him to pieces and dismembered him for revenge. His head, which could prophesy the future, was to wash up on Lesbos together with his lyre. – The earliest portrayal of Orpheus reaches back into the middle of the 6th Century BC. In this time, the Ancient Greek religious movement of Orphism was created, named after their benefactor, with their secret doctrines on the creation of the world, life and Death, their acts of purification and concepts of asceticism (Orphic mysteries) and their poetry, which allegedly came from Orpheus himself (Orphic poems: hymns, cosmogony, poems of the Underworld). The Middle Ages saw him as a symbol for the divine shepherd, and from the time of the early Renaissance, he gradually became a world-wide symbol for purity, sobriety and integrity in Europe, in contrast to the drunk and animalistic atmosphere of the followers of Dionysos. The modern art term Orphism, coined in 1912 by the French poet Gustave Apollinaire, is derived from Orpheus, but has nothing to do with the figure from Greek mythology, but describes a specific technique of creation using freely invented methods of realization without any model in reality. The Orpheus material was realized in poetry throughout all the centuries, starting with Ovid and Vergil, and up to his appearance in the operatic repertoire at the end of the 18th Century, he was the most desired operatic material at all, which also yielded the text for the first Italian opera in Florence and at which Monteverdi tried his hand as well as Schütz and Gluck, and after Strawinsky, Hans-Werner Henze.

 

Construction: Orpheus is a ballet with a plot in three scenes consisting of 11 to 13 sections, depending on one’s counting method, which follow into one another without interruption. Strawinsky did not precede the separate ballet numbers with any numbering because he conceived the ballet, in spite of any division into scenes and acts, as a dramatic unit and not as a number piece. This basically leads to a problem with the numbering, which continues throughout, because Orpheus’s dance (Air de danse) is in two sections, but these two sections are interrupted by an interlude. One either counts these three sections as one, giving 11 numbers in total, as the series of movement durations in the official Strawinsky edition shows, or one counts them as happened later as three numbers, resulting in the final number 13, the secondary effect of which is that the Apotheosis cabbalistically shows that the number 13 is a departure from the twelve-part unit of the earthly world (there are writers that come up with 10 numbers without explaining how they do so).

Representation in key words*

First Act

[I] Orpheus weeps for Eurydice

Lento: 18 bars in an arch form A-B-A1 (A: bars 17 = figure 1; B: b. 812 = figure 2; A1: b. 13[12]-18 = figure 3) with sections approximately one-and-a-half times bigger. The music is in one part throughout all the sections, at first in the style of an ostinato and then (B+A1) a modified harp cantilena in the Phrygian mode polarised around E as a symbol of the weeping Orpheus. The woodwind is added to the string section in the middle section only. The lines proceed in parallel at times at a set interval apart and with permutating single notes. There is no fugal writing used.

[II] Air de Danse

90 bars in a varied A-A1-B-A2 arch form (A: b. 118= figure 45; A1: b. 1936 [37= general pause] = figures 812; B: b. 38 [37= general pause]-65 = figures 1320; A2: b. 6690 = figures 2127) with the possibility of A and A1 being grouped together as one unit; in this way, it is a three-part form with a reduction of the range/length in constantly reducing ratios of 5:4 and 9:7. There is clear polarisation around the notes B flat and D. The character is varied between mourning (Orpheus) and laughter (wood spirits), with only small contrast depending on the content, as Orpheus’s mourning is predominant. There are staccato skipping figures to characterize the entries of the wood spirits. Differences in the writing appear for the same reason between the large intervals as an expression of a dire situation and chromaticism in its double function as a general principle of compositional and structural clamping and a special formal technique for its breakthrough. The themes of the A section are followed by a transitional section and varied repetition with a transition to B. The differentiation of A and B is made by means of the removal of the movement of the dance, which is gradually built up in the A section, altered orchestration and new rhythmic and melodic elements in B. Here, violin chords are played with the entry of these teasing characters without long-lasting effect. There is a fast reversion to the atmosphere of mourning of the A section. The instrumentation of A proceeds into the lower registers by means of a gradual displacement of the linked instrumental blocks. In the B section, among others, there are two structural building blocks consisting of diminishing/diminished broken chords and descending major seconds with permuting alteration of a single note and different length. There is still chromatic ordering of musical sequences and alteration of the mood in B.

[III] L’Ange de la mort et sa danse

59 bars in a two-part form (A: b. 136 = figures 2835; B: b. 3759 = figures 3640) in a 3:2 relationship, and thus not a Classical pas de deux, even though it was choreographed as such by Balanchine. The A-section is in many sections in a framing form with repeats of the introductory and final bars. The mood ranges from serious to eerie, the chords are splintered and thematically interrupted by wandering through the instrumental groups. The entire direction of movement is upwards, announcing the singer’s burgeoning but anxious hope. There is sound of the harp in static, repeated chords. It is only in the final bars before the start of the descent into Hades that it changes into a downwards, strongly accented string of semiquavers, as if Orpheus can no longer wait to find the path to the Underworld and proceeds to speed up. The B section consists of a layered, but not uniform string tremolo with a nine-bar trombone solo and a subsequent fifteen-bar trumpet solo on top of it. It can be assumed that the string tremoli, which turn in on themselves, suggest the seething mists that separate the Over– and Underworlds. That the two woodwind soli signify the Angel of Death going in front and Orpheus following him, from which first the Angel and then the singer disappear into the fields of fog, is clear. The trumpet solo is constructed from a fanfare figure appearing four times with small episodes interrupting them, which are derived from one another.

[IV] Interlude

34 bars in elaborately counterpoint and fugal technique in five sections (1: b.14 = figure 4114; 2: b.512 = figure 41542; 3: b.1318 = figure 43; 4: b. 1929 = figure 4445; 5: 3034 = figure 46). The ten-note row (b2-c sharp2-e1-c1-b1-g1-a flat-c1-a-b flat) appears in four bars, broken up between the violins + violas, second violins + violas, second violins + ‘celli + double bases, ‘celli + double basses, and then developed. From bar 5, sections of the theme are transposed a fifth higher and taken over by the trumpet and trombone. The counterpoint in the ‘celli and double basses is at times symmetrical. Bars 11 and 12 have a transitory function. In the second violins, there are two interlaced tone rows which proceed in the opposite direction. There are chromatic lines in the violas. There is an entire chromatic network throughout up to the end of figure 43. From figure 44 (bar 19), the theme appears anew in a transposed version on F with the melodic material of bars 11 and 12 in the second violins. In the violas, there is a second counterpoint. Thematic stretto. The ‘celli and double basses take up the theme at the same time as the oboes, which have a different rhythm. Up to the end of figure 45, Strawinsky departs from the theme. The string tremoli representing the fog stopped at the beginning of the movement, the wreathes of fog have therefore dispersed. One first hears the Angel of Death (trombone solo) and Orpheus (trumpet solo), and both appear out of the darkness from figure 43, according to the choreographic instruction. Only the trombone solo still plays, as the trumpet solo is now silent. At the beginning of figure 46 (bars 30ff.) after the completion of the contrapuntal thematic development, the mood changes to a threatening one. The interlude, which consists of continuous repeats in the horn quartet accompanied by unison ‘celli and double basses, makes the preparation for the Dance of the Furies. These 5 bars form a self-standing transitional section into the transitional interlude. There are no longer any themes. The alternation of note between F sharp and G sharp in the 2nd and 4th horns stands against the D minor in 1st and 3rd horn. The first Act ends with this sound of double thirds.

[V] Pas de Furies

with repeats, this is 155 bars long and in two sections, each divided into a three-part A-B-A1 form (A: b.185 = figures 4762 [a: b.154 + 4757; b: b.5568 = figures 5859; a1: b.6985 = figures 502523 + 6162]; B: b.86155 [c: b.86128 = figures 6371; d: b. 129139 = figures 7273; c1: b.140155 = figures 7476]. A and B have equal weight and length, and the structural divisions occur symmetrically in respect to one another: the 1st section (a and c) is the most extended, and the 2nd section (b and d) is the shortest. The first and third sections counted together in both sections are five times as long as both the middle sections. Portrayal of the Underworld itself. The depiction of unrest and suffering is achieved by repetitions of alternating notes, repeated notes or sounds, and pain and suffering through tritones, minor seconds and diminished chords. Pizzicato stabs in the strings against the woodwinds. There are several frameworks for the material. The meaninglessness of a state of everlasting repetition of the same thing again and again (Sisyphus’s futile rolling of his stone, for example) makes up the A section, which stagnates into itself, in comparison with the dance-like, but gradually becoming peaceful, form of movement in the second main section, B. For the first time in the ballet Orpheus, gaps are composed directly into the melodic course of the music, imitating the jerky movements of the Furies. The melodic shapes are constantly varying, at times staccato throughout. The sound world is in piano, but marcato and with some forte or sforzato chords, which disappear immediately. The final 11 bars flow out in an accompanying figure.

[VI] Air de danse (Orphée)

Air de danse (Orphée), Interlude and Air de danse (conclusion) are a structural unit in a framework form 57 + 5 + 10 bars (figures 7788, 89, 9091) in a large-scale form A-B-C-B1-D-B2. Air de danse was notated by Strawinsky as being in two sections (b.113 = figures 7779 + b.1457 = figures 8088), but was composed in four sections A-B-C-B1 (A: b.113= figures 7779; B: b.1431 = figures 8083; C: b.3241 = figures 8485; B1: b.4257 = figures 8688) and thus is six times as long as the interlude and three times as long as the final section. Corresponding to the appeasing function of the music, the harp at figure A plays soloistically in two parts, accompanied by two string groups made up of a combined solo and tutti string quintet; tutti strings only play certain accented chords; further technical effects are achieved by alternating pizzicato and bowed playing. In B, two oboes playing soloistically and very softly are grouped together with the harp, which now for its part takes on the accompanying role in alternation with the violins and ‘celli. Clearly, the playing Orpheus has been transformed into an Orpheus who sings and accompanies himself on the harp. At this point, C is allotted structurally the function of an interlude of a cadenza/cadence of the instruments, which flows into B1, a variation and at the same time the completion of the B section. Stylistically in the Air, which is titled Grave, there is proximity to the Bachian style of slow movements. There is dialogue between gentleness, moaning, sighing and lamentation. Towards the end of the movement, there is a piling up of sharp intervals and a stagnation of the melodic line.

[VII] Interlude

at only 5 bars, this is the shortest section of the ballet, and functions in the larger form as the D-section interlude in Orpheus’s Dance. Realization of the plot events by means of the intensification of intervals and the dislocation of C minor chords.

[VIII] Air de danse (conclusion)

in terms of the large-scale structure, this movement is B2, a continuation of Orpheus’s dance after the interruption of the interlude. Melodically, the material is based on the B section from figure 80. The oboe melody line is moved to the harp and cor anglais in contrapuntal imitative technique. There are new, trembling fast repetitions of a single staccato note in groups of hemidemisemiquavers only in the clarinet parts, which are added to the contrapuntal web. It is a very dense movement. The feeling of the musical sense is the happy end of Orpheus’s entry by means of the final chord played by the timpani, harp and pizzicato double basses on a pure F major.

[IX] Pas d’action

37 bars after Strawinsky’s double barline separation, in a large-scale structure A-B-B1 (A: b. 18 = figures 9293; B: b.912 = figure 94; B1: b.1337 = figures 95100) consisting of B sections containing related material and a contrasting A section. Orpheus’s Harp plays only in the A section as two chords several bars apart, at first in the strings, then in strings with woodwinds surrounding them. This represents Orpheus surrounded by the calmed Furies. Structural divisions are A-B-A1-A2. A sequence of melodies with few notes with broken pure F major chordal material. There is a contrasting four-bar B section in three parts, with solo viola and two violoncelli. This clearly represents the two Furies that tie Orpheus’s blindfold. Compositionally, this is depicted by ostinati and repetitions in motoristic semiquaver movement without thematic development, each of the three parts with few notes. In the 2nd violoncello, there are gestural traces of the events: an arch form for the blindfold being put on, and intervals of a second separated by rests/pauses for the double knot with checking of the correct position of the blindfold. The B1 section is characterised by a two-part trumpet section with interrupting rests/pauses and a motoristic, static semiquaver accompaniment in the violas and ‘celli. This depicts Orpheus waiting and the entrance of Pluto (Hades). There is a short rising bassoon solo at figure 973 in the natural range of a fifth F to C, presumably conceived as the scene in which Eurydice is led. Pluto’s final instructions. The entry at figure 100 marks the end of the static, motoristic, running string accompaniment, and the trumpets are no longer used. Dislocation of the semiquaver movement, without the strings, in two flutes and two clarinets, superimposition of the broken chord material in two note chords leading rhythmically in parallel in the flute and clarinet parts. This represents the event of the two people reunited and now put on themselves who are abandoned to their emotions. The scene ends with three string chords, an upward double-bass line and a confluence into an uncertain mixture of sounds made up of D-A-F sharp-B-E; this is a depiction of the start of the ascent to the Overworld and an expression of its questionableness.

[X] Pas de deux

83 bars in a framing structure in three or four sections, according to one’s method of counting. The three-section division A-B-A1 (A: b. 132 = figure 101108; B: b. 3365 = figures 109117; A1: b. 6682 = figures 118121) does not regard the general pause as a division point between sections. The four-section division A-B-A1-A2 (A: b. 132 = figure 101108; B: b.3365 = figure 109117; A1: b.6680 = figures 117120; A2: b.8185 = figure 121) regards the music after the general pause as a form of coda. This division also allows the scene to be proportioned using the Golden Section, because the four sections then become smaller in relationship to one another by 1:5, 1:6 and 1:7. The Pas de Deux between Orpheus and Eurydice is the formal and structural centre of the entire ballet and unites in itself all the previous and subsequent thematic elements including the formal ones. There are cluttered changes of meter throughout unlike in any other section of the ballet (A =32 bars = 24 changes; B = 33 bars = 18 changes). After the catastrophe has taken place, there are no further changes of meter. A complete collapse is represented by unison string movement at figure 10112. Orpheus goes ahead and Eurydice follows, depicted by fugue-like imitative technique at figure 1013ff, retaining the harmonic stepwise movement. Grief and confidence in the A section is turned on its head in the B section to become happiness. Eurydice begins with her rash and careless wooing of Orpheus and dances for him (Balanchine has her play an invisible flute at this point in the choreography). The orchestration, in addition to the strings, flutes, oboes, clarinets and horns, is dominated by a solo duet between the 1st Flute and 1st Clarinet, representing Orpheus and Eurydice. The end of the section is marked by a cadenza-like warning signal from the Angel in the harp over a threatening organ pedal in the split ‘celli, which at the same time dissolves the harmonic density of the section. Bars 6576 in the A1 section correspond to bars 18ff. in the A section. It appears as if the Angel’s warning was successful, Eurydice has given up her attempts at seduction and things have returned to the way they were in the beginning. The high-rolling [Hochrollen] in the music reaches fortissimo, which in comparison with the general mezzo dynamic of this ballet is an unprecedented outbreak of feeling, as a representation of the passion which neither can withstand, and the general pause is a representation of Death, awaking in horror, irreversibility, understanding and dumb despair. Large leaps in the peaceful flow of the final 5 bars. Feeling of despair and exhaustion. A two-note chord, C-E flat, in the first violins after the pause/rest becomes the melodic head of the theme of the subsequent Interlude.

[XI] Interlude

10 bars (figures 121124) in one section with a one-bar transitional flourish, separated by a double barline, into the Pas d’action. Dotted rhythms and upbeats are used to characterise the reverse direction of the action. The harp no longer plays any role. Orpheus is helpless. The curtain of fog, which must be played to and which must be driven through in order to find the way into the Underworld, is impenetrable. At first the trumpets and trombones paint the picture, followed by the oboes and clarinets.

[XII] Pas d’action

90 bars (figures 125142) dictated by the plot without observable large-scale formal divisions. The division in any case is made by the dynamic levels (forte section bars 155 = figures 1251363; fortissimo section bars 5669 = figures 13641392; Piano section bars 7090 = figures 13931427) while avoiding any thematic congruence, or according to motific and aural distinguishing features as an A-B-A1 structure (A: b.134 = figures 125131; B: b. 3555 = figures 1321363; A1: b. 5690 = figures 1364142). The Maenads’ attack and the dismemberment of Orpheus is one section in the plot. The representation is made through the extended use of rests/pauses with figures used to characterise the sudden detachment of the smallest motific sections without structural function. Strong dynamics. Additional sharpening of intervals by the use of minor seconds, which are inverted into a different register, becoming major sevenths. Strong layering of thirds, chords containing disturbing notes and the isolated sound of fifths create a hectic, movement of masses of people. Different processes of layering thirds in the form of bitonal and chromatic (D-F against D sharp-F sharp) or chordal couplings (D-F sharp + A sharp-C sharp). Extension of pitches and sound colour up to the highest registers. Taking its cue from the content, the screeching sounds typical of the Maenades overpower the normal music, corresponding to Ovid’s account that the [Zikonen] prevented the dangerous songs of Orpheus’s lyre and Orpheus’s voice from affecting them by the shouting over them. The music flows into units of screaming chords, followed by the repeated breaking up and dismemberment of the remaining parts of Orpheus’s body. Gradually slowing of the Tempo. – [XIII:] Apothéose d’Orphée: 37 bars (figures 143149) without sectional divisions, but with divisions of musical material and for the plot. Grief for Orpheus becomes the hope for Orpheus and his art, which recalls Apollo’s capacity for remembering. It is not the original, even if it seems to be. Directional movements, the starting note and type of scale are changed from [I]. The harp part in bars 5ff. is similarly mirrored but displaced, and is rewritten from the original Phrygian into the Dorian, twisting the pessimistic downward movement of [I] into the optimistic, transfiguring upward movement of [XIII]. With regard to the hectic nature of the Pas d’action, the peace of the Apotheosis gives the effect of redemption. The movement takes place slowly and solemnly. In the face of future hope, the reality of the past regresses back to what is to come.. All that remains of the lyre of the dead Orpheus is a memory, which interrupts the canonic writing in the horn parts several times.

* Using a scientific paper by Yvonne Kohle ‚Orpheus. Entwicklungsgeschichte, Analyse, Deutung’, 222 pages, Düsseldorf 1993, unpublished.

 

Structure

First Scene [#] Premier Tableau [Erstes Bild]

[I]

Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurydice. [Orpheus weint um Eurydice]

He stands motionless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, il ne bouge pas. [Er steht regungslos mit dem Rücken zum Publikum]

Lento sostenuto Crotchet = 69

            (Figure 21 up to the end of Figure 3)

Some friends pass bringing presents and offering him sympathie

Passent des amis avec des présents. Compliments de condoléances

[Freunde kommen mit Gaben vorbei und bekunden ihr Mitgefühl]

            (Figure 21)

[II]

AIR DE DANSE

Andante con moto Quaver = 112

            (Figure 4 up to the end of figure 27)

[III]

DANCE OF THE ANGEL OF DEATH

L’ANGE DE LA MORT ET SA DANSE

[Tanz des Todesengels]

L’istesso Quaver = 112

            (Figure 28 up to the end of figure 40)

The Angel leads Orpheus to Hades.

L’Ange commène Orphée aux enfers.

[Der Engel geleitet Orpheus zur Unterwelt]

            Figure 361)

[IV]

INTERLUDE

[Zwischenspiel]

Crotchet = Crotchet

            (Figure 41 up to the end of figure 46)

The Angel and Orpheus reappear in the gloom of Tartarus.

L’Ange et Orphée réapparaîssent dans les ténèbre du Tartare.

[Der Engel und Orpheus erscheinen wieder in der Dunkelheit der Unterwelt]

            (Figure 431)

Second Scene [#] Deuxième Tableau [Zweites Bild]

[V]

PAS DES FURIES

their agitation and their threats. [#] leur agitation et leurs menace. [ihre Unruhe und ihre Drohungen,]

Agitato Minim = 126 in plano

            (Figure 47 up to the end of figure 61 with a repeat of figure 502 up to the end of figure

604, but omitting the five-bar first-time figure 502 up to the end of 533)

Sempre alla breve ma meno mosso Minim = 98

            (Figure 63 up to the end of figure 766 [attacca forward to figure 77])

[VI]

AIR DE DANSE

(Orphé)

Grave punktierte Achtel = 63

            (Figure 77 [attacca from figure 766] up to the end of figure 79)

Un poco meno mosso Sechzehntel = 96

            (Figure 80 up to the end of figure 886 [attacca forward to figure 89])

[VII]

INTERLUDE

[Zwischenspiel]

The tormented souls in Tartarus stretch on their fettered arms towards Orpheus, and implore him to continue his song of consolation. [#] Les tourmentés du Tartare tendent leur bras enchaînes vers Orphée le suppliant de continuer son chant consolant. [Die armen Seelen der Unterwelt strecken ihre gefesselten Arme Orpheus entgegen und flehen ihn an, mit seinem Klagegesang fortzufahren]

L’istesso tempo

            (Figure 89 [attacca from figure 886])

[VIII]

AIR DE DANSE

(conclusion)

Orpheus continues his Air [#] Orphée continue son Air. [Orpheus singt sein Lied weiter]

L’istesso tempo

            (Figure 90 up to the end of figure 915 [attacca forward to figure 92])

[IX]

PAS D’ACTION

Hades, moved by the song of Orpheus, grows calm. The Furies surround him, bin his eyes und return Eurydice to him. [#] L’enfer, touché par le chant d’Orphée, se calme. Les Furies l’entourent, lui couvrejT les yeux d’un bandeau et lui rendent Eurydice. [Die Unterwelt, vom Orpheus-Gesang bewegt, beruhigt sich. Die Furien umringen ihn, verbinden ihm die Augen und bringen Eurydice zu ihm]

(Veiled Curtain) [#] (Tulles) [Schleiervorhang]

Andantino leggiadro Quaver = 104

            (Figure 92 [attacca from figure 915] up to the end of figure 93)

Poco più mosso Quaver = 126

            (Figure 94 up to the end of figure 1006 [attacca forward to figure 101])

[X]

PAS-DE-DEUX

(Orpheus and Eurydice before the veiled curtain). [#] (Orphée et Eurydice devant les tulles). [Orpheus und Eurydice vor dem Schleiervorhang)

Andante sostenuto Quaver = 96

            (Figure 101 [attacca from figure 1006] up to the end of figure 1215 [attacca forward to

figure 122])

Orpheus tears the bandage from his eyes. Eurydice falls dead.

Orphée arrache de ses yeux le bandeau. Eurydice tombe morte.

Orpheus nimmt die Binde von seinen Augen. Eurydice fällt tot um

            (at the end of figure 1205)

[XI]

INTERLUDE

Veiled curtain, behind which the decor oft the first scene is placed. [#] Tulles, derrière le décor du premier tableau sera remis. [Hinter dem Schleiervorhang erscheint die Dekoration des ersten Bildes]

Moderato assai Crotchet = 72

            (Figure 122 [attacca from figure 1215] up to the end of figure 1244 [attacca forward to figure

125])

[XII]

PAS D’ACTION

The Bacchanten attack Orpheus, sieze him and tear him in pieces. [#] Les Bacchantes attaquent Orphée, s’emparent de lui et le déchirent en morceaux. [Die Bachantinnen greifen Orpheus an, töten ihn und reißen ihn in Stücke]

Vivace Crotchet = 152

            (Figure 125 [attacca from figure 1244] up to the end of figure 142 [attacca forward to Figure

143])

[XIII]

Third Scene [#] Troisième Tableau [Drittes Bild]

            (Figure 143 [attacca from Figure 1427] up to the end of figure 1496)

Orpheus’ Apotheosis [#] Apothéose d’Orphée [Orpheus-Apotheose]

Apollo appears. He wrests the lyre from Orpheus and raises his song heavenwards. [#] Apparait Apollon. Il s’empare de la lyre d’Orphée et élève son chant vers les cieux. [Apoll erscheint. Er nimmt die Lyra des Orpheus und erhebt seinen Gesang zum Himmel]

Lento sostenuto Crotchet = 69

 

Corrections: In the original version, there are several printing errors, for which it remains unclear as to whether they are printing, manuscript or correction errors that were subsequently corrected in a separate, enclosed errata sheet. This contains 22 corrections necessary for performance, which statistically means that there is at least one mistake to every 2 pages of music.

 

Corrections / Errata

Tables

Full score 761

[Appearing in type script with handwritten additions]

  1.) page 1, bar 1: in the harp part, près de la table and the staccato markings removed.

  2.) page 1, bar 2: sim. Removed.

  3.) page 5, bar 4: in the harp part, près de la table and the staccato markings removed, and the same

            in the following bar, bar 5.

  4.) page 9 bar 9 ([Figure 212]: natural sign before the B flat in the violoncelli.

  5.) page 10 bar 3: change of clef in the ‘cello system from alto clef to treble clef.

  6.) page 12, bar 7 [figure 272]: only the 1st violins should have an additional con sord. Inserted.

  7.) page 13, bar 7 [figure 293]: the 1st bassoon part begins with a crotchet rest.

  8.) page 24, bar 1 [figure 611]: in the 2nd bassoon part, both minims should be lowered from e to e

            flat.

  9.) page 33, bar 9 [187]: in the 1st oboe part, the slur should continue up to e flat 2.

10.) page 35, bar 3 [figure 903]: in both clarinet parts, the first rest should be written as a semiquaver

            rest, not a quaver rest.

11.) page 36, bar 9ff. [figure 94]: figure 94 should have the Italian tempo marking poco più mosso [in

            the corrections printed in later, it is written Poco più mosso] and the metronome marking

            quaver = 126 [in the corrections printed later, it is written as usual with the sign for a quaver

            note].

12.) page 37, bar 2 [figure 961]: instead of quaver-semiquaver rest-semiquaver in the third crotchet

            beat in the 1st and 2nd violins, the rhythm should be semiquaver-semiquaver rest-quaver.

13.) page 41, bar 10 [figure 1123] the third semiquaver note in the 1st oboe part should be g sharp

            instead of g. This was even a mistake in the errata, as the third semiquaver note is f sharp, not

            g sharp. It was meant to refer to the fourth semiquaver note.

14.) page 42, bar 2 [figure 1134]: the two clarinet and bassoon parts should contain a piano marking p.

15.) page 42, bar 2 [figure 1114]: the 1st bassoon part should read: semiquaver rest + semiquaver a

            tied to the following quaver a + quaver a.

16.) page 44, bar 1 [figure 1194]: the metre indication, 3/4, belongs at the beginning of the System.

17.) page 48 bar 9 [figure 1130]: at the beginning of the bar in the viola part, there should be a minim

            rest, and not a crotchet rest.

18.) page 48, bar 8 [figure 1293]: the corresponding rhythm in the flutes, bassoons and both first horns

should be inverted; instead of semiquaver-semiquaver rest-quaver, it should be quaver–

semiquaver rest-semiquaver.

19.) page 48, bar 10 [figure 1301]: the crotchet rest in the first and in the second crotchet rest should

            be dotted.

20.) For all of ) pages 5759 [figure 143 up to the end of figure 149], instead of solo violin, it should

            read 2 solo violins.

21.) page 57, bar 1 [figure 1431]: in the harp part, près de la table and the staccato markings should be

removed, along with the sim. in the subsequent bar, bar 2 [figure 1432].

22.) The last issue cannot be made sense of from the score alone, because it refers to the relationship

            between the score and the parts. The repeat between figure 50 and the end of figure 60 was

            written out full in the parts, as a result of which rehearsal figure 51 should be replaced by 60A

            and 52 by 60B.

Full score 761 + Pocket score 762

  1.) figure 81 1st Flute: There should be a crescendo sign < added that continues opening up to the

triplet figure, followed by a decrescendo sign > starting from there.

  2.) figure 82: >4/8 sempre<.

  3.) figure 182 1./2. Violins: A crescendo sign < should be added between the two systems after the

first group of triplets and up to but excluding the last triplet group of the bar.

  4.) figure 293 1. Bassoon: quaver rest instead of crotchet rest.

  5.) figure 2934 1st Bassoon: a slur from the trill note f figure 293 to the trill note 294 should be

            inserted.**

  6.) figure 3156 2nd Bassoon + 4th Horn: the phrasing mark should not be from the first to the last

            note of the bar, rather only from the first to the second note, or (Bassoon 2:) from the first

            triplet G to the dotted quaver c sharp.

  7.) figure 343 Harp discant: treble clef before the 1. note.

  8.) figure 565 above 1. Oboe: >sƒp< instead of >poco sƒp<.

  9.) figure 5745 above and below 1. Clarinet: decrescendo-sign > from the middle of the bar figure 574

            to the end of the bar figure 575 should be inserted.

10.) figure 614 1. Klarinette: a descrescendo-sign > should be addeddie to minim a; the same applies

            to 614 1st note b.

11.) figure 621 1st clarinet: minim b has to be marked with an accent (>).

12.) figure 671: metronome marking dotted quaver = 63.

13.) figure 674+5 Harp Bass: all notes e instead of eb.

15.) figure 844 1. Oboe: 1., 3., 4., and 5. note have to be marked with accents (>); 2. Oboe: 1. and 4.

            note have to be marked with accents (>).

17.) figure 903 Clarinets: the first rest should be written as a semiquaver rest, not a quaver rest.

18.) figure 912 1st Oboe: a slur from the 1st note of the bar [semiquaver db2] to the last note of the bar

            figure 911 should be inserted.

19.) figure 941: tempo and metronome marking Più mosso quaver = 132

21.) figure 1072 1st Violin: a flat in round brackets should be added to the third but last note [f#1

            instead of f1].**

22.) figure 1073 2nd Violin: bracket natural has to be added to the 1st note [f1].**

23.) figure 1131 1.Oboe: semiquaver ligature c#3-b2-b2-b2 instead of d#3-c#3-c#3-c#3.]**

24.) figure 11712 1. Clarinet: the two large phrasing marks should be removed and replaced by small

            phrasing marks from the 1st to the 2nd note of the last set of triplets in the bar of figure 1171

                        [db1 to ab1], from the 1st to the 2nd note of the 2nd set of triplets in figure 1172 [ab1 to e] and

            from the 1st to the 2nd note of the 3rd set of triplets in figure 1172 [d1 to ab1]. The 2nd and 5th

            note of the triplet in figure 1171 (semiquavers f1 and cb1) and the 2nd, 3rd, 6st and 9th note of

            the triplet in figure figure 1172 (semiquavers d1, db1, f1, g) should be marked with a staccato

            dot.

25.) 1172 red before bar >marc.<, below 1st note quaver d an accent >, from the triplet >pres de la

            table<.

26.) figure 1214: >a tempo< has to be removed.

27.) figure 1263 Clarinets systems: >ƒ< instead of >mƒ<.

28.) figure 1264 1. Clarinet: quaver d#1 has to be marked with staccato (dot).

29.) figure 1264 systems 2. Clarinet / 1. Bassoon: >ƒ< instead of >mƒ<.

30.) figure 1271: >sempre ƒ< has to be added.

31.) figure 1284 systems 1. Trumpet, 1./2. Trombone: the first values semiquaver-semiquaver rest–

            quaver instead of quaver-quaver-quaver.

32.) figure 1322 Double bass: >sƒ< has to be added to the quaver c#s.

33.) figure 1323 Double bass: >sƒ< has to be added to the 2. semiquaver B.

34.) figure 1342 Violoncello: >ƒ< after the 2. crotchet.

35.) figure 1342 Double bass: >ƒ< after the 2. crotchet.

36.) figure 1344 Violoncello: >ƒ< has to be added at the beginning of the semiquaver ligature.

37.) figure 1344 Double bass: >ƒ< has to be added at the beginning of the semiquaver ligature.

38.) figure 1373 1st/2nd Horn: the last two-note chord crotchet b1-f2 instead of crotchet f1-b1.

39.) figure 1373 1st/2nd Trumpet: the last two-note chord crotchet a1-c#3 instead of crotchet c2-a2.*

40.) figure 1374 1st/2nd Horn, two-note chords: should be b1-f2 + e1-e2 + b1-f2 +b1-f2 + e1-e2

            instead of f1-b1 + e1-e2 + f1-b1 + f1-b1 + e1-e2.*

41.) figure 1374 1./2. Trumpet, two-note chords: should be f2-a2 + d2-b2 + a2-c3 + a2-c3 + d2-b2

            instead of c2-a2 + d2-b2 + c2-a2 + c2-a2 + d2-b2.*

42.) figure 1375 1./2. Horn, two-note chords: should be b1-f2 + g1-b1 instead of f1-b1 + g1-b1.*

43.) figure 1375 1./2. Trumpet, the first 3 values: should be a2-c#3 + d2-f#2 + d#2

            f#2 instead of c2-a2 + d2 +d#2-f#2.*

44.) figure 13912 Timpani: quaver rest — semiquaver ligature c-c — quaver eb — quaver rest – crotchet

            rest — quaver rest — semiquaver ligature c-c | — quaver eb — quaver rest — quaver rest –

            semiquaver ligature c-c — quaver eb — dotted crotchet rest instead of quaver rest – semiquaver

            ligature c-c — quaver eb — quaver rest.

* Annotation also in pocket score (green).

** Pocket score. No annotation in the full score.

 

Style: Strawinsky characterises the events in the plot either as foreground or background, meaning that compositionally identical moments can have different expressive value, such as the use of rests. Rests are composed into the ballet music beyond their normal functions, for example, indicating the ends of phrases or giving breathing possibilities, as a structural element,. In the Dance of the Furies, they support the threatening and agitated gestures of the Furies, and in the dance of the Bacchantes, they portray the dismemberment of Orpheus; in the abortive return back from the Underworld, a general pause signifies Eurydice’s second and final death. If this was not historically impossible, one would be tempted to say that Strawinsky knew the entire plethora of rhetorical figures of baroque text setting, from the suspiratio (sighing rest) and the Tmesis (separating rest, from the Greek ‘to cut up’) to the Aposiopesis (a pause which shows the ending). – The ballet incorporates later Neo-Classicism with an evocative interplay between plot and music whilst maintaining compositional individuality. The dynamic level remains almost exclusively in the region of piano and mezzoforte with additional sforzati. There is neither a sustained pianissimo nor forte throughout, however there are a few pianissimo effects in the strings in the first Interlude, a temporary forte in the Dance of the Furies, and separate chordal stabs with ¦¦ and ¦¦¦ markings in the attack of the Bacchantes. The Apotheosis also has piano and mezzopiano markings throughout. The Orpheus ballet contains no humorous scenes or corresponding single scenes, and no caricatures or contradictory interpretation, which Strawinsky had been using constantly even in tragic contexts up to that point. The ballet has, for the first time in any of Strawinsky’s works, a melancholic, pessimistic basic mood, which first appeared in the Basel Concerto, but had not yet established itself. The orchestration is like chamber music, not orchestral. The combination of the small groups is dependent upon the situation in the plot. It is only at the dismemberment of Orpheus that there is a tutti. The harp is assigned to Orpheus. The brass instruments, trumpet and trombone, play in different situations throughout, but are silent at Orpheus’s large entrances, as if they are listening to his song. The solo trombone and solo trumpet correspond to certain entries of the Angel of Death and Orpheus. The woodwinds are, with the exception of the framing movements, used in all types of ways, but are especially used to describe the characters and situations, likewise the timpani in the entrances of the Furies and Bacchantes. The music of Orpheus is consciously written by Strawinsky to be predominantly dark and even threatening, and in being so corresponds to the established conception of the Underworld. Strawinsky however also placed value on its smoothness, because the scene takes place in darkness. He wanted through this to express that in the darkness contrasts are increased, and he suggests this compositionally and in the orchestration. Strawinsky defines the place and time musically. Orpheus finds himself in the course of the ballet at different places at different times, on the Earth, on the way to the Underworld, under the Earth, on the path back into the Overworld and again on the Earth. This cycle of places, which apart from the finality of Eurydice’s second death, has no effect on the final situation, logically is created by the temporal identity of [I] and [XIII]. Strawinsky captures the three time zones before, in and after the Underworld by means of different tonal polarisations and motific formations. Musical figures such as C-B-F, intervallic constructions such as B flat-D flat become structurally definitive for the scenes before the descent. In unfolding the B flat-D flat interval melodically, Strawinsky creates the starting notes of the theme of the fugue. All the music of the Underworld on the other hand is polarised around F, especially Orpheus’s entrances, which develop at times in F major or F minor, or generally in mixed forms of the two. After Orpheus turns round in the plot, the characteristic B-D flat interval is reorganised registrally. As a result, the identical interval accommodates another emotional content. The central section of composition inside the composition is the Pas de deux between Orpheus and Eurydice, which is also the structural centre, and which at the same was written dramaturgically correctly at the temporal centre of the work. This number can therefore be characterised just as much as an entity in itself, which is synthetically constructed out of the elements of the others, as the structural centrepiece out of which single structures are taken, and the various other movements are derived individually from this. The allocations are, as it is Strawinsky’s style, scarcely adhered to. In [I], the quaver movement throughout and static [liegenbleiben] ostinato notes bind the Pas de deux; in [II], fast scalic run and the structural B flat-D flat; in [III] the broken 6/4 chord; in [IV] the one-voice opening and fugal manner of construction; in [V] the chromatic structure and the staccato technique; in [VI-VIII] the rhythmic motif and fugal writing; in [IX] the rhythmic motif and chromatic motif of alternating notes; in [XI] the fugal writing and the structural C-E flat motif; in [XII] the staccato and broken-chord techniques and the chromatic motif of alternating notes; in [XIII] the rhythmic motif and fugal construction. Alongside this, there is a second manner of functional interweaving, developed through overreaching motific writing, which binds together separate movements between one another in terms of compositional construction, creating reference points of meaning. When Strawinsky also condemned the Wagnerian technique of the Leitmotif, he was working on Orpheus himself again with motific techniques that reach across the separate movements, which interpret aligned moments of mood, create musical connections and enable structural links. This includes not only the melodic writing in the harp of Orpheus, which is a leitmotif throughout, and certain moments of characterisation achieved through instrumentation, colour and gesture, which are defined by the plot, but also the more important elements of proportionality, framing devices and correspondences of tempo and dynamic. For example, the two interruptions of the Fugue in the Apotheosis are formed in this way (bars 14 and 15 = figure 1455+6 and 25 and 26 = figure 14756), with which Strawinsky cuts through the horn fugue twice ‘as if with a pair of scissors’, as he explained to Nabokov in his Christmas visit in 1949 in Beverly Hills, a memory of the song of the now dead Orpheus, which has faded away and of which only the accompaniment lives on. – The theme of Rossignol, to overcome Death by music, seems to be taken up again, this time however at the price of a self-inflicted, but at the same time excusable, failure caused by love. The actual failure however is not the death of Eurydice, rather, the emphasis is shifted to the extreme circumstances of Orpheus’s death. In his musical version, Strawinsky followed much more strongly the mythological originals than in the scenario, in which he had to take Balanchine into consideration and in which he was not able to make clear crucial plot points. The attack of the Maenads is made, according to Ovid’s depiction, with missiles, branches and stones. This attack from distance does not succeed however. Orpheus has his lyre and plays. His song makes the branches gather round him but not injure him, and the stones soften and fall down in a circle before him. The Maenads are powerless. They now pit music against music. They begin to screech horribly and to shout more and more loudly, so that they overpower Orpheus’s singing. Orpheus can no longer be heard, and his songs therefore become ineffective. Nearby, farmers are ploughing with their cattle. In the face of the inferno of noise made by the wild mob, they cast aside their tools and flee horrified, leaving their animals behind. The Maenads arm themselves with hoes and slaughter first the cattle and then Orpheus, who no longer has anything with which he could defend himself. Orpheus’s head is washed, along with his lyre, into the river Hebrus (today, the Maritza), and thence into the sea and [fittingly] to Lesbos, the centre of lesbianism, and the lyre begins to play softly in the wind while they are approaching and the dead tongue still lisps to itself. When the head and lyre are washed ashore and a snake tries to bite, Apollo intercedes. Since his murder also breaks the laws of Dionysos, the Maenads are punished awfully. They lose their freedom to move and their human feelings. The event itself of setting music, better: noise against music is represented by Strawinsky by a screaming in the flutes which overpowers Orpheus’s harp music and makes it fall silent. The silence yields to the noise, sober-mindedness to overflowing hatred, idealistic existence to reality, and with it, optimism to pessimism. The Apotheosis, his transfiguration at the end into divinity, virtually amounts to a theatrical self-calming against this background. It is also a capitulation in the face of a world from which justice must flee, in order to resettle in an afterlife of whatever form, whence it throws points of lights onto the Earth. Five years later, Strawinsky left all these considerations behind him and after his bitter experience gained from his court trial that there is no justice in this life he devoted himself completely to theologically orientated music.

 

Dedication: There is no dedication indicated.

 

Duration: 2941″. – The duration of Orpheus is defined , as with other pieces, basically according to the ideal time for the production of a recording, which therefore lends Strawinsky’s own recordings a special significance. The duration is always dependent on the interpretation and remains stated approximately with a circa. The performance duration can be defined exactly to the split-second by taking into account the number of single beats and the metronome markings. The result (rounded to the millisecond: I: 25’’; II: 310’’; III: 27’’; IV: 149’’; V: 256’’; VI:231’’; VII: 024’’; VIII: 115’’; IX[error in German text]: 147; X: 436’’; XI: 033’’: XII: 222’’; XIII: 209’’) shows a five-part formal symmetry 5:7:4:7:5 consisting of I-II (5), III-V (7), VI-VIII (4), IX-X (7) and XI-XIII (5), which also corresponds to the five-part symmetry of the plot: I-II as the Prelude/Introduction = Lento + Air de Danse = Orpheus Folk Scene, counterbalanced by XI-XIII as the Postlude = Interlude + Pas d’action + Lento (Apotheosis) = scene of the Furies and the scene of Apollo, with the self-contained, calming singing of Orpheus in the Underworld, including the interruption and completion, forming the middle section of the ballet VI-VIII = Air de danse + Interlude + Air de danse conclusion, and the two main sections lying between III-V = Pas de deux [The Angel of Death] + Interlude + Dance of the Furies and VIII-IX = Dance of the Furies + Pas de deux. Orpheus opens up, like all the other later compositions, extensive possibilities for games with numerical proportions, without wishing to imply that interpretations of that type are correct and should not be construed as being a corollary. A particular example for this can be seen in the three– or four-part sequence, depending on one’s method of counting, in Orpheus’s song with Interlude and Conclusion at figures 7791.

 

Duration according to Strawinsky’s annotations: 1. scene = 218”; Air de Danse up to the end of figure 12 = 123″, end figure 20 = 3 1/2″; L’ange de la mort et sa danse: without annotation; Interlude: without annotation; Dance of the furies: up to the end of figure 63 = 131″, up to the end of figure 76 = 135″; Air de danse: end figure 79 = 028″, end figure 88 = 213″; Interlude: 027″; Air de Danse: 045″; Pas d’action: up to the end of figure 93 = 030″, end figure 100 = 121″; Pas de deux: end figure 108 = 209, end figure 121 = 250″; Interlude: 113″; Pas d’action figure 142 end 230; 3. Scene: 222“.

 

Date of origin: Hollywood 20th October 1946 up to 26th September 1947.

 

First performance: 28. April 1948*, City Center of Music and Drama in New York, Nicolas Maggalanes (Orpheus), Maria Tallchief (Eurydice), Francisco Moncion (Angel of Death), Tanaquil Le Clerc (Leader of the Bacchantes), Beatrice Tompkins (Leader of the Furies), Herbert Bliss (Apollo) and the Ensemble of the Ballet Society New York, costumes and  stage design by Isamu Noguchi, choreography by George Balanchine under the direction of Igor Strawinsky – The evening of the première began with Strawinsky’s Renard. Then followed the Elegy for solo viola. After Orpheus, it finished with the arrangement of Mozart’s Sinfonia concertante. The evening was so successful for the ballet troupe that Morton Baum, the Chairman at the time of the Executive Committee in charge of the City Center of Music and Drama offered Kirstein and Balanchine that their ballet ensemble be incorporated as a regular ensemble, with an agreement of 20 years of support into their company. This is how it was that the Ballet Society at the New York City Center, which Kirstein had founded in 1946 together with E. M. Warburg, became the soon-to-be-famous New York City Ballet, which made its debut on 11th October 1948, dancing Orpheus again at this opportunity as well as the Symphonie en Ut. Kirstein had become General Director and Balanchine, whom Kirstein had brought to America in 1933 and who had been treated extraordinarily badly in Paris, with bureaucratic disdain, a sort of chief choreographer who in the course of his life oversaw more than thirty Strawinsky productions. Kirstein recognised to what extent he was indebted to Strawinsky’s Orpheus, and refered to the ballet as a real part of his life in a letter of 11th January 1949. On the other hand, Strawinsky who was at that time in a rather depressive phase of his life, expressed his thanks for Kirstein’s efforts on behave of his music on 28th October 1948 with ‘Bravo, archibravo’.

* The date of the second performance on 29th April 1948 in the Hunter College Playhouse in New York is confused in several places in the Strawinsky literature with the date of the première.

 

Choreography: According to Kirstein’s original wishes, Pavel Tchelitshev was to design and produce the scenery. Kirstein regarded him as the greatest painter of his generation. Tschelitshev failed both on account of the projected costs of the one-hundred-thousand dollars, which his set would cost, as well as the inconsiderate manner of his actions, which was to dismiss Kirstein and Balanchine’s concept for Orpheus point-blank as wrong and to attempt to tell the story of Orpheus as the story of a man and his soul, in which Orpheus should be Bacchus and Apollo, and not the main dancer of the ballet. The sum was ludicrous for the circumstances of a free troupe and it would have been impossible to realize under the circumstances of the time even if they had wanted to. Tchelitshev’s conception of Orpheus, a long way from what Kirstein, Balanchine and Strawinsky had come up with amongst themselves, basically put him in a hopeless position. As Kirstein described the situation to Strawinsky in a letter of 16th October 1947, the supposition could not be ignored that Tschelitshev himself had not been seriously interested for a long time. Kirstein then brought the Frenchman André Beaurepaire into the picture, who was highly regarded by Cocteau, and then Corrado Cagli, who was staying in Rome at the time and whose return was uncertain. Finally, the choice fell on the Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi, whom Kirstein described in his letter to Strawinsky dated 4th January 1948 as an artist, who was not greatly original, but could work well with light and space, and that was just what Balanchine was looking for. Noguchi chose elegantly formed lyres and golden masks, which also played a pivotal role in the choreography. Pluto symbolises Hell, but was not portrayed as Greek but Indian as the goddess Kali, who normally appears with long hair, a beard, decapitated heads dangling around her throat, a sword in one hand and a head dripping blood in the other. For Hell, Noguchi built giant flames and bones. Much fuss was made about the colossal white fog curtain made of Chinese silk, which was to separate the Over– and Underworld and the separate scenes from one another; at one thousand dollars, it was quite expensive and it was bought at the last minute. It was kept in constant movement by aimed streams of air so that it appeared to be alive. Noguchi chose pale costume and stage colours in the areas of Rose, Gold, Azure and Black. In the moment in which Pluto gives Eurydice back her life, Noguchi used a banner-like blue beam which made one perceive heaven to be above Hades. The lighting design was also an integrated part of the set and choreography. Orpheus’s lyre was depicted as oversized and large, likewise the masks which Strawinsky, enthusiastic about the set, felt to be somewhat too ethnographic; by this, he presumably meant too folkloristic and fantastical. In fact, they made it difficult for the dancers to see the ground and thus also hindered rhythmic coordination, and so were not completely practical. They were regarded as Freudian. Orpheus resembled a baseball catcher and had a long, undulating mane of hair down his back. At the various meetings between Balanchine and Strawinsky, they mainly discussed matters of the sequence of the plot and durations, not compositional problems of structure, in which Balanchine was only peripherally interested, and in which Strawinsky had never allowed him to express any interest in, as was his manner. All reports of their collaboration eventually lead back to the problems of time. Strawinsky only ever wanted to know from Balanchine how long the piece should last so that he could adjust his composition accordingly. He probably took into consideration certain wishes, but tolerated no interference in his work. Balanchine came to Hollywood again around or after the start of the year 1948 for the last discussion about Orpheus, and aimed to reach an agreement with Strawinsky. The Los Angeles Times also published an interview with Balanchine on 4th January 1948 and quoted the choreographer making the observation that he did not want develop a choreography and have some music written to it, but preferably he would have the music, at the rehearsals of which he would be able to write his choreography. Since Balanchine was in a stage of experimenting with body positions in extreme situations, and as certain positions could only be held for a short period of time, the schemata for the durations of the music were important to the composer. In this matter, the actual collaboration was between Balanchine and Strawinsky. – Strawinsky himself placed value on a extra-temporal setting and on a non-Greek performance structure. The location should not be somewhere in Greece, and it should certainly not have an antique and mythical feel, especially no Doric backdrop. As an example, Strawinsky used the example in a radio broadcast on New York Radio on 1st November 1949 of when the painters of the Renaissance painted depictions of Ancient Greece, they would have used the landscapes and costumes of their own time. Representatively, what should be used is only what continues to speak to the thoughts of our present time from the Orpheus myth. Strawinsky himself had no thoughts for the costumes. On the matter of the style of dancing in the choreography of Orpheus, little has been written, and most about the structure of the plot, which can be more easily described. – The greatest innovation in terms of the dance was the Pas de deux at the Descent of the Angel of Death and Orpheus into the Underworld, because it is a Pas de deux by two male dancers, a choreographic idea that had not existed since the Baroque. Furthermore, Kirstein gave an account of the conception of the background of the choreography for Orpheus. The forest creatures, the happily leaping fauns, satyrs and dryads, were set against the personal tragedy, just as Nature continues to survive despite death and suffering. The black angel binds Orpheus to him inseparably with a black cord. A huge cloud descends and Orpheus is sent to the Underworld with his lyre, which is bound to his person inseparably. It is Eurydice who convinces Orpheus to embrace her. The lyre is torn from him exactly at the moment when he needs it the most, and a hundred invisible hands take Eurydice back. In the final scene, a laurel tree grows out of the grave and represents the victory. Apollo gilds Orpheus’s lyre with eternal light. Balanchine saw the Dark Angel as the messenger of God like Hermes/Mercury, who acts as messenger between the World and the Underworld. He is the leader of the souls of the Dead. The question still remains as to whether Orpheus is essentially not already dead. In the Middle Ages, as Balanchine believed, Mercury was transformed from a messenger into a demon, and Balanchine took up this idea. For him, the connection between Orpheus with the Angel of Death was of the same significance as the relationship of Orpheus to Eurydice. For him, Orpheus was less a warrior than a poet, who was restless, imprudent and rash, but also resourceful. He brought the Maenads from their senses as a result of his pride in wanting to love only Eurydice. The parts of his dismembered body that swim in the ‘Stream of Time’ still have validity. He included all these thoughts in his choreography, which turned into a ritual as a result of this.

 

Subsequent productions

a) Balanchine

1950 London

1952 Paris

1953 Florenz

1953 Mailand

1962 Hamburg; 5th June; Conductor: Leopold Ludwig

1964 Mailand

b) Other Choreographers

1948 Paris; David Lichine (Design: Mayo)

1948 Venedig; Aurel von Miloss

1948 Wien

1949 München; Staatsoper; Rudolf Kölling

1954 Wuppertal; Erich Walter

1955 Hannover; Yvonne Georgi

1956 Berlin; Städtische Oper; Erich Walter; Set design: Heinrich Wendel

1961 Frankfurt; Tatjana Gsowsky

1961 Leningrad; Leningrader Oper (Kremlinplatz); Leningrader Opernballett

1970 Gelsenkirchen; B. Pilato

1970 Halle; H. Haas

1970 Koblenz; W. Winter

1970 Rheydt; U. Schulbin

1970 Stuttgart; John Cranko

1970 Zwickau; G. Buch

e) Film adaptations

1956 Deutsches Fernsehen; Marcel Luitpart

 

Problems of interpretation: Strawinsky’s and Balanchine’s conceptions of the plot were, as was often the case, different. The two men were united in wishing to go in the direction of abstraction. Strawinsky’s conceptions were also always directed towards the Afterlife, a model which was not valid for Balanchine, as he would be in danger of setting theatrical attitudes, invoking gods in which he not only did not believe, but about whom he knew that they didn’t exist. Balanchine therefore built a set design around Apollo, while Strawinsky only saw the symbol of Orpheus as a diachronic allegory that required structure, but not theatricality. Tschelitschev was correct when he said that Balanchine was only concerned with good dance theatre. Strawinsky’s spiritual background was incomparably deeper; at the time of the composition of Orpheus, he had long left behind the belief of the immortality of music in the context of the overcoming of Death, as he did during the composition of Nightingale. It was however for him an almost iron rule never to get involved with choreography or set design, and not even if he didn’t like them, what he was saying but not necessarily with the intention of changing it. Strawinsky trot his own path, knowing that a non-musician finds it more difficult to understand a piece of music than a non-dancer to understand a choreography or set design, so that he was able to compose things into the music which run contrary to what the director actually wanted. For this reason, the features of the musical material often contradict, as can be seen from the analysis of the work, the realization on stage, even if it is not ‘director’s theatre’, which generally does not concern itself with the ideas of writers and composers. This refers to the direction of the structure as well as to the detail and leads to structural problems, as in the case of Orpheus. The second interlude, for example, can be seen as a scene of Orpheus in despair, who alone with his grief wishes again to break through the curtain of fog in the Overworld; it can be seen also as a preparatory scene for the scene of the Bacchantes, and it brings the leader of the Maenads onto the stage to tear off his mask, a directorial invention of Balanchine which did not come from Strawinsky. The sound of the harp in Orpheus’s and Eurydice’s Pas de deux at figures 1163 and 11723 is no contradiction of the original, i.e. that Orpheus had lost his lyre to the Angel and would therefore not be able to play it. The lyre does not indeed play, but is only heard. Eurydice is close to her goal of moving Orpheus to tear off his mask and look at her. At this point in the ballet, it can be seen that the Angel is not the bringer of Death, but is there to help. He sees that the two humans are approaching a catastrophe and tries to warn them. He therefore has the lyre play for a short time at first, then, when Eurydice and Orpheus do not hear, somewhat longer as a warning signal. The only thing that is problematic in terms of interpretation is ostensibly the use of the solo Flute and solo Clarinet in relation to the plot. It was suggested in Balanchine’s pantomime that Eurydice in this scene takes up an invisible flute, with the allocation Flute = Eurydice and Clarinet = Orpheus, if this would make sense both choreographically and compositionally at the same time. It is indisputable that in this section Eurydice seeks to seduce Orpheus with good intentions. In this section however, the clarinet dominates at first, not the flute, which is given a repeating melodic phrase, and this can be interpreted either as a gestural affirmation or negation. The solo flute enters first at figure 1143 and from here, there is a solo duet between the flute and clarinet. The scene can therefore be interpreted that the happiness at the beginning is not the beginning of the seduction scene, but Eurydice’s behaviour stems from the happiness of the certainty that she is going home, which then turns into the joyfulness of the seduction. So in fact from figure 1143, the flute stands for Eurydice and the clarinet for Orpheus, and it is Orpheus who is warned by the Angel without, and then with, but not with lasting success. There is one puzzle contained in the sketches. In one sketch belonging to the Pas d’action [XII] dated 8th July 1947, Strawinsky wrote next to the two fortissimo chords in bars 1 and 3 which are marked with a red arrow the English word ‘harp’. Either Strawinsky originally intended to introduce music in the harp here which he then removed, because according to Balanchine’s ideas in the choreography, the lyre has been taken from Orpheus, or else he identified the two pizzicato chords with the sound of the harp. The subsequent recitative melodic line is derived from the chords by means of permutations and extensions.

 

Remarks: The ballet Orpheus was a commission from Lincoln Kirstein for his School of American Ballet in New York. On 7th May 1946, Kirstein sent Strawinsky a cheque for 2,500 dollars, half of the agreed fee, from which can be concluded that by this point the prenegotations for the commission and its realization, which were taking place via Balanchine, had been settled. Kirstein told Strawinsky about his ballet school, which was a private institution without outside financial support, and showed his pride about the fact that his school of American Ballet had made a gigantic step forward in its history with this first compositional commission. In fact, the international path of success of this ballet company began with the commission of Orpheus; out of this company came the New York City Ballet and the American Ballet, which was eventually taken over by the Metropolitan Opera. As Strawinsky stated to his representative Ralph Hawkes on 13th October 1947, Kirstein was only contractually in possession of the exclusive rights to the première. The original idea came, as Strawinsky explained in a radio interview on 1st November 1949, from Balanchine, who met with Strawinsky over the summer of 1946 in order to settle the details of the plot and the durations of the separate movements. Strawinsky was able to start work after the completion of the Concerto for String Orchestra to be written for Paul Sacher, so after 8th August. On 20th October 1946, Strawinsky wrote the first bars of Orpheus, and the woodwind chords of what would become figure 2. In the Christmas week of 1946, Balanchine again came to Hollywood, where they worked through the first sketches. It was from this time that the much-quoted anecdote from Anatole Chujoy comes. By 14th March 1947, Strawinsky had completed the Lento and Airs de Danse, and on 5th April, he began work on the Dance of the Angel of Death. Thirteen days later, he had already completed two thirds of the ballet, as he wrote to Ralph Hawkes in a letter of 18th April. One day later, he wrote to Nadia Boulanger that he had completed two thirds of the work including the orchestration. Strawinsky even had in mind a première in the autumn at the end of November, but was evidently in poor health. For this reason, and in order to be able to complete the ballet, he undertook no tour of Europe in 1947. On 10th May 1947, he was sketching figures 98 and 112 from the Pas d’action and the Pas de deux. If he had been working chronologically, he would have composed in one month, the Dance of the Angel of Death, the Interlude, the scene with the calming of the Furies and the Airs de danse with interlude. He had presumably, in his style of musical montage, at least compiled the separate sections in a dislocation process; this is suggested by the simultaneity of the composition of the two figures, the dating of which is certain. In the middle of the year, there was to be a further meeting between him and Balanchine, at which they set in stone the durations with a stopwatch. On 8th July 1947, he completed the final interlude. From the available dates, it can be construed that he was working on the Pas de deux and on the Interlude for almost two months and that he was never interrupted from his work to any extent worth mentioning. It is not unusual in Strawinsky’s compositional history that certain sections of a composition would occupy him for an excessively long period of time, in comparison with the entire period of composition. On 18th July 1947, he informed Kirstein that he was working uninterruptedly on Orpheus and thought he would in all likelihood finish it at the beginning of September. On 15th September, Strawinsky found himself at the final movement, and on 26th September 1947 finally, after more than a year of intensive work, he completed the score of Orpheus, and he informed Ralph Hawkes of this on the same day with ‘Glad to tell you’. The corrections of the score and parts were made by Robert Craft. On 16th October, Kirstein had the orchestral score in his possession and was overjoyed with the completed work, apologising at the same time that he had not yet paid the remaining fee of 2,500 dollars, which took place without delay.

 

Influences: Contemporary criticism, as is usual everywhere for Strawinsky’s music, looked in the music of Orpheus as well for influences and reminiscences and struck gold at figure 38, before figures 146 and 148, as well as in the final scene in certain bars. According to them, figure 38 is a reference to Charles Ives, the arpeggios before figures 146 and 148 to Carl Czerny and the final scene to Monteverdi. Strawinsky, who was at the time of composition 65 years old, heard about this and rejected these findings with a contemptuous undertone. Strawinsky was spending a great deal of time at that period with the music of Monteverdi, Gesualdo and their contemporaries. The traces of these studies, as a result of a systematic, musicologically defined reawakening of old music in the sense of a technical phenomenon, are visible in Strawinsky’s subsequent works as well, certainly in the form of an accurate allocation of bars. Strawinsky admitted that he understood the dotted rhythm as a topic of the music of the 18th Century, and he confirmed at the same time that he was examining the music of Gluck’s Orpheus not before 1952. The proximity to Bach in Orpheus’ s Dance also became visible in many other slow movements from his Neo-Classical period, but attracted more than passing attention in the Orpheus ballet.

 

Success: In addition to the success of the première for Kirstein personally, with its subsequent support from Morton Baum, Orpheus became one of Strawinsky’s successful ballets. That is why the number of subsequent performances of the ballet was remarkable. This is also true for England, where the Press were very unpleasant toward Kirstein and the Americans in 1950, even when the success could not be rationalized away; they wanted no doubt to charge the Americans with a deficient culture. In his report to Strawinsky from 23rd August 1950 about the ‘Battle of Britain’, Kirstein referred openly to the ‘roaring Oxford-trained idiots’ to newspapers such as the New Statesman and Nation, in comparison with whom the negative American critics Virgil Thomson and Olin Downes, who were little regarded in circles of experts, were ‘Daniels-Come-to-Judgement’.

 

Versions: The publishing contract between Strawinsky and Boosey & Hawkes was signed on 6th November 1950. The conducting score was published by the beginning of June 1948 at the latest, and the piano reduction, made by Leopold Spinner, was completed in November and published towards the end of 1948. Strawinsky received his copy of the Spinner edition in January 1949. In the Library of the British Museum, the contributory copies for the conducting and pocket scores were entered on 8th June, and the piano reduction on 31st December 1948. Strawinsky later pressed for a reprinting due to the necessary corrections which had previously led to the errata sheet. The production of the errata sheet cannot be dated exactly. Its corrections were later incorporated into the printed score. The proof is difficult, because the publishers undertook changes of this sort tacitly without indicating them, and are not required to give contributory copies of later printings. There are therefore four original editions up to 1971: the first from 1948, the second with the errata sheet included, the third with the corrections incorporated (which made the errata sheet superfluous), and the final edition, which can be recognised by the fact that the title sheet without exception has been anglicized, the original French and English subtitles removed and the name ‘Strawinsky’ rewritten as ‘Stravinsky’. The contributory copies in London H.3992.b.(3.) (conductor’s score) and b.211 (pocket score) contain no errata pages. In any case, the pocket score was reprinted in its corrected form in 1961, but with the old spelling, as an exemplar in the Prussian State Library N.Mus.o.2043 demonstrates, which was published in January 1961. The orchestral material was only ever available to hire. A new edition of the piano reduction is registered for September 1969. One year after Strawinsky’s death Moscow’s Èçäàòåëüñòâî Ìóçûêà continued its series of illegal printings, which were legalized in terms of copyright, with a combined edition of Orpheus and Agon.

 

Errors, legends, rumours, curiosities, stories

The New York City Ballet received support in 1950 for their guest performance in England, above all from the Earl of Harewood, whose wife, Lady Marion Harewood, was none other than the daughter of the very shy (as he was very short) Strawinsky publisher, Erwin Stein from Boosey & Hawkes; she had married into the royal family, which would later cause Schoenberg to refer to his distinguished pupil Stein as ‘Erlkönig’. – The complete stage design of Orpheus must have been sold by Strawinsky to the University of California in September 1948 for more than half of the original price. This is according to Vera Strawinsky and Robert Craft in 1979. It must therefore have belonged to him and must have not been available for further performances due to its having been sold. – On 26th March 1958, Strawinsky wrote to David Adams from Boosey & Hawkes, asking him to send a copy of the piano reduction to him, which strangely is missing from his library, along with the Schirmer score of Schoenberg’s Piano Concerto and a piano reduction of it, if there was one. He received the requested items and the invoice for it. He paid for the Schoenberg music, but not for his own. He basically did not pay his publishers for his own compositions if he ever needed a piece himself. It was presumably a newcomer in the office who charged him for it. – In his book from 1953 The New York City Ballet, Anatole Chujoy related a now famous anecdote that is seen as particularly characteristic of Strawinsky. ‘ “And how long should the Pas de deux between Orpheus and Eurydice last, George?” asked Strawinsky. “Ah” said Balanchine “approximately two-and-a-half minutes”. “Don’t say approximately” snapped Strawinsky. “There is no approximately. Is it two minutes, two minutes fifteen seconds, two minutes thirty seconds or something in between? Tell me the exact time, and I will try to get it as close as possible.”’ – After the concert performance of Orpheus, among other items, on 2nd October 1962 in the Tchaikovsky Hall in Moscow, there appeared in the Communist CPSU newspaper  Pravda (Russian: ‘Truth’) the next day a protest in the name of Socialist Realism against aristocratic music, which would corrupt the Russian national style, as Oliver Merlin writes in Collection Génies et Réalités, Librairie Hachette 1968, p.116.

 

Historical recordings: New York Manhattan Center 22nd/23rd. February 1949 with the RCA-Victor Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Chicago 20th July 1964 with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Moscow 26th September 1962 In the Large Hall of the Conservatory as a live concert with the State Symphony Orchestra of the UDSSR under the direction of Igor Strawinsky – It can be seen from a letter by Strawinsky to Robert Craft dated 8th October 1948 that Strawinsky had written to Richard Gilbert with the intention of arranging a vinyl recording of Orpheus with the firm RCA Victor and the Boston Symphony Orchestra, with whom he was to perform the ballet in a public context. Gilbert was however no longer with the firm and his successor had not yet been named. Strawinsky, who did not know that and greatly regretted Gilbert’s departure, received from Richard A. Mohr, who then became the successor, an immediate reply. Then it was only a question of the rehearsal time, of which Strawinsky wanted to have as much as possible, and Mohr, as is usual with publishers, wanted to give as little as possible. The embattled Strawinsky agreed in a letter to Craft of 4th December 1948 to a four-hour limit on 22nd February 1949 for the rehearsal and recording, but demanded a further day on 23rd or 24th February in order to be able to carry out the work in somewhat more humane conditions for the musicians and for himself. The letter, written in English, is unclear because the postscript contradicts the preceding paragraphs. It can however be seen in a letter from Strawinsky to Robert Craft dated 14th December 1948 that the planned recording had been arranged for two three-and-a-half-hour sessions for the 22nd February 1949. On 22nd January 1949, Strawinsky pressed Craft in a letter to make all possible efforts to make available musicians from the Ballet Society for the Orpheus recording. The recording took place in the Manhattan Center, according to the documentation, on 22nd and 23rd February 1949 in New York with freelance musicians.

 

CD-Edition: II-3/616 (Recording 1964).

 

Autograph: The score is located in the University of California at Berkeley.

 

Copyright: 1948 by Boosey & Hawkes in New York.

 

Editions

a) Overview

761 1948 FuSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 59 pp.; B. & H. 16285.

                        761Straw ibd. [with annotations]

                        761StrawErr

            761[65] [1965] ibd.

762 1948 PoSc; Boosey & Hawkes London; 59 pp.; B. & H. 16285; Ed.-Nr. 640.

                        762Straw ibd. [with annotations].

            76263 1963 ibd.

            762[65] [1965] ibd.

763 1948 VoSc (Spinner); Boosey & Hawkes London; 33 pp.; B. & H. 16502.

764Err [24 corrections]; 8°; B. & H. 16285.

b) Characteristic features

761 igor strawinsky / orpheus / full score / boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Orpheus / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / Full Score · Partition / Boosey & Hawkes, Ltd. / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cape Town · Paris · Buenos Aires (Full score sewn 26.6 x 33 (2° [4°]); 59 [59] pages + 4 cover pages tomato red on light grey green [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production date >No. 453<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + duration data [>approx. 30 minutes<] English + legal reservations centred partly in italics >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto , of the / complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved<] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below title head with scene description flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries.< [#**] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; production indication 1st page of score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 16285<; end of score dated p. 59 centred >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; without end marks) // (1948)

* In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price information >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires.

** short distance.

 

761Straw1

The copy from Strawinsky’s estate is on the cover page above and next the title >orpheus< rechts with >IStr / I dec/°48< signed and dated [°slash original].

 

761[65] igor strawinsky / orpheus / full score / boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Orpheus / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / Full Score · Partition / Boosey & Hawkes, Ltd. / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cape Town · Paris · Buenos Aires // - (Full score [library binding] 26.5 x 33 (2°); 59 [59] pages + 4 cover pages tomato red on light grey green [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production date >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + duration data [>approx. 30 minutes<] English + legal reservations centred partly in italics >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto , of the / complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved<] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below title head with scene description >First Scene [#] Premier Tableau / Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurodyce. / He stands motionsless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, ilne bouge pas.< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations 1st page of score above and next to title head with a text box containing >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries.< [#**] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; production indication 1st page of score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 16285<; end of score dated p. 59 centred >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; without end marks) // [1965]

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price information and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

** Short distance.

 

762 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / London · New York · Los Angeles · Sydney · Cape Town · Toronto · Paris / NET PRICE / Made in England // [text on spine:] >No. 640 IGOR STRAWINSKY · ORPHEUS< // (Pocket score sewn 0.3 x13.8 x 18.8 (8° [8°]); 59 [59] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on beige [front cover title with frame 9.5 x 3.8 beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The Standard Classical and Outstanding Modern Works. / Primera edición española de partituras de bolsillo de las obras / del repertorio clásico y moderno.<* production date >LB 291/43<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Instrumentation> Italian + duration data >approx. 30 minutes< English + legal reservation centred partly in italics >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts there of are strictly reserved.<] + 3 pages back matter [3 empty pages]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below scene title and choreographic instruction >First Scene [#] Premier Tableau / Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurydice. / He production dates motionless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, il ne bouge pas.< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 16285<; end of score dated >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; without end mark) // (1948)

** Classical editions from >J. S. BACH< to >WEBER< are listed including the titles of their works in three columns under the headline >classical WORKs<, Strawinsky not mentioned; under the headline >MODERN WORKS< the names of contemporary composers are listed without any titles in four columns from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >R. VAUGHAN WILLIAMS<, Strawinsky not mentioned. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Toronto-Capetown-Paris.

 

76263 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / London · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · Sydney · Toronto · New York / NET PRICE / MADE IN ENGLAND // [Text on spine:] >No. 640  IGOR STRAWINSKY · ORPHEUS< // (Pocket score sewn 0.5 x 13.8 x 18.6 (8° [8°]); 59 [59] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on beige [front cover title with frame 9.5 x 3.8 beige auf dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical / and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* production date >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, references of origin >This Score was commissioned by Ballet Society for the New York City / Ballet Company. The original choreography was created by George / Balanchine and first performed under the composer’s direction.< + legend >Instrumentation> Italian + duration data >approx. 30 minutes< englisch + legal reservation centred >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries.< justified text italic >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<] + 3 pages back matter [2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A comprehensive library of Miniature Scores containing the best-known classical / works, as well as a representative selection of outstanding modern compositions.<** production date >No. 520< [#] >1.49<]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below scene title and choreographic instruction >First Scene [#] Premier Tableau / Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurydice. / He production dates motionless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, il ne bouge pas.< flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; plate number >B. & H. 16285<; end of score dated p. 59 centred >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; end number p. 59 flush left >3·63 L & B<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England< p. 59 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1963)

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Wagner, Richard<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni<. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

** Classical editions from >J. S. BACH< to >WEBER< are listed including the titles of their works in four columns under the headline >classical editions<, under the headline >MODERN EDITIONS< the names of contemporary composers are listed without any titles in four columns from >BÉLA BARTÓK< to >ARNOLD VAN WYK<, amongst these >IGOR STRAWINSKY<. The following places of printing are listed: London-Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

 

762[65] HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / London · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · Sydney · Toronto · New York / NET PRICE / Made in England // (Pocket score [library binding] 13.8 x 18.9 (8° [8°]; 59 [59] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on beige [front cover title with frame9,5 x 3,8 beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following is a selection of the many twentieth-centurie symphonic works issued in study score format. A complete / catalogue of this extensive library of classical and miniature scores is available on request.<* production date >No. 16a<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, references of origin >This Score was commissioned by Ballet Society for the New York City / Ballet Company. The original choreography was created by George / Balanchine and first performed under the composer’s direction.< + Instrumentenlegende >Instrumentation> Italian + duration data >approx. 30 minutes< English + legal reservation centred partly in italics >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts there of are strictly reserved.<] + 3 pages back matter [2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<** production date >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; production indication  1st page of the score below type area inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 16285<; end of score dated p. 59 centred >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; without end mark) // [1965]

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers, without price information and without specification of places of printing amongst these >Concerto for Piano and Winds / Mass / Petrouchka / The Rake’s Progress / The Rite of Spring / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphonies of Wind Instruments<. Place of printing only London.

** Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price information and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

Nachschau Basel >60 / STRAW / 42< # Achtung. 763 hoch 65 muß in Basel Nachschau gemacht werden, ob die Druckfehler beseitigt wurden! Wenn ja, wäre das 765

 

762Straw

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate is signed in black on the front cover title above frame right with >ISTR<. The copy contains corrections.

 

762[71] HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / London · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · Sydney · Toronto · New York / NET PRICE / Made in England // (Pocket score sewn 13. x 18. (8° [8°]); 59 [59] pages + 4 cover pages dark green on beige [front covver title with frame 9.5 x 3.,8 beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following list is but a selection of the many items included in this extensive library of miniature scores / containing both classical works and an ever increasing collection of outstanding modern compositions. A / complete catalogue of Hawkes Pocket Scores is available on request.<* production date >No. 16< [#] >1.66<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, Entstehungshinweis >This Score was commissioned by Ballet Society for the New York City / Ballet Company. The original choreography was created by George / Balanchine and first performed under the composer’s direction.< + legend >Instrumentation> Italien + duration >approx. 30 minutes< English + legal reservation centred partly in italics >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / [justified text] All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts there of are strictly reserved.<] + 3 pages back matter [2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<** production data >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated 1 below description of the scene flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; plate number >B. & H. 16285<; end of score dated p. 59 centred >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; end number >M.P. 2.71<; production indications 1st page of the score below type area inside right >Printed in England<, p. 59 flush right as end mark >The Markham Press of Kinhgston Ltd., Surbiton, Surrey<) // [1971]

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Tchaikovsky, Peter<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Abraham and Isaac / Agon / Apollon musagète / Concerto in D / The flood / Introitus / Oedipus Rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Piano concerto / Pulcinella suite / The rake’s progress / The rite of spring / Le rossignol / A sermon, a narrative and a prayer / Symphonie de psaumes / Symphonies of wind instrunments / Threni / Variations<, without specification of places of printing.

** Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price information and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

 

763 igor strawinsky / orpheus / piano reduction / boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Orpheus / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / Piano Reduction / by / Leopold Spinner / Boosey & Hawkes, Ltd. [*] / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cape Town · Paris · Buenos Aires // (Piano reduction sewn 26.6 x 32.8 (2° [4°]); 33 [33] pages + 4 cover pages puce on grey beige [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s >Edition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< advertisement >Igor Strawinsky<** >No. 453<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below choreographic instruction flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< flush right >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; production indication 1st page of score below type area centre centred >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 16502<; Ende-Nummer p. 33 flush right >11·48·L. & B.<) // (1948)

* Das Darmstädter Exemplar >F / straw 10 / 12707 / 59< sowie das Basler >62 / STRAW / 63< enthalten an dieser Stelle rechtsangesetzt einen centreden Stempel >INCREASED PRICE / 10/6d. / BOOSEY & HAWKES LTD.<

** In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price information >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spellings original; ° centre centred; °° spelling original]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires.

 

764Err STRAWINSKY  “ ORPHEUS ”  FULL SCORE / ERRATA // (1 page format pocket score (8° [8°]) with 24 corrections [5 note examples]; Pl.-Nr. at the bottom of the page flush left >B. & H. 16285<) // [1948]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

76

O r p h e u s

Ballet in three scenes – Orphée. Ballet en trois tableaux –Orpheus. Ballett in drei Bildern – Îðôåé. Áàëåò â òðåõ ñöåíàõOrfeo. Balletto in tre quadri

 

 

Besetzung: a) Erstausgabe (Orchester): Flauti I. II, Arpa, Violini I, Violini II, Viole, Violoncelli, Contabassi – Piccolo, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes (2nd doubling Cor Anglais, 2 Clarinets in Bb, 2 Bassoons, 2 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets, 2 Trombones (2nd doubling Bass Trombone), Timpani, Harp, String Quintet [Flöten I. II, Violinen I, Violinen II, Bratschen, Violoncelli, Kontrabässe, Piccolo-Flöte, 2 Flöten, 2 Oboen (2. auch Englischhorn), 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 2 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten, 2 Posaunen (2. auch Baßposaune), Pauken, Harfe, Streich-Quintett]; b) Aufführungsanforderungen: (Rollen): Orpheus, Eurydice, Todesengel, Apollo, Pluto, Satyr, Anführerin der Furien, Anführerin der Bacchantinnen, 4 Freunde von Orpheus, 4 Waldgeister, 9 Furien, 8 Bacchantinnen, 7 Seelen in der Unterwelt (männlich); ~ (Orchester*:) kleine Flöte, 2 große Flöten, 2 Oboen (2. Oboe = Englischhorn), Englischhorn (= 2. Oboe), 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 2 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in B, 2 Posaunen (2. Posaune = Baßposaune), Baßposaune (= 2. Posaune), Pauken, Harfe, 2 Solo-Violinen, Solo-Bratsche, 4 Solo-Violoncelli, Solo-Kontrabaß, Streicher ([6 = Mindestbesetzung] Erste Violinen**, [6 = Mindestbesetzung] Zweite Violinen**, [5 = Mindestbesetzung] Bratschen, [4 = Mindestbesetzung] Violoncelli***, [3 = Mindestbesetzung] Kontrabässe)

* benötigt werden 43 Musiker

** dreifach geteilt

*** zweifach geteilt

 

Aufführungspraxis: Es werden 43 Musiker benötigt. Strawinsky hatte wohl ursprünglich für das neue Ballett an ein Symphonie-Orchester in normaler Größe gedacht, also etwa 60 Musiker. Es gab aber in New York nur eine einzige Bühne, in der ein solches Orchester hätte untergebracht werden können, nämlich das Metropolitan Opernhaus. Dort betrug die Abendmiete zu diesem Zeitpunkt allerdings fünfzehntausend Dollar, eine Summe, die Kirstein zu hoch war. Deshalb legte er Strawinsky mit Brief vom 20. Mai 1947 nahe, doch ein kleineres Orchester zu wählen und bezog sich auf Balanchine, der in Richtung Apollon dachte. Strawinsky telegraphierte fünf Tage später zurück, beruhigte Kirstein mit dem Hinweis, der Orpheus verlange nur 43 Musiker, darunter 24 Streicher, während er für Apollon 36 Streicher und damit noch mehr Musiker verpflichten und im Graben unterbringen müsse.

 

Inhalt

a) Ballet-Inhalt nach Strawinsky

[I:] Der thrazische Sänger Orpheus weint um den Tod seiner Gattin Eurydike. Seine Freunde kommen mit Kondolenzgaben und bekunden ihm ihr Mitgefühl. – [II:] Mit dem Spiel der Leier drückt Orpheus seine Trauer aus. – [III:] Der Engel des Todes erscheint. Er wird von Mitleid ergriffen und verspricht dem klagenden Orpheus, ihn mit in den Hades zu nehmen und dort Eurydike zu suchen. Er geleitet Orpheus durch die düsteren Nebel der Zwischenwelt zur Unterwelt, dem Tartarus oder Hades. – [IV:] Beide tauchen aus den Nebelfeldern und der Dunkelheit der Unterwelt auf. – [V:] Die Furien versperren Orpheus den Weg, umtanzen ihn mit Wahnsinnsgebärden und bedrohen ihn. [VI:] Orpheus besänftigt sie mit seinem Gesang. – [VII] Die gequälten Schatten der Unterwelt flehen ihn an, weiterzusingen, weil sein Klagegesang für sie Trost bedeutet. – [VIII:] Orpheus willfahrt ihnen und singt sein Lied zu Ende, das die verlorenen Seelen schlafen läßt. – [IX:] Orpheus ist es gelungen, die Unterwelt mit seinem Gesang zu beglücken und die Furien zu beschwichtigen. Auch Hades (Pluto), der Gott der Unterwelt, ist gerührt und bereit, ihm Eurydike wiederzugeben. Die Furien umringen ihn, verbinden ihm die Augen und führen ihm Eurydike zu. – [X:] Eurydike folgt dem blinden Orpheus durch die Schatten der Zwischenwelten. Orpheus darf sich nicht umsehen und seine Gattin nicht anblicken. Eurydike bittet ihn so inständig, daß Orpheus nicht mehr an sich halten kann und sich die Binde von den Augen reißt. Im selben Augenblick gleitet ihm Eurydike aus den Armen und fällt tot zu seinen Füßen nieder. – [XI:] Orpheus erscheint wieder in der Oberwelt. Seine Leier hat ihm der Todesengel genommen und damit das Instrument, mit dem er Mensch und Tier, Lebende und Tote bezaubern und trösten und sich selbst beschützen konnte. – [XII:] In seiner unablässigen Suche nach seiner verschwundenen Frau mißachtet er die Bacchantinnen. Sie fallen rachsüchtig über ihn her, töten ihn und reißen ihn in Stücke. – [XIII:] Orpheus ist tot, aber sein Gesang lebt weiter. In strahlendem Sonnenlicht erscheint Gott Apoll. Er hält die Leier des Orpheus in den Händen und hebt sie und damit Orpheus‘ ewig lebenden Gesang zum Himmel.

 b) Uraufführungs-Ballett-Inhalt nach Balanchine-Strawinsky

Bühnenbilder: Erstes Bild (I-IV): Eurydikens Grab; Zweites Bild (V-XII): Im Innern des Hades; Drittes Bild (XII): Grab von Orpheus.

Verlauf: [I:] wie a; zusätzlich: Orpheus trauert an Eurydiens Grab. Seine Leier hat er fallen gelassen. Er bleibt auch bei der Ankunft seiner Freunde unbeweglich stehen. [II:] Wenn die Freunde gegangen sind, nimmt er die Leier auf und spielt. Anschließend bringt er das Instrument zum Grab, damit sein Gesang auf diese Weise Eurydike erreiche. Ein Satyr und vier Waldgeister versuchen vergeblich, ihn zu trösten. [III:] wie a; zusätzlich: Die Götter haben mit ihm Mitleid; deshalb erscheint der Todesengel. Er setzt Orpheus eine goldene Maske auf, bevor er mit ihm in die Unterwelt hinabsteigt, so dass Orpheus nichts mehr sieht oder erkennt, die ihn aber unangreifbar macht. [IV bis VIII:] wie a; ohne Zusätze. [IX:] wie a; zusätzlich: Pluto erscheint mit Eurydike, die von Orpheus wegen seiner Maske nicht gesehen werden kann. Pluto verbietet ihm, seine Frau anzuschauen, bevor sie nicht beide wieder ans Tageslicht gelangt sind. [X:] wie a; zusätzlich: So, wie der Engel ihn hergeleitet hat, leitet er ihn wieder aus dem Hades hinaus. Diesmal trägt aber nicht Orpheus die Leier, sondern der Todesengel. Wenn sich Orpheus aus gegenseitigem Verlangen die Maske vom Gesicht reißt und Eurydike daraufhin stirbt, versucht Orpheus vergeblich, seine Leier wieder zu erhalten, während Eurydike ihm von hundert Händen weggerissen wird. Die Leier ist verschwunden. [XI:]: Die Anführerin der Bacchantinnen mit roten Haaren, gefolgt von weiteren 8 Bacchantinnen, entreißt Orpheus die abgenommene Maske. Damit ist Orpheus den thrazischen Frauen wehrlos ausgeliefert. [XII:] Sie fallen über ihn her und enthaupten ihn. [XIII:] Apoll kniet am Grabe von Orpheus und beschwört seinen Geist, und aus dem Grab steigt die von Blumen umkränzte Leier in die Höhe empor.

 

Handlung nach Balanchine: Von diesem Inhalt weicht die Balanchine-Choreographie vielfach ab. So führt sie zu [II] einen Satyr und vier Waldgeister ein, die vergeblich versuchen, Orpheus zu trösten. In [III] muß der Todesengel Orpheus eine goldene Maske aufsetzen, die Orpheus zwar nichts sehen oder erkennen läßt, aber gleichsam zum Symbol seiner Unangreifbarkeit wird. So wie der Engel ihn hergeleitet hat, leitet er ihn wieder aus dem Hades hinaus. Diesmal trägt aber nicht Orpheus die Leier, sondern der Todesengel. Wenn sich Orpheus aus gegenseitigem Verlangen die Maske vom Gesicht reißt und Eurydike daraufhin stirbt, versucht Orpheus vergeblich, seine Leier wiederzuerhalten, während Eurydike ihm von hundert Händen weggerissen wird. Apoll kniet am Grabe von Orpheus und beschwört seinen Geist, und aus dem Grab steigt die von Blumen umkränzte Leier in die Höhe empor.

 

Vorlagen: Der Textvorschlag zu Orpheus kam von Balanchine, die Handlungsaufstellung war eine Gemeinschaftsarbeit von Balanchine und Strawinsky, die Satzüberschriften stammen von Strawinsky. Als öffentlich nicht aufgeschlüsselte Vorlage dienten ein namentlich nicht genanntes Klassik-Lexikon und aus den Metamorphosen des Publius Ovidius Naso Buch zehn Vers 11 bis 77 mit der Darstellung der zweiten Orpheus-Eurydike-Tragödie und Buch elf Vers 1 bis 60 mit der Darstellung von Orpheus‘ Tötung durch die Mänaden, im Ovidschen Original auch Zikonen (nurus Ciconum; nurus = junge Frau) genannt, der Anschwemmung von Kopf und Leier auf Lesbos und seiner Rettung durch Phoebus-Apoll. Die Vorgeschichte, der Unfall-Tod Eurydikes als Folge eines Schlangenbisses (Ovid X,110), den sie sich, wie aus anderen Quellen hervorgeht, zuzog, als sie vor den Nachstellungen des sie bedrängenden benachbarten Bienenzüchters Aristaios flüchtete, auch die fürchterliche Bestrafung der Mänaden durch den Gott Dionysos, der anschließend die Gegend verläßt, sparte das Ballettszenarium aus. Im Ovidschen Original sind Orpheus-Geschichte von der Heirat an bis zum Wiedersehen mit Eurydike über mehrere Bücher hin verstreut. Der Orpheus-Tötung folgt die Erzählung vom Wiedersehen mit Eurydike im Hades (XI,6166), die Darstellung der Bestrafung der Mänaden durch Dionysos-Bacchus, der sie verbannt und in Bäume verwandelt (XI,6784) und der anschließend mit seinen besseren Leuten die Gegend verläßt (XI,8588). Im Ovidschen Original folgt nun die Midas-Geschichte, weil sich Midas durch die freundliche Aufnahme des Silen Gott Dionysos verpflichtete. – Strawinsky hat zwar in die Orpheus–Vorlage eingegriffen und mythologisch falsche Zuordnungen vorgenommen, dies jedoch in einem geringeren Umfang als sonst bei anderen Handlungswerken mit Fremdvorlage. Noch das Gröbste ist die zeitliche Verbindung der bei Ovid selbständigen Mänaden-Geschichte mit der Eurydike-Geschichte und der Furienauftritt in der Unterwelt. Die altklassische Mythologie erhält dadurch einen verqueren Sinn und verliert ihre Logik. Die Mänaden sind sinnlichkeitsbesessene junge Frauen, die Orpheus nur deshalb hassen, weil er nach dem Eurydike-Geschehen durch Thrazien zieht und die Knabenliebe einführt. Als Frauen fühlen sich die Mänaden dadurch mißachtet und rächen sich. Die Furien dagegen (lateinisch: furiae = die Rasenden), die in Wirklichkeit ohnehin Erinnyen (griechisch: die Grollenden) heißen (der lateinische Begriff Furie stammt erst aus dem Anfang des 17. Jahrhunderts), sind mitleidslose Rachegöttinnen. Sie steigen aus dem Hades auf und verfolgen gnadenlos vor allem Missetäter, die schwere Verbrechen begangen haben und unentdeckt geblieben sind. Sie werden mit Fackeln in Händen und Schlangen im Haar, mit ernstem, selten häßlichem Gesicht dargestellt. Im Laufe der Zeit wurde ihre Zahl auf drei begrenzt. Im späteren Griechentum erfuhren sie durch Versöhnungskulte eine Umverwandlung in Eumeniden (griechisch: die Wohlgesinnten). Die Furien, als die inneren Stimmen des Gewissens, in Vorzeiten als die Seelen der Ermordeten gedeutet, die sich bei ihren Mördern einfinden, um ihnen keine Ruhe mehr zu lassen, haben ihrer Funktion nach somit keinen Grund, Orpheus zu quälen; denn Orpheus hat im antiken Sinne nichts Böses begangen. Daher macht Strawinsky aus den Furien die Bewacher der Unterwelt, die sich in Wahrung ihrer Schutz-Aufgabe Orpheus widersetzen, um ihn nicht zu den Schatten vordringen zu lassen. Das wiederum ist sagenfremd, denn der Bewacher der Unterwelt ist nicht die versammelte Furienschar, sondern der Höllenhund Zerberus. Noch unzutreffender ist der Vergleich der Furien mit der Geheimen Staatspolizei der Nationalsozialisten als Gestapo der Hölle (the Gestapo of Hell), wie sich Strawinsky gegenüber der Los Angeles Times (21. September 1947) geäußert haben soll, weil sich die Furien immer nur gegen Kapitalverbrecher und nicht gegen Menschen anderer Denkungsart richteten. Der Verdrehung im Kernbereich altklassischer Mythologie entgeht man am leichtesten, wenn man das Orpheus–Szenarium Balanchine-Strawinskys als orphisches Gegenwartssinnbild im griechischen Gewand versteht und nicht versucht, daraus altklassische Mythologie oder spätrömische Literaturthematik abzuleiten. Hätte sich Tschelitschew mit seiner Orpheus-Apoll-Dionysos-Identifizierung durchgesetzt, wäre vom Mythos überhaupt nichts mehr übriggeblieben als ein paar austauschbare Namen mit griechischem Klang. Die weiteren verbleibenden Unterschiede zwischen der an Ovid angelehnten Handlung und der mythologischen Vorlage sind demgegenüber zweitrangig. So steigt nach griechischer Vorstellung Orpheus allein in das Reich des Hades hinab, während Strawinsky einen Todesengel erfindet (den die alten Griechen gar nicht gekannt haben), der Orpheus in den Hades hinabführen muß. Dabei setzt ihm der Todesengel vor dem Betreten der Unterwelt eine goldene Maske auf, während der originale Orpheus keine Maske trägt, während er in die Unterwelt hinabsteigt. Beim Verlust Eurydikes spielt die Leier keine Rolle, während bei Strawinsky Orpheus seine Leier durch den Todesengel verliert. Apollo rettet das Haupt von Orpheus und vereint es im Hades mit Eurydike, während nach dem Ballettszenarium Orpheus von Apollo zum Gott erhoben wird. Zwischen der Rückkehr des Orpheus in die Oberwelt und seiner Tötung durch die Mänaden vergehen nach Ovid drei Jahre, in denen sich der weithin auch körperlich begehrte Orpheus jeglicher Berührung durch eine Frau entzieht, während nach Strawinsky-Balanchine Orpheus sogleich umgebracht wird, wenn er wieder zur Oberwelt kommt.

 

Orpheus-Mythos: Orpheus gehört nicht zum eigentlichen Sagenbereich des klassischen Altertums, obwohl er zu den Argonauten gezählt wird und durch seinen den Gesang der Sirenen übertreffenden Gegengesang seine Freunde vor dem Untergang rettete, sondern ist eine in die Vorzeit hineinreichende mythische Gestalt, die man als thrazischen Sänger lokalisierte, Sohn des Gottes Apoll und der Dichtermuse Kalliope, der nach Griechenland einwanderte und durch seinen wunderreichen Gesang Menschen, Tiere, Bäume und Steine besänftigen und verzaubern konnte. Er erhielt die Erlaubnis, in die Unterwelt eindringen zu dürfen, um seine verstorbene Frau Eurydice zurückzugewinnen. Da er aber das ihm gewordene Gebot übertrat, sich nach der ihm folgenden Gattin nicht umzusehen, bevor beide das Tageslicht erreicht hätten, verlor er sie wieder. Später widersetzte sich der Sänger den Bacchantinnen (Mänaden = rasende Weiber im Gefolge des Dionysos), die ihn aus Rache auf grausame Weise zerfleischten und zerstückelten. Sein weissagendes Haupt soll zusammen mit seiner Leier in Lesbos angeschwemmt worden sein. Die früheste Darstellung von Orpheus reicht in die Mitte des 6. Jahrhunderts vor Christus zurück. In dieser Zeit entstand auch die nach ihrem Stifter Orpheus benannte altgriechisch religiöse Bewegung der Orphik (Orphismus) mit ihren Geheimlehren über Erschaffung der Welt, Leben und Tod, ihren Reinigungsakten und Askesevorstellungen (orphische Mysterien) und ihren angeblich auf Orpheus zurückgehenden Dichtungen (orphische Dichtungen: Hymnen, Kosmogonie, Unterweltsgedichte). Das Mittelalter erblickte in ihm eine Symbolgestalt für den göttlichen Hirten, seit der frühen Renaissance wurde er in Europa nach und nach zu einer Weltbildhaltung für Reinheit, Besonnenheit und Lauterkeit im Gegensatz zum trunken-triebhaften Dunstkreis des Dionysischen. Der moderne Kunstbegriff Orphismus, 1912 von dem französischen Dichter Gustave Apollinaire geschaffen, leitet sich zwar von Orpheus ab, hat aber nichts mit der griechischen Mythologiegestalt zu tun, sondern bezeichnet eine bestimmte Konstruktionstechnik frei erfundener Darstellungsmittel ohne Vorbild in der Realität. Der Orpheus-Stoff wurde über alle Jahrhunderte hin dichterisch dargestellt, angefangen von Ovid und Vergil, und bis zum Aufkommen der Repertoire-Oper Ende des 18. Jahrhunderts war er der wohl gesuchteste Opernstoff überhaupt, der auch den Text für die erste italienische Oper in Florenz abgab und an dem sich Monteverdi ebenso versuchte wie Schütz und Gluck und nach Strawinsky Hans Werner Henze.

 

Aufbau: Orpheus ist ein Handlungsballett in drei Bildern aus je nach Zählweise 11 bis 13 ohne Unterbrechung ineinander übergehenden Teilen. Strawinsky hat den einzelnen Ballett-Nummern keine Zählung vorangesetzt, weil er das Ballett trotz Szenen– und Bildunterteilung als dramatische Einheit und nicht als Nummernstück auffaßte. Grundsätzlich ergibt sich bei einer Durchnumerierung eine Zählproblematik, weil der Orpheus-Tanz (Air de Danse) zwar zweiteilig ist, die beiden Teile aber durch ein Interludium unterbrochen werden. Entweder zählt man diese drei Stücke als ein Stück und kommt dann auf 11 Nummern, wie es die Zeitdauern-Komplexe der offiziellen Strawinsky-Edition tun, oder man zählt, wie es nachfolgend geschieht, tatsächlich drei Nummern und erhält die Endzahl 13, womit der Nebeneffekt verbunden ist, daß dann die Apotheose kabbalistisch mit ihrer Zahl 13 das Ausscheren aus der Zwölfereinheit der irdischen Welt anzeigt [Es gibt auch Autoren, die auf 10 Nummern kommen, ohne allerdings zu erklären, auf welche Weise].

Darstellung in Stichworten*

Erstes Bild

[I] Orpheus weint um Eurydice

Lento: 18 Takte A-B-A1-Bogenform (A: T. 17 = Ziffer 1; B: T. 812 = Ziffer 2; A1: T. 13[12]-18 = Ziffer 3) mit ungefähr anderthalb mal größeren Seitenteilen. Durch alle Abschnitte durchgehend einstimmige, zunächst ostinatoartig aufgebaute und dann (B+A1) abgewandelte Harfenkantilene im phrygischen Ton mit polarisierendem e als Symbol des weinenden Orpheus. Bläser zusätzlich zur Streicherbegleitung nur im Mittelteil. Parallelstimmenführung in teilweise festen Intervallabständen mit permutierten Einzeltönen. Keine Fugierung.

[II] Air de danse

90 Takte variierte A-A1-B-A2-Bogenform (A: T. 118 = Ziffer 47; A1: T. 1936 [37=Generalpause] = Ziffer 812; B: T. 38[37=Generalpause]-65 = Ziffer 1320; A2: T. 6690 = Ziffer 2127) mit Möglichkeit der Zusammenfassung von A und A1 als Einheit; dadurch formtypologisch Dreiteiligkeit mit Umfangverkleinerung in gleichbleibend abnehmendem Verhältnis 5:4 beziehungsweise 9:7. Offene Polarisationen überwiegend mit Zielton b und d. Stimmungsschwankungen zwischen Trauer (Orpheus) und Lachen (Waldgeister) mit inhaltsbezogen nur geringfügiger Kontrastierung, da sich die Orpheus-Trauer nicht überwinden läßt. Staccato-Hüpfbewegungen zur Charakterisierung der Waldgeisterauftritte. Strukturdifferenzen aus demselben Grund zwischen weiträumigen Intervallen als Ausdruck der Not und Chromatik in ihrer Doppelfunktion als allgemeines kompositorisch-strukturelles Verklammerungsprinzip und besonderes Gestaltungsmittel für deren Durchbrechung. A-Teil-Thematik gefolgt von Überleitungsteil und variierter Wiederholung mit Zuführung zu B. Differenzierung von A und B durch Zurücknahme der in A allmählich aufgebauten tänzerischen Bewegung, veränderter Instrumentation und neuen rhythmischen und melodischen Elementen in B. Dort Violinakkordik mit Einschlag des Neckenden ohne lange Nachwirkung. Schnelle Rückführung in die Trauerstimmung von A. A-Instrumentierung durch allmähliches Verschieben der gekoppelten Instrumentalblöcke in die Tiefe hin. Im B-Teil unter anderem zwei Arbeitsbausteine aus vermindernd gebrochenem Akkord und abwärtsgerichteter großer Sekunde in permutierender Einzeltonveränderung und unterschiedlicher Länge. Chromatische Klangreihung und Stimmungsumschlag noch in B.

[III] L’Ange de la mort et sa danse

59 Takte formtypologisch zweiteilig (A: T. 136 = Ziffer 2835; B: T. 3759 = Ziffer 3640) im Verhältnis 3:2 und damit kein klassischer Pas de deux, wenn auch von Balanchine als solcher choreographiert. Mehrteiliger A-Teil in Rahmenform mit Wiederholung der Eingangs– als Schlußtakte. Die Stimmung ist ernst bis unheimlich, die Akkordik gesplittert und durchbrochen thematisch durch die Klanggruppen wandernd. Die Gesamtbewegung ist aufwärts gerichtet und kündet von der aufkeimenden, aber bangen Hoffnung des Sängers. Harfenklang aus statischen wiederholten Akkorden. Erst in den letzten Takten vor Beginn des Abstiegs in den Hades verwandelt er sich in eine abwärtsgerichtete stark akzentuierte Sechzehntelkette, so als ob Orpheus den Weg in die Unterwelt nicht mehr abwarten kann und vorangehend beschleunigen will. B-Teil aus einem geschichteten, also nicht einförmigen Streichertremolo mit einem neuntaktigen Posaunen-Solo und einem nachfolgenden fünfzehntaktigen Trompeten-Solo darüber. Daß die sich in sich selbst drehenden Streichertremoli auf die wallenden Nebelschleier hinweisen, die Ober– und Unterwelt voneinander trennen, ist anzunehmen. Die Deutung der beiden Blechbläser-Soli als vorausgehender Todesengel und nachfolgender Orpheus, von denen zunächst der Engel und dann der Sänger in den Nebelfeldern verschwinden, ist ebenfalls naheliegend. Das Trompeten-Solo besteht aus einem viermal auftretenden Signalton mit unterbrechenden, von sich selbst abgeleiteten kleinen Episoden.

[IV] Interlude

34 Takte in kunstvoll kontrapunktisch fugierter Satztechnik fünfteilig (1: T. 14 = Ziffer 4114; 2: T. 512 = Ziffer 41542; 3: T. 1318 = Ziffer 43; 4: T. 1929 = Ziffer 4445; 5: 3034 = Ziffer 46). Zehntönige Reihe b2-cis2-e1-c1-b1-g1-as-c1-a-B viertaktig durchbrochen in Violinen + Bratschen, zweiten Violinen + Bratschen, zweiten Violinen + Violoncelli + Kontrabässen, Violoncelli + Kontrabässen vorgestellt, dann durchgeführt. Ab Takt 5 Thementeile in die Oberquint versetzt und von Posaune und Trompete übernommen, Kontrapunkt in den Violoncelli und Kontrabässen teilweise symmetrisch. Takte 11 und 12 mit Überleitungsfunktion. In den zweiten Violinen zwei verschränkte, aber gegenläufige Tonreihen. Chromatische Linien bei den Bratschen. Chromatisches Gesamtgeflecht bis Ende Ziffer 43. Ab Ziffer 44 (Takt 19) Thema neu in transponierter Fassung auf f mit melodischem Material der Takte 11 und 12 der zweiten Violinen. In den Bratschen ein zweiter Kontrapunkt. Thema-Engführung. Violoncelli und Kontrabässe übernehmen das Thema gleichzeitig mit den Oboen, die anders rhythmisieren. Bis Ende Ziffer 45 löst sich Strawinsky vom Thema. Die Schleier-Streichertremoli haben bei Beginn des Satzes aufgehört, die Nebel sind also gewichen. Man hört zunächst den Todesengel (Posaunen-Solo) und Orpheus (Trompeten-Solo) und sieht ab Ziffer 43 laut Choreographieanweisung beide aus der Dunkelheit auftauchen. Nur noch das Posaunen-Solo erklingt, das Trompetensolo ist verstummt. Mit Beginn Ziffer 46 (Takt 30ff.) nach Beendigung der Kontrapunktthematik schlägt die Stimmung ins Bedrohliche über. Das aus fortdauernden Wiederholungen im Hornquartett in Begleitung von Unisono-Violoncelli und Kontrabässen vor der Beendigung stehende Interludium bereitet auf den Furientanz vor. Diese 5 Takte bilden eigentlich einen selbständigen Überleitungsteil im überleitenden Zwischenspiel. Es gibt kein Thema mehr. Dem d-moll im 1. und 3. Horn steht der Tonwechsel fis und gis im 2. und 4. Horn gegenüber. Mit diesem doppelten Terzklang endet das erste Bild.

[V] Pas de Furies

mit Wiederholung 155 Takte zweiteilig mit jeweils dreiteilig binnengegliederter A-B-A1-Form (A: T. 185 = Ziffer 4762 [a: T. 154 = Ziffer 4757; b T. 5568 = Ziffer 5859; a1: T. 6985 = Ziffer 502523 + 6162]; B: T. 86155 [c: T. 86128 = Ziffer 6371; d: T. 129139 = Ziffer 7273; c1: T. 140155 = Ziffer 7476]. A und B sind gleichgewichtig und gleichlang, die Binnengliederung vollzieht sich symmetrisch zu einander: der jeweils 1. Teil (a und c) ist der ausgedehnteste, der jeweils 2. Teil (b und d) der kürzeste. Die jeweils ersten und dritten Teile zusammengenommen in beiden Abschnitten fünfmal so lang wie die beiden Mittelteile. Darstellung der Unterwelt-Situation. Versinnbildlichung von Unruhe und Qual durch Wiederholungen von Wechselnoten, Repetitionstönen oder Klängen, Schmerz und Leid durch Tritoni, kleine Sekunden und verminderte Akkorde, Pizzicati-‚Stiche’ der Streicher gegen die Bläser. Vielfache Material-Muster. Die Sinnlosigkeit des Zustandes eines immerwährenden Wiederholens einundderselben Sache (das unnütze Steinerollen des Sysiphos etwa) als in sich stagnierender A-Teil gegenüber der tänzerischen, aber ruhiger werdenden Bewegungsform des zweiten Hauptteils B. In dessen melodische Verläufe werden zum erstenmal im Ballett Orpheus unentwegt Lücken hineinkomponiert, was auf ruckartige Furienbewegungen abstellt. Die Melodiebewegungen sind wechselhaft, streckenweise durchgehend staccato. Die Klangfläche verläuft im piano, aber marcato und mit einzelnen, anschließend sofort zurückgenommenen Forte– oder Sforzato-Schlägen. Die letzten 11 Takte laufen mit Begleitbewegungen aus.

[VI] Air de danse (Orphée

Air de danse (Orphée), Interlude und Air de danse (conclusion) gestalterische Einheit in Rahmenform, 57 + 5 + 10 Takte (Ziffer 7788, 89, 9091) in Großform A-B-C-B1-D-B2. Air de danse von Strawinsky zweiteilig (T. 113 = Ziffer 7779 + T. 1457 = Ziffer 8088) notiert, aber vierteilig A-B-C-B1 (A: T. 113 = Ziffer 7779; B: T. 1431 = Ziffer 8083; C: T. 3241 = Ziffer 8485; B1: T. 4257 = Ziffer 8688) komponiert und dabei sechsmal so lang wie das Zwischenspiel und dreimal so lang wie der Schlußteil. Entsprechend der Besänftigungsfunktion der Musik spielt die Harfe bei A zweistimmig solistisch, begleitet von zweifachem Streicherchor aus kombiniertem Solo– und Tutti-Streicher-Quintett; Tutti-Streicher setzen nur einzelne Akkordschwerpunkte; weitere spieltechnische Effekte durch wechselndes Pizzicato– und Bogen-Spiel. In B gesellen sich zwei solistisch und sehr weich spielende Oboen der Harfe zu, die jetzt ihrerseits im Wechsel mit Violinen und Violoncelli Begleitfunktion übernimmt. Offensichtlich hat sich der spielende Orpheus in einen sich selbst auf der Harfe begleitenden singenden Orpheus verwandelt. C kommt in diesem Zusammenhang strukturell die Aufgabe eines Zwischenspiels oder einer Kadenz der Instrumente zu, die in B1 mündet, einer Variation und gleichzeitig Beendigung des B-Teils. Stilistisch in der Grave betitelten Air Annäherung an die bachsche Kultur langsamer Sätze. Wechselspiel zwischen Sanftmut, Klage, Seufzer und Jammer. Gegen Satzende Häufung scharfer Intervalle und Stockung der Melodieführung.

[VII] Interlude

mit nur 5 Takten kürzestes Satzteil des Balletts, funktionell in der Großform als D-Teil Zwischenspiel im Orpheus-Tanz. Handlungsinterpretation durch Intervall-Verschärfung und Dur-Moll-Akkordverschiebung.

[VIII] Air de danse (conclusion)

funktionell in der Großform als B2 Fortsetzung des Orpheus-Tanzes nach der Zwischenspiel-Unterbrechung. Melodisch materialbestimmt durch B-Teil ab Ziffer 80. Verlagerung der führenden Oboenstimme zu Harfe und Englischhorn in kontrapunktischer Imitationstechnik. Neu zitternd klingende schnelle Staccato-Einzelton-Wiederholungen in Vierundsechzigstelgruppen ausschließlich in den beiden Klarinettenstimmen, dem kontrapunktischen Geflecht zugeordnet. Sehr dichter Satz. Inhaltsdeutung des guten Endes des Orpheusauftritts durch Schlußakkord von Pauke, Harfe und Pizzicato-Kontrabässen in reinem F-Dur.

[IX] Pas d’action

37 Takte nach Doppelstrich-Trennung dreiteilig in Grob-Struktur A-B-B1 (A: T. 18 = Ziffer 9293; B: T. 912 = Ziffer 94; B1: T. 1337 = Ziffer 95100) aus materialverwandten B-Teilen und einem kontrastierenden A-Teil. Orpheus-Harfe nur im A-Teil als zweimaliger Akkordschlag im Mehrtaktabstand, zuerst von Streichern, dann von Streichern kombiniert mit Holzbläsern umschlossen. Bildhaft für den von den besänftigten Furien umringten Orpheus. Strukturell Binnengliederung a-b-a1-a2. Kompositorisch tonarme Melodiefolge mit gebrochener reiner F-Dur-Akkordik. Kontrastierender viertaktiger B-Teil solistisch aus Bratsche und zwei Violoncelli dreistimmig. Bildhaft offensichtlich für 2 Furien, die Orpheus die Augenbinde anlegen. Kompositorisch durch Ostinati und Wiederholungen in motorischer Sechzehntelbewegung ohne thematische Entwicklung gestaltet, jede der drei Stimmen geringtönig. Im 2. Violoncello gestische Nachzeichnung des Vorgangs: Bogenform für das Umlegen, pausengetrennte Sekundschritte für den Doppelknoten mit Prüfen des richtigen Sitzes der Binde. B1-Teil von zweistimmigem Trompetensatz mit Interruptionspausen und motorisch-statischer Sechzehntelbegleitung in Bratschen und Violoncelli geprägt. Bildhaft für den Vorgang eines abwartenden Orpheus und des königlichen Auftretens Plutos (Hades). Kurzes aufsteigendes Fagottsolo Ziffer 973 im natürlichen Quintraum f bis c vermutlich als Szene der Zuführung Eurydikes gedacht. Letzte Anweisungen Plutos. Mit Einsatz Ziffer 100 Ende der statisch-motorisch verlaufenden Streicherbegleitung, keine Trompeten mehr. Verlagerung der Sechzehntel-Bewegung unter Verzicht auf Streicher auf jeweils zwei Flöten und zwei Klarinetten, Zusammenführung der gebrochenen Akkordik in rhythmisch parallel geführten Zweitonakkorden im Flöten– und Klarinettenpart. Bildhaft für den Vorgang der zusammengeführten und nun auf sich selbst gestellten beiden Menschen, die ihren Empfindungen überlassen sind. Ende mit drei Streicherakkorden und einer aufwärtsführenden Kontrabaßlinie und Einmündung in einen ungewissen Mischklang aus d-a-fis-h-e als Sinnbild des beginnenden Aufstiegs in die Oberwelt und Ausdruck seiner Fragwürdigkeit.

[X] Pas-de-deux

83 Takte in Rahmenform je nach Zählweise drei– und vierfach unterteilbar. Die dreifache Teilung A-B-A1 (A: T. 132 = Ziffer 101108; B: T. 3365 = Ziffer 109117; A1: T. 6682 = Ziffer 118121) wertet die Generalpause nicht als mögliche Abschnittsgliederung. Die vierfache Teilung A-B-A1-A2 (A: T. 132 = Ziffer 101108; B: T. 3365 = Ziffer 109117; A1: T. 6680 = Ziffer 117120; A2: T. 8185 = Ziffer 121) sieht nach der Generalpause eine Art von Koda. Diese Gliederung läßt außerdem eine Zahlenproportion im Verfahren des Goldenen Schnitts zu, weil die vier Abschnitte dann im Verhältnis zueinander um 1:5, 1:6 und 1:7 kleiner werden. Der Orpheus-Eurydike Pas de deux ist das formale und strukturelle Zentrum des ganzen Balletts und vereinigt in sich alle vorherigen und nachfolgenden Gestaltungselemente einschließlich der formalen. Durchgängig überhäufter Metrenwechsel wie in keinem anderen Balletteil (A = 32 Takte = 24 Wechsel; B = 33 Takte = 18 Wechsel). Nach eingetretener Katastrophe kein Metrenwechsel mehr. Gemeinsamer Aufbruch sinnbildlich durch unisone Streicherbewegung Ziffer 10112. Orpheus geht voran, Eurydike folgt, sinnbildlich durch fugierende Imitationstechnik Ziffer 1013ff. und Beibehaltung der harmonischen Schreitbewegung. Trauer und Zuversicht des A-Teils schlägt im B-Teil in Fröhlichkeit um. Eurydike beginnt mit ihrem voreilig-leichtsinnigen Werben um Orpheus und tanzt vor ihm (Balanchine ließ sie an dieser Stelle seiner Choreographie eine unsichtbare Flöte spielen). Instrumentierung zusätzlich zu den Streichern Flöten, Oboen, Klarinetten und Hörner, dominiert von einem konzertierenden Duo zwischen 1. Flöte und 1. Klarinette in Vertretung von Orpheus und Eurydike. Ende der Partie mit kadenzierendem Harfen-Warnsignal des Engels über drohendem Orgelpunkt der geteilten Violoncelli, das gleichzeitig die kompositorische Dichte des Abschnitts auflöst. Takte 65 bis 76 des A1-Teils entsprechen den Takten ab Takt 18ff. des A-Teils. Es scheint so, als habe die Warnung des Engels Erfolg gehabt und Eurydike ihre Verführungsabsichten aufgegeben und als sei der Anfangszustand wieder zurückgekehrt. Doch dann Hochrollen der Musik zum Fortissimo, für die generelle Mezzo-Lage dieses Balletts ein dynamischer Gefühlsausbruch ohne Gleichen, als Sinnbild der Leidenschaft, der beide nicht mehr standhalten können. Generalpause als Sinnbild für Tod, Erwachen in Schrecken, Unabänderlichkeit, Begreifen, stumme Verzweiflung. Große Sprünge im ruhigen Fluß der letzten 5 Takte. Identität von Verzweiflung und Erschöpfung. Doppelakkord c-es der ersten Violinen nach der Pause melodischer Themenkopf des nachfolgenden Interludiums.

[XI] Interlude

10 Takte (Ziffer 121124) einteilig mit eintaktiger, doppelstrichabgetrennter Übergangsfloskel zum Pas d’action Punktierte Rhythmen und Vorschläge als Satzcharakteristika ruckartiger Bewegungen. Die Harfe spielt keine Rolle mehr. Orpheus ist hilflos. Der Schleiervorhang, vor dem gespielt wird und der durchstoßen werden müßte, um erneut den Weg in die Unterwelt zu finden, ist undurchdringlich. Zunächst bestimmen Trompeten und Posaunen das Klangbild, dann Oboen und Klarinetten.

[XII] Pas d’action

90 Takte (Ziffer 125142) handlungsbedingt ohne auffällige Großgliederung. Einteilung allenfalls nach Dynamik-Stufen (Forte-Bereich Takt 155 = Ziffer 1251363; Fortissimo-Bereich Takt 5669 = Ziffer 13641392; Piano-Bereich Takt 7090 = Ziffer 13931427) unter Verzicht auf thematische Zugehörigkeit, oder nach Motiv– und Klangmerkmalen als A-B-A1-Struktur (A: T. 134 = Ziffer 125131; B: T. 3555 = Ziffer 1321363; A1: T. 5690 = Ziffer 1364142). Mänaden-Überfall und Orpheus-Zerstückelung handlungseinheitlich. Sinnbild durch übermäßige Pausenverwendung mit Figurencharakter zur unvermuteten Abtrennung kleinster Motivteilchen ohne Gliederungsfunktion. Starke Dynamik. Zusätzlich Intervallschärfung durch Bildung von kleinen Sekunden, die sich lagenvertauscht in große Septimen umstrukturieren lassen, starke Terzschichtungen, Störtonakkordik und verfremdete Quintklänge zur Erzielung hektischer Massenbewegungen. Verschiedene Terzschichtungsverfahren in Form bitonal-chromatischer (d-f gegen dis-fis) oder akkordischer (d-fis + ais-cis) Verkopplungen. Tonhöhen– und Klangfarbenerweiterung zur Höhe hin. Vorlagenbedingt übertönen die mänadentypischen Kreischklänge den Normalklang, entsprechend der Ovidschen Überlieferung, daß die Zikonen die gefährlichen Gesänge von Orpheus-Leier und Orpheus-Stimme durch Überbrüllen abwehruntauglich machten. Einmünden in einheitliche Schreiakkorde, anschließend nochmalige Zerschlagung und Zerstückelung der übrig gebliebenen Orpheus-Leichenteile. Zunehmende Verlangsamung des Tempovorgangs.

[XIII] Apothéose d’Orphée

37 Takte (Ziffer 143149) ohne Abschnitts-, wohl mit Material– und Sinngliederung. Aus der Trauer des Orpheus ist die Hoffnung auf Orpheus und seine Kunst geworden, die Apolls Erinnerungsvermögen zurückruft. Es ist nicht das Original, auch wenn es so scheint. Bewegungsrichtung, Anfangston und Skalenart sind gegenüber [I] geändert. Die Harfenstimme Takt 5ff. wird gleichsam verschoben gespiegelt, schlägt von original phrygisch nach dorisch um und verdreht die pessimistische Abwärtsbewegung von [I] in die optimistisch-verklärende Aufwärtsbewegung von [XIII]. Gegenüber der Hektik des Pas d’action wirkt die Ruhe der Apotheose wie eine Erlösung. Die Bewegung vollzieht sich langsam und feierlich. Die Realität der Vergangenheit tritt vor der Zukunftshoffnung zurück. Von der realen Leier des toten Orpheus bleibt nur noch die Erinnerung zurück, mit der die Kanontechnik in den Hornstimmen mehrmals unterbrochen wird.

* Unter Benutzung einer unveröffentlichten Hausarbeit von Yvonne Kohle .Orpheus. Entwicklungsgeschichte, Analyse, Deutung’, 222 Seiten, Düsseldorf 1993.

 

Aufriß

First Scene [#] Premier Tableau [Erstes Bild]

[I]

Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurydice. [Orpheus weint um Eurydice]

He stands motionless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, il ne bouge pas. [Er steht regungslos mit dem Rücken zum Publikum]

Lento sostenuto Viertel = 69

            (Ziffer 21 bis Ende Ziffer 3)

Some friends pass bringing presents and offering him sympathie

Passent des amis avec des présents. Compliments de condoléances

[Freunde kommen mit Gaben vorbei und bekunden ihr Mitgefühl

            (Ziffer 21)

[II]

AIR DE DANSE

Andante con moto Achtel = 112

            (Ziffer 4 bis Ende Ziffer 27)

[III]

DANCE OF THE ANGEL OF DEATH

L’ANGE DE LA MORT ET SA DANSE

[Tanz des Todesengels]

L’istesso Achtel = 112

            (Ziffer 28 bis Ende Ziffer 40)

The Angel leads Orpheus to Hades.

L’Ange commène Orphée aux enfers.

[Der Engel geleitet Orpheus zur Unterwelt]

            Ziffer 361)

[IV]

INTERLUDE

[Zwischenspiel]

Viertel = Viertel

            (Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 46)

The Angel and Orpheus reappear in the gloom of Tartarus.

L’Ange et Orphée réapparaîssent dans les ténèbre du Tartare.

[Der Engel und Orpheus erscheinen wieder in der Dunkelheit der Unterwelt]

            (Ziffer 431)

Second Scene [#] Deuxième Tableau [Zweites Bild]

[V]

PAS DES FURIES

their agitation and their threats. [#] leur agitation et leurs menace. [ihre Unruhe und ihre Drohungen,]

Agitato Halbe = 126 in plano

            (Ziffer 47 bis Ende Ziffer 61 unter Wiederholung von Ziffer 502 bis Ende Ziffer 604 bei

Auslassung der fünftaktigen Prima-Klausel Ziffer 523 bis Ende Ziffer 533)

Sempre alla breve ma meno mosso Halbe = 98

            (Ziffer 63 bis Ende Ziffer 766 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 77])

[VI]

AIR DE DANSE

(Orphé)

Grave punktierte Achtel = 63

            (Ziffer 77 [attacca von Ziffer 766 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 79)

Un poco meno mosso Sechzehntel = 96

            (Ziffer 80 bis Ende Ziffer 886 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 89])

[VII]

INTERLUDE

[Zwischenspiel]

The tormented souls in Tartarus stretch on their fettered arms towards Orpheus, and implore him to continue his song of consolation. [#] Les tourmentés du Tartare tendent leur bras enchaînes vers Orphée le suppliant de continuer son chant consolant. [Die armen Seelen der Unterwelt strecken ihre gefesselten Arme Orpheus entgegen und flehen ihn an, mit seinem Klagegesang fortzufahren]

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 89 [attacca von Ziffer 886 aus])

[VIII]

AIR DE DANSE

(conclusion)

Orpheus continues his Air [#] Orphée continue son Air. [Orpheus singt sein Lied weiter]

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 90 bis Ende Ziffer 915 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 92])

[IX]

PAS D’ACTION

Hades, moved by the song of Orpheus, grows calm. The Furies surround him, bin his eyes und return Eurydice to him. [#] L’enfer, touché par le chant d’Orphée, se calme. Les Furies l’entourent, lui couvrejT les yeux d’un bandeau et lui rendent Eurydice. [Die Unterwelt, vom Orpheus-Gesang bewegt, beruhigt sich. Die Furien umringen ihn, verbinden ihm die Augen und bringen Eurydice zu ihm]

(Veiled Curtain) [#] (Tulles) [Schleiervorhang]

Andantino leggiadro Achtel = 104

            (Ziffer 92 [attacca von Ziffer 915 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 93)

Poco più mosso Achtel = 126

            (Ziffer 94 bis Ende Ziffer 1006 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 101])

[X]

PAS-DE-DEUX

(Orpheus and Eurydice before the veiled curtain). [#] (Orphée et Eurydice devant les tulles). [Orpheus und Eurydice vor dem Schleiervorhang)

Andante sostenuto Achtel = 96

            (Ziffer 101 [attacca von Ziffer 1006 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1215 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 122])

Orpheus tears the bandage from his eyes. Eurydice falls dead.

Orphée arrache de ses yeux le bandeau. Eurydice tombe morte.

Orpheus nimmt die Binde von seinen Augen. Eurydice fällt tot um

            (Ende Ziffer 1205)

[XI]

INTERLUDE

Veiled curtain, behind which the decor oft the first scene is placed. [#] Tulles, derrière le décor du premier tableau sera remis. [Hinter dem Schleiervorhang erscheint die Dekoration des ersten Bildes]

Moderato assai Viertel = 72

            (Ziffer 122 [attacca von Ziffer 1215 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1244 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 125])

[XII]

PAS D’ACTION

The Bacchanten attack Orpheus, sieze him and tear him in pieces. [#] Les Bacchantes attaquent Orphée, s’emparent de lui et le déchirent en morceaux. [Die Bachantinnen greifen Orpheus an, töten ihn und reißen ihn in Stücke]

Vivace Viertel = 152

            (Ziffer 125 [attacca von Ziffer 1244 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 142 [attacca weiter nach Ziffer 143])

[XIII]

Third Scene [#] Troisième Tableau [Drittes Bild]

            (Ziffer 143 [attacca von Ziffer 1427 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 1496)

Orpheus’ Apotheosis [#] Apothéose d’Orphée [Orpheus-Apotheose]

Apollo appears. He wrests the lyre from Orpheus and raises his song heavenwards. [#] Apparait Apollon. Il s’empare de la lyre d’Orphée et élève son chant vers les cieux. [Apoll erscheint. Er nimmt die Lyra des Orpheus und erhebt seinen Gesang zum Himmel]

Lento sostenuto Viertel = 69

 

Korrekturen: In der Urfassung blieben zahlreiche Druckfehler stehen, die anschließend auf einem eigenen beigegebenen Errata-Bogen verbessert wurden und bei denen es offen bleiben muß, ob es Druck-, Manuskript– oder Korrekturfehler waren. Er enthält 22 spielnotwendige Verbesserungskomplexe, was statistisch einem Fehlerpotential von mindestens einem Fehler auf jeweils 2 Notenseiten entspricht.

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Tabellen

Dirigierpartitur 761

[Maschinenschriftlich mit handschriftlichen Zusätzen]

  1.) Seite 1 Takt 1: in der Harfenstimme Wegfall des près de la table, Wegfall der Staccati.

  2.) Seite 1 Takt 2: Wegfall des sim.

  3.) Seite 5 Takt 4: in der Harfenstimme Wegfall des près de la table, Wegfall der Staccati, dasselbe

            gilt für den folgenden Takt 5.

  4.) Seite 9 Takt 9 [Ziffer 212]: Auflösezeichen vor Note B der Violoncelli

  5.: Seite 10 Takt 3: Schlüsselversetzung Violoncello-System von Altschlüssel in Violinschlüssel

  6.: Seite 12 Takt 7 [Ziffer 272]: nur 1. Violine zusätzlich con. sord.

  7.: Seite 13 Takt 7 [Ziffer 293]: 1. Fagottstimme beginnt mit einer Viertelpause

  8.: Seite 24 Takt 1 [Ziffer 611]: in der 2. Fagottstimme müssen beide Halbenoten von e auf es

            erniedrigt werden.

  9.: Seite 33 Takt 9 [187]: in der 1. Oboenstimme ist der Bindebogen bis es2 auszuhalten.

10.) Seite 35 Takt 3 [Ziffer 903]: in den beiden Klarinettenstimmen muß jeweils die erste Pause als

            Sechzehntel– nicht als Achtelwert geschrieben werden.

11.) Seite 36 Takt 9ff. [Ziffer 94]: Ziffer 94 ist mit der italienischen Tempobezeichnung poco più mosso

            [in der später eingedruckten Verbesserung mit anderem Schrifttyp Poco più mosso] und der

            Metronomangabe Achtel = 126 [in der später eingedruckten Verbesserung wie üblich als

            Achtelnotenzeichen geschrieben] zu ergänzen.

12.) Seite 37 Takt 2 [Ziffer 961]: statt Achtel-Sechzehntelpause-Sechzehntel im dritten Viertelwert der

            1. und 2. Violinstimme muß die Rhythmusfolge Sechzehntel-Sechzehntelpause-Achtel lauten.

13.) Seite 41 Takt 10 [Ziffer 1123]: die dritte Sechzehntel-Note der 1. Oboenstimme soll gis statt g

            lauten. Hier wurde im Fehlerverzeichnis selbst ein Fehler gemacht, denn die dritte

            Sechzehntel-Note heißt fis, nicht gis. Gemeint ist die vierte Sechzehntelnote.

14.) Seite 42 Takt 2 [Ziffer 1134]: die beiden Klarinetten– und Fagottstimmen sind mit einem piano–

            Zeichen p zu ergänzen.

15.) Seite 42 Takt Takt 2 [Ziffer 1114]: die 1. Fagottstimme muß Sechzehntelpause + Sechzehntel-a

            übergebunden zum folgenden Achtel-a + Achtel-a gelesen werden.

16.) Seite 44 Takt 1 [Ziffer 1194]: die Metrumbezeichnung Dreivierteltakt gehört an den Systemanfang.

17.) Seite 48 Takt 9 [Ziffer 1130]: am Taktanfang der Bratschenstimme hat eine Pause im Wert einer

            Halben-, nicht einer Viertelnote zu stehen.

18.) Seite 48 Takt 8 [Ziffer 1293]: der entsprechende Rhythmus in den Flöten, Fagotten und den

            beiden ersten Hörnern muß umgekehrt werden, statt Sechzehntel-Sechzehntelpause-Achtel

            muß es Achtel-Sechzehntelpause-Sechzehntel heißen.

19.) Seite 48 Takt 10 [Ziffer 1301]: die Viertelpause in der ersten und in der zweiten Viertelpause ist zu

            punktieren.

20.) Seite 5759 durchgehend [Ziffer 143 bis Ende Ziffer 149]: statt Solo-Violine muß es 2 Solo–

            Violinen heißen.

21.) Seite 57 Takt 1 [Ziffer 1431]: in der Harfenstimme Wegfall des près de la table, Wegfall der

            Staccati, und Wegfall des sim. im nachfolgenden Takt 2 [Ziffer 1432].

22.) Die letzte Anmerkung ist aus der Partitur allein nicht zu verstehen, weil sie sich auf das Verhältnis

            zwischen Partitur und Stimmen bezieht. Die Wiederholung zwischen Ziffer 50 bis Ende Ziffer

            60 wurde in den Stimmen voll ausgeschrieben, wodurch die Probenziffer 51 durch 60A, und

            52 durch 60B ersetzt werden muß.

Dirigierpartitur 761 + Taschenpartitur 762

  1.) Ziffer 81 1. Flöte: die Notenligatur ist mit einem sich bis zur Triolen-Ziffer öffnenden crescendo–

            Zeichen < und ab der Ziffer mit einem decresendo-Zeichen > zu versehen.

  2.) Ziffer 82: Eintrag >4/8 sempre<.

  3.) Ziffer 182 1./2. Violinen: zwischen den beiden Systemen ist nach der ersten Triolen-Gruppe bis

            ausschließlich der taktletzten Triolengruppe ein crescendo-Zeichen < einzusetzen.

  4.) Ziffer 293 1. Fagott: die Viertelpause ist durch eine Achtelpause zu ersetzen.

  5.) Ziffer 2934 1. Fagott: die Trillernote f von Ziffer 293 ist mit der Trillernote von Ziffer 294 zu

            überbinden.**

  6.) Ziffer 3156 2. Fagott + 4. Horn: die Phrasierungsbögen dürfen nicht von der ersten bis zur letzten

            Taktnote reichen, sondern nur von der ersten bis zur zweiten beziehungsweise (Fagott 2:) von

            der ersten Triolen-Note G bis zur punktierten Achtelnote cis. #

  7.) Ziffer 343 Harfe Diskantstimme: vor der ersten Note ist ein Violinschlüssel einzutragen–

  8.) Ziffer 565 oberhalb 1. Oboe: es muß richtig sƒp statt poco sƒp heißen.

  9.) Ziffer 5745: oberhalb und unterhalb der 1. Klarinette ist ab Taktmitte Ziffer 574 bis Taktende Ziffer

            575 ein decrescendo-Zeichen > einzufügen

10.) Ziffer 614 1. Klarinette: die Halbe-Note a ist mit einem descrescendo-Zeichen > zu versehen.

11.) Ziffer 621 1. Klarinette: die Halbe-Note h ist mit einem Akzent-Zeichen [>] zu versehen.

12.) Ziffer 671: Metronomangabe punktierte Achtel = 63,#

13.) Ziffer 674+5 Harfe Baßstimme: es muß es richtig e statt durchgehend es heißen,#

15.) Ziffer 844 1. Oboe: die 1., 3., 4., und 5. Taktnote ist mit einem Betonungszeichen > zu versehen; 2.

            Oboe: die 1. und 4. Taktnote ist mit einem Betonungszeichen > zu versehen.

17.) Ziffer 903 Klarinetten: die takteinleitende Achtelpause ist durch eine Sechzehntelpause zu ersetzen.#

18.) Ziffer 912 1. Oboe: die 1. Taktnote [Sechzehntel des2] ist mit einem Bindebogen zur letzten

            Taktnote von Ziffer 911 zu versehen.#

19.) Ziffer 941: Tempo– und Metronomangabe Più mosso Achtel = 132

21.) Ziffer 1072 1. Violine: die drittletzte Sechzehntel-Note f1 soll mit einem geklammerten

            Erhöhungszeichen versehen werden [f#1 statt sf1].**

22.) Ziffer 1073 2.Violine: die 1. Note ist mit einem geklammerten Auflösungszeichen [f1] zu versehen.**

23.) Ziffer 1131 1. Oboe: die Sechzehntelligatur ist richtig cis3-h2-h2-h2 statt dis3-cis3-cis3-cis3 zu

            lesen.

24.) Ziffer 11712 1. Klarinette: die beiden großen Phrasierungsbögen sind wegzunehmen und durch

            kleine Phrasierungsbögen von der 1. zur 2. Note der taktletzten Triolenligatur von Ziffer 1171

            [des1 zu as1], von der 1. zur 2. Note der 2. Triolenligatur von Ziffer 1172 [as1 zu e] und von

            der 1. zur 2. Note der 3. Triolenligatur von Ziffer 1172 [d1 zu as1] zu ersetzen. Die 2. und 5.

            Triolen-Sechzehntelnote von Ziffer 1171 (f1, ces1] und die 2., 3., 6. und 9. Triolen–

            Sechzehntelnote von Ziffer 1172 (f1, des1, f1, g] ist mit einem staccato-Punkt zu versehen.

25.) Ziffer 1172 Harfe: rot vor Takt >marc.<, unterhalb der 1. Note Viertel d ein Akzentzeichen >, ab

            Triole >pres de la table<.

26.) Ziffer 1214: die Angabe a tempo ist zu streichen.

27.) Ziffer 1263 Klarinetten-Systeme: das mƒ-Zeichen ist durch ein ƒ-Zeichen zu ersetzen.

28.) Ziffer 1264 1. Klarinette: die Achtel-Note dis1 ist mit einem staccato-Punkt zu versehen.

29.) Ziffer 1264 Systeme 2. Klarinette / 1. Fagott: das mƒ-Zeichen ist durch ein ƒ-Zeichen zu ersetzen.

30.) Ziffer 1271: der Takt ist mit einem sempre ƒ zu versehen.

31.) Ziffer 1284 Systeme 1. Trompete, 1./2. Posaune: die beiden taktersten Notenwerte sind richtig

            Sechzehntel-Sechzehntelpause-Achtel statt Achtel-Achtel zu lesen.

32.) Ziffer 1322 Kontrabaß: die Achtelnote cis ist mit einem sƒ-Zeichen zu versehen.

33.) Ziffer 1323 Kontrabaß: die zweite Sechzehntelnote H ist mit einem sƒ-Zeichen zu versehen.

34.) Ziffer 1342 Violoncello: nach der 2. Viertelnote ist ein ƒ-Zeichen einzutragen.

35.) Ziffer 1342 Kontrabaß: nach der 2. Viertelnote ist ein ƒ-Zeichen einzutragen.

36.) Ziffer 1344 Violoncello: mit Beginn der Sechzehntel-Ligatur ist ein ƒ-Zeichen einzutragen.

37.) Ziffer 1344 Kontrabaß: mit Beginn der Sechzehntel-Ligatur ist ein ƒ-Zeichen einzutragen.

38.) Ziffer 1373 1./2. Horn: der letzte Zweiton-Akkord ist richtig Viertel h1-f2 statt Viertel f1-h1 zu lesen.

39.) Ziffer 1373 1./2. Trompete: der letzte Zweiton-Akkord ist richtig Viertel a1-cis3 statt Viertel c2-a2

            zu lesen.*

40.) Ziffer figure 1374 1./2. Horn, Zweitonakkorde: es ist richtig h1-f2 + e1-e2 + h1-f2 +h1-f2 + e1-e2

            statt f1-h1 + e1-e2 + f1-h1 + f1-h1 + e1-e2 zu lesen.*

41.) Ziffer 1374 1./2. Trompete, Zweiton-Akkorde: es ist richtig f2-a2 + d2-h2 + a2-c3 + a2-c3 + d2-h2

            statt c2-a2 + d2-h2 + c2-a2 + c2-a2 + d2-h2 zu lesen.*

42.) Ziffer 1375 1./2. Horn, Zweiton-Akkorde: es ist richtig h1-f2 + g1-h1 statt f1-h1 + g1-h1 zu lesen.*

43.) Ziffer 1375 1./2. Trompete, die ersten 3 Zweiton-Akkorde: es ist richtig a21-cis3 + d2-fis2 + dis2

            fis2 zu lesen.*

44.) Ziffer 13912 Pauken: es ist richtig Achtelpause – Sechzehntelligatur c-c – Achtel es –

            Achtelpause – Viertelpause – Achtelpause – Sechzehntelligatur c-c | – Achtel es–

            Achtelpause – Achtelpause – Sechzehntelligatur c-c – Achtel es – punktierte Viertelpause statt

            Achtelpause – Sechzehntelligatur c-c – Achtel es – Achtelpause zu lesen.

* Eintrag auch in der Taschenpartitur.

** Nur in der Taschenpartitur, nicht in der Dirigierpartitur korrigiert.

 

Stilistik: Strawinsky charakterisiert die Handlungsvorgänge vorder– wie hintergründig, wobei kompositorisch identische Gestaltungsmomente verschiedene Ausdruckswerte haben können, wie etwa die Pausenverwendung. Pausen werden von Strawinsky über ihre Normalfunktion hinaus, Phrasenenden zu bezeichnen oder Atmungsmöglichkeiten zu geben, in die Ballettmusik als Gestaltmittel hineinkomponiert. Im Furientanz unterstützen sie die bedrohlich aufgeregte Gestik der Furien, im Bacchantinnentanz stellen sie die Zerstückelung des Sängers dar, im dann gescheiterten Rückweg aus der Unterwelt zeigt eine Generalpause den neuerlichen und endgültigen Tod Eurydikes an. Wenn dies historisch nicht unmöglich wäre, möchte man meinen, Strawinsky kenne das ganze weitverzweigte rhetorische Figurennetz barocker Textkomposition, von der suspiratio (Seufzerpause) über die Tmesis (Trennpause, von griechisch zerschneiden) bis hin zur Aposiopesis (die das Ende anzeigende Pause). – Das Ballett verkörpert späten Neoklassizismus mit beziehungsreicher Zuordnung von Handlung und Musik unter Wahrung der kompositorischen Selbständigkeit. Die Dynamik verbleibt fast ausschließlich im Bereich von piano und mezzoforte mit Sforzato-Einschüben. Es gibt weder ein pianissimo noch ein forte als durchgehende Klangfläche, jedoch Pianissimo-Einzeleffekte bei den Streichern im ersten Zwischenspiel, ein vorübergehendes forte im Furientanz und Einzelakkordschläge mit zwei– und dreifachem forte im Bacchantinnenüberfall. Auch die Apotheose ist ganzflächig im piano und mezzopiano gehalten. Das Ballett Orpheus enthält keine humoristischen Stimmungsbilder oder entsprechende Einzelszenen, keine Karikierungen oder Gegendeutungen, auf die Strawinsky bis dahin selbst in tragischen Zusammenhängen nicht verzichtete. Das Ballett hat, zum ersten Mal im Gesamtwerk Strawinskys, eine melancholisch-pessimistische Grundstimmung, die sich im Basler Konzert ankündigte, aber noch nicht verselbständigte. Die Instrumentierung erfolgt kammermusikalisch, nicht orchestral. Die Zusammensetzung der Kleingruppen ist von der zugehörigen Situation abhängig. Lediglich bei der Zerstückelung des Orpheus kommt es zu einem Tutti. Die Harfe ist Orpheus zugeordnet. Die Blechblasinstrumente Posaune und Trompete erklingen durchgehend zu verschiedenen Situationen, schweigen aber bei den großen Auftritten von Orpheus, so als lauschten sie seinem Gesang. Solo-Posaune und Solo-Trompete korrespondieren mit bestimmten Auftritten von Todesengel und Orpheus. Die Holzbläser sind, von den Rahmensätzen abgesehen, allenthalben vertreten, werden aber wie auch die Pauken bei den Furien– und Bacchantinnen-Auftritten charakter– und situationszeichnend. Die Orpheus–Musik ist von Strawinsky bewußt überwiegend dunkel und sogar bedrohlich gehalten und entspricht damit der gängigen Unterweltsvorstellung. Strawinsky hat aber auch auf ihre Sanftheit Wert gelegt, weil sich die Szene im Dunkeln abspielt. Er wollte damit wohl zum Ausdruck bringen, daß sich in der Dunkelheit die Kontraste aufheben und er dies kompositorisch und instrumental nachzuzeichnen habe. Strawinsky definiert Ort und Zeit kompositorisch. Orpheus befindet sich im Verlauf des Balletts an verschiedenen Orten zu verschiedenen Zeiten, auf der Erde, auf dem Weg in die Unterwelt, unter der Erde, auf dem Weg zurück in die Oberwelt und wieder auf der Erde. Den Orts-Kreislauf, der außer der Gewißheit des endgültigen Eurydiken-Todes keine Änderung der Ausgangssituation gebracht hat, logifiziert die Zeit-Identität von [I] und [XIII]. Die drei Zeitzonen vor, in und nach der Hölle fängt Strawinsky durch andere tonale Polarisationen und Motivbildungen ein. Klangformen wie c-h-f, Intervallkonstruktionen wie b-des werden für die Szenen vor dem Abstieg strukturbildend. Indem Strawinsky das b-des-Intervall melodisch auseinanderlegt, gewinnt er die Anfangstöne des fugierten Themas. Die gesamte Unterwelt-Musik dagegen ist F-polarisiert, vor allem die Orpheus-Auftritte, die teilweise reines F-Dur oder f-moll oder üblicherweise Mischformen davon entwickeln. Nach der Handlungsumkehrung wird das charakteristische b-des-Intervall tonraumverlagert. Damit wird dem jetzt mit anderen Gefühlsinhalten besetzten identischen Raum Rechnung getragen. Zentrales Kompositionsstück innerhalb der Komposition ist der Pas de deux zwischen Orpheus und Eurydike, der als strukturelles Zentrum daher auch dramaturgisch in der Zeitmitte des Stückes aufgebaut wurde. Man kann diese Nummer daher ebensosehr als ein Gebilde charakterisieren, das sich aus den Elementen der anderen synthetisch zusammensetzt, wie als strukturelles Kernstück, aus dem Einzelstrukturen abgenommen wurden, um daraus individuell die anderen Sätze abzuleiten. Die Zuordnungen sind nach Strawinskyart knapp gehalten. Mit [I] verbinden den Pas de deux die durchgehende Achtelbewegung und die liegenbleibenden ostinaten Töne; mit [II] der schnelle Skalenlauf und das strukturbildende b-des-Motiv; mit [III] die gebrochene Quartsextakkordik; mit [IV] einstimmiger Beginn und fugierte Bauweise; mit [V] die chromatische Struktur und die Staccatotechnik; mit [VI-VIII] Rhythmusmotiv und Fugierung; mit [IX] Rhythmusmotiv und chromatisches Wechselnotenmotiv; mit [XI] Fugierung und das strukturbildende c-es-Motiv; mit [XII] Staccato– und gebrochene Quartsextakkordtechnik und die chromatische Wechselnotenmotivik; mit [XIII] Rhythmus-Motiv und fugischer Aufbau. Daneben gibt es eine durch übergreifende Motivik entwickelte zweite Art von Funktionsvernetzung, die einzelne Nummern untereinander auch konstruktionstechnisch nach Sinnbezügen verbindet. Auch wenn Strawinsky Wagnersche Leitmotivtechnik verwarf, arbeitete er im Orpheus selbst wieder mit einzelstücküberschreitenden Gestaltungsmitteln, die gleichgerichtete Stimmungsmomente ausdeuten, inhaltliche Zusammenhänge herstellen und strukturelle Verknüpfungen ermöglichen. Dazu gehören nicht nur die Harfenmelodik von Orpheus als durchgehendes Leitmotiv und einzelne situationsgebundene Charakterisierungsmomente über Instrumentation, Farbe und Gestik, sondern auch die übergeordnete Proportionalität, Rahmenbildungen, Tempo– und Dynamikübereinstimmungen. So bildet unter anderem die zweimalige Fugenunterbrechung in der Apotheose (Takte 14 und 15 = Ziffer 1455+6 und 25 und 26 = Ziffer 1475+6), mit der Strawinsky die Hornfuge zweimal „wie mit einer Schere“ durchschnitt, wie er Nabokow gegenüber bei dessen Weihnachtsbesuch 1949 in Beverly Hills erläuterte, eine Erinnerung an das Lied des jetzt toten Orpheus, das verklungen ist und von dem nur noch die Begleitung weiterlebt. – Das Thema von Rossignol, die Überwindung des Todes durch Musik zu leisten, erscheint neu aufgegriffen, diesmal aber um den Preis des selbstverschuldeten und gleichzeitig verzeihbaren Scheiterns aus Liebe. Das eigentliche Scheitern ist aber nicht der Tod Eurydikes, es sind im Rahmen der Schwerpunktsverlagerung die äußeren Umstände des Orpheus-Todes. In der kompositorischen Umsetzung folgte Strawinsky weitaus strenger den mythologischen Vorgaben als im Szenarium, in dem er auf Balanchine Rücksicht nehmen mußte und ausschlaggebende Handlungsvorgänge nicht sichtbar machen konnte. Der Angriff der Mänaden erfolgt der Ovidschen Darstellung nach zunächst durch Wurfgeschosse, durch Äste und Steine. Dieser Fernangriff richtet aber nichts aus. Orpheus hat seine Leier und spielt. Sein Gesang bringt die Äste dazu, ihn zu umkränzen, nicht ihn zu verletzen, die Steine, sich zu erweichen und im Kreis vor ihm niederzufallen. Die Mänaden sind machtlos. Jetzt setzen sie Musik gegen Musik ein. Sie beginnen, unflätig zu kreischen und immer lauter zu schreien, so daß sie die Orpheusgesänge übertönen. Orpheus kann nicht mehr gehört werden, seine Lieder bleiben daher wirkungslos. Nahebei pflügen Bauern mit ihren Rindern. Vor dem Lärminferno des wilden Haufens werfen sie ihre Werkzeuge weg, fliehen entsetzt und lassen ihre Tiere zurück. Die Mänaden bemächtigen sich der Hacken, schlachten erst die Rinder ab und anschließend Orpheus, der nichts mehr besitzt, um sich wehren zu können. Orpheus‘ Haupt wird zusammen mit seiner Leier in den Fluß Hebrus (die heutige Maritza) und von da ins Meer sinnigerweise nach Lesbos gespült, dem Zentrum der Weiberliebe, und die Leier beginnt, während sie dahertreibt, unter dem Wind leise zu tönen, und die tote Zunge lispelt noch vor sich hin. Als Haupt und Leier angeschwemmt werden und eine Schlange zubeißen will, greift Apoll ein. Da der Tötungs-Vorgang auch gegen die Gesetze des Dionysos verstößt, werden die Mänaden furchtbar bestraft. Sie verlieren ihre Bewegungsfreiheit und ihre menschlichen Gefühle. Den aktuellen Vorgang, Musik, besser: Lärm gegen Musik zu setzen griff Strawinsky auf, indem er ein Flötengekreisch komponierte, das die Harfenklänge von Orpheus übertönt und sein Verstummen bedingt. Die Stille weicht vor dem Lärm, die Besonnenheit vor dem ausufernden Haß, die Idealität vor der Realität und damit der Optimismus vor dem Pessimismus. Die Apotheose der Verklärung am Ende in die Göttlichkeit ist vor diesem Hintergrund eine fast nur noch theatralische Selbstberuhigung und eine Kapitulation vor einer Welt, aus der die Gerechtigkeit flüchten muß, um sich in einem wie auch immer gearteten Jenseits anzusiedeln, aus dem sie Lichtpunkte auf die Erde wirft. Fünf Jahre später hat Strawinsky alle diese Überlegungen hinter sich gelassen und sich unter seiner aus bitterer Prozeßerfahrung gewonnenen Erkenntnis, daß es in diesem Leben keine Gerechtigkeit gibt, nur noch einer theologisch orientierten Musik verschrieben.

 

Widmung: Es ist keine Widmung vermerkt.

 

Dauer: 2941″. – Die Spieldauer von Orpheus wird wie bei anderen Stücken in der Regel nach dem Zeitergebnis vorhandener Tonträger-Aufnahmen bestimmt, wobei den Eigen-Aufnahmen Strawinskys eine besondere Bedeutung zukommt. Die Zeitdauer ist daher interpretationsabhängig und verbleibt im Bereich des Ungefähren. Die Spieldauer läßt sich aber auch unter Beachtung von Takteinzelschlägen und Metronomangaben, dann aber auf Sekundenbruchteile genau, festlegen. Das (im Milli-Sekundenbereich abgerundete) Ergebnis (I: 25″; II: 310″; III: 27″; IV: 149″; V: 256″; VI: 231″; VII: 024″; VIII: 115″; X: 147″; X: 436XI: 033″; XII: 222″; XIII: 209″) zeigt eine fünfteilige Formal-Symmetrie 5:7:4:7:5 aus I-II (5), III-V (7), VI-VIII (4), IX-X (7) und XI-XIII (5), der auch eine sinngebende fünfteilige Handlungssymmetrie entspricht: I-II als Vorspiel = Lento + Air de danse = Orpheus-Volk-Szene, gegengewichtet durch XI-XIII als Nachspiel = Interlude + Pas d’acition + Lento (Apotheose) = Furien– und Apoll-Szene, mit dem geschlossenen besänftigenden Orpheus-Gesang in der Unterwelt einschließlich Unterbrechung und Beendigung als Ballett-Mittelstück VI-VIII = Air de danse + Interlude + Air de danse conclusion, und den beiden zwischengelagerten Hauptteilen III-V = Pas de deux [L’ange de mort] + Interlude + Furientanz und VIII-IX = Furientanz + Pas de deux. Orpheus eröffnet wie einige andere spätere Kompositionen weitgehende Möglichkeiten der Zahlenproportionsspiele, ohne daß damit gesagt wäre, daß derartige Interpretationen auch richtig sind und sich nicht als Korollar einlesen lassen. Ein besonderes Beispiel dafür bietet der je nach Zählweise drei– oder vierteilige Komplex des Orpheus-Liedes mit Zwischenspiel und Konklusion Ziffer 77 bis 91.

 

Dauer entsprechend Strawinskys Eintragungen: 1. Szene 218″; Air de Danse bis Ende Ziffer 12 123″, Ende 2.0 3 1/2″; Tanz Todesengel: kein Eintrag; Interlude: kein Eintrag; Tanz der Furien: bis Ende 63 131″, bis Ende 76 135″; Air de danse: Ende Ziffer 79: 028″, Ende Ziffer 88 213″; Interlude: 027″; Air de Danse: 045″; Pas d’action: Ende Ziffer 93 030″, Ende Ziffer 100 121″; Pas de deux: Ende Ziffer 108 209, Ende Ziffer 121 250″; Interlude: 113″; Pas d’action Ziffer 142 Ende 230; 3. Szene: 222“.

 

Entstehungszeit: Hollywood 20. Oktober 1946 bis 26. September 1947.

 

Uraufführung: 28. April 1948* im City Center of Music and Drama in New York mit den Solisten Nicolas Maggalanes (Orpheus), Maria Tallchief (Eurydice), Francisco Moncion (Todesengel), Tanaquil Le Clerc (Anführerin der Bacchantinnen), Beatrice Tompkins (Anführerin der Furien), Herbert Bliss (Apollo) und dem Ensemble der Ballet Society New york mit den Kostümen und dem Bühnenbild von Isamu Noguchi in der Choreographie von George Balanchine unter der Musikalischen Leitung von Igor Strawinsky – Der Uraufführungsabend begann mit Strawinskys Renard. Es folgte die Elegy für Solo-Viola. Nach Orpheus schloß die Veranstaltung mit Mozarts Symphonie concertante. Der Abend war für die Balletttruppe so erfolgreich, daß Morton Baum, der damalige Chairman des verantwortlichen Exekutivkomitees des City Center of Music and Drama Kirstein und Balanchine anbot, ihr Ballettensemble als ständiges Ensemble unter der Zusage einer zwanzigjährigen Unterstützung in ihr Unternehmen einzugliedern. So wurde aus der Ballet Society at the New York City Center, die Kirstein erst 1946 zusammen mit E. M. Warburg gegründet hatte, das bald weltberühmt werdende New York City Ballet, das seinen Premieren-Einstand am 11. Oktober 1948 hielt und bei dieser Gelegenheit erneut Orpheus und dazu die Symphonie en Ut tanzte. Kirstein war Generaldirektor geworden und Balanchine, den Kirstein bereits 1933 nach Amerika geholt und den man gerade erst in Paris außerordentlich schlecht, ja bürokratisch verächtlich behandelt hatte, eine Art von Chefchoreograph, der im Laufe seines Lebens mehr als dreißig Strawinsky-Produktionen betreute. Kirstein wußte, was er Strawinskys Orpheus zu verdanken hatte und bezeichnete in einem Brief vom 11. Januar 1949 das Ballett als einen Teil seines Lebens. Umgekehrt bedankte sich Strawinsky, menschlich selbst in einer eher depressiven Phase seines Lebens, am 28. Oktober 1948 mit Bravo, archibravo für Kirsteins Bemühungen um seine Musik.

* Das Datum der zweiten Aufführung am 29. April 1948 im Hunter College Playhouse von New York wird in der Strawinsky-Literatur verschiedentlich mit dem Uraufführungsdatum verwechselt

 

Choreographie: Nach dem ursprünglichen Willen Kirsteins sollte Pawel Tschelitschew das Bühnenbild gestalten. Kirstein hielt ihn für den größten Maler seiner Generation. Tschelitschew scheiterte sowohl an den projektierten Kosten von einhunderttausend Dollar, die seine Ausstattung kosten sollte, wie an der rücksichtslosen Art seines Vorgehens, die von Kirstein und Balanchine vorgestellte Orpheus-Idee rundheraus als falsch zu verwerfen und die Orpheus-Geschichte als die Geschichte eines Mannes und seiner Seele erzählen zu wollen, in der Orpheus gleicherweise Bacchus wie Apoll und nicht Ballett-Haupttänzer sein sollte. Die Summe war für die Verhältnisse der freien Truppe aberwitzig und hätte unter den damaligen Umständen selbst dann nicht aufgebracht werden können, wenn man es gewollt hätte. Aber Tschelitschews Orpheus-Idee, weitab von dem, was sich Kirstein, Balanchine und Strawinsky darunter vorstellten, machte ihn grundsätzlich aussichtslos. So, wie Kirstein die Zusammenhänge Strawinsky mit Brief vom 16. Oktober 1947 schilderte, drängt sich die Vermutung auf, als habe Tschelitschew selbst längst nicht mehr ernsthaft gewollt. Kirstein brachte dann den von Cocteau geschätzten Franzosen André Beaurepaire ins Spiel, dann Corrado Cagli, der aber gerade in Rom weilte und dessen Rückkehr ungewiß war. Schließlich fiel die Wahl auf den japanisch-amerikanischen Bildhauer Isamu Noguchi, den Kirstein in seinem Brief vom 4. Januar 1948 an Strawinsky als einen Künstler beschrieb, der zwar nicht übermäßig originell sei, aber mit Licht und Raum umgehen könne, und gerade das sei es, was Balanchine wünsche. Noguchi wählte elegant geformte Leiern und goldene Masken, die auch in der Choreographie eine ausschlaggebende Rolle spielen. Pluto symbolisiert die Hölle, wird aber nicht griechisch, sondern indisch als Göttin Kali dargestellt, die in der Regel mit langen Haaren, einem Bart, mit abgeschlagenen Köpfen, die um ihren Hals baumeln, einem Schwert in der einen und einem bluttriefenden Kopf in der anderen Hand erscheint. Für die Hölle baute Noguchi gewaltige Flammen und Knochen. Viel Aufhebens machte man von einem riesengroßen weißen Schleiervorhang aus Chinaseide, der Ober– und Unterwelt und die einzelnen Szenen voneinander zu trennen hatte, mit eintausend Dollar ziemlich teuer war und den man erst im letzten Augenblick kaufte. Er wurde von gezielten Luftströmen in ständiger Bewegung gehalten, so daß er lebendig wirkte. Noguchi wählte blasse Kostüm– und Bühnenfarben in den Richtungen Rosa, Gold, Azur und Schwarz. In dem Augenblick, in dem Pluto Eurydike dem Leben zurückgibt, ließ Noguchi einen fahnenähnlichen blauen Strahl aufscheinen, der den Himmel oberhalb des Hades erahnen machte. Die Lichtgestaltung war somit ein integrierter Bestandteil von Bühnenbild und Choreographie. Die Orpheus-Leier war überdimensional groß gestaltet, die Masken desgleichen, die Strawinsky, an sich vom Bühnenbild angetan, als etwas zu ethnographisch empfand, er meinte damit vermutlich zu folkloristisch-phantastisch. Tatsächlich behinderten sie die Bodensicht der Tänzer und damit die rhythmische Koordination, waren also nicht unbedingt zweckmäßig. Aufgefaßt wurden sie freudianisch. Orpheus ähnelte einem Baseball-Spieler (a baseball catcher) und trug eine langwallende Haarmähne über dem Rücken herab. Bei den verschiedenen Treffen zwischen Balanchine und Strawinsky ging es im wesentlichen um Handlungsgefüge und um Zeitdauern, nicht um kompositorische Strukturprobleme, für die sich Balanchine nur am Rande interessierte und für die sich zu interessieren Strawinsky nach seiner Art ihm auch nie zugestanden hätte. Alle Kooperationsberichte führen zuletzt auf die Zeitproblematik zurück. Strawinsky wollte von Balanchine immer nur wissen, wie lange ein Stück dauern soll, damit er seine Komposition darauf einrichten konnte. Er berücksichtigte möglicherweise bestimmte Wünsche, gestattete aber keine Einmischung in seine Arbeit. Balanchine kam um oder nach der Jahreswende 1948 zur letzten Orpheus-Besprechung noch einmal nach Hollywood und erzielte mit Strawinsky Übereinstimmung. Die Los Angeles Times veröffentlichte dazu ein Interview mit Balanchine ebenfalls am 4. Januar 1948 und zitierte den Choreographen mit der Bemerkung, er möge keine Choreographie entwickeln, und sich dazu eine Musik schreiben lassen, sondern habe lieber eine Musik, bei deren Proben er seine Choreographie entwickeln könne. Da Balanchine im Begriff war, Körperstellungen in Extremlagen auszuprobieren und bestimmte Stellungen nur kurzzeitig eingehalten werden können, waren die Zeitvorgaben an den Komponisten wichtig. In dieser Zuordnung bestand die eigentliche Zusammenarbeit zwischen Balanchine und Strawinsky. – Strawinsky selbst legte Wert auf eine überzeitliche Darstellung und auf eine nicht griechische Aufführungsstruktur. Der Bühnenbildort sollte deshalb nicht irgendwo in Griechenland liegen und er sollte überhaupt nicht antik-mythisch wirken und vor allem keine dorische Kulisse bilden. Als Beispiel führte Strawinsky in einer New Yorker Rundfunksendung vom 1. November 1949 an, wenn die Maler der Renaissance Darstellungen des antiken Griechenlands vorführten, dann hätten sie die Landschaften und Kostüme ihrer eigenen Zeit gewählt. Bildhaft soll nur das gemacht werden, was aus dem Orpheus-Mythos an fortzeugenden Gedanken in unsere Zeit hineinragt. Strawinsky selbst hatte keine Kostümvorstellungen. Über das eigentlich Tänzerische an der Orpheus-Choreographie wurde wenig geschrieben, allenfalls über die Handlungsauslegung, die sich ja auch leichter darstellen läßt. – Die größte tänzerische Neuheit war der Pas de deux beim Abstieg von Todesengel und Orpheus in die Unterwelt, weil es ein Pas de deux zweier männlicher Tänzer war, ein choreographischer Einfall, den es seit dem Barock nicht mehr gegeben haben soll. Kirstein berichtete darüber hinaus über die Hintergrundvorstellung der Orpheus-Choreographie. Die Waldkreaturen, die fröhlich springenden Faune, Satyrn und Dryaden wurden der persönlichen Tragödie entgegengesetzt, wie auch die Natur trotz Tod und Elend fortbestehe. Der schwarze Engel bindet Orpheus mit einer schwarzen Kordel unlösbar an sich. Eine große Wolke schwebt herab, und Orpheus wird mit der untrennbar mit seiner Person verbundenen Leier zur Unterwelt geschickt. Wenn Eurydike übergeben wird, fällt eine Seidenwolke. Es ist Eurydike, die Orpheus überredet, sie zu umarmen. Die Leier wird ihm genau in dem Augenblick weggerissen, in dem er sie am meisten braucht, und hundert unsichtbare Hände ziehen Eurydike zurück. In der Abschlußszene ist es ein Lorbeerbaum, der aus dem Grab hervorwächst und der für den Sieg steht. Apoll vergoldet die Leier des Orpheus mit ewigem Licht. Balanchine sah den dunklen Engel (Dark Angel) als Götterboten gleich Hermes-Merkur, der zwischen der Welt und der Unterwelt vermittelt. Er ist der Führer der toten Seelen. Die Frage stellt sich, ob Orpheus im Grunde nicht schon tot ist. Im Mittelalter, so glaubte Balanchine, soll Merkur vom Boten zum Dämon umgedeutet worden sein, und Balanchine griff diese Deutung auf. Für ihn hatte die Verbindung von Orpheus mit dem Todesengel denselben Stellenwert wie die Beziehung von Orpheus zu Eurydike. Für ihn war Orpheus weniger Kämpfer als Poet, der unruhig, unüberlegt und unbesonnen, aber genial handelt. Die Mänaden hat er durch seinen Stolz, nur Eurydike lieben zu wollen, von Sinnen gebracht. Die Teile seines zerfleischten Körpers schwimmen im ‘Strom der Zeit’, haben also auch heute noch Gültigkeit. Alle diese Gedanken brachte er in seine Choreographie ein, die dadurch zum Ritual wurde.

 

Nachfolge-Produktionen

a) Balanchine

1950 London

1952 Paris

1953 Florenz

1953 Mailand

1962 Hamburg; 5. Juni; Dirigent: Leopold Ludwig

1964 Mailand

b) Andere Choreographen

1948 Paris; David Lichine (Ausstattung: Mayo)

1948 Venedig; Aurel von Miloss

1948 Wien

1949 München; Staatsoper; Rudolf Kölling

1954 Wuppertal; Erich Walter

1955 Hannover; Yvonne Georgi

1956 Berlin; Städtische Oper; Erich Walter; Bühnenbild: Heinrich Wendel

1961 Frankfurt; Tatjana Gsowsky

1961 Leningrad; Leningrader Oper (Kremlinplatz); Leningrader Opernballett

1970 Gelsenkirchen; B. Pilato

1970 Halle; H. Haas

1970 Koblenz; W. Winter

1970 Rheydt; U. Schulbin

1970 Stuttgart; John Cranko

1970 Zwickau; G. Buch

e) Verfilmungen

1956 Deutsches Fernsehen; Marcel Luitpart

 

Deutungsgegensätze: Die Handlungsvorstellungen Strawinskys und Balanchines sind wie häufig so auch hier unterschiedlich gewesen. Die beiden Männer trafen sich in der Gemeinsamkeit eines Weges in Richtung Abstraktion. Darüber hinaus waren Strawinskys Vorstellungen immer jenseitsgerichtet, eine Vorgabe, die für Balanchine nicht galt, so daß er in die Gefahr geriet, theatralische Attitüden zu setzen, Götter zu beschwören, an die er nicht nur nicht glaubte, sondern von denen er wußte, daß es sie nicht gab. So baute Balanchine um Apoll eine Bühnenkulisse, während Strawinsky im Orpheus-Symbol nur ein überzeitliches Gleichnis sah, das der Auslegung, aber nicht der Theatralisierung bedurfte. Tschelitschew hat wohl doch etwas Richtiges gesehen, wenn er meinte, es gehe Balanchine nur um gutes Tanztheater. Der geistige Hintergrund Strawinskys war unvergleichlich weiter. Und zum Zeitpunkt der Orpheus-Komposition war er weit davon entfernt, noch an die Unsterblichkeit der Musik im Sinne einer Überwindung des Todes zu glauben, wie einstmals während der Komposition der Nachtigall. Aber es war für ihn ein beinahe eisernes Gesetz, sich nie in Choreographien oder Inszenierungen einzumischen, auch dann nicht, wenn sie ihm nicht gefielen, was er zwar sagte, aber nicht unbedingt mit der Absicht, es zu ändern. Strawinsky ging dann seinen eigenen Weg, wohl wissend, daß es der Nichtmusiker schwerer hat, eine Musik zu verstehen, als ein Nichttänzer, eine Choreographie oder Inszenierung zu begreifen, so daß er Dinge einkomponieren konnte, die dem zuwiderliefen, was der Regisseur eigentlich wollte. Aus diesem Grund widerspricht der Materialbefund, wie er sich aus der Werkanalyse ergibt, häufig dem Darstellungsverfahren, das man auf der Bühne ausprobierte, auch wenn es sich nicht um Regietheater handelt, das sich grundsätzlich nicht um die Vorstellungen von Dichtern oder Komponisten kümmert. Das bezieht sich auf die Richtung der Auslegung wie aufs Detail und führt zu Auslegungsproblemen, auch im Falle des Orpheus. Das zweite Interlude beispielsweise läßt sich als die Szene eines verzweifelten Orpheus deuten, der allein mit seiner Trauer auf der Oberwelt den Schleiervorhang erneut durchbrechen will; man kann es auch als eine Vorhut-Szene zum Bacchantinnenbild auffassen wollen und die Anführerin der Mänaden auf die Bühne bringen, um Orpheus die Maske abzureißen, eine inszenatorische Erfindung Balanchines, die nicht von Strawinsky stammt. Kein Widerspruch dagegen ist das Erklingen der Harfe im Pas de deux von Orpheus und Eurydike bei Ziffer 1163 und 11723 unter der Vorgabe, Orpheus habe die Leier an den Engel verloren und könne sie deshalb nicht spielen. Die Leier spielt auch nicht, sondern erklingt nur. Eurydike steht kurz vor dem Ziel, Orpheus zu bewegen, sich die Maske abzureißen und sie anzusehen. An dieser Ballett-Stelle läßt sich zeigen, daß der Engel nicht Todbringer, sondern Helfer ist. Er sieht, daß sich die beiden Menschen in eine Katastrophe hineinsteigern und will sie warnen. So läßt er, erst kurz, dann, als Eurydike beziehungsweise Orpheus nicht hört, die Leier als Warnsignal etwas länger erklingen. Deutungsproblematisch ist scheinbar allein die Zuordnung von solistischer Flöte und solistischer Klarinette zur Handlung. Es läge allein schon aus der Balanchine-Pantomime, Eurydike in dieser Szene mit einer unsichtbar gespielten Flöte zu bewehren, die Zuordnung Flöte = Eurydike und Klartinette = Orpheus nahe, wenn dies gleichzeitig choreographisch und kompositorisch einen Sinn ergäbe. Unstreitig ist, daß in diesem Abschnitt Eurydike Orpheus in gutem Sinne zu verführen sucht. Im Abschnitt dominiert aber zunächst die Klarinette, nicht die Flöte, der eine Repetitionsmelodik zugeeignet ist, die sich eher als eine gestische Bejahung oder Verneinung deuten läßt. Die Solo-Flöte setzt erst Ziffer 1143 ein und ab hier kommt es zum solistisch konzertierenden Duo zwischen Flöte und Klarinette. Also ist die Szene so zu interpretieren, daß die einsetzende Fröhlichkeit nicht gleich der Beginn der Verführungsszene ist, sondern Eurydikes Verhalten aus der Fröhlichkeit der Heimweggewißheit herrührt, die dann in den Übermut der Verführung mündet. So steht in der Tat ab Ziffer 1143 die Flöte für Eurydike, die Klarinette für Orpheus, ist es Orpheus, der vom Engel einmal ohne, dann mit, aber nicht mit nachhaltigem Erfolg gewarnt wird. Auch die Skizzenblätter geben Rätsel auf. In einem zum Pas d’action [XII] gehörigen Skizzenblatt vom 8. Juli 1947 schrieb Strawinsky neben die beiden mit einem roten Pfeil gekennzeichneten Fortissimo-Akkorde von Takt 1 und 3 das englische Wort für Harfe (Harp). Entweder hat Strawinsky ursprünglich vorgehabt, Harfenklänge einzuführen, auf die er dann verzichtete, weil nach Balanchinscher Choreographievorstellung Orpheus die Leier weggenommen ist, oder er identifizierte die beiden Pizzicato-Akkorde mit Harfenklang. Die nachfolgende rezitativische Melodieführung ist aus den Akkorden durch Permutationen und Erweiterungen abgeleitet.

 

Bemerkungen: Das Ballett orpheus war ein Auftragswerk Lincoln Kirsteins für seine school of american ballet in New York. Am 7. Mai 1946 schickte Kirstein an Strawinsky einen Scheck über 2.500 Dollar, die Hälfte des vereinbarten Honorars, woraus zu schließen ist, daß zu diesem Zeitpunkt die über Balanchine laufenden Vorverhandlungen zu Auftrag und Durchführung abgeschlossen waren. Kirstein unterrichtete Strawinsky über seine Ballettschule, die eine private, finanziell nicht von außen geförderte Einrichtung war und zeigte sich sehr stolz darüber, daß seine school of american ballet mit diesem ersten Kompositionsauftrag in ihrer Geschichte einen gewaltigen Schritt nach vorne getan hätte. Tatsächlich begann mit dem Orpheus–Auftrag der internationale Erfolgsweg der Ballettkompagnie, aus der das new york City Ballet hervorging und deren american ballet schließlich von der Metropolitan Oper übernommen wurde. Wie Strawinsky seinem Verleger Ralph Hawkes gegenüber am 13. Oktober 1947 bestätigte, besaß Kirstein kontraktlich allerdings nur das ausschließliche Uraufführungsrecht. Die Stoffidee stammte, wie Strawinsky in einem Rundfunkinterview vom 1. November 1949 erklärte, von Balanchine, der im Sommer 1946 mit Strawinsky zusammentraf, um die Handlungszüge und die Zeitdauern der einzelnen Sätze festzulegen. Mit der Arbeit konnte Strawinsky erst nach der Fertigstellung des für Paul Sacher zu schreibenden Streicherkonzerts beginnen, also nach dem 8. August. Am 20. Oktober 1946 notierte Strawinsky die ersten Takte von Orpheus, und zwar die Bläser-Akkorde der heutigen Ziffer 2. In der Weihnachtswoche 1946 kam Balanchine neuerlich nach Hollywood, wo man die ersten Skizzen durcharbeitete. Aus dieser Zeit stammt die viel zitierte Zeit-Anekdote, die auf Anatole Chujoy zurück geht. Bis zum 14. März 1947 stellte Strawinsky Lento und Airs de danse fertig, am 5. April begann er mit dem Tanz des Todesengels. Dreizehn Tage später hatte er nicht ganz zwei Drittel des Balletts fertig, wie er Ralph Hawkes mit Brief vom 18. April mitteilte. Einen Tag später heißt es Nadja Boulanger gegenüber, er habe zwei Drittel des Werkes einschließlich der Orchestration beendet. Strawinsky denkt sogar an eine Uraufführung bereits im Herbst Ende November, ist aber gesundheitlich offensichtlich angeschlagen. Aus diesem Grund, so heißt es, und wohl auch, um das Ballett abschließen zu können, unternahm er 1947 keine Europareise. Am 10. Mai 1947 skizzierte er die Ziffern 98 und 112 aus dem Pas d’action und dem Pas de deux. Sollte er chronologisch gearbeitet haben, müßte er in einem Monat den Tanz des Todesengels, das Interludium, die Szene mit den besänftigten Furien und die Airs de danse mit Zwischenspiel komponiert haben. Vermutlich hat er nach seiner Art der Musik-Montage aber zumindest die Einzelstücke im Verschiebeverfahren zusammengesetzt; darauf deutet auch die Gleichzeitigkeit der Entstehung der beiden Ziffern hin, deren Datierung gesichert ist. Mitte des Jahres soll es zu einer weiteren Begegnung zwischen ihm und Balanchine gekommen sein, bei der man die Zeitdauern mit der Stoppuhr festlegte. Am 8. Juli 1947 beendete er das letzte Interludium. Aus den erschlossenen Daten läßt sich ableiten, daß er am Pas de deux und am Zwischenspiel beinahe zwei Monate arbeitete und daß die Arbeit nie nennenswert unterbrochen wurde. Es ist in der Kompositionsgeschichte Strawinskys nicht ungewöhnlich, daß ihn einzelne Teile einer Komposition, gemessen an der gesamten Entstehungszeit, über Gebühr aufhielten. Am 18. Juli 1947 verständigte er Kirstein, er arbeite ununterbrochen am Orpheus und gedächte ihn aller Voraussicht nach Anfang September abzuschließen. Am 15. September befand sich Strawinsky bei den letzten Seiten, und am 26. September 1947 endlich, nach über einjähriger intensiver Arbeit, beendete er die Partitur von Orpheus, was er mit „Glad to tell you“ noch am selben Tag Ralph Hawkes mitteilte. Die Korrekturen von Partitur und Stimmen übernahm Robert Craft. Am 16. Oktober war Kirstein im Besitz der Orchesterpartitur und zeigte sich über das vollendete Werk überglücklich und entschuldigte sich gleichzeitig, die Restsumme von 2.500 Dollar noch nicht bezahlt zu haben, was aber unverzüglich erfolge.

 

Einflüsse: Die zeitgenössische Kritik hat, wie allenthalben bei Strawinsky-Musik üblich geworden, auch in der Orpheus-Musik nach Einflüssen und Reminiszenzen gesucht und ist bei Ziffer 38, vor Ziffer 146 und 148 und in den Schlußszenen taktbezogen fündig geworden. Ihr zufolge soll Ziffer 38 auf Charles Ives zurückgehen, die Arpeggien vor Ziffer 146 und 148 auf Carl Czerny und die Schlußszene auf Monteverdi. Der zum Zeitpunkt der Komposition fünfundsechzigjährige Strawinsky hat von diesen Vorhaltungen gewußt und sie mit einem verächtlich klingenden Unterton zurückgewiesen. Strawinsky hat sich damals viel mit Monteverdi, Gesualdo und deren Umfeld-Zeitgenossen beschäftigt. Die Spuren dieser Studien als Folge der gezielten musikwissenschaftlich bedingten Wiedererweckung alter Musik im Sinne eines technischen Phänomens sind in den nachfolgenden Werken auch bei Strawinsky sichtbar geworden, allerdings nicht in der Form einer punktuellen Zuordnung von Takten. Strawinsky hat zugegeben, daß er den punktierten Rhythmus als Gestaltungsmittel der Musik des 18. Jahrhunderts begriff, er hat gleichzeitig aber auch versichert, sich mit Glucks Orpheus-Musik erst 1952 beschäftigt zu haben. Die Bachnähe des Orpheustanzes ist darüber hinaus schon in vielen anderen langsamen Sätzen seiner neoklassizistischen Zeit sichtbar geworden, um im Orpheus-Ballett mehr als vorübergehende Aufmerksamkeit auszulösen.

 

Erfolg: Zusätzlich zum Uraufführungserfolg für Kirstein persönlich mit seiner nachfolgenden Unterstützung durch Morton Baum, wurde Orpheus eines der Erfolgsballette Strawinskys. Dem entsprechend war die Zahl der Nachspielungen des Balletts beachtlich. Das gilt auch für England, wo sich die Presse 1950 Kirstein und den Amerikanern gegenüber sehr unangenehm aufführte, auch wenn man den Erfolg selbst nicht wegdiskutieren konnte, aber den Amerikanern unbedingt mangelhafte Kultur vorhalten wollte. In seinem Bericht an Strawinsky vom 23. August 1950 über die England-Schlacht (Battle of Britain) sprach Kirstein geradezu von den gröhlenden oxfordgebildeten Idioten (roaring Oxford-trained idiots) an Zeitungen wie New Statesman und Nation, mit denen verglichen die in Fachkreisen wenig geachteten amerikanischen Negationskritiker Virgil Thomson und Olin Downes Waisenknaben seien (Daniels-Come-to-Judgement).

 

Fassungen: Der Verlagsvertrag zwischen Strawinsky und Boosey & Hawkes wurde am 6. November 1950 geschlossen. Die Dirigierpartitur erschien bis spätestens Anfang Juni 1948, der von Leopold Spinner angefertigte Klavierauszug wurde im November freigegeben und bis Ende des Jahres 1948 ausgeliefert. Strawinsky erhielt sein Belegexemplar der Spinner-Ausgabe im Januar 1949. In der Bibliothek des Britischen Museums trafen die Belegexemplare für Dirigier– und Taschenpartitur am 8. Juni, für den Klavierauszug am 31. Dezember 1948 ein. Später drängte Strawinsky wegen notwendiger Korrekturen, die ohnehin zu einem Erratablatt geführt hatten, auf einen Neudruck. Die Herstellung des Erratablattes ist nicht genau zu datieren. Seine Berichtigungen wurden später in die gedruckte Partitur eingearbeitet. Die Nachweise sind schwierig, weil die Verlage Änderungen dieser Art stillschweigend vornehmen, ohne sie anzuzeigen, und nicht gehalten sind, von Nachdrucken Belegexemplare abzugeben. Somit gibt es bis 1971 vier Originalausgaben: die erste von 1948, die zweite mit dem eingelegten Errata-Blatt, die dritte mit den eingedruckten Berichtigungen, die das Errata-Blatt überflüssig machen, und schließlich die letzte, die daran zu erkennen ist, daß man das Titelblatt ausnahmslos anglisierte, den originalen französischen zusammen mit dem englischen Untertitel wegnahm und den Namen Strawinsky in Stravinsky umschrieb. Die Belegexemplare in London H.3992.b.(3.) (Dirigierpartitur) und b.211 (Taschenpartitur) enthalten keine Errata-Seiten. Allerdings hat man die Taschenpartitur noch 1961 in der korrigierten Form, aber in der alten Schreibweise neu aufgelegt, wie ein Exemplar der Preußischen Staatsbibliothek N.Mus.o.2043 belegt, das im Januar 1961 ausgeliefert wurde. Das Orchestermaterial war immer nur leihweise erhältlich. Eine Neuausgabe des Klavierauszuges ist für September 1969 registriert. Ein Jahr nach Strawinskys Tod setzte Moskaus Èçäàòåëüñòâî Ìóçûêà seine urheberrechtlich legitimierte Raubdruckserie mit einem kombinierten Druck von orpheus und agon fort.

 

Irrtümer, Legenden, Kolportagen, Kuriosa, Geschichten

Unterstützung erfuhr das New York City Ballet 1950 bei ihrem Englandgastspiel vor allem durch den Earl of Harewood, dessen Gattin, Lady Marion Harewood, niemand anders als die Tochter des eher schüchternen, weil sehr kurz gewachsenen Strawinsky-Herausgebers Erwin Stein vom Verlag Boosey & Hawkes war. Sie hatte in die königliche Familie eingeheiratet, was Schönberg dazu veranlaßte, von seinem bedeutenden Schüler Stein künftig als vom “Erlkönig” zu sprechen. – Die komplette Bühnenausstattung von Orpheus soll Strawinsky im September 1948 für mehr als die Hälfte der ursprünglichen Kosten an die Universität von Kalifornien verkauft haben. So berichteten jedenfalls 1979 Vera Strawinsky und Robert Craft. Sie muß ihm also gehört und durch den Verkauf für weitere Aufführungen nicht mehr zur Verfügung gestanden haben. – Am 26. März 1958 schrieb Strawinsky an David Adams vom Verlag Boosey & Hawkes und bat, ihm ein Exemplar des Klavierauszuges zu schicken, der seltsamerweise in seiner Bibliothek fehle, und die Schirmersche Partitur von Schönbergs Klavierkonzert und davon einen Klavierauszug, falls es einen solchen gebe. Er bekam das Gewünschte und gleich die Rechnung dazu. Die Schönberg-Noten bezahlte er, aber nicht seine eigenen. Er bezahle grundsätzlich nicht seine Verleger für seine eigenen Kompositionen, wenn er einmal selbst ein Stück benötige. Vermutlich sei das irgendein Neuling im Büro gewesen, der das verschuldet habe. – In seinem 1953 erschienenen Buch The New York City Ballet überliefert Anatole Chujoy eine berühmt gewordene Anekdote, die man als für Strawinsky besonders charakteristisch empfunden hat. “Und wie lange soll der Pas-de-deux Orpheus und Eurydice dauern, George?”, fragte Strawinsky. “Ach”, meinte Balanchine, “ungefähr zweieinhalb Minuten”. “Sag kein ungefähr”, raunzte ihn Strawinsky an. “Es gibt kein ungefähr. Sollen es zwei Minuten, zwei Minuten fünfzehn Sekunden, zwei Minuten dreißig Sekunden oder etwas dazwischen sein? Nenn mir die genaue Zeit, und ich will versuchen, ihr so nahe wie möglich zu kommen.” – Nach der Konzert-Aufführung unter anderem von Orpheus am 2. Oktober 1962 in der Moskauer Tschaikowsky-Halle kam es am nächsten Tag in der kommunistischen Hofzeitung Prawda (Prawda: russisch “Wahrheit”) zu einem Protest im Namen des sozialistischen Realismus gegen die aristokratische Musik, die den russischen Nationalstil korrumpiere. So schreibt es jedenfalls Oliver Merlin in Collection Génies et Réalités, Librairie Hachette 1968, S. 116.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: New York Manhattan Center 22./23. Februar 1949 mit dem RCA-Victor Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Chicago 20. Juli 1964 mit dem chicago Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Moskau 26. September 1962 im Großen Saal des Konservatoriums als Konzertmitschnitt mit dem Staatlichen Sinfonieorchester der UdSSR unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky. – Aus einem Brief Strawinskys an Robert Craft vom 8. Oktober 1948 geht hervor, daß Strawinsky in der Absicht an Richard Gilbert geschrieben hatte, eine Plattenaufnahme von Orpheus durch die Firma RCA Victor mit dem Bostoner Symphonieorchester in die Wege zu leiten, mit dem er das Ballett im Rahmen eines öffentlichen Konzertes aufzuführen hatte. Gilbert war zu diesem Zeitpunkt aber nicht mehr in der Firma und der Nachfolger noch nicht ernannt. Strawinsky, der das nicht wußte und das Ausscheiden Gilberts sehr bedauerte, erhielt von Richard A. Mohr, der dann der Nachfolger wurde, einen Zwischenbescheid. Dann ging es nur noch um Probenzeit, von der Strawinsky möglichst viel haben und Mohr wie verlagsüblich möglichst wenig geben wollte. Der bedrängte Strawinsky stimmte mit Brief an Craft vom 4. Dezember 1948 einer Vierstundengrenze am 22. Februar 1949 für Probe und Aufnahme zu, verlangte aber einen weiteren Tag 23. oder 24. Februar, um für die Musiker und für sich selbst die Arbeit unter etwas menschlicheren Bedingungen verrichten zu können. Der englisch geschriebene Brief ist unklar, weil der Nachsatz mit dem Vordersatz im Widerspruch steht. Aus einem Schreiben Strawinskys vom 14. Dezember 1948 an Robert Craft geht dann aber hervor, daß die geplante Aufnahme für zwei Dreieinhalb-Stunden-Sitzungen für den 22. Februar 1949 vereinbart worden war. Am 22. Januar 1949 drängte Strawinsky Craft brieflich, alles daran zu setzen, um ihm für die Orpheus–Aufnahme Musiker der Ballet Society zu verschaffen. Die Aufnahme fand dann im Manhattan Center den Unterlagen zufolge am 22. und 23. Februar 1949 in New York mit frei arbeitenden (free-lance) Musikern statt.

 

CD-Edition: II-3/616 (Aufnahme 1964)

 

Autograph: Die Partitur lagert in der Berkeley-Universität von Kalifornien (University of California at Berkeley).

 

Copyright: 1948 durch Boosey & Hawkes in New York

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

761 1948 Dp; Boosey & Hawkes London; 59 S.; B. & H. 16285.

            761Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen]

            761[65] [1965] ibd.

762 1948 Tp; Boosey & Hawkes London; 59 S.; B. & H. 16285; Ed.-Nr. 640.

            762Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            76263 1963 ibd.

            762[65] [1965] ibd.

763 1948 KlA (Spinner); Boosey & Hawkes London; 33 S.; B. & H. 16502.

764Err [24 Korrekturen]; B. & H. 16285.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

761 igor strawinsky / orpheus / full score / boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Orpheus / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / Full Score · Partition / Boosey & Hawkes, Ltd. / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cape Town · Paris · Buenos Aires // (Dirigierpartitur fadengeheftet 26,6 x 33 (2° [4°]); 59 [59] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag tomatenrot auf hellgraugrün [Außentitelei, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<* Stand >No. 453<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Orchesterlegende >Instrumentation< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [>approx. 30 minutes<] englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalte zentriert teilkursiv >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto , of the / complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved<] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb englisch-französischem Szenenkomplex rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries.< [#**] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16285<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 59 zentriert >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; ohne Endevermerke) // (19

* editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires angegeben.

** geringer Abstand.

 

 761Straw1

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf dem Außentitel oberhalb und neben dem Werktitel >orpheus< rechts mit >IStr / I dec/°48< signiert und datiert [° Schrägstrich original].

 

761Straw2

 

761[65] igor strawinsky / orpheus / full score / boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Orpheus / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / Full Score · Partition / Boosey & Hawkes, Ltd. / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cape Town · Paris · Buenos Aires // - (Dirigierpartitur [nachgeheftet] 26,5 x 33 (2° [4°]); 59 [59] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag tomatenrot auf hellgraugrün [Außentitelei, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky<* Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Orchesterlegende >Instrumentation< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [>approx. 30 minutes<] englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalte zentriert teilkursiv >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto , of the / complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved<] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Kopftitel mit Szenenbeschreibung >First Scene [#] Premier Tableau / Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurodyce. / He stands motionsless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, ilne bouge pas.< rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite oberhalb und neben Kopftitel gekastet >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries.< [#**] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16285<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 59 zentriert >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; ohne Endevermerke) // [1965]

* Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

** geringer Abstand.

 

762 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / London · New York · Los Angeles · Sydney · Cape Town · Toronto · Paris / NET PRICE / Made in England // Rückendeckeltitel >No. 640 IGOR STRAWINSKY · ORPHEUS< // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 0,3 x13,8 x 18,8 (8° [8°]); 59 [59] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelgrün auf beige [Außentitelei mit Spiegel 9,5 x 3,8 beige auf dunkelgrün, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The Standard Classical and Outstanding Modern Works. / Primera edición española de partituras de bolsillo de las obras / del repertorio clásico y moderno.<* Stand >LB 291/43<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Instrumentenlegende >Instrumentation> italienisch + Spieldauerangabe >approx. 30 minutes< englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt zentriert teilkursiv >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts there of are strictly reserved.<] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [3 Leerseiten]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Szenentitel und Choreographieanweisung >First Scene [#] Premier Tableau / Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurydice. / He stands motionless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, il ne bouge pas.< rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1.Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16285<; Kompositionsschlußdtierung >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1948)

* Angezeigt werden unter der Rubrik >CLASSICAL WORKS< dreispaltig ohne Strawinsky-Nennung Kompositionen von >J. S. BACH< bis >WEBER; unter der Rubik >MODERN WORKS< dreispaltig ohne Titelangaben Namen von Komponisten von >BÉLA BARTOK< bis >R. VAUGHN WILLIAMS<, keine Strawinsky-Nennung. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Los Angeles-Sydney-Toronto-Capetown-Paris angegeben.

 

76263 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / London · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · Sydney · Toronto · New York / NET PRICE / MADE IN ENGLAND // [Rückendeckelbeschriftung:] >No. 640  IGOR STRAWINSKY · ORPHEUS< // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 0,5 x 13,8 x 18,6 (8° [8°]); 59 [59] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelgrün auf beige [Außentitelei mit Spiegel 9,5 x 3,8 beige auf dunkelgrün, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical / and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* Stand >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Entstehungshinweis >This Score was commissioned by Ballet Society for the New York City / Ballet Company. The original choreography was created by George / Balanchine and first performed under the composer’s direction.< + Instrumentenlegende >Instrumentation> italienisch + Spieldauerangabe >approx. 30 minutes< englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt zentriert >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries.< geblockt kursiv >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / A comprehensive library of Miniature Scores containing the best-known classical / works, as well as a representative selection of outstanding modern compositions.<** Stand >No. 520< [#] >1.49<]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Szenentitel und Choreographieanweisung >First Scene [#] Premier Tableau / Orpheus weeps for Eurydice. [#] Orphée pleure Eurydice. / He stands motionless, with his back to the audience. [#] Debout, dos au public, il ne bouge pas.< rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16285<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 59 zentriert >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; Endenummer S. 59 linksbündig >3·63 L & B<; Herstellungshinweis 1.Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig halbrechts >Printed in England< S. 59 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1963)

* Angezeigt werden ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Entstehungsjahre dreispaltig Kompositionen von >Bach, Johann Sebastian< bis >Wagner, Richard<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni<. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist nächst London mit Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York angegeben.

** Angezeigt werden mit Werkangabe unter der Rubrik >classical editions< vierspaltig klassische Ausgaben von >J. S. BACH< bis >WEBER<, unter der Rubrik >MODERN EDITIONS< vierspaltig ohne Werktitelnennung Namen zeitgenössischer Komponisten von >BÉLA BARTÓK< bis >ARNOLD VAN WYK< einschließlich >IGOR STRAWINSKY<. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York angegeben.

 

762[65] HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LTD. / London · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · Sydney · Toronto · New York / NET PRICE / Made in England // (Taschenpartitur [nachgeheftet] 13,8 x 18,9 (8° [8°]); 59 [59] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelgrün auf beige [Außentitelei mit Spiegel 9,5 x 3,8 beige auf dunkelgrün, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following is a selection of the many twentieth-centurie symphonic works issued in study score format. A complete / catalogue of this extensive library of classical and miniature scores is available on request.<* Stand >No. 16a<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Entstehungshinweis >This Score was commissioned by Ballet Society for the New York City / Ballet Company. The original choreography was created by George / Balanchine and first performed under the composer’s direction.< + Instrumentenlegende >Instrumentation> italienisch + Spieldauerangabe >approx. 30 minutes< englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt zentriert teilkursiv >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts there of are strictly reserved.<] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky<** Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Werktitel rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1.Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16285<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 59 zentriert >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; ohne Endevermerk) // [1965]

* Angezeigt werden dreispaltig ohne Editionsnummern, ohne Preisangaben und ohne Niederlassungsfolge Kompositionen, an Strawinsky-Werken >Concerto for Piano and Winds / Mass / Petrouchka / The Rake’s Progress / The Rite of Spring / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphonies of Wind Instruments<. Als Niederlassung ist allein London angegeben.

** Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

 

762Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf der Außentitelei oberhalb Spiegel rechts schwarz mit >ISTR< gezeichnet. Auf der Rückseite notierte er verschiedene Übersetzungen des Titels ‚Feuervogel’. Das Exemplar enthält Korrekturen.

 

762[71] HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 640 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAWINSKY / ORPHEUS / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / London · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · Sydney · Toronto · New York / NET PRICE / Made in England // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 13,8 x 18,9 (8° [8°]); 59 [59] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelgrün auf beige [Außentitelei mit Spiegel 9,5 x 3,8 beige auf dunkelgrün, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following list is but a selection of the many items included in this extensive library of miniature scores / containing both classical works and an ever increasing collection of outstanding modern compositions. A / complete catalogue of Hawkes Pocket Scores is available on request.<* Stand >No. 16< [#] >1.66<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Entstehungshinweis >This Score was commissioned by Ballet Society for the New York City / Ballet Company. The original choreography was created by George / Balanchine and first performed under the composer’s direction.< + Instrumentenlegende >Instrumentation> italienisch + Spieldauerangabe >approx. 30 minutes< englisch + Rechtsschutzvorbehalt zentriert teilkursiv >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / [geblockt] All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction / in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the / complete work or parts there of are strictly reserved.<] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky<** Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Szenenbeschreibung rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< [#] >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<;; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16285<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 59 zentriert >Hollywood / Sept. 23rd 1947<; Endenummer >M.P. 2.71<; Herstellungshinweis 1.Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halbrechts >Printed in England<, S. 59 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >The Markham Press of Kinhgston Ltd., Surbiton, Surrey<) // [1971]

* Angezeigt werden Kompositionen dreispaltig ohne Editionsnummern von >Bach, Johann Sebastian< bis >Tchaikovsky, Peter<, an Strawinskys-Werken >Stravinsky, Igor / Abraham and Isaac / Agon / Apollon musagète / Concerto in D / The flood / Introitus / Oedipus Rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Piano concerto / Pulcinella suite / The rake’s progress / The rite of spring / Le rossignol / A sermon, a narrative and a prayer / Symphonie de psaumes / Symphonies of wind instrunments / Threni / Variations<. Es ist keine Niederlassungsfolge angegeben.

* Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

 

763 igor strawinsky / orpheus / piano reduction / boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Orpheus / Ballet in three scenes / Ballet en trois tableaux / Piano Reduction / by / Leopold Spinner / Boosey & Hawkes, Ltd. [*] / London · New York · Sydney · Toronto · Cape Town · Paris · Buenos Aires // (Klavierauszug zu zwei Händen fadengeheftet 26,6 x 32,8 (2° [4°]); 33 [33] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag braunrot auf graubeige [Außentitelei, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener >Edition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<** >No. 453<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >ORPHEUS / ORPHÉE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Choreographieanweisung rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unteralb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Copyright for all countries< rechtsbündig >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig zentriert >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16502<; Ende-Nummer S. 33 rechtsbündig >11·48·L. & B.<) // (1948)

* Das Darmstädter Exemplar >F / straw 10 / 12707 / 59< sowie das Basler >62 / STRAW / 63< enthalten an dieser Stelle rechtsangesetzt einen zentrierten Stempel >INCREASED PRICE / 10/6d. / BOOSEY & HAWKES LTD.<

** editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires angegeben.

 

764Err STRAWINSKY  “ ORPHEUS ”  FULL SCORE / ERRATA // (1 Seite Taschenpartiturformat (8° [8°]) mit 24 Korrekturen [5 Notenbeispiele]; Pl.-Nr. blattunterseits linksbündig >B. & H. 16285<) // [1948]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM