46

Î ò ÷ å  Í à ø ú

äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäàPater noster pour chœur mixte a cappella – Pater noster für [vierstimmig] gemischten Chor a cappella – Pater noster for mixed choir a cappella – Pater noster per coro misto [a quattro voci] a cappella

 

 

Text: ‘Pater noster’ (after the evangelist Matthew 6.913) is the incipit of the ‘oratio dominica’, the prayer of the Lord. In the Western Church, it was already being used at the time of St. Augustine, and in the Eastern Church at the time of St. Cyrill of Jerusalem. In both churches, it has its central liturgical place in the Mass: in the practice of the West since Gregory the Great, it comes directly after the canonic High Prayer; in the Eastern practice, it comes either before or, as in Nestorian and Coptic practice, after the Breaking of the Bread, but also in the Office since Breviary Pius V of 1568, before Matins, Lauds (in case Lauds is separate from Matins), the Minor Hours and Vespers, at the beginning of Compline and at the end of entire Office and the Minor Hours, if it represents the end and does not continue into other prayers. Apart from that, it is used at Last Anointment, the Commendatio Animae, at the Exequies, in rosary prayer, at Baptism and at other liturgical and non-liturgical places. The performance practice has changed in many ways in the course of the history of the liturgy. In the Tridentine tradition, the priest prays with it as a representative of the congregation, although there are also choral settings in many parts in the Roman rite. After the Second Vatican Council, the Pater Noster became a congregational prayer. In the Eastern rite, it was always thus, and was prayed by the congregation or sung by the choir.

 

Sung text: >Pater noster, qui es in caelis: sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo, et in terra. Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie. Et dimitte nobis debita nostra, sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. / Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, / sed libera nos a malo. Amen.< [Our Father which art in heaven, hallowed be thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in earth, as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.*]

* King James Bible.

 

Source: Holy Scripture after the evangelist Matthew Mt 6:913.

 

Construction: The motet is a formalised, four-part unaccompanied choral work at a length of 37 bars (Church-Slavonic original version) or 45 bars (Latin version); it is only given a metronome mark in the Latin version, and often changes meter according to the declamation. – Using the number of references to ‘Our Father’ as a basis, the motet is in ten sections in Church-Slavonic and eleven parts in Latin as a result of the additional ‘Amen’. The sections are constructed using three arch-shaped patterns of recitation which are repeated partly in separate blocks and partly in different orders. In addition, the patterns of recitation are used for the entry and, (only) in the Latin version, for the ‘Amen’.

1.)      A = A : I

2.)      B = B : II

3.)      C = B : II

4.)      D = B : II

5.)      E = E : III

6.)      F = E : III

7.)      G = E : III

8.)      H = H : IV

9.)      I = E : III

(10.)      J = E : III

(11.)      K = K : V

For both versions, different bar, and therefore overall, lengths arise because of the different lengths of the words and sentences between the old Slavonic and the Latin ‘Our Father’. For the same reason, Strawinsky had to calculate the meters for the two languages differently. Thus, four quavers in one language become two crochets in the other, six quavers become seven quavers, four quavers become three, a minim becomes two crochets and so forth. The minims, which are used more often in the Church-Slavonic version as the notes for the ends of sections, are normally realized in the Latin version in shorter note values and, in addition, gain a breath mark. The strongly syllabic setting is interrupted in both versions by two-note melismas at textually significant points (Latin version: bar 9: ‘ad-veniat’ [The Kingdom of God ‘may come’], bar 13: ‘fi-at’ [The Will of God ‘may come to pass’]). In spite of this, it must be assumed, considering the two-note melismas which are found more frequently in the Church-Slavonic version, that it is not a question of textual interpretation, rather a question of the compositional principle of avoiding leaps. This was conventional in religious vocal compositions, especially in old classical polyphony, in order to create a sung line which is as soft and gently flowing as possible. For the same reason, the range of the vocal parts is kept narrow. The soprano (B flat – E flat) and the alto (E flat – A flat) parts do not exceed a fourth, but the tenor range (A-E flat) is extended by a semi-tone and the bass only is more expansive (G-f). In the two upper parts, there is not a single leap, and in the tenor, only a few. The bass line is an exception for structural reasons and interrupts flowing passages with one or several consecutive leaps.

 

Structure

a) Church-Slavonic version

[without metronome marking] (37 Bars; c minor)

b) Latin Version

Crotchet = 72 (45 bars; c minor)

 

Style: The Pater noster is set syllabically and in a style of chordal recitation without melodic line as such; there are however certain exceptions, more commonly in the Church-Slavonic version than in the Latin version, for melodic, though presumably not textual, reasons. The proximity to the setting of the language in formalised Byzantine Church music can be clearly heard. In comparison with the two following motets, Credo and Ave Maria, the setting of the Pater noster corresponds clearly to that of the Credo. The motet, which is kept in the minor key, avoids harmonic piquancy and, in Church-Slavonic style, ends in pure C minor, in Latin on a bare C, without chordal realisation. In the Latin version, section I begins with the word ‘sed’ at the end of section C (transition bar 3940).

 

Performance practice: The Pater noster is a supplicatory prayer of trust and belief. Strawinsky achieved less with his gentler manner of performance than Ernest Ansermet, who created the style of a rather hard, rhythmic, sharply intoned and also virtuosic Strawinsky. Ansermet’s contours can be related to the Pater Noster just as much as it can be to Byzantine solemnity. In both cases, a stylistically impressive and valid tonal palate is seen. It does not however correspond to Strawinsky’s religious thinking. The religious supplicant is neither hardened nor pathetic nor made more solemn; he opens himself and begins a dialogue, which is prayer. To this extent, Strawinsky’s own gentle, cautious, rather still interpretation is closer to the meaning of the work. The many changes in meter also do not serve the rhythmic impulse for effect, rather they arise inevitably from the flow of the language. The liturgical text must only be understood and examined closely in a measured fashion. Everything which can be inferred in the interpretation of what is understood and measured, referring back to the work itself or from an intoxication transferring the thought on to the substance, misses the religious meaning. The Pater Noster is not an opportunity for artistic effect, by this conviction. Strawinsky would not tolerate any expressivity in the setting of his church-music motets, as he associated mawkishness and sentimentality with it.

 

Dedication: no known at present.

 

Duration: about 134“ (Church-Slavonic version).

 

Date of origin: Church-Slavonic version: 1926; Latin version: [February] March 1949.

 

First performance: Pater Noster, Credo and Ave Maria were premièred under Strawinsky’s baton at a memorial concert to the memory of the American composer, Blaire Fairchild, who died on 23rd April 1933 in Paris, on 18th May 1934, in the Salle Gaveau in Paris under the joint title ‘Trois Chants d’église’. Strawinsky explained however that he had heard the motets for the first time during the Mass for the Dead for his cousin Beliankin in a Russian Orthodox Church in Paris.

 

Remarks: Strawinsky seemed fairly excited about the American edition and the preceding article that would go with it. The New York branch of Boosey & Hawkes had enquired of him in all seriousness of the name of the author of the text for the ‘Our Father’ prayer, so that it could be put on the title page of the score. He found the border of the front page, consisting of stylised singing heads with mouths torn open, abhorrent. On his received copy, he therefore wrote in his commented complimentary copy the margin: ‘What a stupid decor!’. The entire series is produced in this design, which appears “Kitsch” to European eyes.

 

Significance: The Pater Noster was the first publicly given sign of Strawinsky’s new thinking. The avoidance of belief normally begins with the conscious or gradual abandonment of the ability or will to partake in prayer, which is the dialogue between Man and God. His return to it is therefore also the first step to reversal. In this way, Strawinsky introduced these works, consciously motivated by religion, with a setting of the most important prayer of Christianity, the Lord’s Prayer, the ‘Our Father’. What also supports this meaning is the fact that sketches for the composition of a church prayer, which were found in his estate, reached back to the year 1930, but were not realized. According to this, Strawinsky was consciously looking for a prayer years before the Pater Noster which corresponded with his state of belief and ended his search with the setting of the ‘Our Father’. The next step of the avoidance of belief is denial. Accordingly, the next step for the return is its avowal to others. The setting of the Credo as the next choral motet is therefore consequently given.

 

Latin adaptation: In the correspondence, there is a small note on the adaptation of the work into Latin. In his letter to Robert Craft on 22nd March 1949, he states that he had just made a final Latin version of Pater Noster and Ave Maria. Both manuscripts in the meanwhile would be in the hands of the publishers Boosey & Hawkes. It may be noteworthy that the Latin versions were the result of longer consideration. The problems which are mentioned here were presumably a result of the adjusted word setting and therefore the use of accents in the new setting; in the case of the Ave Maria, they were a result of the longer text of the Latin version, especially the realisation of the meaning of the text through the use of corresponding motific patterns.

 

Versions: The Pater Noster, which is only accessible to choirs who can sing in Russian, was published in 1932 by the Russian Music publishers and was a failure for them. In 1932, 14 copies were sold and up to 1938, only 88 were sold worldwide, almost half of which were in France. The transfer of the contract to the publishers Boosey & Hawkes took place on 6th November 1950. This edition, with the Russian (Church-Slavonic) text, was republished in 1967 by Boosey & Hawkes with a new plate number. In March 1949, Strawinsky completed a version with the Latin text. It was published in 1949 by Boosey & Hawkes in New York and in 1953 by Boosey & Hawkes in London. The American contributed copy was received by Strawinsky on 23rd November 1949. In Germany, there was also an edition published of the Latin version in 1957. The Church-Slavonic editions all contained a transliteration, and the Latin editions normally contained a piano part intended exclusively for rehearsal purposes and which may not be played under any circumstances as an instrumental accompaniment to a performance.

 

Historical recordings: New York April 1949, Latin version, with the choir of the Church of the Blessed Sacrament under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 8th Mai 1964, Church-Slavonic version*, Festival Singers of Toronto trained by the director Elmer Iseler, under the direction of Igor Strawinsky

* The accompanying booklet for the CD prints the Latin text, but it is sung in Church-Slavonic.

 

CD-Edition: XI-1/10 (Recording 1964).

 

Autographe: Neat copies of both versions are stored in the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel.

 

Copyright: 1932 (Church-Slavonic version) by Russischer Musikverlag, 1947 assigned to Boosey & Hawkes; 1949 (Latin version) by Boosey & Hawkes New York.

 

Editions

a) Overview

461 1932 ChSc Church Slavonic; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 3 pp.; R. M. V. 545.

462 1949 ChSc Latin, American edition; Boosey & Hawkes New York; 6 pp.; – .

                        462Straw ibd. (with annotations)

463 1950 ChSc Latin, English edition; Boosey & Hawkes London; 6 pp.; B. & H. 16974.

464 [1956] ChSc Latin, German edition; Boosey & Hawkes Bonn; 6 pp.; B. & H. 16974.

            464Straw ibd. (with annotations)

465 1967 ChSc; Church Slavonic; Boosey & Hawkes London; 4 pp.; B. & H. 19595.

b) Characteristic features

461 ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊ¯É / Îò×å Íàøú / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà / [Vignette] / ðîññ³éñêîå / ìóçûêàëüíîå èçäàòåëüñòâî // IGOR STRAWINSKY / PATER NOSTER / pour chœur mixte a capella / Prix: RM. 1. = / Frs. 1. = * / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.** / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEVITZKY / BERLIN · LEIPZIG · PARIS · MOSCOU · LONDRES · NEW YORK · BUENOS AIRES / S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXII // (Choral score 18.4 x 27.4 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text in Church Slavonic with a transliteration for English speakers alongside it; 3 [2] pages + title page thin cardboard in ornamental letters in old Russian red-black on white-yellow [front cover title in an ornamental frame with very distorted fancy lettering*** and a vignette 2 x 2 of the Maltese Cross with convex ends] + 1 page back matter [table of French pronunciation of Latin transliteration letters >Notice sur la transcription latine<]; title head >„ Îò×å Íàøú “ / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right centred >ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊIÉ / 1926<; legal reservations without Copyright 1st page of the score below type area flush left centred >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays / Edition Russe de Musique / Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin.< flush right >TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION, DE REPRODUCTION ET / D’ARRANGEMENTS RESERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS.<; plate number >R. M. V. 545<; production indications p. 3 flush left centred as end mark >S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXII< flush right >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // (1932)

* The currency units appear one directly above the other.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

*** Using accent signs; the initials of the two-part main title printed in red script.

 

462 1833 [#] S. A. T. B. [#] 18c / PATER NOSTER / New Version With Latin Text / by / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°] Boosey & Hawkes // (Choral score with vocal score for rehearsal [piano part p. 2 preceding = preceding the 1st piano system on the first page] >For / rehearsal / only<] 17.3 x 26,2 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text Latin; 5 [4] pages + 1 page front matter [ornamental title page black on cream white flush left continuous band border 25.3 x 5 + at the bottom a succinctly running border 16.7 x 1.2 with singers’ heads with their mouths wide open **] + 1 page back matter [page with (publisher’s) advertisements >Early Church Chorusses / Edited and Arranged / by / NOBLE CAIN<* without production data]; title head >PATER NOSTER<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY / New version with Latin text<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1949 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York. / Copyright in all Countries.< flush right >All Rights°° Reserved / Tous Droits Reservés<; marked sheet p. 35 below type area flush left >Pater noster 4<; without plate number; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in U.S.A.<; without end mark; (1949)

° The London copy >1: F 1176.u.(9.)< (legal deposite blue 16.12. 49) has a stamp from left diagonally upwards at this point >MUSIC FOR COPYRIGHT PURPOSES ONLY<.

°° Original spelling

* 12 compositions are advertised without column divisions from >Miserere Mei° W. Byrd< bis >Ave Verum Corpus – (TTBB

Vittoria< [° Fill character (dotted line)].

 

** The standard decorative page for all editions in this series. 

 

462Straw

 

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate contains the dated signature >IStr / Nov 23/°49< flush right on the outer title page between the 1st line and the title of the work, and along the band on the left the disgusted remark >What a stupid decor!<, and under the title of the work the partly underlined statement >I was asked, just before the printing / of it by B. & H. Inc. in N Y who is / the author of this text – to print / his name on this score / IStr)< [°slash original].

 

464 Winthrop Roger / Church Choral Series / Nr. 29 / Igor Strawinsky / Pater Noster / für 4-stimmigen gemischten Chor / a cappella / Boosey & Hawkes // (Choral score 18 x 25.8 (8° [Lex. 8°]) with piano part for rehearsal only [piano part preceding = preceding the 1st piano system on the first page] >(nur zum / Einüben)<; sung text Latin; 6 [4] pages without cover + 1 page front matter [title page black on white] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >BÉLA BARTOK / VOCAL AND CHORAL MUSIC / GESANG UND CHORWERKE · MUSIQUE POUR CHANT ET CHOEUR< production data >No. 778< [#] >3.55<]; title head >PATER NOSTER<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY / Neufassung with lat. Text<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1949 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York. / Copyright in all countries. / All Rights° Reserved°<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in Germany<; plate number >B. & H. 16974<) // [1955]

° Original spelling

 

465 Igor Stravinsky / Îò×å Íàøú ” / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà / Pater Noster / (Church Slavonic Version) / S.A.T.B. a capella / Boosey & Hawkes // Chorpartitur [library binding] 18.5 x 26 (8° [Lex. 8°]); sung text Russian with Transliterationsbelowlegung; 4 [2] pages + 1 pages front matter [Titelei] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky< production data >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; title head >„ Îò×å Íàøú ” / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà / Pater Noster / (Church Slavonic Version) / S. A. T. B. a capella <; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 next to and below last line title head flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1926<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1932 by Edition Russe de Musique / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey& Hawkes Inc. / for all countries< flush right >All rights reserved / Tonsättning forbjudes<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 19595<; without end mark) // [1967]

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price informations and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

46

Î ò ÷ å  Í à ø ú

äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäàPater noster pour chœur mixte a cappella – Pater noster für [vierstimmig] gemischten Chor a cappella – Pater noster for mixed choir a cappella – Pater noster per coro misto [a quattro voci] a cappella

 

Text: ‚Pater noster’ (nach dem Evangelisten Matthäus 6.913) ist das Incipit des oratio dominica heißenden Gebets des Herrn. In der Westkirche wurde es schon zu Zeiten des heiligen Augustinus gebetet, in der Ostkirche bereits beim heiligen Cyrill von Jerusalem. Es hat in beiden Kirchen seinen zentralen liturgischen Ort in der Messe, im Westritus seit Gregor dem Großen unmittelbar nach dem kanonischen Hochgebet, im Ostritus teilweise vor oder, wie im nestorianischen und koptischen Ritus, nach der Brotbrechung, aber auch im Offizium seit dem Brevier Pius V. von 1568, hier vor der Matutin, vor den Laudes (falls die Laudes von der Matutin getrennt werden), den kleinen Horen und der Vesper, zu Beginn der Komplet, am Schluß des Gesamtoffiziums und am Schluß der kleinen Horen, wenn sie wirklich den Schluß bilden und nicht in andere Gebete weitergeführt werden. Es wird außerdem bei der Letzten Ölung, der Commendatio animae, bei den Exequien, im Rosenkranzgebet, bei der Taufe und anderen liturgischen und nichtliturgischen Orten gebetet. Die Aufführungspraxis hat sich im Laufe der Liturgiegeschichte mehrfach geändert. Tridentinisch wurde es vom Priester stellvertretend für die Gemeinde gebetet, obwohl es mehrstimmige Chorvertonungen auch im römischen Ritus gibt. Nach dem zweiten vatikanischen Konzil ist das Pater noster ein Gemeindegebet geworden. Im Ostritus war es das immer schon und wurde von der Gemeinde gebetet beziehungsweise vom Chor gesungen.

 

Singtext: >Pater noster, qui es in caelis: sanctificetur nomen tuum. Adveniat regnum tuum. Fiat voluntas tua, sicut in caelo, et in terra. Panem nostrum cotidianum da nobis hodie. Et dimitte nobis debita nostra, sicut et nos dimittimus debitoribus nostris. / Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, / sed libera nos a malo. Amen.< [Vater unser, der Du bist im Himmel, geheiligt werde Dein Name; zu uns komme Dein Reich; Dein Wille geschehe, wie im Himmel, so auch auf Erden! Unser tägliches Brot gib uns heute; und vergib uns unsere Schuld, wie auch wir vergeben unsern Schuldigern; und führe uns nicht in Versuchung, sondern erlöse uns von dem Übel [heute: Bösen]. Amen.

 

Quelle: Heilige Schrift nach dem Evangelisten Matthäus 6,913.

 

Aufbau: Die Motette ist ein nur in der lateinischen Fassung metronomisiertes, deklamationsbedingt metrisch häufig wechselndes, formalisiertes vierstimmiges Chorstück ohne Begleitung im Umfang von 37 (kirchenslawische Originalfassung) beziehungsweise 45 (lateinische Fassung) Takten. – Entsprechend der Anzahl der Vaterunser-Sinnbezüge ist die Motette kirchenslawisch in zehn, lateinisch wegen des hinzugefügten Amen in elf Abschnitte unterteilt. Die Abschnitte sind über 3 bogenförmige Rezitationsformeln errichtet, die sich teils in geschlossenen Blöcken, teils in unterschiedlicher Reihenfolge wiederholen. Hinzu kommt die Rezitationsformel für den Eingang und (nur) in der lateinischen Fassung für das Amen.

1.)      A = A : I

2.)      B = B : II

3.)      C = B : II

4.)      D = B : II

5.)      E = E : III

6.)      F = E : III

7.)      G = E : III

8.)      H = H : IV

9.)      I = E : III

(10.)      J = E : III

(11.)      K = K : V

Für die beiden Fassungen ergeben sich wegen der unterschiedlichen Wort– und Satzlängen im altslawischen und im lateinischen Vaterunser unterschiedliche Takt– und damit Stücklängen. Aus demselben Grund mußte Strawinsky die Metren für die beiden Sprachen anders berechnen. So werden aus 4 Achteln in der einen Sprache 2 Viertel in der anderen, aus 6 Achteln werden 7 Achtel, aus 4 Achteln werden 3, aus einer Halbenote werden 2 Viertelnoten, und so weiter. Die in der kirchenslawischen Fassung als Abschnittsendton häufiger vorkommenden Halbenoten werden in der lateinischen Fassung in der Regel in kürzere Notenwerte aufgelöst und erhalten zusätzlich ein Atemzeichen. Die streng syllabische Vertonung wird in beiden Fassungen durch Zweitonmelismen an textlich herausragenden Stellen unterbrochen (Lateinische Fassung: Takt 9: ad-veniat [das Reich Gottes „möge kommen“], Takt 13: fi-at [der Wille Gottes „möge geschehen“]). Trotzdem muß, vor allem im Vergleich mit den in der kirchenslawischen Fassung häufiger auftretenden Zweitonmelismen, davon ausgegangen werden, daß es sich nicht um Textinterpretation, sondern um das in kirchlichen Vokalkompositionen vor allem der altklassischen Polyphonie gebräuchliche Kompositionsprinzip des Vermeidens von Sprüngen handelt, um eine möglichst sanft gleitende, weiche Gesangslinie zu erhalten. Aus demselben Grund ist der Ambitus der Singstimmen klein gehalten. Er geht für Sopran (b-es) und Alt (es-as) nicht über eine Quarte hinaus, ist für den Tenor (a-es) um einen Halbton erweitert und lediglich im Baß (G-f) raumgreifender. In den beiden Oberstimmen gibt es keinen einzigen Sprung, im Tenor einige wenige. Lediglich der Fundamentbaß bildet strukturbedingt eine Ausnahme und unterbricht gleitende Passagen mit einem oder auch mehreren Sprüngen hintereinander.

 

Aufriß

a) kirchenslawische Fassung

[ohne Metronomisierung] (37 Takte; c-moll)

b) lateinische Fassung

Viertel = 72 (45 Takte; c-moll)

 

Stilistik: Das Pater noster ist mit einigen in der kirchenslawischen Fassung mehr als in der lateinischen Fassung melodie– und vermutlich nicht textbedingten Ausnahmen syllabisch und dabei rezitativisch akkordisch ohne eigentliche Melodiebildung vertont. Die Nähe zur chorischen Sprachbehandlung formalisierter byzantinischer Kirchenmusik ist deutlich zu hören. Im Vergleich mit den beiden nachfolgenden Motetten Credo und Ave Maria entspricht die Vertonung des Pater noster der des Credo. Die in moll gehaltene Motette verzichtet auf harmonische Schärfen und schließt kirchenslawisch in reinem c-moll, lateinisch auf einem nicht akkordisch gefüllten C. In der lateinischen Fassung beginnt der Abschnitt I mit dem Wort ‚sed’ schon am Ende von Abschnitt C (Übergang Takt 39 zu 40).

 

Aufführungspraxis: Das Pater Noster ist ein Bittgebet aus vertrauensvoller Glaubenshaltung. Strawinsky hat sich mit seiner weicheren Art der Aufführung weniger durchgesetzt als Ernest Ansermet, der den Stil eines eher harten, rhythmisch scharf intonierenden und dabei virtuosen Strawinsky schuf. Auf das Pater Noster läßt sich die Ansermetsche Konturengebung ebenso übertragen wie byzantinische Feierlichkeit. In beiden Fällen erzeugt man ein stilistisch beeindruckendes und legitimes Klangbild. Es entspricht aber nicht der religiösen Vorstellung Strawinskys. Der religiöse Bittsteller ist weder verhärtet noch pathetisch noch verfeierlicht; er öffnet sich und nimmt einen Dialog auf, Gebet genannt. Insofern ist Strawinskys eigene, weiche, verhaltene, eher stille Interpretation dem Sinngehalt näher. Auch die vielen Metrenwechsel dienen nicht einem rhythmischen Impuls, um Wirkung zu erzielen, sondern sie ergeben sich zwangsläufig aus dem Sprachfluß. Der liturgische Text soll nur verstanden und angemessen vorgetragen und der Betrachtung anheim gegeben werden. Alles, was interpretatorisch über das Verstehen und das Angemessene hinausgeht, was also auf das Stück selbst rückverweist oder aus einem Rausch heraus das Denken auf die Substanz verstellt, geht an der religiösen Sinngebung vorbei. Das Pater Noster ist nach dieser Überzeugung kein Feld für künstlerische Effekte. Strawinsky hat sich jede Expressivität bei der Darstellung seiner kirchenmusikalischen Motetten verbeten, wobei er unter Expressivität Gefühlsüberschwang und Sentimentalität verstand.

 

Widmung: keine Widmung bekannt.

 

Dauer: etwa 134“ (kirchenslawische Fassung).

 

Entstehungszeit: kirchenslawische Fassung: 1926; lateinische Fassung: [Februar] März 1949.

 

Uraufführung: Pater noster, Credo und Ave Maria wurden unter der Leitung Strawinskys aus Anlaß eines Gedächtniskonzertes zum Andenken an den am 23. April 1933 in Paris verstorbenen amerikanischen Komponisten Blaire Fairchild am 18. Mai 1934 in der Pariser Salle Gaveau unter dem Gesamttitel ‚Trois Chants d’église’ uraufgeführt. Strawinsky erklärte jedoch, die Motette zum erstenmal während der Totenmesse für seinen Vetter Beliankin in einer russisch-orthodoxen Kirche in Paris gehört zu haben.

 

Bemerkungen: Über die amerikanische Ausgabe und die zugehörige Vorgeschichte zeigte sich Strawinsky in besonderem Maße erregt. Die New Yorker Niederlassung von Boosey & Hawkes hatte bei ihm allen Ernstes nach dem Namen des ‚Textautors’ des Vaterunser-Gebetes nachgefragt, um ihn auf dem Titelblatt der Partitur angeben zu können. Die Bildleiste des Vorderblattes aus untereinander gesetzten stilisierten Sängerköpfen mit aufgerissenen Mäulern fand er abscheulich. Auf seinem Belegexemplar brachte er eine Anmerkung >What a stupid decor!< [Was für eine dumme Ausstattung] an. Die ganze Serie ist in dieser für europäische Augen Kitschaufmachung hergestellt..

 

Bedeutung: Das Pater noster war das erste öffentlich gesetzte Zeichen für Strawinskys religiöse Neubesinnung. Glaubensabwendung beginnt in der Regel mit der bewußten oder schleichend einsetzenden Preisgabe der Fähigkeit oder des Willens zum Gebet als des Dialogs zwischen Mensch und Gott. Seine Wiederaufnahme ist daher auch der erste Schritt zur Rückkehr. So leitet Strawinsky die bewußt religiös motivierten Werke mit einer Vertonung des wichtigsten Gebetes der Christenheit überhaupt, dem Gebet des Herrn, dem Vaterunser, ein. Für diese Deutung spricht auch, daß sich im Nachlaß eine in das Jahr 1930 zurückreichende Skizze für die Komposition eines Kirchengebetes befand, die er nicht ausführte. Demnach hat Strawinsky also schon Jahre vor dem Pater noster bewußt nach einem seiner Glaubenssituation entsprechenden Gebet gesucht und seine Suche mit der Vertonung des Vaterunsers beendet. Der nächste Schritt einer Abwendung vom Glauben ist seine Verleugnung. Entsprechend ist der nächste Schritt der Rückkehr das Bekenntnis nach außen. Die Vertonung des credo als nächste Chor-Motette erscheint somit folgerichtig.

 

Lateinische Adaptation: Im Briefwechsel findet sich eine kleine Bemerkung über die Latinisierung. In seinem an Robert Craft gerichteten Schreiben vom 22. März 1949 erklärte er, gerade (just) eine endgültige (final) lateinische Fassung von Pater noster und Ave Maria gemacht zu haben. Beide Manuskripte befänden sich inzwischen in Händen des Verlags Boosey & Hawkes. Es dürfte ein Hinweis darauf sein, daß die lateinischen Fassungen Ergebnis längerer Überlegungen gewesen sind. Die Probleme, die hier anklingen, ergaben sich vermutlich aus der veränderten Wortstellung und damit Akzentverlagerung der neuen Vertonung, im Falle des Ave Maria aus dem längeren Text der lateinischen Fassung, besonders aber der Sinnverdeutlichung durch übereinstimmende Motivformeln.

 

Fassungen: Das nur russisch singenden Chören zugängliche Pater noster erschien 1932 im Russischen Musikverlag und war verlegerisch gesprochen ein Mißerfolg. Im Jahr 1932 wurden 14 Exemplare verkauft, bis 1938 weltweit nur 88, davon knapp die Hälfte in Frankreich. Die Vertragsübernahme in den Verlag Boosey & Hawkes erfolgte unter dem Datum 6. November 1950. Diese Ausgabe mit dem russischen (kirchenslawischen) Text wurde 1967 von Boosey & Hawkes mit neuer Platten-Nummer wiederaufgelegt. Im März 1949 fertigte Strawinsky eine Fassung mit lateinischem Text an. Sie kam 1949 bei Boosey & Hawkes in New York, 1953 bei Boosey & Hawkes in London heraus. Das amerikanische Belegexemplar erhielt Strawinsky am 23. November 1949. Auch in Deutschland wurde 1957 eine eigene Ausgabe der lateinischen Version hergestellt. Die kirchenlawischen Ausgaben enthielten immer eine Transliteration, die lateinischen Ausgaben in der Regel einen Klaviersatz, der ausschließlich für die Einstudierung gedacht ist und bei einer Aufführung unter keinen Umständen als Instrumentalbegleitung mitgespielt werden darf.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: New York April 1949 in der lateinischen Fassung mit dem Chor der Church of the Blessed Sacrament unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 8. Mai 1964 in der kirchenslawischen Fassung* mit den Festival Singers of Toronto in der Einstudierung durch den Chorleiter Elmer Iseler unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky.

* Das Begleitheft der CD-Ausgabe druckt den lateinischen Text ab; gesungen wird kirchenslawisch.

 

CD-Edition: XI-1/10 (Aufnahme 1964).

 

Autographe: Reinschriften beider Fassungen werden in der Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel verwahrt.

 

Copyright: 1932 für die kirchenslawische Fassung durch den Russischen Musikverlag 1947 auf Boosey & Hawkes übertragen; 1949 für die lateinische Fassung durch Boosey & Hawkes New York

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

461 1932 Chp kirchenslawisch; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 3 S.; R. M. V. 545.

462 1949 Chp lateinisch, amerikanische Ausgabe; Boosey & Hawkes New York; 6 S.; – .

                        462Straw ibd. (mit Anmerkungen)

463 1950 Chp lateinisch, englische Ausgabe; Boosey & Hawkes London; 6 S.; B. & H. 16974.

464 [1956] Chp lateinisch, deutsche Ausgabe; Boosey & Hawkes Bonn; 6 S.; B. & H. 16974.

                        464Straw ibd. (mit Anmerkungen)

465 1967 Chp; kirchenslawisch; Boosey & Hawkes London; 4 S.; B. & H. 19595.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

461 ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊ¯É / Îò×å Íàøú / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà / [Vignette] / ðîññ³éñêîå / ìóçûêàëüíîå èçäàòåëüñòâî // IGOR STRAWINSKY / PATER NOSTER / pour chœur mixte a capella / Prix: RM. 1. = / Frs. 1. = / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEVITZKY / BERLIN · LEIPZIG · PARIS · MOSCOU · LONDRES · NEW YORK · BUENOS AIRES / S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXII // (Chorpartitur 18,4 x 27,4 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext russisch mit Transliteration für französisch Sprechende; 3 [2] Seiten + Titelseite leichter Karton schwarzrot auf hellbeige [Außentitelei im Zierrahmen mit stark verfremdeter Zierschrift** und Vignette 2 x 2 Malteser-(Johanniter-)kreuz mit konvexen Enden] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Ausspracheanweisung russische Transliteration in das Französische >Notice sur la transcription latine<]; Kopftitel >„ Îò×å Íàøú “ / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊIÉ / 1926<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig zentriert >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays / Edition Russe de Musique / Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin.< rechtsbündig >TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION, DE REPRODUCTION ET / D’ARRANGEMENTS RESERVÉS POUR TOUS PAYS.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 545<; Herstellungshinweis S. 3 linksbündig zentriert als Endevermerk >S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXII< rechtsbündig >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // (1932)

* G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

** unter Verwendung von Akzentzeichen; Initialen des zweiteiligen Haupttitels in Rotdruck.

 

462 1833 [#] S. A. T. B. [#] 18c / PATER NOSTER / New Version With Latin Text / by / IGOR STRAWINSKY / [°] Boosey & Hawkes // (Chorpartitur mit Klavierauszug zu Einstudierungszwecken [Klavierstimme S. 2 vorgesetzt >For / rehearsal / only<] 17,3 x 26,2 (8° [Lex. 8°]); Singtext lateinisch; 5 [4] Seiten + 1 Seite Vorspann [Ziertitelei schwarz auf cremeweiß linksbündig durchgehend Leiste 25,3 x 5 + unten bündig verlaufend Leiste 16,7 x 1,2 mit den Mund weit aufsperrenden Sängerköpfen**] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit (verlagseigener) Werbung >Early Church Chorusses / Edited and Arranged / by / NOBLE CAIN<* ohne Stand]; Kopftitel >PATER NOSTER<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAWINSKY / New version with Latin text<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1949 in U. S. A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York. / Copyright in all Countries.< rechtsbündig >All Rights Reserved / Tous Droits Reservés<; Werkhinweis S. 35 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Pater noster 4<; ohne Platten-Nummer; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig halbrechts >Printed in U.S.A.<; ohne Endevermerk; (1949)

° das Londoner Exemplar enthält an dieser Stelle einen von links aus schräg hochgezogenen Stempelaufdruck >MUSIC FOR COPYRIGHT PURPOSES ONLY.<

* Angezeigt werden ohne Spalteneinteilung 12 Kompositionen von >Miserere Mei° W. Byrd< bis >Ave Verum Corpus – (TTBB)° Vittoria< [° Distanzpunkte].

 

** Standard-Zierblatt für alle Ausgaben dieser Serie.

 

462Straw

 

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar enthält auf der Außentitelei zwischen der 1. Zeile und dem Werktitel rechtsbündig die datierte Signatur >IStr / Nov 2349<, entlang der linken Leiste die empörte Anmerkung >What a stupid decor!<, und unter dem Werktitel die teilunterstrichene Mitteilung >I was asked, just before the printing / of it by B. & H. Inc. in N Y who is / the author of this text – to print / his name on this score / IStr)< [° Schrägstrich original].

464 Winthrop Roger / Church Choral Series / Nr. 29 / Igor Strawinsky / Pater Noster / für 4-stimmigen gemischten Chor / a cappella / Boosey & Hawkes // (Chorpartitur 18 x 25,8 (8° [Lex. 8°]) mit zum Zwecke der Einstudierung beigegebenem nicht für die Aufführung bestimmten Klaviersatz >(nur zum / Einüben)<*; Singtext lateinisch; 6 [4] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 1 Seite Vorspann [Titelei schwarz auf weiß] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >BÉLA BARTOK / VOCAL AND CHORAL MUSIC / GESANG UND CHORWERKE · MUSIQUE POUR CHANT ET CHOEUR< Stand >No. 778< [#] >3.55<]; Kopftitel >PATER NOSTER<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAWINSKY / Neufassung mit lat. Text<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1949 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York. / Copyright in all countries. / All Rights Reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in Germany<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16974<) // [1955]

* Anmerkung vor dem Klavier-System.

 

465 Igor Stravinsky / Îò×å Íàøú ” / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà / Pater Noster / (Church Slavonic Version) / S.A.T.B. a capella / Boosey & Hawkes // Chorpartitur [naachgeheftet] 18,5 x 26 (8°); Singtext russisch mit Transliterationsunterlegung; 4 [2] Seiten + 1 Seiten Vorspann [Titelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky< Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; Kopftitel >„ Îò×å Íàøú ” / äëÿ öåðêîâíàãî îáèõîäà / Pater Noster / (Church Slavonic Version) / S. A. T. B. a capella <;Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 neben und unterhalb letzter Zeile Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert>IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1926<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1932 by Edition Russe de Musique / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey& Hawkes Inc. / for all countries< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved / Tonsättning forbjudes<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 19595<; ohne Endevermerk) // [1967]

* Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

 

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM