61

S y m p h o n i e  e n  U t

pour orchestre – Symphonie in C für Orchester – Symphony in C for orchestra – Sinfonia in do per orchestra

 

Scored for: a) First edition: 1 Flauto piccolo, 2 Flauti grandi, 2 Oboi, 2 Clarinetti in Si e La, 2 Fagotti, 4 Corni in Fa, 2 Trombi in Do, 3 Tromboni, 1 Tuba, Timpani, Archi [1 Piccolo, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in Bb and A, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in C, 3 Trombones, 1 Tuba, Timpani, Strings]; b) Performance requirements: 1 Piccolo Flute (also 3rd Flute), 3 Flutes (3rd Flute = Piccolo Flute), 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in A and Bb, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in C, 2 Tenor Trombones, 1 Bass Trombone, 1 Tuba, Timpani, 3 Solo Violas, Strings (First Violins*, Second Violins*, Violas**, Violoncellos**, Double Basses**).

* Divided in three.

** Divided in two, some times three.

 

Construction: The Symphony in C is a four-movement orchestral work numbered with Roman numerals and with an attacca transition from movement II to movement III, as well as continuous rehearsal figures across all four movements which only partly relate to the music, every five, four or six bars. An influence from Beethoven has been construed from the fact that one of these rhythmic models corresponds to the outline of Beethoven’s motif in the 5th Symphony (quaver rest-quaver-quaver-quaver / quaver, or augmented, crotchet rest-crotchet-crotchet-crotchet / minim), and from other components a similar influence from Haydn. Strawinsky himself supported this idea with his verbal utterances. – In the first movement, an architectonic symmetry can be seen in the style of Mozart’s finales, in that 9 (or 7) sections can be identified which correspond in terms of their numbers of bars, regardless of how one tries to define the separate sections with historical formal terms such as 1st or 2nd subject, development, recapitulation and so on: section I to section IX (each 25 bars). section II to section VIII (each 34 bars), section III to section VII (each 34 bars), section IV to section VI (respectively 58 to 57 or 56 bars) and section V, the middle section, with 67 or 68 bars. A similar architectonic structure can be seen for all Strawinsky’s instrumental works, observable to a greater or lesser extent, and this can be portrayed negatively if one views it from the point of view of the development of the ideas, but it can just as well be seen positively if one considers it from the point of view of the richness of the ideas from which the work is constructed. – The second movement, which especially enthused Strecker, shrinks the orchestra to a chamber-music concertino score without trombones, tuba and timpani with only one horn and one trumpet. Each instrument plays soloistically with great use of ornaments. Structurally, it is an A-B-A1 aria, in terms of genre it is a concertino movement speeding up from section to section. The motivic fragments form the transition into the third movement, which continues for this reason without a pause. – The third movement is in a complicated three-part scheme with a miniature middle movement of a suite, Meno mosso at figure 113ff. and a final fugue at figure 122ff., which appears as a variation of the first section and is constructed using several types of contrapuntal processes such as inversions and retrogrades.  The middle section of a suite is based on the two old, rhythmically related dances, the Minuet and Passepied. – The fourth movement in the style of the Concerto Grosso (some have even attempted to detect rudimentary sonata movement forms in it) combines two short, slow sections with two longer, fast sections and a coda with an A-B-A1-B1-C form. Strawinsky does not use the three-note motif alone as the basis for the work, as in the other movements, but employs self-contained intervallic combinations from the first movement. The final, held, pure wind chords from figure 181 augment the motif out of which the Symphony is developed, throughout the entire palette of the score. The piece closes with a single, muted, broad string chord.

 

Structure

I

Moderato alla breve Minim = 66 (to figure 340)

Tempo agitato senza troppo accelerare Crotchet = 132144 (figure 240 up to the end of figure 733)

II

Larghetto concertante Quaver = 50 (figure 474 up to the end of figure 81)

Sechszehntel = quaver Doppio movimento (figure 82 up to the end of figure 93)

Achtel = semiquaver Doppio valore (figure 94 up to figure 985 [attacca forward to 986 = figure 599])

III

Allegretto Quaver = 126 ([attacca from figure 985] figure 599 up to the end of figure 112)

Meno mosso Quaver l= 78 (figure 113 up to the end of figure 121)

Tempo I, Allegretto Quaver l = 126 (figure 122 up to the end of figure 128)

Più mosso Crotchet = 92 (figure 129 up to the end of figure 134)

Tempo I Quaver = 126 (figure 135)

IV

Largo Crotchet = 50 (figure 4136 up to the end of figure 137)

Tempo giusto, alla breve Minim = 84 (figure 138 up to the end of figure 161)

Largo Minim = 50 Doppie del Tempo I (figure 162)

a tempo Minim = 84 (figure 163 up to the end of figure 164)

Alla breve (in 2) = (figure 165 up to the end of figure 174)

Poco meno mosso Minim = 63 crotchet = 126 in 4 (figure 175 up to the end of figure 1864)

 

Style: Behind the name of the piece, ‘Symphony’, is concealed Strawinsky’s definition of an orchestral piece without parameters. To seek elements of classical exposition or development in a dialectically orientated composition of a piece in sonata form with more than one affect, cannot succeed. To look for derivations from orthodox structures can be lead to certain discoveries, because certain things fit into the scheme, but it is only useful as long as the idea of the Suite as the compositional principle for the whole piece is not overlooked. Strawinsky’s typical motivic variations come out of Classical developmental elements. Strawinsky does not think in terms of dialectical processes. He manipulates intervallic combinations like a series and organises both their allocation as well as their sequence into equilibria with or without a centre. In this respect, the entire piece is a single large development of motific fragments which are combined together, into which thematic connections can be read, depending on one’s analytical proclivities, although one can also argue against these analyses with the same efficacy, as tables describing architectonic balance only have weight as long as they correspond to the balance of duration. The Symphonie en Ut is based as a piece on two three-note combinations of a minor second + a fourth (b1-c2-g1) and a major second + a fourth (d2-e2-b1); these are not developed dynamically, but rather appear in a static sequence. there is also a rhythmic framework which underpins this but which contradicts the metrical construction. According to the prevailing opinion of the literature, the work is broken up into a European section (movements one and two) and an American section (movements three and four). There is also the metrical restlessness of the third movement to take into account. Strawinsky himself explained that certain episodes without programmatic elements in American cities should be construed in this way. Compositionally, Strawinsky was seeking to imitate the motivic construction of Beethoven’s 5th Symphony, by using a motif without repeated notes and retaining the characteristic rhythm in the accompaniment process. The entire Symphony revolves around this motif, which unlike with Beethoven, is used without tension; this results in the perpetually rearranging variation of the same motific fragment.

 

Dedication*: >This symphony, composed to the Glory of God, is dedicated to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on the occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of its existence<.

* The Schott editions of the pocket score have no dedication.

 

Date of origin: I. Movement: Paris autumn 1938 up to springtime 1939; II. Movement: Sancellemoz about the end of March 1939 up to August 1939; III. Movement: Cambridge, Massachusets, autumn 1939 up to winter 1939/40; IV. Movement: Beverly Hills, California, Hollywood, summer up to 19th August 1940; work on the piece had to be interrupted on several occasions due to other commitments.

 

Duration: 2656″.

 

First performance: 7th November 1940, Chicago, Chicago Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

 

History of origin: The history of the composition of the Symphony, which Robert Craft has traced in a separate article, was much dictated by Fate, and was very changeable and was moreover overshadowed by the worst family tragedies: the death of his sister-in-law, Ludmilla Belyankin, early in 1937 from tuberculosis, the death of his eldest daughter, Ludmilla in November 1938 from tuberculosis, the death of his wife Yekaterina Nossenko on 2nd March 1939 from tuberculosis and the death of his mother, Anna Strawinsky on 7th June 1939. The Strawinsky family had ceased to exist. Strawinsky himself was so distressed that he all but fled from Paris and, having recently become ill with tuberculosis,  withdrew to the lung sanatorium Sancellemoz at Sallanches in High Savoyen for five months, where his wife had lived for many years. He must have found himself in a condition of the most extreme exhaustion, as can be seen from a letter to his daughter-in-law dated 18th March 1939 from Sancellemoz. He was also in dire financial straits in addition to this. On 15th March 1939, Nadia Boulanger wrote from Cambridge, Massachussets to Strawinsky in Sancellemoz, Mrs. John Alden Carpenter and Mrs. Robert Wood Bliss had guaranteed the première of the Symphony in Chicago. Strawinsky was at this time working on the first movement, which he completed on 17th April in his characteristic particle format. On 16th May, the orchestration of the movement had been completed to the extent that he was able to give it to his representative from Schott publishers, Wilhelm Strecker. He had received the manuscript back with exceptional photographic reproductions by 9th July, and on 10th July the contract between him and Strecker had been signed. On 19th July, Strawinsky completed the second movement in short score. At this point in time, the printing of the score was planned for August and the extraction of the parts from the first movement was almost complete. On 29th July, Strawinsky was working on the orchestration and was under time pressure because he was to go to Venice for the biennial arts festival on 31st August, thence on to Paris and he was finally to take a ship to America on the Île de France on 27th September. Strecker himself had come to Sancellemoz on 22nd August 1939 to collect the now completed second movement of the Symphony, about which he was very excited. By 9th September, the photographic reproductions were completed. In the meanwhile, the premises on which the composition had been based had changed. The expected performance in America seems to have fallen through and Strawinsky was, via Strecker, looking for other performance possibilities, such as with the British Broadcasting Corporation in London. It still seemed that Strawinsky would return to Europe. Strecker gave him the address of Associated Music Publishers in New York as a point of contact for the other movements of the Symphony. In a letter of 29th March 1940, the issue of the première resolved itself, once again thanks to Mrs. Bliss and Mrs. Carpenter. The American commission to write a symphony for the fifty-year Jubilee of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, came from Mrs. Robert Wood [Mildred] Bliss and Mrs. John Alden Carpenter, who made available a total of 3,500 Dollars. On 14th March 1940, Strawinsky met Mildred Bliss at an evening reception held in his honour by Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge in the Colony Club in New York, after Strawinsky had that morning given a matinée for the benefit of French war aid in the town hall (French War Relief). Mildred Bliss informed Strawinsky at this opportunity of the division of the intended total sum of 3,500 dollars. According to her, 1,000 Dollars came from Mrs. Carpenter and the rest from Mrs. Bliss, who included in her contribution of 2,500 Dollars the sum of 1,000 Dollars for the purchase of the score, which she wanted/intended to give to the Library of Congress; this did in fact happen. Strawinsky had to give his agreement that he would write a symphony for the Fiftieth Anniversary of Chicago Symphony Orchestra, as it was also later referred to in the dedication printed in the front of all the editions. In this question emerged misunderstandings. Strawinsky from Boston wrote on 14th April to Frederick Stock in Chicago that no-one had mentioned anything to him about the connection between the commission and the dedication. It had generally always been his intention to dedicate the Symphony to the Chicago Orchestra, not before, but after the contract. Up to that point, he wanted to keep the possibility open of dealing with other interested parties and as a result to be free to dedicate the Symphony to another orchestra if necessary. The final American contract, which was still up in the air, was signed on 17th April 1940. In the meanwhile, the photographs of the second movement were produced in such a way that they were unusable for the printing because they were not sharp enough. The original manuscript of the second movement was needed, which was at Schott in Mainz. Due to the events of the War in Europe, they were afraid to put the manuscript in the post. Schott communicated that it would be brought to New York by Mrs. Gertrud Hindemith. In fact, the manuscript was stored for the entire war at Schott in Mainz and Strawinsky first received the original of the second movement in December 1952 in the Gladstone Hall in New York from Paul Hindemith. With Ernest Voigt of Associated Music Publishers’s statement that he received the manuscript of the first and third movement on 8th May 1940, the time frame was at the same time set for the completion of the third movement for between Autumn 1939 and the end of the first part of 1940 at the latest. Strawinsky had travelled on to California a long time previously, to where the photographic copies were sent to him on 7th June from New York. From the letter that Strawinsky sent to Voigt from Beverly Hills, it can be seen that he was in the midst of work on the fourth movement. He hoped, subject to eventual interruptions, to be able to send the movement by the end of July and the entire score by the end of August. He estimated the length of the final movement at 50 pages, with 4 to 5 bars to a page. He then had two months to extract the parts and to make the corrections. At this point in time, France had lost the war against Germany, and Strawinsky was so despondent about the events in France that his work was substantially delayed, and he should have been able to complete it a long time before he actually did. The score was given its final date of 19th August 1940, while Strawinsky himself later claimed that it was completed on 17th August. On 23rd August, he sent the final movement to Voigt with the request that it be photographed and subsequently that the manuscript be sent on to the Washington Library of Congress and that they transfer the pre-arranged sum of one thousand dollars to him, according to a letter of 8th July 1939. This date is taken today to be the date of completion of the Symphony. Since he was not however in possession of the original of the second movement, he must have written it out anew. The photographic printing originals for the first two movements were however with Schott in Mainz, and those for the final two movements were in the possession of Associated Music Publishers in New York. Mainz could not go into production without the American documents, but conversely, New York could do so very well due to the original being available. The costs for the delivery were high and the dangers great. Voigt therefore wrote to Strecker that the score would have to be produced in New York, but this did not happen. In the meanwhile, there was the question of the payment for the première; Strawinsky agreed to Strecker’s conducting this ten days before the beginning of the war in France for a named fee of 250 dollars, and there was also the matter of the fee for the upcoming vinyl recording by Columbia, for which it was necessary to use 7 records due to its length of 28 minutes. On 7th November 1940, Strawinsky conducted the première and a repeat performance on 8th November in a matinée and a further repeat on 12th November.

 

Remarks: The parts produced by Associated Music Publishers in New York must have been only crawling with mistakes. On 29th July 1941, Strawinsky wrote to Nadia Boulanger to co-ordinate the corrections together. He referred to them as ‘the idiots of Associated Music Publishers’ and complained that it could not be ruled out that Associated Music Publishers had sent the uncorrected material to England for the eventual performances. On 2nd November 1941, Strawinsky wrote a letter to Ernest Voigt in which he mentioned that Nadia Boulanger was now in possession of his score with all the corrections made and was prepared to liaise with Voigt due to an urgently necessary new set of orchestral parts. Orchestral parts generally do not survive for many performances. After that, they must be replaced. This is true even more when they are for a new piece in which the composer clearly discovers errors and goes on to make corrections. At the same time, Strawinsky was making inquiries as to whether this material, which had been sent to Hugo Strecker in London, referred to the old or the corrected material, and he seemed to know the actual circumstances for a long time. He did not want, as he wrote further, to be in the shoes of the conductor who had to conduct this music without being familiar with all the material with which he himself had had his hands full coming to terms. In a further letter to Ernest Voigt of 13th October 1942, Strawinsky expressed his hope that the parts would be brought into order from then on. Strawinsky additionally wrote that he had never come across as faulty a set of parts in his entire musical career (‘the most abundant in mistakes of any I have ever met at any time in my musical career’). The new copies, which Strawinsky presumed Alexei Haieff to be behind, must have been produced very well and very quickly. – Strawinsky was beginning a completely new life in America, where he married his sweetheart of many years, Vera Soudeikina, risking conflict with his children. His change of residential location was only an external sign of this. Strawinsky did not actually emigrate in the strict sense of the word — he simply did not come back again. He was one of the few people who remained in his protective guest country after the changed situation of 1945. But he sought himself a grave on the Island of the Dead in Venice (the place of Wagner’s death), a few metres from Diaghilev.

 

Significance: The meaning of the piece lies in the consequently varying serial structural character of a miniature motif, which comes out of the concept of an inevitably tension-less static sequence of episodes. For the same reason, the Symphony in C is regarded as one of Strawinsky’s weaker works in the eyes of certain serious critics, who did not assume generally hostile and false Marxist theses.

 

Versions: The further distribution of the Symphony suffered from the lack of a correct printing, and Strawinsky had to give his own copy out of his hand in terms of time, in order to allow the intended performances to go ahead. From that point, he applied pressure with letters to Hugo Winter (11/2 and 27/3/1944) on several occasions for at least a makeshift printing, which was not carried out. But there was in any case a recording scheduled before 11th February 1944, which Strawinsky used to explain his intentions to other conductors, especially the hasty Koussevitsky. After the end of the Second World War, when connection to Schott could be re-established, preparations began for the printing. In a letter of 11th July 1946, Strawinsky demanded to see the copies of the corrections for the final movement before the publication, and this was carried out; he conveyed as a precaution to the publishers on 29th September with a cable telegram that he had made many changes and had wished their adoption as quickly as possible. Strawinsky was however not able to send the corrections by airmail, and the normal post connection took at least 78 weeks. – On 5th October, Hugo Strecker in London held the corrections in his hands, and his father in Mainz did the same on 1st December. The Symphony was published by Schott at the start of 1948, first in the form of a pocket score edition. On 11th April 1948, Robert Craft conducted the Symphony in Town Hall using a photocopy of the manuscript, which was in the Library of Congress, and Strawinsky gave him the original autograph score of the second movement, which spent the war in Mainz, as a present to him on 1st January 1953 in memory of this concert; it actually should have belonged in the Library of Congress, but had been written anew by Strawinsky, because he was not able to deliver the manuscript in time according to the contract. On 1st June 1948, Strawinsky received the first printed copies of the contributory copies from Mainz. They took four months to get from Mainz to Los Angeles. Neither a piano reduction for four hands completed by Strawinsky was published nor a version for two pianos that Strawinsky’s son, Soulima, produced. The parts were available to hire. The British Museum received only a contributory copy of the pocket score which was entered on 17th March 1948, presumably because the conductor’s score was part of the hire material. Commercially, the Symphony was a success.

 

Print runs: 700 copies of the conducting score (Edition number 3840) were published in two printings during Strawinsky’s lifetime with print runs on 22nd November 1949 (200) and 8th February 1968 (500), and from Strawinsky’s death to the end of the century, there were a further 2 print runs of 1,000 copies each (print runs 10/02/1977 and 15/09/1982) according to the plate books. The pocket score (edition number 3536) had 7 print runs during Strawinsky’s lifetime with a complete number of copies of 8,100 copies (print runs: 23rd February 1948: 1,500; 24th May 1955: 800; 19th March 1959: 800; 20th June 1962: 1,000; 5th March 1964: 1,500; 20th March 1967: 1,500; 17th March 1971: 1,000). For the time after Strawinsky’s death up to the end of the century, the Schott plate books catalogue only a single print run (23/10/1973) of 1,000 copies. Since such a relationship between the conducting and study scores appears unusual, it may be more correct to assume that the subsequent printings of the conducting score in 1977 and 1982 were printings of the pocket score. For the 1955 edition, his Christian name on the main title page was removed, the performance length corrected from Strawinsky’s estimate of 40 minutes to 28 minutes, the copyright statement limited to 1948, and a new set of adverts inserted.

 

Choreographies: The Symphony presented itself as a choreographic original, but Strawinsky was not happy about this. He would later flatly reject Kirstein’s inquiry to have the Symphony in Three Movements choreographed (‘I am against it’) and in doing so, he not only differentiated between symphonic and choreographic intention, but also brought into question objectively favourable choreographies like that of the Basel String Concerto (The Cage), without considering the choreographic or dance-related benefits.

 

Historical recordings: Cleveland, 14. December 1952, Cleveland Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Toronto, 2./3. December 1962, Massey Hall, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: IV-2/47 (recording 1962).

 

Autograph: The autograph score is stored in the Library of Congress, Washington D.C., and the second movement is a new copy.

 

Copyright: 1948 by Schott & Co., London.

 

Editions

a) Overview

611 (1948) PoSc; Schott Mainz; 86 p.; B·S·S 36032; 3536.

                        611Straw1 ibd. [with annotations].

                        611Straw2 ibd. [with annotations].

            611(55) ibd.

612 (1949) FuSc; Schott Mainz / London; 86 p.; B·S·S 36032; Schott 3840.

                        612Straw1 ibd. [signed].

                        612Straw2 ibd. [without annotations].

            612(68) (1968) ibd.

b) Characteristic features

611 IGOR STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en Ut / pour Orchestre / PARTITUR / [vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3536 // SYMPHONIE / EN UT / POUR ORCHESTRE / PAR / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [asterisk] / Partition d’orchestre [#*] Edition Schott 3840 / Parties d’orchestre [#*] en location / Partition de poche [#*] Edition Schott 3536 / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#**] SCHOTT & Co. Ltd. / MAINZ: Weihergarten 5 [#**] LONDON W. 1: 48 Great Marl– / [#] [#**] borough Street / PARIS: Editions Max Eschig [#]** New-York: 25 West 45th Str. / 48 Rue de Rome [#**] Associated Music Publishers Inc. / Printed in Germany – Imprimé en Allemagne // [without text on spine] // (Pocket score sewn 0.6 x 13.6 x 18.8 (8° [8°]); 86 [86] pages + 4 pages thicker paper black-grey on light grey [front cover title with publisher’s emblem orange oval centre centred 1.9 x 2.5 with wheel of Mainz in the frame and containing text in bottom half >PER MARE< [#] >ET TERRAS< left and right, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Schott’s Studien-Partituren<*** production data >45<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Distribuzione dell’ orchestra< Italian + duration data [40′] Italian] without back matter; title head >Symphonie en Ut<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to and below movement number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1940<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1939 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London / Copyright 1948 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London<; plate number [p. 1:] >B·S·S 36032a< [pp. 286:] >B·S·S 36032<; production indication p. 86 flush right as end mark >Stich u. Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<; printed inspection stamp p. 86 below type area indented flush left in the text box contained >G. M. Z. F. O. Visa No 5958 D. d. l’E. P. / AUTORISATION No 2406 D. d. l’I.<) // (1948)

* Fill character (dotted line).

** A black, round, publisher’s vignette spanning more than 5 lines ø 1.,2 , a wheel in a frame with writing underneath with half an each side  >PER MARE< [#] >ET TERRAS<.

*** Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers and without fill character (dotted line) under the heading in a text box >Kammermusik< from >Badings, Henk< to >Windsperger, L.<, amongst these >Strawinsky, Igor Ragtime<, under the heading in a text box >Orchesterwerke< from >Albeniz, I.< to >Wunsch, Hermann<, amongst these >Strawinsky Igor, Feuerwerk / (Feu d’artifice) /° Scherzo / fantastique /° Feuervogel / (L’oiseau de feu) /° Konzert / in D für Viol. u. Orchest. /° / Suite I für kleines Orch. /° / Suite II für kleines Orch. /° / Concerto en mi b für Kam– / merorchester<; under the heading in a text box >Gesang m. Kammer-Orch.< from >Falla, Manuel de< to >Strawinsky, Igor, Pribaoutki / (Scherzlieder) /° Wiegenlieder / der Katze /° Pastorale für / Sopran, Oboe, Engl. Horn, / Klarinette und Fagott<; under the heading in a text box >Opern und Ballette< Kompositionen from >Falla, Manuel de< to >Wagner, Richard<, amongst these >Strawinsky, Igor, Die Ge– / schichte°° vom Soldaten /° / Reinecke /° Jeu de cartes< [° flash original; °° the letter >c< in >sch< is badly printed].

 

611Straw1

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate is signed and dated energetically with >Igor Strawinsky / May 1948< on the outer title page from above to below the vignette, with a very large-reaching opening letter >I<. The statement of duration was corrected from 40 minutes to 28 minutes.

 

611Straw2

A 2nd copy from Strawinsky’s estate only contains up to page 62 and contains annotated corrections. Strawinsky corrects also the duration here to >2930< minutes, and removes the (rhythmic) dot on the fifth-last semiquaver note (f2) in the oboe system at figure 1094.

 

611(55) STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en Ut / pour Orchestre / PARTITUR / [vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3536 // SYMPHONIE / EN UT / POUR ORCHESTRE / PAR / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [asterisk] / Partition d’orchestre [#*] Edition Schott 3840 / Parties d’orchestre [#*] en location / Partition de poche [#*] Edition Schott 3536 / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#**] SCHOTT & Co. Ltd. / MAINZ: Weihergarten 5 [#**] LONDON W. 1: 48 Great Marl– / [#] [#**] borough Street / PARIS: Editions Max Eschig [#]** New-York: 25 West 45th Str. / 48 Rue de Rome [#**] Associated Music Publishers Inc. / Printed in Germany – Imprimé en Allemagne // [Text on spine:] STRAWINSKY SYMPHONIE EN UT // (Pocket score sewn 0,7 x 13,8 x 18,8 ([8°]); 86 [86] pages + 4 pages thicker paper blackgrey on light grey veined [front cover title with orange coloured publisher’s emblem oval 1,9 x 2,5 wheel of Mainz in a frame with and containing text in bottom half >PER MARE< [#] >ET TERRAS< left and right, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >STUDIEN-PARTITUREN / zeitgenössischer Orchesterwerke< *** production data >105<] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Distribuzione dell’ orchestra< Italian + duration data [28′] Italian] without back matter; title head >Symphonie en Ut<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to and below movement number (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1940<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1948 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London<; plate number [p. 1:] >B·S·S 36032a< [pp. 286:] >B·S·S 36032<; production indication p. 86 flush right as end mark >Stich u. Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1955)

* Fill character (dotted line).

** A round separating vignette covering five lines, ø 1.2 cm wheel of Mainz in the frame containing text in bottom half >PER MARE< # >ET TERRAS< left and right.

*** Compositions are advertised in three columns with edition numbers behind fill character (dotted line) from >WERNER EGK< to >ALEX. TSCHEREPNIN<, amongst these >IGOR STRAWINSKY / Scherzo fantastique° 3501 / Circus-Polka° 4274 / „Feuerwerk“, Fantasie°° 3464 // STRAWINSKY (Fortsetzung) / Symphonie in C° 3536 / Symphony in three / movements° 4075 / „Der Feuervogel“, / Suite (19193467< / „Der Feuervogel“, / Suite (19454420< / Vier norwegische Im– / pressionen°°° / Ode (Elegischer Ge– / sang) in 3 Teilen für / kleines Orchester°°° / Suite I für kleines / Orchester° 3469 / Suite II für kleines / Orchester° 3470 / Pas de deux (L’oiseau / bleu) (Tschaikowsky)°°°° 4409 / Concerto in Es (Dum– / barton Oaks) f. Kam– / merorchester° 3527 / Danses concertantes° 4275 / Konzert in D für Vio– / line und Orchester° 3504< [° Fill character (dotted line); °° without fill character (dotted line); °°° without fill character (dotted line) and without edition number; °°°° fill character (dot)].

 

612 IGOR STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en Ut / pour Orchestre / Partitur / [vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3536 // SYMPHONIE / EN UT / POUR ORCHESTRE / PAR / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [asterisk] / Partition d’orchestre [#*] Edition Schott 3840 / Parties d’orchestre [#*] en location / Partition de poche [#*] Edition Schott 3536 / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#**] SCHOTT & Co. Ltd. / MAINZ: Weihergarten 5 [#**] LONDON W. 1: 48 Great Marl– / [#] [#**] borough Street / PARIS: Editions Max Eschig [#]** NEW-YORK: 25 West 45th Str. / 48 Rue de Rome [#**] Associated Music Publishers Inc. / Printed in Germany – Imprimé en Allemagne // (Full score sewn 24.1 x 31.2 ([4°]); 86 [86] pages + 4 pages thicker paper dark grey on light grey [front cover title with light orange coloured publisher’s emblem oval 3.6 x 4.5 wheel of Mainz in a frame and containing text in bottom half >PER MARE< [#] >ET TERRAS< left and right, empty page, [missing], [missing], + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >Distribuzione dell’ orchestra< Italian + duration data [40′] Italian] without back matter; title head >Symphonie en Ut<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to and below movement number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1940<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1939 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London° / Copyright 1948 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London<; plate number >B·S·S 36032<; production indication p. 86 flush right as end mark >Stich u. Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1948)

° The1st line of the legal reservation is blacked out in the original, so as to render it illegible.

* Fill character (dotted line).

** A black oval separating vignette spanning more than five lines, ø 2.2 cm wheel of Mainz in the frame containing text in bottom half >PER MARE< # >ET TERRAS< left and right.

 

612Straw1

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate is signed and dated >I Strawinsky / Oct 1949< flush right on the outer title page from above to below >Partitur<, and contains many performance-related indications entered in red and black. The statement of duration is corrected to 28 minutes. The two back pages of the cover are missing. The copyright statement was blocked out in black, presumably by the publishers, so as to render it illegible.

 

612Straw2

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate has no cover and contains no annotated corrections.

 

612[68] STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en ut / pour orchestre / [vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3840 // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en ut / pour orchestre / (1940) / Partition / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE . MAINZ / Schott & Co. Ltd., London . B. Schott’s Söhne (Edition Max Eschig), Paris / Schott Music Corp. (Associated Music Publishers Inc.), New York / Printed in Germany // (Full score [library binding] 26.5 x 33.1 (2°); 86 [86] pages + 4 pages thicker paper black grey on grey veined [front cover title with ovaler publisher’s emblem brownred 2.8 x 3.5, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page, legend >ISTRUMENTI< Italian + duration data [28’] Italian] without back matter; title head >Symphonie en ut<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to and below movement number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / (1940)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© Schott & Co. Ltd., London, 1948<; plate number [exclusively] in connection with production indication p. 86 flush right as end mark >B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz 36032<) // [1968]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

61

S y m p h o n i e  e n  U t

pour orchestre – Symphonie in C für Orchester – Symphony in C for orchestra – Sinfonia in do per orchestra

 

 

Besetzung: a) Originalausgabe: 1 Flauto piccolo, 2 Flauti grandi, 2 Oboi, 2 Clarinetti in Si e La, 2 Fagotti, 4 Corni in Fa, 2 Trombi in Do, 3 Tromboni, 1 Tuba, Timpani, Archi [1 Piccolo-Flöte, 2 große Flöten, 2 Oboen, 2 Klarinetten in B und A, 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in C, 3 Posaunen, 1 Tuba, Pauken, Streicher]; b) Ausführungsanforderungen: kleine Flöte (= 3. große Flöte), 3 große Flöten (3. große Flöte = kleine Flöte), 2 Oboen, 2 Klarinetten in A und B, 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in C, 2 Tenor-Posaunen, Baß-Posaune, Tuba, Pauken, 3 Solo-Bratschen, Streicher (Erste Violinen*, Zweite Violinen*, Bratschen**, Violoncelli**, Kontrabässe**)

* dreifach geteilt

** zweifach, einige Male dreifach geteilt

 

Aufbau: Die Symphonie ist ein viersätziges, römisch numeriertes Orchesterwerk mit attacca–Übergang vom II. in den III. Satz und einer nur bedingt sinnbezogenen Durchbezifferung über alle vier Sätze hinweg im schematischen Fünfer-, aber auch Vierer– und Sechser-Taktabstand. – Aus der Tatsache, daß eines dieser Rhythmus-Modelle dem Schema der Motivik Beethovens zur 5. Symphonie entspricht (Achtelpause-Achtel-Achtel-Achtel / Achtel oder augmentiert Viertelpause-Viertel-Viertel-Viertel / Halbe), hat man eine Beeinflussung durch Beethoven herausgelesen, aus anderen Komponenten eine solche durch Haydn. Strawinsky selbst hat dem mit mündlichen Äußerungen Nahrung gegeben. — Für den ersten Satz läßt sich eine metroarchitektonische Symmetrie nach Art der Mozart-Finales nachweisen, indem man 9 (oder 7) Abschnitte auffindet, die sich taktzahlartig entsprechen, gleich wie auch immer man die einzelnen Abschnitte mit historischen Formbegriffen wie 1. oder 2. Thema, Durchführung, Reprise und so weiter festzuschreiben versucht: Abschnitt I zu Abschnitt IX (jeweils 25 Takte), Abschnitt II zu Abschnitt VIII (jeweils 34 Takte), Abschnitt III zu Abschnitt VII (ebenfalls jeweils 34 Takte), Abschnitt IV zu Abschnitt VI (jeweils 58 zu 57 oder 56 Takten) und Abschnitt V als Mittelabschnitt mit 67 oder 68 Takten. Eine solche metroarchitektonische Formierung läßt sich für alle Strawinskyschen Instrumentalwerke mehr oder weniger versteckt nachweisen und negativ darstellen, wenn man vom Entwicklungsgedanken ausgeht, aber ebenso gut auch positiv, wenn man untersucht, mit welchem Gestaltenreichtum das Stück gearbeitet ist. — Der zweite Satz, von dem sich Strecker insbesondere begeistert zeigte, verringert das Orchester auf eine kammermusikalische Concertino-Partitur ohne Posaunen, Tuba und Pauken und mit jeweils nur einem Horn und einer Trompete. Jedes Instrument wird mit großem ornamentalem Aufwand solistisch geführt. Formtypologisch handelt es sich um eine A-B-A1-Arie, gattungsgeschichtlich um einen konzertanten, sich von Abschnitt zu Abschnitt beschleunigenden Satz. Die Motivsplitter bilden den Eingang des dritten Satzes, der sich aus diesem Grund ohne Pause anschließt. — Der dritte Satz bildet ein kompliziertes dreiteiliges Schema mit einem miniaturesken Suiten-Mittelteil Meno mosso Ziffer 113ff. und einer Schlußfuge Ziffer 122ff., die als Variation des ersten Teils auftritt und mit vielfachen kontrapunktischen Verfahren wie Umkehrungen und Krebsformen ausgestattet ist. Der Suitenmittelteil beruht auf den beiden alten, miteinander rhythmisch verwandten Tänzen Menuett und Passepied. — Der vierte Satz in Concerto-grosso-Art (selbst rudimentäre Sonatensatzformen darin aufzuspüren ist versucht worden) kombiniert zwei kurze langsame mit zwei längeren schnellen Teilen und einer Koda mit dem Formtypus A-B-A1-B1-C. Er nimmt nicht nur, wie die anderen Sätze auch, das Dreitonmotiv als Arbeitsgrundlage auf, sondern auch vollständige Intervallkombinationen aus dem ersten Satz. Die letzten, lang ausgehaltenen reinen Bläserakkorde ab Ziffer 181 augmentieren das Arbeitsmotiv, aus dem sich die Symphonie speist, über die ganze Partiturpalette hinweg. Mit einem einzelnen sordinierten vollflächigen Streicherakkord schließt das Stück.

 

Aufriß

I

Moderato alla breve Halbe = 66 (bis Ziffer 340)

Tempo agitato senza troppo accelerare Viertel = 132144 (Ziffer 240 bis Ende Ziffer 733)

II

Larghetto concertante Achtel = 50 (Ziffer 474 bis Ende Ziffer 81)

Sechszehntel = Achtel Doppio movimento (Ziffer 82 bis Ende Ziffer 93)

Achtel = Sechszehntel Doppio valore (Ziffer 94 bis Ziffer 985 [attacca weiter nach 986 = Ziffer 599])

III

Allegretto Achtel = 126 ([attacca von Ziffer 985] Ziffer 599 Ende Ziffer 112)

Meno mosso Achtel= 78 (Ziffer 113 bis Ende Ziffer 121)

Tempo I, Allegretto Achtel = 126 (Ziffer 122 bis Ende Ziffer 128)

Più mosso Viertel = 92 (Ziffer 129 bis Ende Ziffer 134)

Tempo I Achtel = 126 (Ziffer 135)

IV

Largo Viertel = 50 (Ziffer 4136 bis Ende Ziffer 137)

Tempo giusto, alla breve Halbe = 84 (Ziffer 138 bis Ende Ziffer 161)

Largo Halbe = 50 Doppie del Tempo I (Ziffer 162)

a tempo Halbe = 84 (Ziffer 163 bis Ende Ziffer 164)

Alla breve (in 2) = (Ziffer 165 bis Ende Ziffer 174)

Poco meno mosso Halbe = 63 Viertel = 126 in 4 (Ziffer 175 bis Ende Ziffer 1864)

 

Stilistik: Hinter der Stückbezeichnung Symphonie verbirgt sich die Strawinskysche Definition vom orchestralen Klangstück ohne Vorgabe. Das Aufsuchen klassischer Expositions– oder Durchführungselemente einer dialektisch orientierten Sonatensatzkomposition mit mehr als einem Affekt läuft fehl. Das Nachsuchen als Ableitung nach Formenlehrevorstellungen wird zwar fündig, weil dieses oder jenes in das Schema hineinpaßt, ist aber nur so lange nützlich, wie das Suitendenken als kompositorisches Prinzip für das Ganze nicht übersehen wird. Aus den klassischen Durchführungselementen werden die typischen Strawinskyschen Gestaltvariationen. Strawinsky denkt nicht in dialektischen Prozessen. Er montiert Intervallkombinationen reihenartig und organisiert sowohl ihre Zugehörigkeit wie ihre Abfolge in Balancen mit oder ohne Zentrum. Insofern ist das ganze Stück eine einzige große Motivsplitter-Durchführung mit Überblendcharakter, in die man thematische Zusammenhänge je nach analytischer Geschicklichkeit hineinlesen, die man mit ebenderselben Geschicklichkeit aber auch widerlegen kann, wobei metroarchitektonische Balance-Tabellen nur so lange von Gewicht sind, wie ihnen eine Zeitdauern-Balance entspricht. Die symphony en ut beruht als Stück auf zwei dreitönigen Quart-Intervallkombinationen Kleine Sekunde + Quart (h1-c2-g1) und Große Sekunde + Quart (d2-e2-h1), die keine dynamische Entwicklung, sondern eine statische Reihung erfahren und denen rhythmische Muster unterlegt werden, die der metrischen Konstruktion widersprechen. Nach Literaturmeinung zerfällt das Stück in einen europäischen (Sätze eins und zwei) und einen amerikanischen Teil (Sätze drei und vier). Man hat darin auch die metrische Unruhe des dritten Satzes einbeziehen wollen. Strawinsky selbst erklärte, daß bestimmte Episoden ohne Bilderlebnisse in amerikanischen Städten nicht so hätten entworfen werden können. Kompositionstechnisch suchte Strawinsky die Motivkonstruktion von Beethovens 5. Symphonie nachzuahmen, indem er ein Motiv ohne Wiederholungstöne verwendete, aber den charakteristischen Rhythmus im Begleitverfahren beibehielt. Die gesamte Symphonie dreht sich um dieses Motiv, das allerdings im Gegensatz zu Beethoven spannungslos gehalten wird. Das Ergebnis ist ein immerwährendes reihendes Variieren desselben Motivsplitters.

 

Widmung*: >This symphony, composed to the Glory of God, is dedicated to the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on the occasion of the Fiftieth Anniversary of its existence< [Diese zur Verherrlichung Gottes komponierte Symphonie ist dem Chicagoer Symphonie-Orchester aus Anlaß seines fünfzigjährigen Bestehens gewidmet].

* die Schottschen Taschenpartiturausgaben tragen keine Widmung.

 

Entstehungszeit: I. Satz: Paris Herbst 1938 bis Frühjahr 1939; II. Satz: Sancellemoz gegen Ende März 1939 bis August 1939; III. Satz: Cambridge, Massachusets, Herbst 1939 bis Winter 1939/40; IV. Satz: Beverly Hills, Kalifornien, Hollywood, Sommer bis 19. August 1940; die Arbeit mußte mehrfach wegen anderer Verpflichtungen unterbrochen werden

 

Dauer: 2656

 

Uraufführung: am 7. November 1940 in Chicago mit dem chicago symphony orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky

 

Entstehungsgeschichte: Die Entstehungsgeschichte der Symphonie, die Robert Craft in einem eigenen Artikel nachgezeichnet hat, ist schicksalsbedingt sehr wechselhaft gewesen und war überdies von schlimmsten Familientragödien überschattet: Tod der Schwägerin Ludmilla Beljankin Frühjahr 1937 an Tuberkulose; Tod seiner ältesten Tochter Ludmilla November 1938 an Tuberkulose; Tod seiner Frau Jekaterina Nossenko 2. März 1939 an Tuberkulose; Tod seiner Mutter Anna Strawinsky am 7. Juni 1939. Die Familie Strawinsky hatte aufgehört zu existieren. Er selbst war so erschüttert, daß er Paris beinahe fluchtartig verließ und sich, neuerlich an Tuberkulose erkrankt, für fünf Monate in das Lungensanatorium Sancellemoz bei Sallanches in Hoch-Savoyen zurückzog, wo seine Frau jahrelang gelebt hatte. Er muß sich in einem schlimmen Zustand äußerster Erschöpfung befunden haben, wie aus einem Brief seiner Schwiegertochter vom 18. März 1939 aus Sancellemoz hervorgeht. Schwere finanzielle Sorgen kamen hinzu. Am 15. März 1939 schrieb Nadja Boulanger aus Cambridge in Massachusetts an Strawinsky in Sancellemoz, Frau John Alden Carpenter und Frau Robert Wood Bliss garantierten den Auftrag einer Uraufführung der Symphony in Chikago. Strawinsky war zu dieser Zeit bereits mit dem ersten Satz beschäftigt, den er am 17. April in der für ihn charakteristischen Particellform abschloß. Am 16. Mai war der Satz so weit fertiginstrumentiert, daß er ihn seinem Verleger Strecker vom Schott-Verlag geben konnte. Bis zum 9. Juli erhielt er das Manuskript mit ausgezeichneten Photoreproduktionen zurück, und am 10. Juli wurde zwischen ihm und Strecker der Vertrag geschlossen. Am 19. Juli beendete Strawinsky den zweiten Satz in Kurzpartitur. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war der Stich der Partitur auf August festgelegt worden und der Stimmenauszug aus dem ersten Satz nahezu abgeschlossen. Am 29. Juli war Strawinsky mit der Orchestrierung beschäftigt und stand unter Zeitdruck, weil er am 31. August nach Venedig zur Biennale, anschließend nach Paris gehen und sich am 27. September auf der Ile de France nach Amerika einschiffen mußte. Strecker selbst kam am 22. August 1939 nach Sancellemoz, um sich den nun abgeschlossenen zweiten Symphonie-Satz abzuholen, von dem er sich hell begeistert zeigte. Bereits am 9. September waren die photographischen Arbeiten beendet. Inzwischen hatten sich aber die Kompositions-Voraussetzungen verändert. Der erwartete Amerika-Auftrag schien sich zerschlagen zu wollen und Strawinsky bemühte sich über Strecker um andere Aufführungsmöglichkeiten, etwa gemeinsam mit der British Broadcasting Corporation in London. Noch sah es so aus, als werde Strawinsky nach Europa zurückkehren. Strecker gab ihm die Verlagsanschrift von Associated Music Publishers in New York als Anlaufstelle für die weiteren Symphonie-Sätze. Mit Brief vom 29. März 1940 regelte sich das Uraufführungsproblem dank Frau Bliss und Frau Carpenter neu. Der amerikanische Auftrag, für das fünfzigjährige Jubiläum des Chicagoer Symphonie-Orchesters eine Symphonie zu schreiben, ging von Frau Robert Wood [Mildred] Bliss und Frau John Alden Carpenter aus, die zusammen insgesamt 3.500 Dollar zur Verfügung stellten. Am 14. März 1940 traf Strawinsky auf einem zu seinen Ehren von Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge im Colony Club zu New York gegebenen Abendempfang mit Mildred Bliss zusammen, nachdem Strawinsky am Morgen in der Town Hall eine Matinée zu Gunsten französischer Kriegshilfe (French War Relief) gegeben hatte. Mildred Bliss unterrichtete Strawinsky bei dieser Gelegenheit über die Aufteilung der für ihn bestimmten Summe von insgesamt 3.500 Dollar. Demnach kamen 1.000 Dollar von Frau Carpenter, der Rest von Frau Bliss, die außerdem in ihren Anteil von 2.500 Dollar einen Betrag von 1.000 Dollar einrechnete, der für den Ankauf der Partitur gedacht war, die sie der Library of Congress zu schenken gedachte, was auch geschah. Strawinsky mußte dafür sein Einverständnis erklären, die Symphonie zum fünfzigsten Jahrestag des Chikago-Orchesters komponiert zu haben, wie es dann später auch in der allen Ausgaben vorangedruckten Widmung heißt. In dieser Frage gab es Kontraktschwierigkeiten. Strawinsky schrieb am 14. April aus Boston an Frederick Stock in Chikago, man habe ihm nichts von der Verbindung zwischen Auftrag und Widmung gesagt. Generell sei es immer seine Absicht gewesen, die Symphonie dem Chikagoer Orchester zu widmen, aber nicht vor, sondern erst nach Vertrag. Bis dahin wollte er sich die Möglichkeit offenhalten, auch mit anderen Interessenten zu verhandeln und in Folge dessen frei sein, die Symphonie gegebenenfalls einem anderen Orchester zuzueignen. Der endgültige, zeitweise noch in der Schwebe gehaltene amerikanische Vertrag wurde dann am 17. April 1940 geschlossen. Inzwischen stellten sich die Photographien des zweiten Satzes, weil nicht scharf genug, als für den Druck unbrauchbar heraus. Man benötigte das Originalmanuskript des zweiten Satzes, das bei Schott in Mainz lag. Wegen der europäischen Kriegsläufe scheute man sich, das Manuskript auf die Post zu geben. Schott teilte mit, es werde durch Frau Gertrud Hindemith nach New York gebracht. Tatsächlich lagerte das Manuskript während des ganzen Krieges bei Schott in Mainz, und Strawinsky erhielt das Original des zweiten Satzes erst im Dezember 1952 im New Yorker Gladstone Hotel durch Paul Hindemith. Mit der Bestätigung Ernest Voigts von Associated Music Publishers, am 8. Mai 1940 die Manuskripte des ersten und dritten Satzes erhalten zu haben, wird gleichzeitig der Zeitrahmen für die Fertigstellung des dritten Satzes zwischen spätestens Herbst 1939 und spätestens Ende Frühjahr 1940 festgelegt. Strawinsky war längst nach Kalifornien weitergereist, wohin man ihm am 7. Juni aus New York die Photoabzüge schickte. Aus einem Brief, den Strawinsky am 16. Juli aus Beverly Hills an Voigt schrieb, geht hervor, daß er sich mitten in der Arbeit am vierten Satz befand. Er hoffe, vorbehaltlich eventueller Unterbrechungen, den Satz noch Ende Juli und die Gesamtpartitur Ende August schicken zu können. Er schätze den Umfang des letzten Satzes auf 50 Seiten mit je 4 bis 5 Takten. Man habe dann noch zwei Monate Zeit, um die Stimmen auszuziehen und die Korrekturen anzubringen. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt hatte Frankreich den Krieg gegen Deutschland verloren und Strawinsky war von den französischen Ereignissen so bedrückt, daß sich seine Arbeit, die längst hätte fertig gestellt werden können, erheblich verzögerte. Die Partitur wurde abschließend mit 19. August 1940 datiert, während Strawinsky selbst später behauptete, sie sei am 17. August abgeschlossen worden. Am 23. August schickte er den letzten Satz an Voigt mit der Bitte, ihn photographieren zu lassen und anschließend das Manuskript an die Washingtoner Kongreßbibliothek weiterzuleiten und diese zu bitten, entsprechend Brief vom 8. Juli 1939 die ausgehandelten eintausend Dollar an ihn überweisen zu wollen. Dieses Datum gilt heute als Abschlußdatum der Symphonie. Da er aber das Original des zweiten Satzes nicht besaß, muß er es neu geschrieben haben. Nun lagen aber die photographischen Druckvorlagen für die ersten beiden Sätze bei Schott in Mainz, die für die letzten beiden bei Associated Music Publishers in New York. Mainz konnte ohne die amerikanischen Unterlagen nicht produzieren, umgekehrt New York auf Grund der vorhandenen Originale jedoch sehr wohl. Die Kosten für die Verschickung waren hoch, die Fährnisse groß. Deshalb schrieb Voigt an Strecker, daß die Partitur in New York hergestellt werden müsse, was aber nicht geschah. Inzwischen ging es nur noch um die Tantiemen für die Uraufführung, deren Leitung von Strecker Strawinsky zehn Tage vor Kriegsbeginn in Frankreich gegen ein genanntes Honorar von 250 Dollar zugesagt worden war, und um die Honorierung für die bevorstehende Schallplattenaufnahme durch Columbia, die bei einer Spieldauer von 28 Minuten 7 Platten erforderlich machte. Am 7. November 1940 dirigierte Strawinsky die Uraufführung, eine Wiederholung am 8. November in einer Matinee und eine weitere Wiederholung am 12. November.

 

Bemerkungen: Die von Associated Music Publishers in New York hergestellten Stimmen müssen von Fehlern nur so gewimmelt haben. Am 29. Juli 1941 schrieb Strawinsky an Nadja Boulanger, um sich mit ihr über die Korrekturen abzustimmen. Er nannte die New Yorker Verlags-Verantwortlichen Idioten (the idiots of Associated Music Publishers) und beschwerte sich, es sei nicht auszudenken, daß Associated Music Publishers für eventuelle Aufführungen das unkorrigierte Material nach England geschickt habe. Am 2. November 1941 schrieb Strawinsky einen Brief an Ernest Voigt, in dem er ihn darauf hinwies, daß jetzt Nadja Boulanger im Besitz seiner Partitur mit allen eingetragenen Korrekturen und bereit sei, mit Voigt Verbindung wegen eines dringend erforderlichen Neusatzes der Orchesterstimmen aufzunehmen. Orchesterstimmen überstehen in der Regel nicht allzu viele Aufführungen. Anschließend müssen sie ersetzt werden. Das gilt um so mehr, wenn es sich um ein neues Stück handelt, in dem der Komponist unentwegt Fehler entdeckt und außerdem noch Verbesserungen anbringt. Gleichzeitig erkundigte sich Strawinsky, ob es sich bei dem Material, das man an Hugo Strecker nach London geschickt habe, um das alte oder um das korrigierte Material handele, wo er doch den wirklichen Sachverhalt längst zu wissen schien. Er möchte, so heißt es weiter, nicht in der Haut eines Dirigenten stecken, der diese Musik zu dirigieren habe, ohne mit all dem völlig vertraut zu sein, wo er selbst doch schon seine liebe Not habe, mit dem Material zurechtzukommen. In einem weiteren Brief an Ernest Voigt vom 13. Oktober 1942 drückte Strawinsky seine Hoffnung aus, daß die Stimmen nunmehr in Ordnung gebracht worden seien. Strawinsky schreibt dazu, ein derartig verfehlertes Stimmenmaterial sei ihm in seiner ganzen musikalischen Laufbahn noch nicht zu Gesicht gekommen (the most abundant in mistakes of any I have ever met at any time in my musical career). Die neuen Kopien, hinter denen Strawinsky Alexei Haieff vermutete, müssen dann wohl sehr gut und sehr schnell hergestellt worden sein. – Strawinsky begann in Amerika, wo er seine langjährige Geliebte Vera Soudeikina heiratete und darüber ein Zerwürfnis mit den Kindern in Kauf nahm, ein völlig neues Leben. Der Wohnortwechsel war davon nur das äußere Zeichen. Strawinsky ist im eigentlichen Sinne nicht emigriert — er ist nur nicht mehr zurückgekommen. Er gehörte zu den wenigen, die auch nach der veränderten Situation von 1945 im schützenden Gastland blieben. Lediglich sein Grab suchte er sich auf der Toteninsel von Venedig (dem Sterbeort Wagners) wenige Meter neben Diaghilew aus.

 

Bedeutung: Die Bedeutung des Stückes liegt im konsequent durchgeführten reihend-variativen Gestaltungscharakter eines Miniaturmotivs, das von der Idee her zur zwangsläufig spannungslosen statischen Episodenreihung führt. Aus demselben Grund zählt die Symphonie in C für etliche seriöse Beurteiler, die also nicht von den prinzipiell feindselig-falschen marxistischen Thesen ausgehen, zu den schwächeren Arbeiten Strawinskys.

 

Fassungen: Die weitere Verbreitung der Symphonie litt unter dem Fehlen einer ordnungsgemäßen Druckfassung, und Strawinsky mußte zeitweise sein eigenes Exemplar aus der Hand geben, um gewünschte Aufführungen zu ermöglichen. Daher drängte er mit Briefen an Hugo Winter (11. 2. und 27. 3. 1944) mehrfach auf eine wenigstens provisorische Druckfassung, die aber nicht zustande kam. Allerdings lag bereits vor dem 11. Februar 1944 eine Tonaufnahme vor, von der Strawinsky Gebrauch machte, um anderen Dirigenten seine Absichten zu erläutern, insbesondere dem eilfertigen Koussewitzky. Erst nach Beendigung des Zweiten Weltkrieges, als die Verbindungen zu Schott wiederhergestellt werden konnten, begannen die Druckvorbereitungen. Mit Schreiben vom 11. Juli 1946 verlangte Strawinsky vor Veröffentlichung die Korrekturabzüge des letzten Satzes zu sehen, und als man dem nachkam, teilte er dem Verlag am 29. September mit einem Kabeltelegramm vorsorglich bereits mit, sehr viele Änderungen angebracht zu haben und deren Erledigung so schnell wie möglich zu wünschen. Aber Strawinsky konnte die Korrekturen nicht mit Luftpost schicken, und die normale Postverbindung dauerte damals mindestens 7 bis 8 Wochen. – Am 5. Oktober hielt Hugo Strecker in London die Korrekturen in Händen, sein Vater in Mainz aber erst am 1. Dezember. Anfang 1948 erschien dann die Symphonie bei Schott zunächst in Form einer Taschenpartiturausgabe. Noch am 11. April 1948 dirigierte Robert Craft in Town Hall die Symphonie nach einer Photokopie des in der Library of Congress lagernden Manuskriptes, und Strawinsky schenkte ihm am 1. Januar 1953 in Erinnerung an dieses Konzert das originale, den Krieg in Mainz überdauert habende Autograph des zweiten Satzes, das eigentlich in die Kongreßbibliothek gehört hätte, aber von Strawinsky neu geschrieben worden war, weil er sonst das Manuskript nicht hätte vertragsgemäß abliefern können. Am 1. Juni 1948 bekam Strawinsky von Mainz aus die ersten gedruckten Exemplare als Belegexemplare. Um von Mainz nach Los Angeles zu gelangen, hatten sie vier Monate gebraucht. Ein von Strawinsky angefertigter vierhändiger Klavierauszug erschien ebensowenig wie eine Fassung für zwei Klaviere, die Strawinskys Sohn Soulima herstellte. Die Stimmen waren leihweise erhältlich. Das Britische Museum erhielt nur von der Taschenpartiturausgabe ein Belegexemplar, das am 17. März 1948 einging, vermutlich weil die Dirigierpartitur zum Leihmaterial zählte. Geschäftlich war die Symphonie ein Erfolg.

 

Druckaufträge: Von der Dirigierpartitur (Editions-Nummer 3840) wurden zu Lebzeiten Strawinskys in 2 Auflagen 700 Exemplare mit Druckauftrag vom 22. November 1949 (200) und 8. Februar 1968 (500) hergestellt, nach Strawinskys Tode bis zum Jahrhundert-Ende entsprechend den Stichbüchern weitere 2 Auflagen mit jeweils 1.000 Stück (Druckaufträge 10. 2. 1977 und 15. 9. 1982). Die Taschenpartitur (Editions-Nummer 3536) erzielte zu Lebzeiten Strawinskys 7 Auflagen mit einer Gesamtauflagenhöhe von 8.100 Stück (Druckaufträge: 23. Februar 1948: 1500; 24. Mai 1955: 800; 19. März 1959: 800; 20. Juni 1962: 1000; 5. März 1964: 1500; 20. März 1967: 1500; 17.März 1971: 1000). Für die Zeit nach Strawinskys Tode bis zum Jahrhundert-Ende verzeichnen die Schottschen Stichbücher nur noch eine einzige Auflage (23. 10. 1973) von 1.000 Stück. Da ein solches Verhältnis zwischen Dirigier– und Studienpartitur ungewöhnlich erscheint, dürfte es nahe liegend sein, die Dirigierpartitur-Nachdrucke von 1977 und 1982 als Taschenpartitur-Drucke anzunehmen. Für die Ausgabe 1955 wurden auf dem Außentitel der Vorname entfernt, die Spieldauer entsprechend Strawinskyscher Vorgabe von 40 in 28 Minuten verbessert, die Copyrightangabe auf 1948 beschränkt sowie eine neue Werbung eingestellt.

 

Choreographien: Die Symphonie bot sich als choreographische Vorlage an, doch Strawinsky freute sich darüber nicht. Später wird er im Zusammenhang mit Kirsteins Anfrage, die Symphony in three movements choreographieren zu lassen, unmittelbar ablehnen (I am against it.) und dabei nicht nur den Unterschied zwischen symphonischer und choreographischer Intention herausstellen, sondern auch objektiv geglückte Choreographierungen wie die des Basler Streicherconcertos (The Cage) in Frage stellen, ohne dabei die choreographischen oder gar tänzerischen Leistungen anzutasten.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: Cleveland 14. Dezember 1952 mit dem Cleveland Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 2./3. Dezember 1962 in der Massey Hall mit dem Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: IV-2/47 (Aufnahme 1962).

 

Autograph: Das Autograph lagert in der Library of Congress, Washington D.C., wobei es sich beim zweiten Satz um eine Neuschrift handelt.

 

Copyright: 1948 durch Schott & Co., London.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

611 (1948) Tp; Schott Mainz; 86 S. 8°; B·S·S 36032; 3536.

                        611Straw1 ibd. [gezeichnet].

                        611Straw2 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            611(55) ebd.

612 (1949) Dp; Schott Mainz / London; 86 S. 4°; B·S·S 36032; Schott 3840.

                        612Straw1 ibd. [signiert].

                        612Straw2 ibd. [ohne Eintragungen].

            612(68) (1968) ibd.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

611 IGOR STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en Ut / pour Orchestre / PARTITUR / [Vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3536 // SYMPHONIE / EN UT / POUR ORCHESTRE / PAR / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [Asterisk] / Partition d’orchestre [#*] Edition Schott 3840 / Parties d’orchestre [#*] en location / Partition de poche [#*] Edition Schott 3536 / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#**] SCHOTT & Co. Ltd. / MAINZ: Weihergarten 5 [#**] LONDON W. 1: 48 Great Marl– / [#] [#**] borough Street / PARIS: Editions Max Eschig [#]** New-York: 25 West 45th Str. / 48 Rue de Rome [#**] Associated Music Publishers Inc. / Printed in Germany – Imprimé en Allemagne // [ohne Rückendeckelbeschriftung] // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 0,6 x13,6 x 18,8 (8°); 86 [86] Seiten + 4 Seiten festes Papier schwarzgrau auf hellgrau [Außentitelei mit orangenfarben ovaler Verlagsvignette 1,9 x 2,5 Mainzer Rad im Spiegel mit beidseitig unterseits halb umlaufender Schrift >PER MARE [#] ET TERRAS<, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Schott’s Studien-Partituren<*** Stand >45<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Orchesterlegende >Distribuzione dell’ orchestra< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [40′] italienisch] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >Symphonie en Ut<; Autorenangabe1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] neben und unter unpunktiert römischer Satznummer >I< rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / 1940<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1939 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London / Copyright 1948 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London<; Platten-Nummer [S. 1:] >B·S·S 36032a< [S. 286:] >B·S·S 36032<; Herstellungshinweis S. 86 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich u. Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<; Kontrollstempeldruck S. 86 unterhalb Notenspiegel eingerückt linksbündig gekastet >G. M. Z. F. O. Visa No 5958 D. d. l’E. P. / AUTORISATION No 2406 D. d. l’I.<) // (1948)

* Distanzpunkte.

** über 5-zeilige schwarze runde Verlags-Trennvignette ø 1,2 Rad im Spiegel mit beidseitig unterseits halb umlaufender Schrift >PER MARE [#] ET TERRAS halb umlaufender Schrift.

*** Angezeigt werden ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Distanzpunkte dreispaltig unter der gekasteten Rubrik >Kammermusik< Kompositionen von >Badings, Henk< bis >Windsperger, L.<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Strawinsky, Igor Ragtime<, unter der gekasteten Rubrik >Orchesterwerke< Kompositionen von >Albeniz, I.< bis >Wunsch, Hermann<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Strawinsky Igor, Feuerwerk / (Feu d’artifice) /° Scherzo / fantastique /° Feuervogel / (L’oiseau de feu) /° Konzert / in D für Viol. u. Orchest. /° / Suite I für kleines Orch. /° / Suite II für kleines Orch. /° / Concerto en mi b für Kam– / merorchester<; unter der gekasteten Rubrik >Gesang m. Kammer-Orch.< Kompositionen von >Falla, Manuel de< bis >Strawinsky, Igor, Pribaoutki / (Scherzlieder) /° Wiegenlieder / der Katze /° Pastorale für / Sopran, Oboe, Engl. Horn, / Klarinette und Fagott<; unter der gekasteten Rubrik >Opern und Ballette< Kompositionen von >Falla, Manuel de< bis >Wagner, Richard<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Strawinsky, Igor, Die Ge– / schichte°° vom Soldaten /° / Reinecke /° Jeu de cartes< [° Schrägstrich original; °° Buchstabe >c< in >sch< angebrochen].

 

611Straw1

 

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf dem Außentitel oberhalb bis unterhalb der Vignette schwungvoll mit weit ausholendem Anfangsbuchstaben >I< zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / May I948< gezeichnet und datiert und enthält Korrekturen [die Zeitdauerangabe wurde von 40 Minuten auf 28 Minuten korrigiert; S. 57 Ziffer 1094 ist der ganze Oboen-Notenkomplex umkringelt; S. 58 Ziffer 2111 Oboe 1: von der 2. zur 3. Note ist ein Bindebogen einzutragen; S. 58 Ziffer 1113 Fagotte: über der 4. Note steht ein mit Bleistift geschriebenes Fragezeichen, die fragliche Fagottstelle ist nicht korrigiert].

 

611Straw2

 

Ein 2. Nachlaßexemplar Strawinskys ist auf der Außentitelei oberhalb Namen rechtsbündig mit >IStrawinsky< gezeichnet, aber nicht datiert. Es reicht nur bis Seite 62 und enthält Korrektureintragungen [Strawinsky verbessert die Spieldauer auch hier, allerdings auf >2930< Minuten und nimmt im Oboen-System von Ziffer 1094 bei der fünftletzten Sechzehntelnote (f2) die (verlängernde) Punktierung weg. Die Fagottstelle ist nicht korrigiert. Das Kontra-G ist stehen geblieben. S. 17 Ziffer 275 = 281 1. Posaune: es ist vom Baßschlüssel in den Violinschlüssel umzuschlüsseln, dasselbe gilt für Ziffer 282; S. 55 Ziffer 1045 1. Fagott: die 1. Sechzehntelnote ist als b1 zu lesen; S. 57 Ziffer 1094 1. Oboe: der Bindebogen zwischen 3. und 4. Note soll gestrichen werden].

 

611(55) STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en Ut / pour Orchestre / PARTITUR / [Vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3536 // SYMPHONIE / EN UT / POUR ORCHESTRE / PAR / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [Asterisk] / Partition d’orchestre [#*] Edition Schott 3840 / Parties d’orchestre [#*] en location / Partition de poche [#*] Edition Schott 3536 / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#**] SCHOTT & Co. Ltd. / MAINZ: Weihergarten 5 [#**] LONDON W. 1: 48 Great Marl– / [#] [#**] borough Street / PARIS: Editions Max Eschig [#]** New-York: 25 West 45th Str. / 48 Rue de Rome [#**] Associated Music Publishers Inc. / Printed in Germany – Imprimé en Allemagne // [Rückendeckelbeschriftung:] STRAWINSKY  SYMPHONIE EN UT // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 0,7 x 13,8 x 18,8; 86 [86] Seiten + 4 Seiten stärkeres Papier schwarzgrau auf hellgrau gemasert [Außentitelei mit orangenfarben ovaler Vignette 1,9 x 2,5 Mainzer Rad im Spiegel mit beidseitig unterseits halb umlaufender Schrift >PER MARE / ET TERRAS<, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >STUDIEN-PARTITUREN / zeitgenössischer Orchesterwerke< *** Stand >105<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Orchesterlegende >Distribuzione dell’ orchestra< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [28′] italienisch] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >Symphonie en Ut<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] neben und unterhalb unpunktiert römischer Satznummer >I< rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / 1940<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1948 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London<; Platten-Nummer [S. 1:] >B·S·S 36032a< [S. 286:] >B·S·S 36032<; Herstellungshinweis S. 86 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich u. Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1955)

* Distanzpunkte

** 5-zeilige runde Verlags-Trennvignette ø 1,2 Rad im Spiegel mit beidseitig unterseits halb umlaufender Schrift >PER MARE / ET TERRAS<.

*** Angezeigt werden dreispaltig mit Editionsnummern nach Distanzpunkten Kompositionen von >WERNER EGK< bis >ALEX. TSCHEREPNIN<, an Strawinsky-Werken >IGOR STRAWINSKY / Scherzo fantastique° 3501 / Circus-Polka° 4274 / „Feuerwerk“, Fantasie°° 3464 // STRAWINSKY (Fortsetzung) /  Symphonie in C° 3536 / Symphony in three / movements° 4075 / „Der Feuervogel“, / Suite (19193467< / „Der Feuervogel“, / Suite (19454420< / Vier norwegische Im– / pressionen°°° / Ode (Elegischer Ge– / sang) in 3 Teilen für / kleines Orchester°°° / Suite I für kleines / Orchester° 3469 /  Suite II für kleines / Orchester° 3470 / Pas de deux (L’oiseau / bleu) (Tschaikowsky)°°°° 4409 / Concerto in Es (Dum– / barton Oaks) f. Kam– / merorchester° 3527 / Danses concertantes° 4275 / Konzert in D für Vio– / line und Orchester° 3504< [° Distanzpunkte; °° ohne Distanzpunkte; °°° ohne Distanzpunkte und ohne Editionsnummer; °°°° Distanzpunkt].

 

612 IGOR STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en Ut / pour Orchestre / Partitur / [Vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3536 // SYMPHONIE / EN UT / POUR ORCHESTRE / PAR / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [Asterisk] / Partition d’orchestre [#*] Edition Schott 3840 / Parties d’orchestre [#*] en location / Partition de poche [#*] Edition Schott 3536 / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE [#**] SCHOTT & Co. Ltd. / MAINZ: Weihergarten 5 [#**] LONDON W. 1: 48 Great Marl– / [#] [#**] borough Street / PARIS: Editions Max Eschig [#]** NEW-YORK: 25 West 45th Str. / 48 Rue de Rome [#**] Associated Music Publishers Inc. / Printed in Germany – Imprimé en Allemagne // (Dirigierpartitur fadengeheftet 24,1 x 31,2 ([4°]); 86 [86] Seiten + 4 Seiten festes Papier dunkelgrau-schwarz auf hellgrau [Außentitelei mit hellorangenfarben ovaler Verlagsvignette 3,6 x 4,5 Mainzer Rad im Spiegel mit halb umlaufender Schrift, Leerseite, [fehlt], [fehlt], + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Orchesterlegende >Distribuzione dell’ orchestra< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [40′] italienisch] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >Symphonie en Ut<; Autorenangabe1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] neben und unter unpunktiert römischer Satznummer >I< rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / 1940<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1939 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London° / Copyright 1948 by Schott & Co. Ltd., London<; Platten-Nummer >B·S·S 36032<; Herstellungshinweis S. 86 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich u. Druck von B. Schott’s Söhne in Mainz<) // (1948)

° — - — - = Die erste Zeile des Rechtsschutzvorbehaltes ist original unlesbar geschwärzt.

* Distanzpunkte.

** 5-zeilige schwarze ovale Verlags-Trennvignette ø 2,2 Rad im Spiegel mit beidseitig unterseits halb umlaufender Schrift >PER MARE< # >ET TERRAS<.

 

612Straw1

 

Strawinsky Nachlaßexemplar ist auf dem Außentitel oberhalb bis unterhalb >Partitur< rechtsbündig mit >IStrawinsky / Oct I949< signiert und datiert und enthält zahlreiche rot und schwarz eingetragene aufführungspraktische Hinweise. Die Dauerangabe ist auf 28 Minuten korrigiert. Die beiden Umschlag-Rückseiten fehlen. Die erste Zeile der Copyrightangabe ist, vermutlich verlagsseits, schwarz überdeckt, in Strawinskys 2. Partitur-Exemplar aber lesbar. Die Fagottstelle ist ebenfalls korrigiert: die untere Note wurde wegradiert, die obere von Hand eingetragen [S. 21, Ziffer 345 2. Fagott: statt 1E ist richtig G zu lesen].

 

612Straw2

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist ohne Umschlag und enthält keine Eintragungen.

 

612[68] STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en ut / pour orchestre / [Vignette] / EDITION SCHOTT / 3840 // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Symphonie en ut / pour orchestre / (1940) / Partition / B. SCHOTT’S SÖHNE . MAINZ / Schott & Co. Ltd., London . B. Schott’s Söhne (Edition Max Eschig), Paris / Schott Music Corp. (Associated Music Publishers Inc.), New York / Printed in Germany // (Dirigierpartitur [nachgeheftet] 26,5 x 33,1 (2° [4°]); 86 [86] Seiten + 4 Seiten stärkeres Papier schwarzgrau auf grau gemasert [Außentitelei mit ovaler Verlagsvignette braunrot 2,8 x 3,5, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Orchesterlegende >ISTRUMENTI< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [28’] italienisch] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >Symphonie en ut<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] neben und unterhalb unpunktierter römischer Satznummer rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / (1940)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Schott & Co. Ltd., London, 1948<; Platten-Nummer [nur] in Verbindung mit Herstellungshinweis S. 86 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz 36032<) // [1968]

 

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM