28

U n t e r s c h a l e

Russische Bauernlieder. Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen –Four Russian Peasant Songs for equal voices – Ïîäáëþäíûÿ [Podbljudnyja] – Chansons Paysannes Russes – Sottocoppa. Quattro cori a voci uguali (Quattro canti paesani russi per coro femminile) a cappella

 

 

Title: There is no original Russian subtitle. The English title ‘Saucers’, which is often encountered in the Strawinsky literature, as well as the French translation ‘Soucoupes’, is not in the original printed edition. The German title Unterschale emphasises in a similar way to the Italian translation Sottocoppa by Roman Vlad that it neither concerns one saucer nor several, but rather the event which happens under the saucer. For this reason, Strawinsky also called his piece Ïîäáëþäíûÿ,made-up word which literally translates as saucer-under-a-saucer. Strawinsky was not happy with the English translation ‘Saucer’ or even worse: ‘Saucers’ for the works. Regarding the English translation of the title, he was of the opinion that a phrase such as ‘Saucer-readings’ (i.e. predictions from a saucer) or ‘Saucer-riddles’ would catch the intended meaning more exactly.

 

Source: The origin of the texts is obviously not localised. They are taken from Afanasjev’s collection of folk tales Íàðîäíûå ðóññêèå ñêàçêè (Russian folk tales) and according to Strawinsky, they can be traced to peasant songs from North Russia in the area of Pskow. They concern the superstitious belief in foretelling the future, for which women would retrieve all types of objects from under an upended saucer at Christmas time while songs were sung, from which the future could be told. The parlour game of fortune telling at Christmas is related in terms of approach to the half-serious German custom of pouring liquid lead into water at the New Year and deriving meanings from the coincidental shapes formed, without, as in Russia, singing songs. Other sources claim that tea-leaves would be laid out, which may itself be similar to the local practice of tea-leaf reading (in other lands: coffee ground reading). None of the four songs have a genuine concern with Christmas, only the first references the Church of Tschigissi near (today: in) Moscow as a religious motif.

 

Summary: The meaning of the text does not avoid combinations of nonsense words, but it remains obscure and requires elucidation, although it is not a narration, rather just rhymes and their phonic associations. – The first of the peasant songs concerns the Church in Tschigissi. Tschigissi is an old suburb of (in) Moscow on the river Jauza. There was a church-dedication festival to consider, or a rich peasant who collected gold with shovels and a great deal of silver in baskets. – The Russian title of the second song is Îâñåíü, meaning ‘Autumn’, and is at the same time the Russian name for the Thunder God who is meant in relation to the autumn storms. Presumably, the CD translations for the three languages uses the original name (‘Ovsen’) for this reason. According to Craft, Strawinsky must have confused the name for the first day of Spring in the pre-Christian Russian calendar with the Russian word for Autumn. The song is a dialogue between a hunt for a black grouse and a call to the God of autumn, i.e. the Thunder God. Once the hunter has discovered the grouse under a bush because the animal is betrayed by its tail hanging out, he captures it and at the same time receives a handful of money. – The third song (Ùóêà = The Pike) concerns a pike which must have been a magical pike and is, seen superficially, a cock-and-bull story. The pike comes from Novgorod, which it reached from Bjeloe osero. From Bjeloe osero, the ‘White Lake’, to Novgorod is several hundred kilometres. The stretch, which goes via Lake Ladoga, is the name for an old waterway. The giant pike has scales which glitter like silver and gold, a back which glitters like pearls, a head adorned with jewels and two eyes of diamonds. – The final song has the Russian title Ïóçèø (Master Portly) what means a big stomach. In Roth’s translation, this becomes ‘Dicksack’, and in the less poetic CD version, ‘Fat belly’. What is meant is a sack of seeds which contains lice and fleas and is emptied on a field of beetroot and, as Roth translates, a whole measure of lice and a half-measure of fleas, while the CD edition speaks of half a sack of lice and a whole sack of fleas. The song has a call of ‘Slava’ at the end of the refrain which Roth meaningfully translates as ‘Salvation’ while the CD translator makes it an ‘O Yes’.

 

Performance practice: All melismatic vowels should be pronounced in the German version with separate vocalisations. At the word “Heiland” (1st song, bar 3) for example, the syllable “Hei” falls on two tied tenuto quavers c2, and the syllable “land” on two tenuto quavers b1-a1. These should not be sung at this point with it continuous vowels “ei” and “a”, but “Hei-ei-la-and”. In bar 16, the adjective “rein” for “reines” silver should be articulated on the notes of different value b1-g1-a1-b1-c2-c2 not as “rei-nes“, but “rei-ei-ei-ei-eines”. — The same or similar problems for translation stand for the prophetic songs of the Saucer cycle as for Pribautki. Strawinsky himself said that he was sceptical of all translations, but the German translation in the first Schott edition of 1930 filled him with such enthusiasm that he demanded that the name of the translator, Hermann Roth, stand on the title page with his own name. It can be seen from the correspondence that the translation took effort to prepare and that Strawinsky was asked for explanations. The translation in the accompanying booklet of the official CD edition is not the old Roth translation. The more recent translation differentiates from the original very markedly at certain points but conveys the feeling of the text literally if not poetically to the reader. The CD edition does not even print the Russian original text in transliteration, so that comparisons are impossible without the original score.

 

Construction: This varied collection on Russian folk-song texts of four unaccompanied female choirs of sopranos and altos, with up to three solo voices, uses different models and demands a different approach for each of them; the songs vary between the choir alone and being joined by the soloists, and between two– and four-part choral writing. –

The first song is a responsorial dialogue between the choral sopranos and a four-part short response, A-B-A1-B-A2-B-A3-B1, for which the range of the voices is very narrow. The soprano part remains in the range of a sixth, g1-e2, mainly based around the third, h1-d2. In the three first phrases, the note e2 is the highest note and appears on only one occasion and in the fourth phrase it does not appear. In the response, which consists of only three quavers and two semiquavers with a final quaver, the soprano part has a figure of a third a1-d2, the second soprano has a figure of a second a1-h1, the first alto has a figure of a fourth d1-g1 and the second alto a figure of a second alternating d1-c1 and d1-c#1 to sing. The soprano melody line, which is dependent on the text, corresponds to the length of the verses: A=5 bars overlapping with the response (bars 16), A1 and A2= 3 bars respectively overlapping with the response (bars 710, 1114), A4=5 bars overlapping with the response (bars 1520). The three final bars (bars 2123) consist of one augmented response. –

The second song is a homophonic chorus song for soprano and alto which proceeds in parallel in close and harsh harmonic friction and is constructed by inverting short rudimentary melodic figures in the style of an intonation, diminuting melismatically in soprano und alto quavers. The soprano range spans the sixth e1-b1, but normally moves in the range of the third g1-b1; the alto range spans the sixth b1-g1 in total but it only seems larger, in reality the division of the 75 actually sung notes, including tied-over notes, prefers a few of them: the lowest note, b, is only sung once, c sharp twice, c1 four times, d sharp 1 and f1 not at all. The most commonly sung notes are f sharp with 23 and e1 with 21 appearances, followed at a distance by g1 with 14 and d1 with 10. In spite of this, a structural build-up over 22 bars can be observed. The first 5 bars (bars 15) are repeated in a shorter version in the next 4 bars (bars 69) and also form the ending, in that bar 6 overlaps with bar 7 as bars 1819, bars 12 overlaps 3 with bars 2021 repeated. The actual final bar, 22, is the call ‘Îâñåíü’ (‘Ovsen’) a continually returning bar of reminiscence which at the same time divides the work in its declamatory form at bars 2, 6, 11, 14, 16, and 19 and concludes at bar 22. bars 1011 is a repetition of the sequence from bar 1, overlapping into bar 3 while bars 1213 and 15 and 17 are derived from bars 45; bar 18 corresponds to bar 13. The work is constructed from the call formula and two declamatory figures which first appear in bar 1 and 4 and are then developed. –

The third song is an original recitation for three solo voices proceeding in parallel with occasional one-bar interjections from the four-part choir. The soprano solo lies within the narrow range of a fifth, g1-d2, because these outer notes, g1 and d2, are only used infrequently, g1 four times and d2 only three times, so that the actual notes of the recitation lie predominantly within the range of a major third. Under the self-standing, flexible recitation of the solo Soprano run two further solo voices in the alto register, entirely in parallel sixths; this is how the tale of the miraculous pike is told by the three soloists. The four-part choir interjects after each verse with an awestruck call of ‘Salvation’ (‘Slava’) with two chords, a dotted crotchet chord of f#1-a1-c#2– e2 and a short tearing away quaver–long chord of f#1-a1-d2-e2. –

The fourth song is a quick refrain in three verses for a female singer and choir, again within a narrow range. The solo calls are short and are intoned, to use the Gregorian term, as a ‘Tuba’ on a d2 and within the range of a fifth, from a fourth below to a tone above. All three intonations evolve out of the text and speech rhythms and span 1619 sung syllables, because the one-syllable original words which are translated by two-syllable words are set to two syllables. The declamations are not structurally identical. All three homophonic choral responses are in any case dependent on the text, are 7 bars in length and structurally identical. The final calls of ‘Slava’ are differently numbered. They come: seven times after the first entry, five times after the second and six times after the third (in the German edition, five calls are also written after the first entry, but two of them, presumably for printing reasons, have repeat marks around them; otherwise it would not have been possible to bring the choral entry onto one page). The later version, with a four-horn accompaniment, has a greatly altered alto part and the choir calls are consistently arranged in groups of five, though they are written out only once in repeat marks and (only in the English edition) bear the German marking ‘fünfmal’.

 

Structure

No 1

Beim Heiland von Tschigissi*

Ó Cïàñà âú ×èãèñàõú

[On Saints’ days in Chigisakh]

[Pendant la fête des Saints à Chigisakh]

            Beim Heiland in Tschigissy* am Jausabach, glanzvoll …

Ó, ó Cïàñà, ó Cïàñà, âú ×èãèñàõú çà ßóçîþ.…

            On Saints’ days in Chigisakh on Yaouzoi, so ’tis said …

            Pendant la fête des Saints à Chigisakh sur Yaouzoi, on dit …

                        (23 bars)

* The varying spellings are original.

 

No 2

Herbst

Îâñåíü

Ovsen

Ovsen

            Herbst, o Herbst! Auf das Birkhuhn ich jag’!

Îâñåíü, îâñåíü, îâñåíü!˜ ß òåòåðþ ãîíþ.

            I’m hunting the grouse, Ovsen!

            Je chasse le coq de bruyère, Ovsen!

                        (22 bars)

 

No 3

Der Hecht

Ùóêà

The Pike

Le Brochet

            Hechtfisch kam daher aus Nowgorod;

Ùóêà øëà èçú Íîâàãîðîäà; … Cëàâà!˜

            Once a pike swam out of Novgorod, … Glory!

            Un jour, un brochet quitta Novgorod, … Gloria!

                        (26 bars)

 

No 4

Freund Dicksack

Ïóçèø

Master Portly

Gros sac ventru

            Einstmals trabte Freund Dicksack auf’s Rübenfeld, …

Óæú, êàêú âûøëî ïóçèùå …

            Master Portly tramped through the big tumip field …

            Gros sac ventru allait à travers le grand champ de navets.

                        Frisch und laut Áîäðî è ãðîìêî (bar 1 up to bar 40)

                                    Solo (3 bars = bar 1 up to bar 3)

                                    Choir (10 bars = bar 4 up to bar 13 with bar 8 repeated = bar 12)

                                    Solo (3 bars = bar 14 up to bar 16)

                                    Choir (9 bars = bar 17 up to bar 25)

                                    Solo (6 bars = bar 26 up to bar 31)

                                    Choir (11 bars = bar 32 up to bar 42)

                        Largamente (bar 41 up to bar 42)

 

Corrections / Errata

Edition 281 (red)

1st Song

  1.) bar 19, Soprano: quavers d2-d2-d2-e2 instead of d2-d2-d2-d2 (red; also 282Straw)

3rd Song

  2.) bar 4, Soprano: quavers a1-c2-a1-a1-f1 instead of a1-b1-a1-a1-g1 (pencil).

  3.) bar 4 + 5, Piano, 2. and 3. voice, bar 4: the last two-note-chord a-g1* instead of a-f1; four dividing

            dots (vertical) have to be added after the 2. quavers two-note-chord; the three last two-note–

            chords of bar 5 have to be read semiquaver a-f1 / semiquaver b-g1 / quaver a-a1** / instead of

            quaver b-g1 / quaver a-f1 / crotchet b-g1.* (pencil)

4th Song

  4). p. 9, bar 8: the quaver ligature of the highest part has to be read b1-ab1 instead of b1-a1 (pencil).

* It cannot be ruled out that Strawinsky made an inaccurate correction and that it should actually read b-g1.

** It cannot be ruled out that Strawinsky made an inaccurate correction and that it should actually read c1-a1.

 

Edition 285

2nd Song

  1.) p. 6, bar 1, Piano discant: 5/8 sequence of notes has to be read g1 / g1 / two-note-chord f#1-a1 /

            g1 / two-note-chord f#1-a1 instead of g1 / a1 / two-note-chord f#1-a1 / g1 / two-note-chord f#1

            a1; see also all comparable places pp. 5, 11, 14, 16, 19, 22.

  2.) p. 6, bar 1, Piano discant: semiquaver two-note-chord f#1-g1 instead of f1-g#1.

 

Style: The songs are studies of vocal sound in Russian which are written in the declamatory manner of the Russian language and are integrally concerned with the sound of the words. The sounds of each syllable are of great importance and the songs are constructed so that they are set inside a limited range of notes and at times used as a form of rhythmic punctuation, though not in order to emphasise the content of the text. Stylistically, the works belong to the group of works which includes Les Noces and, in the fourth piece, the opera The Nightingale.

 

Dedication: no dedication known.

 

Duration: Original version: 3′; Horn arrangement: between 340″ and 406″.

 

Date of origin: a) original version: chronologically independent of one another Morges 1916, Morges 1917, Salvan 1914, 1915; b) Horn arrangement: 1954.

 

First performance: Original version: 1917 in Genf under the conduction of Wassily Kibalschisch; Horn arrangement: 11th October 1954 as part of the Monday Evening Concerts in Los Angeles under the conduction by Robert Craft.

 

Remarks: The actual history of the work is unknown. The person who gave the commission is not known. The dating of the piece can be traced from the dates at the end of the composition in the printed edition. They demonstrate the compositional independence of the songs from each other, in that Strawinsky had been writing one of the ’Saucer’ pieces from 1914 and in each of the years of the war until 1917 as if he had made them a set for himself. The first song of the series was either composed on 22nd October 1916 in Morges as the third song (which is unlikely) or (which is more probable) concluded. The place of composition for the second song was given as Morges in 1917, it is the latest one of the series. The third song appears to have been the earliest of them all, it was written in 1914 in Salvan. The last song, with no place of composition given, was dated from 1915 and is the second in terms of when it was written.

 

Versions: According to White, the contract for the printing of the works in 1919 was settled in Chester in London. They were not published however. Strawinsky was horrified and was very acrimonious towards Strecker. Strawinsky wrote thankfully that, by the end of 1929, the Chester contract had given the additional right to a printing licence for a German edition and with it, the right to sell the option of the first printing. In the Chester matter however, he was anything but demure, writing to Strecker on 27th December 1929 with mischievous irony and wordplay that the works had lain for ten years in the vault of the famous Chester and without Strecker, they would presumably have lain in ‘that dirty fleabox’ for as long again until an English governor, brandishing fleaherb, would bring his choirs to light in the name of a triumphant ten-year celebration. The fact that they were not published by Chester at first after the split caused by the lost Firebird trial can be partly explained by the fact that Strawinsky had severed his business connections with Chester. Strecker expressed his enthusiasm for the songs and communicated successfully with Kling. They were first published by Schott in Mainz simultaneously in two editions with the Chester licence of 1930 without a copyright mark in a Russian-German choral score edition with a German title; only two years later, it was issued with a 1932 Copyright protection in a Russian-English-French edition by Chester, which had already been prepared by the beginning of the year and so must have been printed at the end of 1931 at the latest. The London exemplar bears the date 13th January. 1932. In 1938, the American publishers, Marks, printed a copyright licence from that year which should have been renewed ten years later in 1948 for a new version. This date is in fact questionable. From the exemplar received in London, there are reasons for supposing a printing error for the date which was given as 1948. In any case, the responsible librarian of the London Library who registered the entry of the contributed copy with the date 20th May, 1950, crossing out the 1948 Copyright date and correcting it by hand with 1950. The American edition came out under number 27 in the ‘Arthur Jordan Choral Series’ in the Soprano and Alto version as well as, something which contradicts original sense of the works, a version for Tenor and Bass. In 1954, Strawinsky replaced the piano accompaniment with an arrangement for horn quartet and extended the pieces. In this form, they were first published in 1957 by Schott and then in mid-1958 by Chester in London. The contributed exemplar in London bears the date 9th July, 1958. In a letter of 18th August, 1954, Strawinsky offered a new arrangement to Chester, with whom the rights to the originals still lay. His relationship with this publishing house seems to have normalised itself again to a certain extent after the death of the younger Kling. The head of the publishing house, Gibson, accepted. The first edition may have run to 930 copies; in any case, the publishers had this many in stock in the calculations of 30th June 1959, which spanned the time period from 1st July 1958 onwards. Of these, they sold 81 in the first three years and 337 in the fourth year. –

 

Print runs: In Schott’s plate books, the distinction is made in the case of Unterschale between the score [here: P], the vocal score [here: Sp] and a non-sign [here -]. There were 15 print runs of Unterschale from 1930 onwards with a total number of 9,300 copies produced, the majority of which were in runs of 300 or 1,000 copies. It is possible to differentiate between the editions to a certain extent because some of the print runs are just normal continuations (print runs: 23rd May 1930: 300 [P.]; 23rd May 1930: 300 [Sp]; 9th July 1932: 300 [Sp]; 17th February 1934: 300 [-]; 27th August 1938: 200 [Sp]; 10th January 1950: 400 [Sp]; 1st October 1951: 400 [Sp]; 14th February 1953: 500 [Sp]; 1st June 1954: 600 [-]; 16th May 1955: 1000 [-]; 28th January 1959: 1,000 [Sp]; 21st February 1962: 1,000 [Sp]; 25th August 1964: 1,000 [Sp]; 10th October 1967: 1,000 [Sp]; 17th February 1971: 1,000 [-]. From Strawinsky’s death to the end of the century, there were 3 print runs with an additional 1,802 copies produced (print runs 19/6/1973: 1,000; 23/4/1986: 400; 4/7/1990: 400402). – All pre-War editions can be recognized by the incorrectly printed first name of the translator (incorrectly Herman instead of Hermann, which is correct). The changes between the editions are mostly very small. In the copy 281D, one of the publishers’ free copies from 1938, the uppermost line of the inner title (‘Singpartitur’) has been removed or left out. The copy 281E must be the last pre-War edition, because copies from the War bear the Visa stamp that was required for the French occupied zone in Germany, meaning that they belong to the remaining stock that was not sold until 1945. Significantly, the Russian title was removed from the titles, and the phrase ‘Singpartitur’ was re-inserted.

 

Horn arrangement: The horn arrangement was completed in 1954 and printed in 1958. Many of his adjustments from that time come as a result of the performances at the ‘Monday Evening Concerts’ in Los Angeles, made possible by Craft. Although Strawinsky had always emphasised that his Russian Peasant Songs were text-dependent and untranslatable, the original Russian sung text for the edition was replaced by an English one and neither the original text nor any other language was included in the printing. The name of the translator was not given, an indicator of the fact that Strawinsky did not like the translation. It was however used in the official CD edition. The horns were written in non-transposing parts in C in the choral score, and are reduced, as per usual, onto 2 systems as I./III. and II./IV. Horn. The letters and bar numbers restart for each of the pieces, and do not appear at important structural points, but rather show schematic units of four bars. Apart from this, Strawinsky stipulated metronome markings which are missing from the original choral edition. In spite of the marking ‘with accompaniment of four horns’, this version is more than a reproduction of the song with horn accompaniment. The arrangement has become a new composition in its own right in which the recitative-like stasis of the original changes into a dynamic work of imitation; the former intimacy of the chamber music is adapted into a concert style and the miniature scale of the first version develops in an almost improvisatory manner and is redesigned as a large-scale form, thanks to the additional length. The songs gained a new Prelude, Interlude and Postlude played by the horns, and they are constructed and derived from intervallic material. The instrumental parts only support the sung parts to a certain extent. They gain their own self-standing, expressive existence through canonic, imitative development of the material of the songs. With the exception of the third song, in which he constructs the choral parts out of the solo parts and removes the third solo part and thus the characteristic movement in sixths, the original structures of the choral movements remain untouched; there is however rhythmic and metrical displacement throughout which creates a feeling of clarification and also creates compositional entries into the parlando of the original which is playing in thirds (as in the second song). The third piece ends with three eight-part chords in the choir and quartet in each of which eight notes of the scale are played together in each group/family of instruments. This arrangement heralds a new style. –

The first song has the metronome marking crotchet=104. The 23 bars of the original choral movement (as a result of the repeated sections with their own sections) as well as the one-bar instrumental prelude and ten-bar coda, make 59 bars in total. The choral movement itself is extended from 23 to 24 bars in length. This extension leads to a metrically more convincing resolution than in the original, since in the original, the choral interjections always come in the middle of the bar and run on into the next one. By means of a small displacement of the bar lines, which makes a 5/8 bar at figure A4 into a 3/4 bar, both the first choral interjections gain an extra bar. Strawinsky continues with this adjustment at figure D8, where he adopts the same technique of a 5/8 bar becoming a 3/4 bar. Taking this into consideration, the choral movement gains an extra bar in the horn-quartet version without having been altered at all. On the subject of Strawinsky‘s variable working habits, it is illuminating that he makes this adjustment here yet does not write it out for the subsequent choral interjections, although he employs further metrical displacements. At the section in the original to the end 3/4, 5/8, 3 x 2/4, 3/4, 3 x 2/4 = 41/8, there is the following from E1: 2 x 2/4, 3/8, 3 x 2/4, 3/4, 2 x 2/4 = 37/8. The difference of four quavers, without diminuation and without reduction of the bars, is accomplished by removing the last of the 2/4 bars with combinations of held minims in the original. Instead of this, he repeats from bar 1 onwards and makes a ten-bar instrumental coda out of the original final bar, using a second-time bar with a four-part, but differently arranged, final chord in the horns (D-g1-a1-d2 instead of d1-d2). A single alteration was made to a voice part by Strawinsky, or else it was printed with more care, and it is in the horn version; one must ask the question as to whether it is a compositional alteration or the removal of a printing error in the original, or even a printing error which had passed into the edition. In bar 19 of the original (figure F2 of the edition/revision), there are four quavers on d2. In the revision, these are changed to three quavers on d2 and a quaver on e2. The horns take up the recitation-like melody in the solo part and develop it. They simply act to reinforce the choral interjections. The short instrumental coda becomes its own imitative section in the manner of an invention. –

The second song has a metronome mark of quaver=200 and was raised a major third higher than the original. From the original 22 bars, it becomes 45 bars in the revision. Of these, two bars come from a prelude in the first and third horn, which play a melody line which is self-imitating and rises simply, resembling that of the first movement. In fact, Strawinsky developed all the preludes out of the same melodic material as rising fanfare signals, always for two horns, in different forms. In the second piece as well, the extension of the bars is noticeable but it is real; thus the bar lengths are made smaller. For example, out of the 5/8 bar, two 3/8 bars are produced (Original: bar 1; revision: figure A3-4) and the progression 4/8 + 3/8 becomes 2/8 + 3/8 + 2/8 (original: bars 67; revision: figures C1-3); Strawinsky however repeats the opening section and in doing so, changes the overall form. It does not necessarily become an A-B-A form; since the work is constructed as a sequence of formulae with the calls of ‘Ovsen’ as punctuation and this procedure only gets longer. After the two-bar introduction, the 22 bars of the original follow at first until the end (bars 331 of the revision = figure A3 to figure H3), at which point he enters into the original structure of the melody, some second playing in thirds and thus weakens its recitative-like parlando. In doing this, he has the possibility, since the work closes with the ‘Ovsen’ call, of continuing with the formula after the ‘Ovsen’ call. He therefore returns to bar 3 of the original (bar 6 = figure B2 of the revision) and follows it for 9 bars (Original: bars 311; revised version: bar 3242 = figures H4-K2). He then repeats the ‘Ovsen’ call again (bar 43 = figure K3) and has its final note g sharp (originally e) sound out over two 3/8 bars (originally one 3/8 note in a 5/8 bar, and this note is used as a bridge into the extension), accompanied by the horns. The horns lead their own self-standing filigree, imitative material and have a three– and four-part canonic counterpoint against the two-part choir. –

The third song has a metronome marking of quaver = 208. The 26 bars of the original become 54 bars, including the horn interlude and prelude, and the choral entry alone is expanded to 50 bars. In the extension, Strawinsky returns exclusively to the bar shortening, which is here especially dramatic. For example, the second bar of the song in the original is notated as an 8/8 bar. In the revised version, this bar is made into three bars, two 3/8 bars and one 2/8 bar. All the ‘Slava’ calls are gathered together under one 5/8 bar, but in the revised version, this become two bars, a 3/8 and a 2/8. In fact, Strawinsky stayed extremely close to the original in terms of the overall structure, but he so markedly disrupted the structure of the different sections that he reduced the three original solo parts into two choral parts, soprano and alto, by removing the lower solo alto part. In this way, the movement in sixths, which had been so characteristic of the piece, was removed, and as Strawinsky found it necessary to define the intervallic structures underneath the soprano part in a different way, which then may have had an effect on the upper part at certain points. One must here pose the question again as to whether this is the alteration of a melody or the removal of a printing error. The second quaver value of bar 4 (figure B3) is changed from b1 to c2. This corresponds, shortened by a quaver, to the identical figure of notes in bar 1, in the revised version as well as the original. In the same bar, the fifth quaver, g1, is altered to f1 in the revision, lowered by a second, and this is kept on for all the subsequent comparable bars (bar 8 = figure B3; bar 11 = figure C3; bar 16 = figure E3; bar 19 = figure F4; bar 23 = figure G3). A further alteration in the melody line concerns the reordering of the crotchets before the choral interjections in quavers with subsequent quaver rest (bar 2 = figure A5; bar 5 = figure B7; bar 9 = figure C6; bar 13 = figure D8; bar 17 = figure E6; bar 20 = figure F8). The reason for this correction may be found in the altered performance situation. In the original, the parts are sung by female soloists, which are shortened in the revision, and in whose intonation of which the choir are now engaged; now the choir itself is singing this while it is also needed to sing the choral call. The original effect is therefore technically impossible now, so Strawinsky discarded it completely and, instead of the breath marks, he wrote a quaver rest into the score and employed this technique for an especially effective final call; since he previously separated the two not with a quaver rest but with a breath mark, he indicated that this final call should link and complete itself directly without a pause. For the same reason, the upbeat in bar 25 (3 quavers; figure G5) should have been removed, as Strawinsky did not want to assigne this effect suitable to the chorus which in the first place belongs to the soloist. The final call was already raised up in the original by another chord and by this suitable for the final. All 6 calls of ‘Slava’ in the original are made up of dotted crotchets, f#1-a1-c#2-e2, with a subsequent quaver chord f#1-a1-d2-e2 and a final quaver rest; only the final chord consists of two crotchet chords, f#1-a1-d2-e and e1-g#1-b1-c#2, and a minim final chord without a following rest, d#1-f#1-b1-c2. Strawinsky retained this combination of chords for the transcription and further strengthened it by means of a massive horn chord with a moving, first horn part anticipating the final note. He very solemnly built up the final chord in a new way in that he follows two eight-part crotchet chords with an eight-part final chord to the value of a minim: f#1-d2-a1-e2 + e1-b1-g#1-c#2 + d#1-f#1-b1-c#2 in the choir and f#-d-e-a + c#1-e-g#1-b + d#1-f#1-b-c# in the horn quartet. It is not a twelve-tone chord but rather an eight-note chord for each of the separate ensemble groups, so two sections of eight parts. The horn parts take over the parts replacing the removed low female voice part alongside their accompaniment, which is very much thinned out and not imitative. Strawinsky completely removed the characteristic movement in sixths. Technically it is debatable as to whether the horn quartet should be kept a dynamic level lower than the two chorus parts. The choir intones the call ‘Glory’ fortissimo, the horn quartet only at forte. In practice, the volume of the horns will reach an identical dynamic to that of the chorus. The third song is the only piece of the suite in which the horns each receive one-bar interludes. In terms of material, they are, like all the introductions, derived from the same combination of intervals in the course of the form, in which the first interlude is structurally identical to the second, but not to the third. –

The fourth song has the metronome mark crotchet =108 and contains in its penultimate bar, from which the original largamento marking has been removed, a further metronome marking of three quavers, written as unmarked triplets = crotchet = 72. The 42 bars of the original, including repeats, become 57 bars in the transcription, including 2 bars of instrumental prelude, without any change in the length of the music. The same form is retained, as well as the system of metrical displacement which, in the case of this refrain form, almost has a new meter for each bar. In the first 10 bars of singing up to the call of ‘Salvation’, there is a change of 6 bars in the original. In the revision, there are, without the upbeat, 14 bars of which 12 are altered. In none of the four pieces of this collection did Strawinsky alter the structure of the movement so much as here. The melody line remains all unchanged but one note in the choral soprano part only at this moment, not at the other two previous comparable points (original bar 38, last note: quaver f1; revised version figure 16, penultimate quaver: quaver b1), but the form of the movement for both the other solo parts is at times almost completely differently conceived, without this being a result of the addition of the horn accompaniment. There is also a change in the chorus endings with their calls of ‘Slava’; in the original, there are 7 calls for the first time, 5 for the second time, and 6 for the third and last time, of which the 6th call, in a slower largamento, was extended for the fourth time in comparison with the other calls. In the revised version, the number of calls at one time is standardised at 5, which also holds true for the final call section, only that here the different length of the final call remains unaltered. Although the first edition is an anglicised Chester edition, the first and second choral response of the calls of ‘Slava’, which are only notated once in repeat bars, have the German marking ‘fünfmal’ above them. The horn accompaniment sets the chorus against the instrumentalists moving in up to four parts and does not provide a background support. The same is true for the solo calls which are punctuated by the single horns in the manner of a signal, but are not accompanied and are occasionally hurried in terms of intonation. It is certainly not easy for a soprano to sing a C when the horn is playing a D, or indeed singing two semiquavers, b-a, over a held C in the horn.

 

Historical Recordings: Historical Recordings: Hollywood 28th July 1955 in the version for 4 horns with Marni Nixon and Marilyn Horne sung in English conducted by Igor Strawinsky; Hollywood 20th* August 1965 in the version for 4 horns, Gregg Smith Singers (Chorus director: Gregg Smith) and Horn players from the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Igor Strawinsky, sung in Russian.

* 2nd August according to the booklet in the CD edition.

 

CD-Edition: VIII-2/2225 (Horn arrangement recording 1965).

 

Autograph score: A neat copy of the original version, along with numerous signed and dated sketches, are in the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel; the manuscript of the Horn quartet was in the possession of Robert Craft.

 

Copyright: 1932 by J.& W. Chester London.

 

Editions

a) Overview

281A 1930 ChSc; G-R; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 pp.; 3264032643.

281B 1930 ChSc; G-R; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 pp.; 3264032643.

                        281Straw1 ibd. [with annotations].

                        281Straw2 ibd. [with annotations].

282 1932 ChSc; R-E-F; Chester London; 11 pp.; J. W. C. 9732.

                        282Straw1 ibd. [with annotations].

                        282Straw2 ibd. [with annotations].

283 [1932] ChSc [teilkorrigiert]; d-r; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 pp.; 3264032643.

284 [1938] ChSc [French kontrolliert]; d-r; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 pp.; 3264032643.

285 [1948] ChSc; e-f; Marks New York / Chester London; 15 p.; 1273413.

                        285Straw ibd. [with annotations].

            285[50] [1950] ibd.

286 [1950] ChSc; G-R; Schott Mainz; 11 p.; 3264032643.

                        286Straw ibd. [without annotations].

287 [1956] ChSc-Horns; G; Schott Mainz; 11 p.; 39491.

288 (1958) ChSc-Horns; E; Chester London; 10 p.; J. W. C. 6715.

                        288Straw ibd.

b) Characteristic features

281A STRAWINSKY* / UNTERSCHALE** / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / VIER RUSSISCHE / BAUERNLIEDER / [Vignette] / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE MAINZ // UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur [#***] n. M. 3.– / Singpartitur <bei Mehrbezug> [°] / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz and Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany // (Choir score stapled 16.5 x 25.8 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text German-Russian; 11 [10] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on yellow beige [front cover title with vignette 4 x 3.7 stylised fish, 2 empty pages, empty page with centre centred publisher’s emblem rectangular 2.4 x 3.8 lion with wheel of Mainz in its paws and with writing encircling >B · SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#] PER MARE [#] MAINZ UND LEIPZIG [#] ET TERRAS<] + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Werke für gemischten Chor / a capella< production data >955<****]; title head flush right [exclusively p. 1] >Unterschale / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ< flush left [all song titles] >Vier Russische / Bauernlieder< [with consecutive Arabic numbering]; author specified flush right centred below song title >Beim Heiland von Tschigissi / Ó ÑÏÀÑÀÂÚ ×ÈÃÈÑÀÕÚ < 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< below song title >Herbst< [#] >ÎÂÑÅÍÜ< p. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, below song title >Der Hecht< [#] >ÙÓÊÀ< p. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< below song title >Freund Dicksack*)< [#] >ÏÓÇÈÙÅ< p. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush right without Copyright >Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Tous droits d’exécution réservés<; plate numbers [1. song p. 23:] >32640< [2. song p. 45:] >32641< [3. song p. 68:] >32642< [4. song p. 911:] >32643<; production indication p. 11 flush right as end mark >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1930)

° An illegible, blackened section of the text.

* A much thickened i-dot over the >I<.

** Printed in red.

*** Fill character (dotted line).

**** Y as fancy letter. In French, the library material is advertised without edition numbers, the compositions for sale are advertised with edition numbers behind fill character (dotted line) >Feu d’artifice. Fantaisie pour grand orchestre, op. 4 / Partition d’orchestre <format de poche>° 3464 / Réduction pour Piano à 4 mains (O. Singer)° 962 / <Parties d’orchestre en location> / [Asterisk] / L’oiseau de feu. Ballet / Transcriptions pour Violon et Piano par l’auteur: / Prélude et Ronde des princesses° 2080 / Berceuse° 2081 / [Asterisk] / Pastorale. Chanson sans paroles pour une voix et quatre / instruments à vent / Partition <avec réduction pour Piano>° 3399 / <Parties en location> / [Asterisk] / Unterschale. Russische Bauernlieder. 4 Chöre für gleiche Stimmen. / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy — Herbst — Der Hecht — Freund Dicksack<. After Mainz the places of printing are listed: Leipzig-London-Brüssel-Paris [° fill character (dotted line)].

 

281B STRAWINSKY* / UNTERSCHALE** / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / VIER RUSSISCHE / BAUERNLIEDER / [Vignette] / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE MAINZ // UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur [#***] n. M. 3.– / Sing-Partituren nach Vereinbarung / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz and Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany // (Chorpartitur stapled 17.4 x 27.3 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text German-Russian; 11 [10] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on yellow beige [front cover title with vignette 4 x 3.7 a stylized fish rolled up and orientated to the left, 2 empty pages, empty page with centre centred publisher’s emblem rectangular 2.4 x 3.8 lion with wheel of Mainz in its paws and with writing encircling >B · SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#] PER MARE [#] MAINZ UND LEIPZIG [#] ET TERRAS<] + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >IGOR STRAWINSKY< production data >959<****]; title head flush right [exclusively] 1. page of the score >Unterschale*) / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ< flush left centred 1st page of the score, p. p. 4, 6, 9 >Vier Russische / Bauernlieder< [with consecutive Arabic numbering]; song title German-Russian centre; author specified flush right centred below song title >Beim Heiland von Tschigissi / Ó ÑÏÀÑÀÂÚ ×ÈÃÈÑÀÕÚ < 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< below song title >Herbst< [#] >ÎÂÑÅÍÜ< p. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, below song title >Der Hecht< [#] >ÙÓÊÀ< p. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< below song title >Freund Dicksack*)< [#] >ÏÓÇÈÙÅ< p. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush right centred >Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Tous droits d’exécution réservés<; plate numbers [1st song p. 23:] >32640< [2nd song p. 45:] >32641< [3rd song p. 68:] >32642< [4th song p. 911:] >32643<; production indication p. 11 flush right as end mark >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1930)

* A much thickened i-dot over the >I<.

** Printed in red.

*** Fill character (dotted line).

**** Y as fancy letter. In French, the library material is advertised without edition numbers, the compositions for sale are advertised with edion numbers behind fill character (dotted line) >Feu d’artifice. Fantaisie pour grand orchestre, op. 4 / Partition d’orchestre <format de poche>° 3464 / Réduction pour Piano à 4 mains (O. Singer)° 962 / <Parties d’orchestre en location> / [Asterisk] / L’oiseau de feu. Ballet / Transcriptions pour Violon et Piano par l’auteur: / Prélude et Ronde des princesses° 2080 / Berceuse° 2081 / [Asterisk] / Pastorale. Chanson sans paroles pour une voix et quatre / instruments à vent / Partition <avec réduction pour Piano>° 3399 / <Parties en location> / [Asterisk] / Unterschale. Russische Bauernlieder. 4 Chöre für gleiche Stimmen. / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy — Herbst — Der Hecht — Freund Dicksack<. After Mainz the following places of printing are listed: Leipzig-London-Brüssel-Paris [° fill character (dotted line)].

 

281Straw1

 

On the front cover title, Strawinsky’s copy is above >STRAWINSKY< flush right with >Igor Strawinsky / mai 1930< signed and dated, and contains corrections in red and with pencil [1st song, p. 3, 3rd system, last Takt, (bar 19), Soprano: quaver e2 instead of d2 (red); 4. song, p. 9, 3rd system, bar 3 (bar 8), d1-as1 instead of d1-a1; p. 10, 3rd system, bar 2, (bar 21), last chord: e1-ab1 instead of e1-a1]. The Russian text is without mistakes

 

 

282 STRAWINSKY* / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / FOUR RUSSIAN / PEASANT SONGS / [Vignette] / J. & W. CHESTER LTD. LONDON // FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / FOR / EQUAL VOICES / RUSSIAN, ENGLISH, AND FRENCH TEXTS / MUSIC BY / IGOR STRAWINSKY / Ó Ñïàñà âú ×èãèñàõú [#**] Îâñåíü / 1. On Saints Days in Chigisakh. [#**] 2. Ovsen. / Près de l’Eglise à Chigisak. [#**] Ovsen. / Ùóêà [#**] Ïóçèùå / 3. The Pike. [#**] 4. Master Portly. / Le Brochet. [#**] Monsieur Ventrue. VOCAL SCORE 2/6 Net / PARTS BY ARRANGEMENT / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET / LONDON, W. 1 / For Germany: B. SCHOTT’s SÖHNE, MAINZ and LEIPZIG // (Choir score sewn in green 17 x 26 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text Russian-English-French; 11 [10] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on light-lila*** [front cover title with vignette 4 x 3.7 a stylized fish rolled up and orientated to the left, 3 empty pages] + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >RÉPERTOIRE COLLIGNON. / Arrangements of Old Folk-Songs.<**** without production data]; title head >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS<; author specified 1. page of the score paginated p. 2 below piece title flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< unpaginated [p. 4] >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, unpaginated [p. 6] >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<, unpaginated [p. 9] >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright MCMXXXII,by J. & W. Chester Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved / Tous droits réservés<; plate number >J. W. C. 9732<; without end mark) // (1932)

* A much thickened i-dot over the >I<.

** A vertical hyphen extending beyond the limits of the line itself.

*** It has turned brown in many places. The London copy >F.1771.(20.)< shows the original colour most (the last two cover pages are missing).

**** Arrangements are advertised by Arnold Bax, Eugène Goossens, Herbert Howells and Guy Weitz as well as by Frank Bridge and John Ireland; Strawinsky not mentioned.

 

282Straw1

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate is between name and Russian text flush right with >IStr / février 1932< signed and dated and contains corrections [1st song, p. 3, 3rd system, bar 3 (bar 19), Soprano: last quaver e2 instead of d2 (red); 2nd song, p. 5, 2nd system, Soprano: bar 1 and bar 3 (bars 14 + 16) should be read >Îâ-ñåíü< instead of >Î-ñåíü< (red)].

 

282Straw2

 

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate is without cover pages and contains corrections [1st song, p. 3, 3rd system, last bar (bar 19), Soprano: last quaver e2 instead of d2; 2nd song, p. 5, 2nd system, Soprano: bar 1 and bar 3 (bars 14 + 16) >Îâ-ñåíü< instead of >Î-ñåíü< (red)].

 

283 STRAWINSKY* / UNTERSCHALE** / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / VIER RUSSISCHE / BAUERNLIEDER / [Vignette] / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE MAINZ // UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur … n. M. 3.– / Sing-Partituren nach Vereinbarung / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz and Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany [***] // (Choir score library binding 19.3 x 27.1 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text German-Russian; song title German-Russian; 11 [10] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on yellow beige [front cover title with vignette 4 x 3.7 a stylized fish rolled up and orientated to the left, 2 empty pages, empty page centre centred publisher’s emblem rectangular 2.4 x 3.8 lion with wheel of Mainz in its paws and with writing encircling >B · SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#] PER MARE [#] MAINZ UND LEIPZIG [#] ET TERRAS<] + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >IGOR STRAWINSKY< production data >959<****]; title head [exclusively] p. [2] flush right >Unterschale *) / Ïîäáëþäíûí< p. [2], 4, 6, 7 flush left centred >Vier Russische / Bauernlieder< with centre below numbering with Arabic numerals; author specified below song title flush right centred 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< p. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, p. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< p. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush right without Copyright >Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Tous droits d’exécution réservés<; plate numbers [1. song p. 23:] >32640< [2. song p. 45:] >32641< [3. song p. 68:] >32642< [4. song p. 911:] >32643<; production indication p. 11 flush right as end mark >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // [1934]

* A much thickened i-dot over the >I<.

** Printed in red.

*** The copy of the Städtische Musikbibliothek München >95/121317< (received 1938) contains on the inside front cover page below centre the framed stamp >Vom Verlage überreicht<.

 

284[38] UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur / (Singpartitur) / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz and Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany // (Choir score stapled 19.3 x 27.1 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text German-Russian; song title German-Russian; 11 [10] pages without cover + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head [exclusively] p. [2] flush right [with note = asterisk] >Unterschale *) / Ïîäáëþäíûí< p. [2], 4, 6, 7 flush left centred >Vier Russische / Bauernlieder< with centre consecutive Arabic numbering >No 1< > No 2< > No 3< > No 4<; title head as song title German-Russian; author specified flush right centred below song title >Beim Heiland von Tschigissi / Ó ÑÏÀÑÀÂÚ ×ÈÃÈÑÀÕÚ < 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< below song title >Herbst< [#] >ÎÂÑÅÍÜ< p. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, below [with note = asterisk] song title >*) Der Hecht< [#] >ÙÓÊÀ< p. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< below [with note = asterisk] song title >Freund Dicksack*)< [#] >ÏÓÇÈÙÅ< p. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; without legal reservation; plate numbers [1. song p. 23:] >32640< [2. song p. 45:] >32641< [3. song p. 68:] >32642< [4. song p. 911:] >32643<; printed inspection stamp p. 11 below type area flush left centred with a text box containing >Visé par la Direction de l’Education Publique / Autorisé par la Direction de l’Information / G. M. Z. F. O.<; production indication p. 11 flush right as end mark >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // [1938]

 

285 The / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL SERIES / No. 27 / STRAVINSKY / FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / S S A A or T T B B / a cappella / 25 ¢ / [drawing] / Published jointly by / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London, England / Edward B. Marks Music Corporation, Radio City, New York // (Choir score with piano part only >For / rehearsal< [piano part preceding the 1st piano system on the third page] [library binding] 17.6 x 26.8 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text English-French; 15 [13] pages without cover + 2 pages front matter [title with strips of picture16.2 x 8.2 images of the entire bodies of alternately female and male singers (3 of the former and 2 of the latter) in front of a system of five lines at mid-leg height, page with a text box containing duration data [4’] and difficulty level >difficult< English**] +1 page back matter [page with >EDWARD B. MARKS MUSIC CORPORATION / R.C.A. building [#] New York, N. Y.< advertisement >THE / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL SERIES / A distinguished collection of classical and / contemporary masterpieces<** without production data + >THE / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL PERENNIAS / A selected list of folk songs, children’s choruses / and choral arrangements<*** without production data]; title head >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS<; author specified below piece title >I / On Saints’ Days in Chigisakh / Près de l’Église à Chigisakh< >II / Ovsen* / Ovsen< >III / The Pike / Le Brochet< >IV / Master Portly* / Monsieur Ventru< flush right centred 1. page of the score paginated p. 3 >Igor Strawinsky, 1916 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [p. 6] >Igor Strawinsky, 1917 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [p. 8] >Igor Strawinsky, 1914 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [p. 11] >Igor Strawinsky, 1915 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area centre centred italic >Printed by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation / by arrangement with J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Copyright, 1938, by J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / New version copyright, 1948 [°], by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation, New York<; production indication 1. page of the score centre below legal reservations >Printed in U. S. A.<; plate number >1273413<; without end mark) // (1948)

° In the London copy >F.1801<, the copyright number >1948< has been crossed out by hand and replaced by >1950<.

* The grades of difficulty are specified >easy / medium / difficult / very difficult<. The level of difficulty of the specific publication is shown by a tick printed in bold.

** 30 Compositions are advertised in alphabetical order from >ARCADELT< to >WILBYE< with price informations behind fill character (dotted line), amongst these >27. STRAVINSKY [#] Four Russian Peasant Songs—SSAA or TTBB, a cappella° .25< [°Fill character (dotted line)].

*** Without names of the componists; Strawinsky not mentioned.

 

285Straw

 

Strawinsky must have been both amused and irritated with this edition especially. He entered a squiggle at the statement of the text on p.6 >Piano reduction< in red, linked it with a line without an arrow, which led under his name, and put there a forceful red question mark. He used this to criticize the error in transcription which, as it is there seven times, was either a genuine transcription error or the result of a correction process that was not carried out in a meticulous enough manner [Corrections: 2. song, bar 2, Piano, 2nd double note semiquaver f#-g instead of f-g#, the same mistake repeated still six times: bar 5, 11, 14, 16, 19, 22]. The copy contains no further corrections].

 

285[50] MC 27 [#] FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS [#] STRAVINSKY [#] SSAA OR TTBB [#] 60¢ / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL SERIES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / S S A A or T T B B / a cappella / [strip of picture] / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. / *M / Edward B. [#°] Exclusive distributor of all printed products: / Marks Music [#°] Belwin [°°] Mills / Corporation [#°°°] Publishing Corp. [°°] MELVILLE, N. Y. 11746 // (Choir score (with vocal score for rehearsal only) not sewn 17.6 x 26.8 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text English-French; 15 [13] pages without cover + 2 pages front matter [title page with strips of picture16.2 x 8.2 images of the entire bodies of alternately female and male singers (3 of the former and 2 of the latter) in front of a system of five lines at mid-leg height, page with a text box containing duration data [4′] and difficulty level [>difficult<]*** English centre centred] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >FESTIVAL MUSIC FOR CHORUSES<** without production data]; title head >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS<; author specified 1. page of the score paginated p. 3 below piece titles Roman numbered (without dot) English-French flush right centred >Igor Stravinsky, 1916 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [p. 6] >Igor Strawinsky, 1917 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [p. 8] >Igor Strawinsky, 1914 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [p. 11] >Igor Strawinsky, 1915 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area in connection with production indication centre partly in italics >Printed by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation by / arrangement with J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Copyright, 1938, by J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / New version Copyright, 1950, by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation New York / Copyright renewed [#] All Rights Reserved [#] Printed in U.S.A<; plate number >1273413<; without end mark) // (1950)

* Name of the publishers. The M is three lines high and precedes the following text, which is divided up into two text blocks by a continuous, three-line slash [°]. The final two lines in the right block of text are divided by the sign of a quaver note, the beam and tail of which cross into the second [°°] line and the notehead of which crosses into the third [°°°] line.

*** The grades of difficulty are specified >easy / medium / difficult / very difficult<. The level of difficulty of the specific publication is shown by a tick printed in bold.

** Strawinsky not mentioned.

 

287 IGOR STRAWINSKY / Unterschale / Vier Russische Bauernlieder / für Frauenchor and eine Solostimme / mit Begleitung von vier Hörnern in F / Deutsche Übertragung von Hermann Roth / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy /* Herbst /* Der Hecht /* Freund Dicksack / [Asterisk] / Chorpartitur / Partitur /* 4 Hornstimmen / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE · MAINZ / Printed in Germany // (Choir score with two systems of horn parts stapled 16.9 x 26.4 ([Lex. 8°]); sung text German; 10 [9] pages + title page black on white + 2 pages back matter [empty pages]; notes on performance 1. page of the score below type area below >**)<; explanation of the songs p. 6, 8; duration datan below [2.-4.] respectively next to and below [1. ] song title flush right in a text box [1. song:] >1. Beim Heiland von Tschigissy< unpaginated [p. 2] >74 Sek.< [2. song:] >2. Herbst< p. 4 >39 Sek.< [3. (with note = asterisk) song:] >3. Der Hecht*)< p. 6 >47 Sek.< [4. (with note = asterisk) song:] >4. Freund Dicksack*)< p. 8 >53 Sek.<; title head with note (asterisk) >Unterschale*)< and explanation of the title below type area; author specified [exclusively] 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] between title head and song title flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / Neufassung (1954)<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush left >© by B. Schott’s Söhne / 1957<; plate number in connection with production indication p. 10 as end mark >Stich and Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz 39491<) // (1957)

* Slash original.

 

288 IGOR STRAWINSKY / FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / for / EQUAL VOICES / with accompaniment of / FOUR HORNS / CHORUS PART / (Instrumental parts on hire) / J. & W. CHESTER LTD. / 11 GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET / LONDON, W. 1 / Made in Great Britain // (Choir score with horn parts as Choir score not sewn 17.7 x 28.1 (4° [Lex. 8°]); sung text English; 10 [9] pages + title page black on white + 2 pages back matter [empty page, page with publisher’s advertisements >SELECTED PART-SONGS / in the / CHESTER EDITION<* production data >LB. 629<]; title head >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / for Equal Voices / with Four Horns<; author specified 1. page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] below title head flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / (New version, 1954)<; legal reservation 1. page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright for all countries, 1958. © / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London. W. 1.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number [exclusively on 1. page of the score] >J. W. C. 6715<; production indications 1. page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England< p. 10 flush right as end mark >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1958)

* Compositions are advertised under the heading >MIXED VOICES< from >BANTOCK, G.< to >TRADITIONAL [#] Song of the Haulers on the Volga (S.A.T.B.)<, Strawinsky not mentioned; under the heading >WOMEN’S VOICES< from >Castelnouvo-Tedesco, C°< to >STRAWINSKY, I. [#] Four Russian Peasant Songs° Equal Voices<; under the heading >MALE VOICES< without Strawinsky-Nennung Kompositionen from >BERKELEY, L.< to >TRADITIONAL [#] Song of the Haulers on the Volga<, Strawinsky not mentioned [° original spelling].

 

288Straw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28

U n t e r s c h a l e

Russische Bauernlieder. Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen –Four Russian Peasant Songs for equal voices – Ïîäáëþäíûÿ [Podbljudnyja] – Chansons Paysannes Russes – Sottocoppa. Quattro cori a voci uguali (Quattro canti paesani russi per coro femminile) a cappella

 

 

Titel: Es gibt keine originale russische Untertitelung. Die in der Strawinsky-Literatur häufig anzutreffende englische Übersetzungs-Untertitelung Saucers beziehungsweise französisch Soucoupes (Untertassen) findet sich in keiner originalen Druck-Ausgabe. Die deutsche Titelgebung Unterschale hebt wie die italienische Sottocoppa von Roman Vlad darauf ab, daß es sich eben nicht um eine Untertasse und schon gar nicht um mehrere handelt, sondern um den Vorgang, der sich unterhalb der Untertasse abspielt. Deswegen nannte Strawinsky seine Stücke auch Ïîäáëþäíûÿ, eine Sprachschöpfung, die wörtlich übersetzt Unter-Untertasse heißen müßte. Strawinsky war mit der englischen Bezeichnung Saucer oder noch schlimmer: Saucers für seine Stücke nicht glücklich. Auf die englische Titelübersetzung bezogen meinte er, eine Betitelung wie Saucer-readings (Untertassenlesen = Wahrsagen aus einer Untertasse) oder Saucer-riddles (Untertassenrätsel = Untertassen-Enträtselung) träfe den gemeinten Vorgang besser.

 

Vorlage: Die Herkunft der Texte ist offensichtlich nicht lokalisiert. Sie sind der Afanassjewschen Volksmärchensammlung Íàðîäíûå ðóññêèå ñêàçêè (Russische Volksmärchen) entnommen und nach Strawinsky als Bauernlieder im nördlichen Rußland in der Gegend von Pskow anzusiedeln. Sie sollen sich auf einen abergläubischen Wahrsagebrauch beziehen, bei dem Frauen zur Weihnachtszeit unter Absingen von Liedern allerhand Gegenstände unter einer umgestülpten Untertasse hervorholen und daraus die Zukunft weissagen. Das Gesellschaftsspiel der Weihnachtswahrsagerei ist vom Ansatz her dem halbernsten deutschen Brauch verwandt, auf Neujahr flüssig gemachtes Blei in Wasser auszugießen und aus den Zufallsfiguren Deutungen abzuleiten, allerdings ohne dabei, wie in Rußland, Lieder zu singen. Andere Quellen wollen wissen, es handele sich dabei um Teeblätter, die auseinandergelegt würden, was dem hiesigen Kaffeesatzlesen (in anderen Ländern: Teeblattlesen) wohl nicht unähnlich sein dürfte. Einen echten Weihnachtsbezug hat keines der vier Lieder, lediglich das erste nennt als religiöses Motiv die Kirche von Tschigissi bei (heute: in) Moskau.

 

Inhalt: Der Textsinn stellt zwar nicht auf Unsinnskombinationen ab, bleibt aber dunkel und muß mit Erläuterungen versehen werden, obwohl es nicht um erzählte Handlung geht, sondern um Reime und ihre klanglichen Assoziationen. – Das erste der Bauernlieder bezieht sich auf die Kirche in Tschigissi. Tschigissi ist ein alter Moskauer Vorort, der an dem Flüßchen Jauza liegt. Dort hat man sich ein Kirchweihfest zu denken, ein reiches Bäuerlein, das Gold mit Schaufeln einsammelt und reichlich Silber dazu in Körben. – Der russische Titel des zweiten Liedes heißt Îâñåíü, also Herbst, ist aber gleichzeitig die russische Bezeichnung für den Donnergott, der hier unter Bezug auf die Herbstgewitter gemeint ist. Vermutlich deshalb läßt die CD-Übersetzung für alle drei Sprachen den Originalbegriff (Ovsen) stehen. Nach Craft soll Strawinsky allerdings die Bezeichnung des ersten Frühlingstages im vorchristlichen russischen Kalender mit dem russischen Wort für Herbst verwechselt haben. Das Lied ist ein Wechselspiel zwischen der Jagd auf ein Birkhuhn und der Herbst– sprich: Donnergott-Anrufung. Als der Jäger das Birkhuhn unter einem Strauch entdeckt hat, weil der heraushängende Schwanz dem Tier zum Verräter wird, fängt er es ein und gewinnt gleichzeitig damit eine Handvoll Geld. – Das dritte Lied handelt von einem Hecht, der geradezu ein Wunderhecht gewesen sein muß, und ist äußerlich gesehen schlimmstes Jägerlatein. Der Hecht kommt von Nowgorod her, das er vom Bjeloe osero aus erreichte. Vom Bjeloe osero, dem „Weißen See“, bis nach Nowgorod, sind es mehrere hundert Kilometer. Die Strecke, die über den Ladoga-See führt, bezeichnet eine alte russische Wasserstraße. Der gewaltige Hecht hat Schuppen, die wie Silber und Gold leuchten, einen Rücken, der wie Perlen glänzt, ein edelsteinumkränztes Haupt und zwei Augen aus Diamanten. – Das letzte Lied ist russisch mit Ïóçèùå überschrieben, die Vergrößerungsform von Bauch. In der Rothschen Übersetzung wird daraus Dicksack, in der weniger poetischen der CD-Ausgabe Dickbauch. Gemeint ist ein Samensack, der Läuse und Flöhe enthält und auf einem Rübenfeld geleert wird, und zwar, wie Roth übersetzt, ein volles Maß Läuse und ein halbes Maß Flöhe, während die CD-Ausgabe von einem halben Sack Läusen und einem ganzen Sack Flöhen spricht. Das Lied erhält am Refrain-Ende Slawa-Rufe, die Roth sinnvoll mit Heil-Rufen überträgt, während der CD-Übersetzer daraus ein o ja macht.

 

Aufführungspraxis: Alle melismatisierten Vokale sind bei der deutschsprachigen Ausführung einzeln auszusprechen.Bei dem Wort „Heiland“ Takt 3 des 1. Liedes etwa fällt die Silbe „Hei“ auf zwei übergebundene Tenuto-Achtel c2, und die Silbe „land“ auf zwei Tenuto-Achtel h1-a1. Zu singen ist an dieser Stelle nicht mit ausgehaltenen Vokalen „ei“ und „a“, sondern „Hei-ei-la-and“. In Takt 16 ist das Adjektiv „rein“ für „reines“ Silber auf die Töne unterschiedlicher Wertigkeit h1-g1-a1-h1-c2-c2“ nicht „rei-nes“, sondern „rei-ei-ei-ei-eines“. zu artikulieren. – Für die Wahrsagelieder des Untertassen-Zyklus gilt annähernd das gleiche Übersetzungsproblem wie für die Pribautki. Strawinsky äußerte sich über alle Übersetzungen skeptisch, lediglich die deutsche Übersetzung im Rahmen der ersten Schott-Ausgabe von 1930 versetzte ihn so in Begeisterung, daß er darauf bestand, den Übersetzernamen Hermann Roth mit auf das Titelblatt zu nehmen. Aus dem Briefwechsel geht hervor, daß die Übersetzung Mühe bereitete und daß man Strawinsky um Erläuterungen bat. Die Übertragung im Begleitheft der offiziellen CD-Ausgabe ist nicht die alte Roth-Übersetzung. Die neuere Übersetzung weicht vom Original streckenweise sehr stark ab, vermittelt aber dem Leser das Gefühl, den Text wenigstens sprachlich, wenn auch nicht poetisch zu verstehen. Die CD-Ausgabe druckt den russischen Originaltext nicht einmal mehr in einer Transliteration ab, so daß ohne eine Originalpartitur Vergleiche unmöglich sind.

 

Aufbau: Die unterschiedlich als Chor mit und ohne Solisten zwei– bis vierstimmig komponierte vierteilige Sammlung von vier unbegleiteten Frauenchören aus Sopran und Alt mit bis zu drei Solostimmen nach russischen Volksliedtexten verkörpert unterschiedliche Typen und verlangt für jeden von ihnen eine andere Vortragsweise.

Das 1. Lied ist ein responsorialer Wechselgesang zwischen Chorsopran und einem vierstimmigen kurzen Responsum A-B-A1-B-A2-B-A3-B1, wobei die Ambitus der Stimmen sehr eng begrenzt sind. Der Sopran verbleibt im Rahmen einer Sexte g1 bis e2 unter Bevorzugung der Terztöne h1-d2. In den drei ersten Phrasen kommt der Ton e2 als Spitzenton jeweils nur ein einzigesmal, in der 4. Phrase überhaupt nicht vor. Etwas ähnliches gilt für den Ton g1, der nur zweimal in der 1. Phrase, je einmal in der 2. und 3. Phrase und wieder zweimal in der 4. Phrase angesungen wird. Im Responsum, das nur aus 3 Achtel– und 2 Sechzehnteltönen mit einem abschließenden Achtelton besteht, hat der Sopran lediglich eine Terzfloskel a1-d2, der 2. Sopran eine Sekundfloskel a1-h1, der 1. Alt eine Quartfloskel d1-g1 und der 2. Alt eine Sekundfloskel abwechselnd d1-c1 und d1-cis1 zu singen Die sprachabhängige Sopranmelodielinie ist verslängenbedingt: A = 5 Takte überlappend zum Responsum (Takt 16), A1 und A 2 = jeweils 3 Takte überlappend zum Responsum (Takt 710, 1114), A4 = 5 Takte überlappend zum Responsum (Takt 1520). Die 3 Schlußtakte (Takt 2123) bestehen aus einem augmentierenden Responsum.

Das 2. Lied ist ein homophon parallel geführtes zweistimmiges Chorlied für Sopran und Alt in engen und harten harmonischen Reibungen und besteht aus wiederkehrenden kurzen rudimentären Melodiefloskeln mit Intonationscharakter, die lediglich im Sopran Achtelwerte des Alts in Sechzehntelwerte melismatisch diminuieren. Der Sopranambitus umfaßt die Quinte e1-h1, bewegt sich aber überwiegend im Terzbereich g1-h1; der Altambitus umfaßt die Sexte h-g1 als Tonvorrat, ist aber nur scheinbar größer, weil die Verteilung der einschließlich übergebundenen 75 tatsächlich gesungenen Töne einige wenige bevorzugt: der tiefste Ton h wird nur einmal angesungen, cis1 zweimal, c1 viermal, dis1 und f1 überhaupt nicht. Bevorzugte Singtöne sind fis1 mit 23 und e1 mit 21 Notierungen, es folgen in Abstand g1 mit 14 und d1 mit 10. Ein formtypologischer Aufbau der 22 Takte ist trotzdem zu ermitteln. Die ersten 5 Takte (Takt 15) werden in den folgenden 4 Takten (Takt 69) verkürzt wiederholt und bilden gleichzeitig den Schluß, indem Takt 6 überlappend zu 7 als Takt 1819, Takt 12 überlappend zu 3 als Takt 2021 wiederkehrt. Der eigentliche Schlußtakt 22 bildet als Anrufung von Îâñåíü (Ovsen) einen im deklamatorischen Ablauf immer wiederkehrenden Erkennungstakt, der das Stück bei Takt 2, 6, 11, 14, 16 und 19 gleichzeitig abteilt und bei Takt 22 beschließt. Takt 1011 ist eine Wiederholung von Takt 1 bis überlappend 3, Takt 1213 und die Takte 15 und 17 sind aus Takt 45 abgeleitet, Takt 18 entspricht wiederum Takt 13. Das Stück wird im wesentlichen von 2 in den Takten 1 und 4 erstmals auftretenden und dann abgewandelten Deklamationsformeln und von der Rufformel getragen.

Das 3. Lied ist eine organalartig parallel geführte Rezitation von 3 Solostimmen mit von Zeit zu Zeit eintaktigen vierstimmigen Choreinwürfen. Das Sopransolo bewegt sich nach Ambitus in einem ganz engen Quintrahmen g1-d2, weil dessen Grenztöne g1 und d2 nur wenigemale angesprochen werden, g1 viermal, d2 sogar nur dreimal, so daß die eigentlichen Rezitationstöne überwiegend im Rahmen einer großen Terz abgesungen werden. Unter der selbständig beweglichen Rezitation des Solosoprans begleiten zwei weitere Solostimmen aus dem Altregister ausschließlich in Sextenparallelen. So erzählen die drei Solistinnen die Geschichte vom Wunderhecht. Der vierstimmige Chor punktiert nach jedem Vers mit einem bewundernden Heil-Ruf (Slawa) mit zwei Akkorden, einem fis1-a1-cis2-e2-Akkord im Wert einer punktierten Viertel und einem gewissermaßen wegreißenden Achtelwert-Akkord fis1-a1-d2-e2.

Das 4. Lied ist ein dreistrophiges schnelles Refrainlied für eine Vorsängerin und einen Chor mit wiederum engem Ambitus. Die Solorufe sind kurz, werden, um den gregorianischen Begriff zu benutzen, als Tuba auf d2 intoniert und im Quintraum bis zur Quarte nach unten und einem Ganzton höher umspielt. Alle 3 Intonationen sind sprachabhängig und umfassen je nach Text und je nach Sprache eine Tonreihe von 16 bis 19 Singsilben, weil einsilbige Originalwörter auf einer einzelnen Singsilbe, die zweisilbig übersetzt werden, auch zwei Singsilben erhalten. Die Intonationen sind nicht strukturidentisch. Lediglich die ebenfalls sprachformalisierten drei geschlossenen homophonen Chorantworten von jeweils 7 Takten Umfang sind strukturidentisch. Unterschiedlich sind die abschließenden Slawa-Rufe gezählt: siebenmal nach dem ersten Einsatz, fünfmal nach dem zweiten und sechsmal nach dem dritten (In der deutschen Ausgabe werden auch nach dem ersten Einsatz 5 Rufe ausgeschrieben, aber zwei von ihnen, vermutlich drucktechnisch bedingt, mit Wiederholungszeichen versehen; anders hätte man die Chorantwort nicht auf einer Seite unterbringen können). Die spätere Fassung in Begleitung von 4 Hörnern wird den Altstimmensatz eingreifend verändern und die Chorrufe auf einheitlich 5 festlegen, dabei aber nur einmal ausschreiben, in eine Wiederholungsklammer bringen und (in einer ausschließlich englischen Ausgabe) mit der deutschen Bezeichnung ‚fünfmal‘ versehen.

 

Aufriß

No 1

Beim Heiland von Tschigissi*

Ó Cïàñà âú ×èãèñàõú

[On Saints’ days in Chigisakh]

[Pendant la fête des Saints à Chigisakh]

            Beim Heiland in Tschigissy* am Jausabach, glanzvoll …

Ó, ó Cïàñà, ó Cïàñà, âú ×èãèñàõú çà ßóçîþ.…

            On Saints’ days in Chigisakh on Yaouzoi, so ’tis said …

            Pendant la fête des Saints à Chigisakh sur Yaouzoi, on dit …

                        (23 Takte)

* die unterschiedliche Schreibweise ist original

 

No 2

Herbst

Îâñåíü

Ovsen

Ovsen

            Herbst, o Herbst! Auf das Birkhuhn ich jag’!

Îâñåíü, îâñåíü, îâñåíü!˜ ß òåòåðþ ãîíþ.

            I’m hunting the grouse, Ovsen!

            Je chasse le coq de bruyère, Ovsen!

                        (22 Takte)

 

No 3

Der Hecht

Ùóêà

The Pike

Le Brochet

            Hechtfisch kam daher aus Nowgorod;

Ùóêà øëà èçú Íîâàãîðîäà; … Cëàâà!˜

            Once a pike swam out of Novgorod, … Glory!

            Un jour, un brochet quitta Novgorod, … Gloria!

                        (26 Takte)

 

No 4

Freund Dicksack

Ïóçèø

Master Portly

Gros sac ventru

            Einstmals trabte Freund Dicksack auf’s Rübenfeld, …

Óæú, êàêú âûøëî ïóçèùå …

            Master Portly tramped through the big tumip field …

            Gros sac ventru allait à travers le grand champ de navets.

                        Frisch und laut Áîäðî è ãðîìêî (Takt 1 bis Takt 40)

                                    Solo (3 Takte = Takt 1 bis Takt 3)

                                    Chor (10 Takte = Takt 4 bis Takt 13 unter Wiederholung von Takt 8 = Takt 12)

                                    Solo (3 Takte = Takt 14 bis Takt 16)

                                    Chor (9 Takte = Takt 17 bis Takt 25)

                                    Solo (6 Takte = Takt 26 bis Takt 31)

                                    Chor (11 Takte = Takt 32 bis Takt 42)

                        Largamente (Takt 41 bis Takt 42)

 

 

 

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Ausgabe 281 (rot)

1. Lied

  1.) Takt 19 Sopran: statt falsch Achteltonfolge falsch d2-d2-d2-d2 ist richtig d2-d2-d2-e2 zu lesen (rot

auch 28-2Straw).

3. Lied

  2.) Takt 4 Sopran: statt falsch Achtelfolge a1-h1-a1-a1-g1 ist richtig a1-c2-a1-a1-f1 zu     lesen (Blei)

  3.) Takt 4 + 5 Klavier 2. und 3. Solostimme: der taktletzte Zweitonakkord von Takt 4 ist statt falsch a–

            f1 richtig a-g1* zu lesen; hinter den zweiten Achtel-Zweitonakkord ist eine Trenn-Linie aus 4

Punkten einzusetzen; die drei letzten Zweitonakkorde von Takt 5 sind statt falsch Achtel   h-g1 / Achtel a-f1 / Viertel h-g1 richtig Sechzehntel a-f1 / Sechzehntel h-g1 / Achtel a-a1** /

Viertel h-g1 zu lesen* (Blei)

4. Lied

  4). S. 9, Takt 8, die Achtelligatur der Oberstimme ist statt falsch h1-a1 richtig h1-as1 zu lesen (Blei).

* es ist nicht auszuschließen, daß Strawinsky ungenau korrigiert hat und daß es richtig h-g1 heißen sollte.

** es ist nicht auszuschließen, daß Strawinsky ungenau korrigiert hat und daß es richtig c1-a1 heißen sollte.

 

Ausgabe 285

2. Lied

  1.) S. 6, Takt 1 Klavier Diskant: die Fünfachtelnoten-Folge ist statt falsch g1 / a1 /

            Zweitonakkord fis1-a1 / g1 / Zweitonakkord fis1-a1 richtig g1 / g1 / Zweitonakkord fis1-a1 / g1 /

            Zweitonakkord fis1-a1 zu lesen; dies gilt für alle Vergleichsstellen S. 5, 11, 14, 16, 19, 22.

  2.) S. 6, 2. Lied, Takt 1 Klavier Diskant: der Sechzehntel-Zweitonakkord ist statt falsch f1-gis1 richtig

            fis1-g1 zu lesen.

 

Stilistik: Bei den Liedern handelt es sich um russische Vokalklangstudien, die auf den Deklamationsspielraum der russischen Sprache abgestellt sind und im wesentlichen vom Sprachklang leben. Es geht um Silbenklangwerte an und für sich, die sich in einem begrenzten Tonraum darstellen und streckenweise durch eine Art von Interpunktionsrhythmik gegliedert werden, und nicht um zu deutende Textinhalte. Stilistisch gehören die Stücke zum Umfeld von les noces und, im 4. Stück, der Nachtigall-Oper.

 

Widmung: keine Widmung bekannt.

 

Dauer: Originalfassung: 3′; Hornquartett-Fassung: zwischen 340″ und 406″.

 

Entstehungszeit: a) Originalfassung: zeitlich voneinander unabhängig Morges 1916, Morges 1917, Salvan 1914, 1915; b) Hornquartett-Fassung: 1954.

 

Uraufführung: Originalfassung: 1917 in Genf unter der Leitung von Wassily Kibalschisch; Hornquartett-Fassung: am 11. Oktober 1954 im Rahmen der Monday Evening Concerts in Los Angeles unter der Leitung von Robert Craft.

 

Bemerkungen: Die eigentliche Entstehungsgeschichte ist unbekannt. Ein Auftraggeber ist nicht bekannt. Die Stückdatierungen ergeben sich aus den Kompositionsende-Datierungen der Druckausgaben. Sie zeigen die große Unabhängigkeit der Lieder im Entstehungsumfeld, wobei Strawinsky seit 1914 in jedem Kriegsjahr bis 1917 eines der Untertassen-Stücke schrieb, so als ob er sie für sich selbst verfaßt habe. Das erste Lied der Serie wurde am 22. Oktober 1916 in Morges als drittes Lied entweder komponiert (was unwahrscheinlich ist) oder aber (was wahrscheinlicher ist) abgeschlossen. Für das zweite Lied wurde von Strawinsky das Jahr 1917 mit dem Entstehungsort Morges angegeben. Es ist das späteste aus der Serie. Das dritte Lied scheint das früheste von allen gewesen zu sein. Es entstand 1914 in Salvan. Das letzte Lied ohne mitgeteilten Entstehungsort wurde mit 1915 datiert und ist der Entstehungszeit nach das zweite.

 

Fassungen: Nach White wurde der Vertrag über den Druck der Stücke bereits 1919 mit Chester in London geschlossen. Die Stücke erschienen aber nicht. Strawinsky war empört und äußerte sich Strecker gegenüber sehr bissig. Nachdem dieser Ende 1929 den Chester-Verlag dazu gebracht hatte, ihm das Recht eines Lizenzdruckes für eine deutsche Ausgabe und damit die Erstdruck-Option zu verkaufen, schrieb Strawinsky, außerordentlich dankbar, aber in Sachen Chester alles andere als zimperlich, am 27. Dezember 1929 böse-ironisch und textanspielend an Strecker, die Stücke hätten zehn Jahre im Tresor der glorreichen Firma Chester gelegen und würden ohne Strecker vermutlich noch einmal so lange in „diesem schmutzigen Flohkasten“ dort gelegen haben, bis ein englischer Statthalter, Flohkraut schwingend, seine Chöre im Namen eines triumphierenden Jahrzehnts ans Tageslicht gebracht hätte. Daß sie nach der durch den verlorenen Feuervogel-Prozeß ausgelösten Entzweiung zunächst auch nicht mehr bei Chester erschienen, ist einigermaßen erklärlich, weil Strawinsky die Geschäftsverbindungen zu Chester abbrechen ließ. Strecker zeigte sich von den Liedern begeistert und vermittelte erfolgreich bei Kling. So kamen sie zunächst bei Schott in Mainz zeitgleich in zwei Parallel-Ausgaben mit Chester-Lizenz von 1930 ohne Copyright-Vermerk in einer russisch-deutschen Chorpartitur-Ausgabe mit deutschem Haupttitel heraus und erst zwei Jahre später mit einer auf 1932 copyrightgeschützten russisch-englisch-französischen Ausgabe bei Chester, die bereits am Jahresanfang vorlag, also spätestens Ende 1931 gedruckt worden sein muß. Das Londoner Belegexemplar trägt das Datum 13. Januar 1932. Der amerikanische Marks-Verlag druckte 1938 eine auf dieses Jahr ausgestellte Copyright-Lizenz, die zehn Jahre später 1948 für eine neue Fassung erneuert worden sein soll. Das Datum ist aber in Frage zu stellen. Aus dem in London erhaltenen Belegexemplar lassen sich Gründe für die Annahme eines Datendruckfehlers ableiten, der durch die Zahl 1950 berichtigt werden müßte. Jedenfalls hat der verantwortliche Bibliothekar der Londoner Bibliothek, der den Eingang des Belegexemplars mit 20. Mai 1950 registrierte, die Copyright-Zahl 1948 durchgestrichen und handschriftlich mit 1950 verbessert. Die amerikanische Ausgabe erschien unter der Nr. 27 in der Reihe Arthur Jordan Choral Series als Sopran-Alt– oder, was dem Herkunftssinn der Stücke widerspricht, Tenor-Baß-Ausgabe. Im Jahre 1954 ersetzte Strawinsky die Klavierbegleitung durch eine Hornquartett-Instrumentierung und erweiterte dabei die Stücke. In dieser Form erschienen sie 1957 wieder zuerst bei Schott und Mitte 1958 bei Chester in London. Das Londoner Belegexemplar trägt das Datum 9. Juli 1958. Mit Schreiben vom 18. August 1954 hatte Strawinsky die Instrumentierung Chester angeboten, bei dem die Rechte an den Originalen lagen. Das Verhältnis zu diesem Verlag scheint sich nach dem Ableben des jüngeren Kling wieder einigermaßen normalisiert zu haben. Der Verlagsleiter Gibson nahm an. Die Erstauflage dürfte 930 Exemplare betragen haben, jedenfalls hatte der Verlag bei der Abrechnung zum 30. Juni 1959, die ja den Zeitraum vom 1. Juli 1958 ab umfaßte, so viele im Stock (on hand). Davon setzte er in den ersten drei Jahren 81 und im vierten Jahr 337 Stück ab.

 

Druckaufträge: In den Schottschen Stichbüchern wird bei der Unterschale zwischen Partitur [hier: P], Singpartitur [hier: Sp] und einer Nichtbezeichnung [hier –] unterschieden. Von der Unterschale wurden bei Schott seit 1930 fünfzehn Auflagen mit einer Stückzahl von insgesamt 9.300 Exemplaren hergestellt, die meisten von ihnen bei einer Auflagenhöhe von 300 oder 1000. Die Auflagenunterscheidung ist nur begrenzt möglich, weil es sich streckenweise um normale Weiterdrucke handelt (Druckaufträge 23. Mai 1930: 300 [P]; 23. Mai 1930: 300 [Sp]; 9. Juli 1932: 300 [Sp]; 17. Februar 1934: 300 [–]; 27. August 1938: 200 [Sp]; 10. Januar 1950: 400 [Sp]; 1. Oktober 1951: 400 [Sp]; 14. Februar 1953: 500 [Sp]; 1. Juni 1954: 600 [–]; 16. Mai 1955: 1000 [–]; 28. Januar 1959: 1000 [Sp]; 21. Februar 1962: 1000 [Sp]; 25. August 1964: 1000 [Sp]; 10. Oktober 1967: 1000 [Sp]; 17. Februar 1971: 1000 [–]). Nach Strawinskys Tode kamen bis zum Jahrhundert-Ende 3 Auflagen mit 1.802 Exemplaren hinzu (Druckaufträge 19. 6. 1973: 1000; 23. 4. 1986: 400; 4. 7. 1990: 400402). – Alle Vorkriegsausgaben lassen sich leicht an dem falsch geschriebenen Übersetzervornamen (falsch Herman statt richtig Hermann) erkennen. Die Ausgabenänderungen sind zum Teil ganz geringfügig, in einem der Verlags-Freiexemplare aus dem Jahre 1938 ist lediglich die oberste Zeile der Innentitelei >(Singpartitur)< weggenommen oder ausgelassen worden. Bei dem Exemplar 284 muß es sich um die letzte Vorkriegsausgabe handeln, weil erhaltene Stücke den für die französische Besatzungszone in Deutschland erforderlichen Visa-Stempel tragen, sie also zu den bis 1945 nicht verkauften Restbeständen gehören. Bezeichnenderweise wurde der russische Titel aus den Titeleien entfernt, der Ausdruck >Singpartitur< dagegen wieder eingefügt.

 

Hornquartett-Fassung: Die Horn-Umarbeitung war 1954 abgeschlossen und wurde 1958 gedruckt. Viele seiner damaligen Bearbeitungen hängen wohl mit den durch Craft in den Monday Evenings Concerts von Los Angeles ermöglichten Aufführungen zusammen. Obwohl Strawinsky immer wieder betont hat, seine russischen Bauernlieder seien sprachabhängig und unübersetzbar, wurde der ursprünglich russische Singtext für die Ausgabe durch einen englischen Singtext ersetzt und dem Druck weder das Text-Original noch eine andere Sprache beigegeben. Der Name des Übersetzers wurde nicht genannt, ein Zeichen dafür, daß Strawinsky die Übersetzung nicht gefiel. Sie ging später in die offizielle CD-Edition ein. Die Hörner in der Chorpartitur wurden in C nicht transponierend geschrieben,und sind wie üblich als I./III. und II./IV. Horn auf 2 Systemen zusammengefaßt. Die Stücke tragen jetzt von Stück zu Stück neu gezählte Buchstaben-Partiturbezifferungen, die nicht auf Sinnbezüge abheben, sondern schematisch jeweils Vierereinheiten anzeigen. Strawinsky hat außerdem Metronomangaben vorgeschrieben, die in der ursprünglichen Chorausgabe fehlen. Trotz der Bezeichnung „with accompaniment of four horns“ ist die Ausgabe mehr als ein unangetastet gebliebenes Liederwerk mit Hornbegleitung. Sie ist zu einer charakterlich neuen Komposition geworden, in der die rezitativische Statik des Originals in ein dynamisches Imitationswerk aufgelöst, die kammermusikalische Intimität zum Konzertstil verändert und die Miniaturhaftigkeit einer fast schon improvisierend verlaufenden Vorlage dank der neuen Längungen zur schon großen Form umstilisiert wird. Die Lieder erhalten unterschiedliche Horn-Vor-, Zwischen– und Nachspiele, die aus abgeleitetem Intervallmaterial konstruiert werden. Die Instrumentalstimmen unterstützen die Singstimmen nur bedingt. Sie bestreiten aus dem Material der Lieder ein streckenweise selbständiges ausdrucksstarkes kanonisch imitatorisches Eigenleben. Zwar bleiben die ursprünglichen Chorsatzstrukturen, vom dritten Lied abgesehen, wo er aus Solostimmen Chorstimmen macht und die dritte Solostimme und damit die charakteristischen Sextengänge wegnimmt, im wesentlichen unangetastet, jedoch kommt es allenthalben zu rhythmisch-metrischen Verschiebungen, die eine Art von metrischer Klarstellung bilden, aber auch zu kompositorischen Eingriffen in die Parlando-Bildung des Originals, das (etwa im 2. Stück) ausgeterzt wird. Das dritte Stück schließt mit drei achtstimmigen Akkorden in Chor und Quartett, bei der in jeder Klanggruppe jeweils 8 Töne der Tonleiter zusammengestellt sind. Eine solche Zuordnung kündigt einen neuen Stil an. –

Das 1. Stück ist mit Viertel = 104 metronomisiert. Aus den 23 Takten des originalen Chorsatzes wurden dank des Wiederholungsteiles mit eigenen Klauseln, des eintaktigen instrumentalen Vorspiels und einer zehntaktigen Koda 59 Takte. Der Chorsatz selbst ist von 23 scheinbar auf 24 Takte angewachsen. Diese Längung führt aber zu einer metrisch überzeugenderen Lösung als sie das Original brachte; denn im Original setzen die Choreinwürfe immer taktmittig ein und überlappen in den nächsten Takt. Durch eine kleine Taktstrichverschiebung, die aus einem Fünfachtel-Takt bei Ziffer A4 einen Dreiachtel-Takt macht, erhalten die beiden ersten Choreinwürfe jeweils einen Takt für sich allein. Den Ausgleich baute Strawinsky bei Ziffer D3, wo er dasselbe Verfahren einer Umschrift von Fünfachtel– auf Dreiachtel-Takt anwendet. Damit zählt der Chorsatz in der Hornquartett-Bearbeitung einen Takt mehr, ohne tatsächlich verändert worden zu sein. Für die variative Arbeitsweise Strawinskys ist es aufschlußreich, daß er es dabei beläßt und nicht durchgängig auch für die beiden nachfolgenden Choreinwürfe vorschreibt, obwohl er weitere metrische Verschiebungen anbrachte. Wo es im Original bis zum Ende 3/4, 5/8, 3 x 2/4, 3/4, 3 x 2/4 = 41/8 heißt, lautet die Folge jetzt ab E1: 2 x 2/4, 3/8, 3 x 2/4, 3/4, 2 x 2/4 = 37/8. Die Differenz von 4 Achtelwerten ohne Taktminderung durch Taktverkleinerung kommt durch den Verzicht auf den letzten in einer Halbenotenkombination ausgehaltenen Zweiviertel-Takt des Originals zustande. Statt dessen wiederholt er von Takt 1 an und macht aus dem ursprünglich letzten Takt des Originals eine zehntaktige Instrumental-Koda als Volta II mit einem zwar vierstimmigen, aber anders zusammengesetzten Schlußakkord der Hörner (D-g1-a1-d2 statt d1-d2). Eine einzige Singstimmenänderung hat Strawinsky angebracht, oder vorsichtiger ausgedrückt, findet sich in der Hornbearbeitung, weil man fragen muß, ob es sich um eine kompositorische Änderung oder eine Druckfehlerbereinigung des Originals oder um einen in die Bearbeitung hineingeratenen Druckfehler handelt: In Takt 19 des Originals = Ziffer F2 der Bearbeitung stehen 4 Achtelnoten d2. In der Bearbeitung stehen an dieser Stelle jetzt 3 Achtelnoten d2 und eine Achtelnote e2. Die Hörner nehmen die rezitierende Melodie-Solostimme auf und führen sie durch. Lediglich bei den Choreinwürfen wirken sie verstärkend. Die kleine Instrumentalkoda wird zu einer eigenen Imitationsszene nach Inventionsart. –

Das 2. Stück ist mit Achtel = 200 metronomisiert und wird um eine Durterz höher als das Original genommen. Aus seinen 22 Takten werden in der Bearbeitung 45 Takte. Davon entfallen 2 Takte auf ein Vorspiel von I. und III. Horn, die jeweils eine zueinander imitierend gearbeitete einfache aufsteigende Melodielinie spielen, die der des 1. Stückes ähnelt. Tatsächlich hat Strawinsky alle 4 Vorspiele aus dem gleichen Melodiematerial als aufsteigende Signalfanfaren und immer jeweils für 2 Hörner in anderer Form entwickelt. Auch im 2. Stück ist die Takterweiterung auffällig, aber sie ist real. Zwar werden die Taktzuschnitte kleiner genommen. Aus einem Fünfachteltakt werden beispielsweise zwei Dreiachteltakte (Original: Takt 1; Bearbeitung: Ziffer A3-4), aus einer Folge von 4/8 + 3/8 wird eine Folge von 2/8 + 3/8 + 2/8 (Original: Takt 67; Bearbeitung: Ziffer C1-3); aber Strawinsky wiederholt den Anfangsteil und verändert dadurch die Form. Es kommt dadurch aber nicht unbedingt zu einer A-B-A-Form; denn das Stück ist als eine Formelreihung mit den Ovsenrufen als Interpunktionen gearbeitet und wird auf diese Weise nur länger. Nach dem zweitaktigen Vorspiel folgt er zunächst den 22 Takten des Originals bis zum Schluß (Takt 331 der Bearbeitung = Ziffer A3 bis Ziffer H3), wobei er in die originale Melodiestruktur eingreift, etwa Sekunden austerzt und dadurch ihr rezitativisches parlando abschwächt. Damit hat er aber, weil die Vorlage mit dem Ovsen-Ruf schließt, die Möglichkeit, mit der Formel nach dem Ovsen-Ruf fortzufahren. So kehrt er zu Takt 3 der Vorlage (Takt 6 = Ziffer B2 Bearbeitung) zurück und folgt ihr neuerlich für original 9 Takte (Original: Takt 311; Bearbeitung: Takt 3242 = Ziffer H4 bis K2). Dann wiederholt er den Ovsen-Ruf noch einmal (Takt 43 = Ziffer K3) und läßt dessen letzten Ton gis (original e) über 2 Dreiachteltakte (original 1 Dreiachtelwert in einem Fünfachteltakt, dessen Ton er als Überleitung zur Verlängerung benutzt) hörnerbegleitet ausschwingen. Die Hörner führen ein filigranes imitatorisches Eigenleben und bilden gegenüber dem zweistimmigen Chorsatz eine Art von drei– und vierstimmigen kanonischem Kontrapunkt. –

Das 3. Stück ist mit Achtel = 208 metronomisiert. Aus den 26 Takten der Vorlage sind einschließlich Hornzwischenspiele und Hornvorspiel 54 Takte geworden, der Chorsatz allein ist scheinbar auf 50 Takte angewachsen. Diese Längung geht aber ausschließlich auf die hier besonders einschneidend betriebene Taktverkleinerung zurück. So ist im Original der 2. Liedtakt als Achtachtel-Takt notiert. In der Bearbeitung werden daraus 3 Takte aus 2 Dreiachtel– und 1 Zweiachtel-Wert. Alle Slawa-Rufe sind im Original unter einem Fünfachtel-Takt zusammengefaßt, in der Bearbeitung werden sie zu zwei Takten mit Dreiachtel– und Zweiachtel-Wert auseinandergezogen. Tatsächlich hat sich Strawinsky im Ablauf der Großform ganz streng an die Vorlage gehalten; wohl hat er sehr stark allein schon dadurch in die Binnensatzstruktur eingegriffen, daß er aus den originalen 3 Solostimmen zwei Chorstimmen Sopran-Alt machte und auf die tiefere Solo-Altstimme verzichtete. Dadurch sind die für das Stück ehemals so charakteristischen Sextengänge entfallen und Strawinsky sah sich genötigt, die Intervallstrukturen unterhalb der Sopranstimme neu zu bestimmen, was dann in einigen Fällen auch Auswirkungen auf die Oberstimme gehabt haben mag. Doch stellt sich hier erneut die Frage, was veränderte Melodie oder bereinigter Druckfehler ist. Der zweite Achtelwert von Takt 4 (Ziffer B3) wird von h1 in c2 verändert. Das entspricht, auf Achtel verkürzt, der identischen Tonformel von Takt 1 sowohl in der Bearbeitung wie im Original. Im selben Takt wird der 5. Achtelwert g1 in der Bearbeitung zu f1 (Ziffer B4), eine Sekundrückung nach unten, die für alle nachfolgenden Vergleichstakte beibehalten wird (Takt 8 = Ziffer B3; Takt 11 = Ziffer C3; Takt 16 = Ziffer E3; Takt 19 = Ziffer F4; Takt 23 = Ziffer G3). Eine weitere Veränderung der Melodielinie betrifft die Umwandlung der Viertelnotenwerte vor den Choreinwürfen in Achtelwerte mit nachfolgender Achtelpause (Takt 2 = Ziffer A5; Takt 5 = Ziffer B7; Takt 9 = Ziffer C6; Takt 13 = Ziffer D8; Takt 17 = Ziffer E6; Takt 20 = Ziffer F8). Der Grund für diese Korrektur dürfte in der veränderten Aufführungspraxis zu suchen sein. Im Original werden die in der Bearbeitung verkürzten Stimmen von Solistinnen gesungen, in deren Intonation der Chor einfällt; jetzt singt eine Chorstimme selbst, die auch am Chorruf beteiligt ist. Der Originaleffekt ist dadurch technisch nicht mehr möglich; also verzichtete Strawinsky ganz darauf und schrieb statt eines Atemstriches gleich eine Achtelpause in die Partitur und nutzte das Verfahren für einen besonders wirkungsvollen Schlußruf; denn diesen trennte er gerade nicht mit einer Achtelpause, sondern nur mit dem Atemstrich ab und zeigte damit an, daß dieser Finalruf als einziger pausenlos an– und abschließen soll. Aus demselben Grund dürfte der Vorschlag in Takt 25 (3. Achtelwert; Ziffer G5) entfallen sein, weil Strawinsky diesen Solisteneffekt keiner Chorstimme mehr zuordnen wollte. Der Schlußruf war schon in der Vorlage durch eine andere Akkordik herausgehoben und finalgerecht gemacht worden. Alle 6 Slawa-Rufe des Originals bestehen aus einem punktierten Viertelnotenakkord fis1-a1-cis2-e2 mit einem nachfolgenden Achtelwertakkord fis1-a1-d2-e2 und Abschluß-Achtelpause, nur der Schlußakkord besteht aus zwei Viertelnotenakkorden fis1-a1-d2-e und e1-gis1-h1-cis2 und einem abschließenden Akkord im Wert einer Halbennote ohne nachfolgende Pause dis1-fis1-h1-c2. Diese Akkordkombination hat Strawinsky für die Transkription beibehalten und durch eine massive Hornakkordik mit einer beweglichen, den Schlußton antizipierenden 1. Hornstimme noch verstärkt. Den Schlußakkord baut er nun besonders feierlich abgehoben neu aus, indem er zwei achtstimmigen Viertelnoten-Akkorden einen achtstimmigen Schlußakkord im Wert einer Halbennote folgen läßt: fis1-d2-a1-e2 + e1-h1-gis1-cis2 + dis1-fis1-h1-cis2 im Chor und fis-d-e-a + cis1-e-gis1-h + dis1-fis1-h-cis im Hornquartett. Es ist kein Zwölftonakkord, wohl aber für jeden der beteiligten Ensemble-Gruppen ein Achttonakkord im Rahmen einer doppelten Achtstimmigkeit. Die Hornstimmen übernehmen neben ihrer in diesem Stück sehr ausgedünnten und nicht imitatorischen Begleitung keineswegs den Stimmen-Ersatz der weggenommenen tiefen Frauenstimme. Strawinsky hat die charakteristischen Sextengänge vollständig entfernt. Begleittechnisch ist er bestrebt, das Hornquartett immer eine dynamische Stufe geringer als die beiden Chorstimmen zu halten. Der Chor intoniert die Glory-Rufe im Fortissimo, die Hörner im einfachen Forte. Aufführungspraktisch läuft das dann angesichts des Hornvolumens auf eine identische Dynamik hinaus. Das 3. Lied ist das einzige Stück der Suite, in der die Hörner kurze, nämlich eintaktige Zwischenspiele zugeteilt bekommen. Materialmäßig sind sie wie alle Introduktionen Ableitungen aus derselben Intervallkombination in Laufwerkform, wobei das erste mit dem zweiten, nicht aber mit dem dritten Zwischenspiel strukturidentisch ist. –

Das 4. Stück ist mit Viertel = 108 metronomisiert und enthält im vorletzten Takt, dessen originale Largamento-Bezeichnung entfallen ist, eine weitere, verdeutlichende Metronombezeichnung drei als unbezifferte Triole geschriebene Achtel = Viertel = 72. Aus den original einschließlich Wiederholungstakt 42 Takten werden in der Transkription 57 Takte einschließlich 2 Takte Instrumentalvorspiel, ohne daß sich dabei die Spieldauer geändert hätte. Die Form ist beibehalten, beibehalten auch das System der metrischen Verschiebungen, das im Falle dieses Refrainliedes beinahe jedem Einzeltakt ein neues Metrum vorschreibt. In den ersten 10 Singtakten bis zum Heil-Ruf waren es im Original 6 Taktwechsel. In der Bearbeitung sind daraus ohne Auftakt 14 Takte mit 12 Taktwechseln geworden. In keinem der 4 Stücke dieser Sammlung hat Strawinsky so stark in die Satzstruktur eingegriffen wie hier. Zwar ist die Melodieführung bis auf einen einzigen Ton im Chor-Sopran und auch nur an dieser Stelle, nicht an den beiden vorherigen Vergleichsstellen (Original Takt 38 letzter Taktwert: Achtel-Note f1; Bearbeitung Ziffer I6 vorletzter Achtel-Wert: Achtel-Note b1) unverändert geblieben, aber die Satzform der beiden anderen Solostimmen ist, ohne daß dies von der Hörnerbegleitung aus bedingt wäre, streckenweise beinahe neu gearbeitet worden. Eine Veränderung findet sich auch bei den Chorschlüssen mit ihren Slawa-Rufen Im Original sind es beim erstenmal 7, beim zweitenmal 5, beim dritten und letztenmal 6 Rufe, wobei der 6. Ruf, ohnehin als Largamento verlangsamt, noch um den vierfachen Zählwert gegenüber den anderen Rufen gelängt wird. In der Bearbeitung werden die Rufphasen einheitlich auf 5 festgelegt, was auch für die Schlußrufzone gilt, nur daß hier die Zeitdauern-Sonderstellung des letzten Rufes erhalten bleibt. Obwohl es sich bei der Erstausgabe um eine anglisierte Chester-Ausgabe handelt, überschreibt man in der ersten und zweiten Chorantwort die nur einmal notierten und in Wiederholungsklammern gesetzten Slawa-Rufe mit der deutschen Zahlbezeichnung fünfmal. Die Hörnerbegleitung setzt dem Chorsatz einen eigenen bis zu vierstimmigen bewegten Instrumentalsatz entgegen, bildet also keine stützende Begleitung. Das gilt auch für die Solorufe, die von den einzelnen Hörnern in Signalform nur punktiert, aber nicht begleitet und damit mitunter intonationsmäßig bedrängt werden. Es ist sicherlich für eine Sopranistin nicht einfach, ein c zu singen, wenn das Horn ein d bläst, oder auf ein ausgehaltenes Horn-c zwei Sechzehntel h-a.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: Hollywood 28. Juli 1955 in der Fassung für 4 Hörner mit Marni Nixon und  Marilyn Horn mit englischer Singsprache unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Hollywood 20*. August 1965 in der Fassung für 4 Hörner mit den Gregg Smith Singers (Chorleiter: Gregg Smith) und Hornisten des columbia symphony orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky mit russischer Singsprache.

* 2. August nach Angabe im Begleitheft der CD-Ausgabe.

 

CD-Edition: VIII-2/2225 (Fassung 1954 für 4 Hörner in der Aufnahme 1965).

 

Autograph: Eine Reinschrift der Originalfassung befindet sich zusammen mit zahlreichen signierten und datierten Skizzen in der Paul Sacher Stiftung zu Basel; das Hornquartett-Manuskript befand sich im Besitz Robert Crafts.

 

Copyright: 1932 durch J.& W. Chester in London.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

281A 1930 Chp; d-r; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 S.; 3264032643.

281B 1930 Chp; d-r; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 S.; 3264032643.

                        281Straw1 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

                        281Straw2 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

282 1932 Chp; r-e-f; Chester London; 11 S.; J. W. C. 9732.

                        282Straw1 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

                        282Straw2 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

283 [1932] Chp [teilkorrigiert]; d-r; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 S.; 3264032643.

            283[34] [1934] ibd.

284 [1938] Chp [französisch kontrolliert]; d-r; Schott Mainz-Leipzig; 11 S.; 3264032643.

285 [1948] Chp; e-f; Marks New York / Chester London; 15 S. 8°; 1273413.

                        285Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            285[50] [1950] ibd.

286 [1950] Chp; d-r; Schott Mainz; 11 S.; 3264032643.

                        286Straw ibd. [ohne Eintragungen].

287 [1956] Chp-Hörner; d; Schott Mainz; 11 S.; 39491.

288 (1958) Chp-Hörner; e; Chester London; 10 S.; J. W. C. 6715.

                        288Straw ibd.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

281A STRAWINSKY* / UNTERSCHALE** / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / VIER RUSSISCHE / BAUERNLIEDER / [Vignette] / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE MAINZ // UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur [#***] n. M. 3.– / Singpartitur <bei Mehrbezug> [°] / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz und Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany // (Chorpartitur klammergeheftet 16,5 x 25,8 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext deutsch-russisch; 11 [10] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag steifes Papier schwarz auf gelbbeige [Außentitelei mit Vignette 4 x 3,7 stilisierter Fisch, 2 Leerseiten, Leerseite mit eckiger Schott-Vignette 2,4 x 3,8 mittenzentriert schwarz-weiß Löwe mit Mainzer Rad und eckig umlaufender Schrift [links] >B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE< [oben] >PER MARE< [rechts]>MAINZ UND LEIPZIG< [unten] >ET TERRAS<] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Werke für gemischten Chor / a capella< Stand >955<****]; Kopftitel rechtsbündig [nur S. 1] >Unterschale / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ< linksbündig [alle Liedtitel] >Vier russische / Bauernlieder< [mit nachfolgender arabischer Numerierung]; Autorenangabe rechtsbündig zentriert unterhalb Liedtitel >Beim Heiland von Tschigissi / Ó ÑÏÀÑÀÂÚ ×ÈÃÈÑÀÕÚ< 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< unterhalb Liedtitel >Herbst< [#] >ÎÂÑÅÍÜ< S. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, unterhalb Liedtitel >Der Hecht< [#] >ÙÓÊÀ< S. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< unterhalb Liedtitel >Freund Dicksack*)< [#] >ÏÓÇÈÙÅ< S. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig ohne Copyright >Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Tous droits d’exécution réservés<; Platten-Nummern [1. Lied S. 23:] >32640< [2. Lied S. 45:] >32641< [3. Lied S. 68:] >32642< [4. Lied S. 911:] >32643<; Herstellungshinweis S. 11 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1930)

° unlesbar geschwärztes Textstück.

* stark verdickter i-Punkt über >I>

** Rotdruck

*** Distanzpunkte

**** angezeigt werden das Leihmaterial von >Feu d’artifice< ohne Editionsnummer, mit Editionsnummern die zugehörige käufliche Taschenpatitur (3464) und der Klavierauszug (Singer; 962); die käuflichen Violintranskriptionen aus >L’oiseau de feu< (>Prélude et Ronde des princesses< 2080 und >Berceuse< 2081); die käufliche Partitur für Stimme und vier Instrumente (3399) und (ohne Editionsnummer) das Leihmaterial von >Pastorale<; sowie ohne Editionsnummer die russischen Bauernlieder >Unterschale< [Niederlassungsfolge Leipzig-London-Brüssel-Paris].

 

281B STRAWINSKY* / UNTERSCHALE** / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / VIER RUSSISCHE / BAUERNLIEDER / [Vignette] / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE MAINZ // UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur [#***] n. M. 3.– / Sing-Partituren nach Vereinbarung / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz und Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany // (Chorpartitur [nachgeheftet] 19,3 x 27,3 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext deutsch-russisch; 11 [10] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier schwarz auf gelbbeige [Außentitelei mit Vignette 4 x 3,7 nach links orientierter stilisierter zusammengerollter Fisch, 2 Leerseiten, Leerseite mit rechteckiger Schott-Vignette 2,4 x 3,8 mittenzentriert schwarz-weiß Löwe mit Mainzer Rad in den Pranken und eckig ganz umlaufender Schrift [links] >B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE< [oben] >PER MARE< [rechts]>MAINZ UND LEIPZIG< [unten] >ET TERRAS<] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >IGOR STRAWINSKY< Stand >959<****]; Kopftitel rechtsbündig [nur] 1. Notentextseite >Unterschale*) / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ< linksbündig zentriert 1. Notentextseite, S. 4, 6, 9 >Vier russische / Bauernlieder< [mit nachfolgender arabischer Numerierung]; Liedtitel deutsch-russsisch mittig; Autorenangabe rechtsbündig zentriert unterhalb Liedtitel >Beim Heiland von Tschigissi / Ó ÑÏÀÑÀÂÚ ×ÈÃÈÑÀÕÚ< 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< unterhalb Liedtitel >Herbst< [#] >ÎÂÑÅÍÜ< S. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, unterhalb Liedtitel >Der Hecht< [#] >ÙÓÊÀ< S. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< unterhalb Liedtitel >Freund Dicksack*)< [#] >ÏÓÇÈÙÅ< S. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig zentriert >Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Tous droits d’exécution réservés<; Platten-Nummern [1. Lied S. 23:] >32640< [2. Lied S. 45:] >32641< [3. Lied S. 68:] >32642< [4. Lied S. 911:] >32643<; Herstellungshinweis S. 11 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1930)

* stark verdickter i-Punkt über >I>

** Rotdruck

*** Distanzpunkte

**** Y als Zierbuchstabe; angezeigt werden Leihmaterialien ohne, Kaufmaterialien mit Angabe der Editionsnummern nach Distanzpunkten französisch >Feu d’artifice. Fantaisie pour grand orchestre, op. 4 / Partition d’orchestre <format de poche>° 3464 / Réduction pour Piano à 4 mains (O. Singer)° 962 / <Parties d’orchestre en location> / [Asterisk] / L’oiseau de feu. Ballet / Transcriptions pour Violon et Piano par l’auteur: / Prélude et Ronde des princesses° 2080 / Berceuse° 2081 / [Asterisk] / Pastorale. Chanson sans paroles pour une voix et quatre / instruments à vent / Partition <avec réduction pour Piano>° 3399 / <Parties en location> / [Asterisk] / Unterschale. Russische Bauernlieder. 4 Chöre für gleiche Stimmen. / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy — Herbst — Der Hecht — Freund Dicksack<. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist nächst Mainz mit Leipzig-London-Brüssel-Paris angegeben [° Distanzpunkte].

 

281Straw1

 

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf der Außentitelei oberhalb >STRAWINSKY< rechtsbündig mit >Igor Strawinsky / mai 1930< signiert und datiert. Es enthält Rot– und Bleistift-Korrekturen [1. Lied, S. 3, 3. System, letzter Takt, (Takt 19), Sopran: richtig Achtel e2 statt d2 (rot); 4. Lied, S. 9, 3. System, Takt 3 (Takt 8), richtig d1-as1 statt d1-a1; S. 10, 3. System, Takt 2, (Takt 21), letzter Akkord: richtig e1-as1 statt e1-a1]. Der russische Text ist ohne Fehler.

 

281Straw2

 

282 STRAWINSKY* / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / FOUR RUSSIAN / PEASANT SONGS / [Vignette] / J. & W. CHESTER LTD. LONDON // FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / FOR / EQUAL VOICES / RUSSIAN, ENGLISH, AND FRENCH TEXTS / MUSIC BY / IGOR STRAWINSKY / Ó Ñïàñà âú ×èãèñàõú [#**] Îâñåíü / 1. On Saints Days in Chigisakh. [#**] 2. Ovsen. / Près de l’Eglise à Chigisak. [#**] Ovsen. / Ùóêà [#**] Ïóçèùå / 3. The Pike. [#**] 4. Master Portly. / Le Brochet. [#**] Monsieur Ventrue. VOCAL SCORE 2/6 Net / PARTS BY ARRANGEMENT / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET / LONDON, W. 1 / For Germany: B. SCHOTT’s SÖHNE, MAINZ and LEIPZIG // (Chorpartitur grünfadengeheftet 17 x 26 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext russisch-englisch-französisch; 11 [10] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier schwarz auf hell-lila*** [Außentitelei mit Vignette 4 x 3,7 stilisierter Fisch, 3 Leerseiten] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >RÉPERTOIRE COLLIGNON. / Arrangements of Old Folk-Songs.<**** ohne Stand]; Kopftitel >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Stücktitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< unpaginiert [S. 4] >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, unpaginiert [S. 6] >Igor Strawinsky / 1914<, unpaginiert [S. 9] >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright MCMXXXII,by J. & W. Chester Ltd.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved / Tous droits réservés<; Platten-Nummer >J. W. C. 9732<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1932)

* mit verdicktem i-Punkt.

** zeilenüberschreitender senkrechter Trennstrich.

*** vielfach eingebräunt. Das Londoner Exemplar >F.1771.(20.)<, dem die beiden letzten Umschlagblätter fehlen, zeigt die Originalfarbe noch am deutlichsten.

**** Angezeigt werden Arrangements von Arnold Bax, Eugène Goossens, Herbert Howells und Guy Weitz sowie von Frank Bridge und John Ireland; keine Strawinsky-Nennung.

 

282Straw1

 

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist zwischen Namen und russischem Text rechtsbündig mit >IStr / février 1932< gezeichnet und datiert und enthält Korrekturen [1. Lied, S. 3, 3. System, Takt 3 (Takt 19), Sopran: letzte Achtelnote richtig e2 statt d2 (rot); 2. Lied, S. 5, 2. System, Sopran: Takt 1 und Takt 3 (Takte 14 + 16) ist richtig Îâ-ñåíü statt Î-ñåíü zu lesen (rot)].

 

282Straw2

 

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist ohne Umschlag und enthält Korrekturen [1. Lied, S. 3, 3. System, letzter Takt (Takt 19), Sopran: letzte Achtelnote richtig e2 statt falsch d2; 2. Lied, S. 5, 2. System, Sopran: Takt 1 und Takt 3 (Takte 14 + 16) ist richtig Îâ-ñåíü statt Î-ñåíü zu lesen (rot)].

 

283 STRAWINSKY* / UNTERSCHALE** / Ïîäáëþäíûÿ / VIER RUSSISCHE / BAUERNLIEDER / [Vignette] / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE MAINZ // UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur … n. M. 3.– / Sing-Partituren nach Vereinbarung / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz und Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany [***] // (Chorpartitur [nachgeheftet] 19,3 x 27,1 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext deutsch-russisch; Liedtitel deutsch-russisch; 11 [10] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag steifes Papier schwarz auf gelbbeige [Außentitelei mit Vignette 4 x 3,7 stilisierter Fisch, 2 Leerseiten, Leerseite mit eckiger Schott-Vignette 2,4 x 3,7 mittenzentriert schwarz-weiß Bär mit Mainzer Rad und eckig umlaufender Schrift [links] >B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE< [oben] >PER MARE< [rechts]>MAINZ UND LEIPZIG< [unten] >ET TERRAS<] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >IGOR STRAWINSKY< Stand >959<****]; Kopftitel [nur] S. [2] rechtsbündig >Unterschale *) / Ïîäáëþäíûí< S. [2], 4, 6, 7 linksbündig zentriert >Vier russische / Bauernlieder< mit mittig untergestellter arabischer Numerierung; Autorenangabe unterhalb Liedtitel rechtsbündig zentriert 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< S. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, S. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< S. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig ohne Copyright >Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Tous droits d’exécution réservés<; Platten-Nummern [1. Lied S. 23:] >32640< [2. Lied S. 45:] >32641< [3. Lied S. 68:] >32642< [4. Lied S. 911:] >32643<; Herstellungshinweis S. 11 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // [1934]

* stark verdickter i-Punkt über >I>.

** Rotdruck.

*** das 1938 zugegangene Exemplar >95/121317< der Städtischen Musikbibliothek München trägt unterhalb mittig den gekasteten Stempel >Vom Verlage überreicht<.

 

284 UNTERSCHALE / Russische Bauernlieder / Vier Chöre für gleiche Stimmen / von / Igor Strawinsky / Deutsche Übertragung von / Herman Roth / [Asterisk] / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy – Herbst / Der Hecht – Freund Dicksack / Partitur / (Singpartitur) / B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz und Leipzig / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Imprimé en Allemagne – Printed in Germany // (Chorpartitur klammergeheftet 19,3 x 27,1 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext deutsch-russisch; Liedtitel deutsch-russisch; 11 [10] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel [nur] S. [2] rechtsbündig [asteriskkommentiert] >Unterschale *) / Ïîäáëþäíûí< S. [2], 4, 6, 7 linksbündig zentriert >Vier russische / Bauernlieder< mit jeweils mittig untergestellter arabischer Numerierung >No 1< > No 2< > No 3< > No 4<; Kopftitel als Liedtitel deutsch-russisch; Autorenangabe rechtsbündig zentriert unterhalb Liedtitel >Beim Heiland von Tschigissi / Ó ÑÏÀÑÀÂÚ ×ÈÃÈÑÀÕÚ< 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] >Igor Strawinsky / 1916< unterhalb Liedtitel >Herbst< [#] >ÎÂÑÅÍÜ< S. 4 >Igor Strawinsky / 1917<, unterhalb [asteriskkommentiertem] Liedtitel >*) Der Hecht< [#] >ÙÓÊÀ< S. 6 >Igor Strawinsky / 1914< unterhalb [asteriskkommentiertem] Liedtitel >Freund Dicksack*)< [#] >ÏÓÇÈÙÅ< S. 9 >Igor Strawinsky / 1915<; ohne Rechtsschutzvorbehalt; Platten-Nummern [1. Lied S. 23:] >32640< [2. Lied S. 45:] >32641< [3. Lied S. 68:] >32642< [4. Lied S. 911:] >32643<; Kontrollstempeldruck S. 11 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig zentriert gekastet >Visé par la Direction de l’Education Publique / Autorisé par la Direction de l’Information / G. M. Z. F. O.<; Herstellungshinweis S. 11 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Druck u. Verlag von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // [1938]

 

285 The / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL SERIES / No. 27 / STRAVINSKY / FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / S S A A or T T B B / a cappella / 25 ¢ / [Zeichnung] / Published jointly by / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London, England / Edward B. Marks Music Corporation, Radio City, New York // (Chorpartitur mit Klavierauszug zu Einstudierungszwecken [Klavierstimme S. 3 vorgesetzt >For / rehearsal< [nachgeheftet] 17,6 x 26,8 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext englisch-französisch; 15 [13] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Titelei mit Bildstreifen 16,2 x 8,2 Ganzkörperdarstellungen von 3 Sängerinnen und 2 Sängern abwechselnd, Seite mit gekastet Spieldauer– [4’] und Schwierigkeitsangabe >difficult< englisch**] +1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit >EDWARD B. MARKS MUSIC CORPORATION / R.C.A. building [#] New York, N. Y.< Werbung >THE / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL SERIES / A distinguished collection of classical and / contemporary masterpieces<** ohne Stand + >THE / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL PERENNIALS / A selected list of folk songs, children’s choruses / and choral arrangements<*** ohne Stand]; Kopftitel >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS<; Autorenangabe jeweils unterhalb Stücktitel >I / On Saints’ Days in Chigisakh / Près de l’Église à Chigisakh< >II / Ovsen* / Ovsen< >III / The Pike / Le Brochet< >IV / Master Portly* / Monsieur Ventru< rechtsbündig zentriert 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 >Igor Strawinsky, 1916 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [S. 6] >Igor Strawinsky, 1917 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [S. 8] >Igor Strawinsky, 1914 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [S. 11] >Igor Strawinsky, 1915 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig zentriert kursiv >Printed by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation / by arrangement with J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Copyright, 1938, by J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / New version copyright, 1948 [°], by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation, New York<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite mittig unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalten >Printed in U. S. A.<; Platten-Nummer >1273413<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1948)

° Im Londoner Exemplar >F.1801< ist die Copyrightzahl >1948< von Hand durchgestrichen und mit >1950< ersetzt.

* untereinanderstehend werden >easy / medium / difficult / very difficult< angegeben. Die Angabe >difficult< ist mit einem gedruckten Hakenzeichen versehen.

** Angezeigt werden in alphabetischer, nicht in alphanumerischer Reihenfolge 30 Kompositionen von >ARCADELT< bis >WILBYE< mit Preisangaben nach Distanzpunkten, an Strawinsky-Werken >27. STRAVINSKY [#] Four Russian Peasant Songs—SSAA or TTBB, a cappella° .25< [° Distanzpunkte].

*** ohne Komponistenangabe; keine Strawinsky-Nennung.

 

285Straw

 

Über diese Ausgabe muß sich Strawinsky in besonderem Maße ärgerlich-belustigt haben. Er kringelte nämlich die Textangabe >Piano reduction< in rot ein, verband sie mit einem Strich ohne Pfeil, der oberhalb seines Namens führte und setzte da ein kräftiges rotes Fragezeichen hin. Damit wollte er wohl den Transkriptionsfehler kritisieren, der, da er sich siebenmal vorfindet, entweder ein echter Übertragungsfehler war oder das Ergebnis einer nicht sorgfältig genug vorgenommenen Satzkorrektur [Korrekturen: 2. Lied, Takt 2, Klavier, 2. Doppelnote Sechzehntel richtig fis-g statt f-gis, derselbe Fehler noch sechsmal: Takt 5, 11, 14, 16, 19, 22]. Das Exemplar enthält keine weiteren Korrekturen.

 

285[50] MC 27 [#] FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS [#] STRAVINSKY [#] SSAA OR TTBB [#] 60¢ / ARTHUR JORDAN CHORAL SERIES / IGOR  STRAVINSKY / FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / S S A A or T T B B / a cappella / [Bildstreifen] / J. & W. Chester, Ltd. / *M / Edward B. [#°] Exclusive distributor of all printed products: / Marks Music [#°] Belwin [°°] Mills / Corporation [#°°°] Publishing Corp. [°°] MELVILLE, N. Y. 11746 // (Chorpartitur mit einer nur für die Einstudierung bestimmten Klavierfassung ungeheftet eingelegt 17,6 x 26,8 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext englisch-französisch; 15 [13] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Titelei mit Bildstreifen 16 x 8,2 stilisiert gezeichnete stehende ornatbekleidete Sängergruppe aus 3 Sängerinnen und 2 Sängern abwechselnd vor einem Fünfliniensystem in mittlerer Beinhöhe, Seite mit Spieldauer– [4′] und Schwierigkeitsgradangabe [>difficult<]*** englisch mittenzentriert gekastet] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >FESTIVAL MUSIC FOR CHORUSES<** ohne Stand]; Kopftitel >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb unpunktiert römisch numeriertem englisch-französischem Werktitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Stravinsky, 1916 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [S. 6] >Igor Strawinsky, 1917 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [S. 8] >Igor Strawinsky, 1914 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle< [S. 11] >Igor Strawinsky, 1915 / Piano reduction by Felix Greissle<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel in Verbindung mit Herstellungshinweis mittig teilkursiv >Printed by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation by / arrangement with J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / Copyright, 1938, by J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London / New version Copyright, 1950, by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation New York / Copyright renewed [#] All Rights Reserved [#] Printed in U.S.A<; Platten-Nummer >1273413<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1950)

* aufgemachter Verlagsnachweis. Das M steht dreizeilengroß vor dem nachfolgenden Text, der durch einen durchlaufenden ebenfalls dreizeiligen Schrägstrich [°] in zwei Textblöcke aufgeteilt wird. Die beiden letzten Zeilen des rechten Textblocks erfahren eine Trennung durch ein Achtelnotenzeichen, dessen Stiel und Fähnchen die zweite [°°], dessen Notenkopf die dritte [°°°] Zeile unterbricht.

*** aufgeführt werden die Schwierigkeitsgrade >easy / medium / difficult / very difficult<. Der gemeinte Schwierigkeitsgrad wird durch einen fett gedruckten Haken angezeigt.

** keine Strawinsky-Nennung.

 

287 IGOR STRAWINSKY / Unterschale / Vier russische Bauernlieder / für Frauenchor und eine Solostimme / mit Begleitung von vier Hörnern in F / Deutsche Übertragung von Hermann Roth / Beim Heiland von Tschigissy /* Herbst /* Der Hecht /* Freund Dicksack / [Asterisk] / Chorpartitur / Partitur /* 4 Hornstimmen / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE · MAINZ / Printed in Germany // (Chorpartitur mit 2 Hornstimmensystemen klammergeheftet 16,9 x 26,4 ([Lex. 8°]); Singtext deutsch; 10 [9] Seiten + Titelseite schwarz auf weiß + 2 Seiten Nachspann [Leerseiten]; Aufführungspraktische Hinweise 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter >**)<; Liederläuterungen S. 6, 8; Spieldauerangaben unterhalb [2.-4.] beziehungsweise neben und unterhalb [1. ] Liedtitel rechtsbündig gekastet [1. Lied:] >1. Beim Heiland von Tschigissy< unpaginiert [S. 2] >74 Sek.< [2. Lied:] >2. Herbst< S. 4 >39 Sek.< [3. (asteriskkommentiertes) Lied:] >3. Der Hecht*)< S. 6 >47 Sek.< [4. (asteriskkommentiertes) Lied:] >4. Freund Dicksack*)< S. 8 >53 Sek.<; Kopftitel mit Anmerkungsasterisk >Unterschale*)< und Titelerläuterung unterhalb Notenspiegel; Autorenangabe [nur] 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] zwischen Kopf– und Liedtitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / Neufassung (1954)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© by B. Schott’s Söhne / 1957<; Platten-Nummer in Verbindung mit Herstellungshinweis S. 10 als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz 39491<) // (1957)

* Schrägstrich original

 

288 IGOR STRAWINSKY / FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / for / EQUAL VOICES / with accompaniment of / FOUR HORNS / CHORUS PART / (Instrumental parts on hire) / J. & W. CHESTER LTD. / 11 GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET / LONDON, W. 1 / Made in Great Britain // (Chorpartitur mit Hornstimmen als Klavierauszug ungeheftet 17,7 x 28,1 (4° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext englisch; 10 [9] Seiten + Titelseite schwarz auf weiß + 2 Seiten Nachspann [Leerseite, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >SELECTED PART-SONGS / in the / CHESTER EDITION<* Stand >LB. 629<]; Kopftitel >FOUR RUSSIAN PEASANT SONGS / for Equal Voices / with Four Horns<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / (New version, 1954)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright for all countries, 1958. © / J. & W. Chester, Ltd., London. W. 1.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer [nur auf 1. Notentextseite] >J. W. C. 6715<; Herstellungshinweise 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England< S. 10 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1958)

* Angezeigt werden unter >MIXED VOICES< ohne Strawinsky-Nennung Kompositionen von >BANTOCK, G.< bis >TRADITIONAL [#] Song of the Haulers on the Volga (S.A.T.B.)<, unter >WOMEN’S VOICES< Kompositionen von >Castelnouvo-Tedesco, C< bis >STRAWINSKY, I. [#] Four Russian Peasant Songs° Equal Voices< [° Originalschreibung], unter >MALE VOICES< ohne Strawinsky-Nennung Kompositionen von >BERKELEY, L.< bis >TRADITIONAL [#] Song of the Haulers on the Volga<.

 

288Straw

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM