101

e j m h u  o v r c t

‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc – Abraham and Isaac. A Sacred Ballad for baritone and Chamber Orchestra — Abraham und Isaak. Geistliche Ballade für Bariton und Kammerorchester – Abraham et Isaac. Une Ballade sacrée pour baryton et orchestre de chambre – Abramo e Isacco. Ballata sacra per baritono ed orchestra da camera

 

 

Title: The work was originally to be called ‘A Sacred Cantata’. Strawinsky crossed out ‘Cantata’ and wrote instead ‘Ballad’, presumably because what he understood by the word Ballad was a dramatic narration.*

* He asks the question regarding the “meaning and definition of an Israel festival, which still remained unanswered”. The subtitle may originally have simply been >Cantata<, and in a corrected version of a neat copy, it is even only >ABRAHAM and ISAAC / for Baritone and / Chamber Orchestra< without subtitle. There is also a copyright on the name itself in this manuscript. 

 

Scored for: a) First edition: 2 Flauti grandi, Flauto alto, Oboe, Corno inglese, Clarinetto, Clarinetto basso, 2 Fagotto, Corno, 2 Trombe, 2 Tromboni (ten. e bass.), Tuba, Archi [2 Flutes, Alto Flute, Oboe, English horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoons, Horn, 2 Trumpets, 2 Trombones (tenore and bass), Tuba, Strings]; b) Performance requirements: Solo baritone, 2 Flutes, Alto Flute, Oboe, English horn, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet, 2 Bassoons, Horn, 2 Trumpets, Tenor Trombone, Bass Trombone, Tuba, Solo Viola, Solo Violoncello, Solo Double bass, Strings* (First Violins**, Second Violins**, Violas**, Violoncellos, Double basses)

* 24 players.

** divided in two.

 

Score: The score is a reformed score with modern part-ordering laid out in separate blocks with the systems reduced according to the number of instruments playing; all the instruments are notated in C and sound as written; the key signature is not reprinted when the subsequent system has the same key signature as the previous one. Instead of the clef, there is a continuous vertical line to the next system, which changes the clef.

 

Voice type: The baritone part is for high baritone with a range from C(B sharp) to E1.

 

Summary: Abraham receives the order from God to sacrifice his son Isaac. Abraham will obey. As he raises the knife to slaughter his son, an angel of God bids him stop.

 

Source: The English text printed in the score is taken from the King James Bible. The section set by Strawinsky is taken from the first 19 verses of Chapter 22 from the first book of Moses (Genesis = B’reshit) in the Old Testament of the Bible. Their theological meaning is on the one hand the unconditional obedience with which Man must obey God, and on the other the codification of the rejection of human sacrifices.

 

Problem of translation: Strawinsky stated that some of his compositions were untranslatable because they are bound directly to the language. He was especially referring to Renard, that can only be sung in Russian, Oedipus Rex, in Latin, Vom Himmel hoch, da komm’ ich her, in German and Abraham and Isaac in Hebrew. If it was important to him, Strawinsky contradicted his own utterances without hesitation. His official vinyl recording of Renard, which also went into the CD version, was not sung in Russian under his direction, but English. When the Israelis had problems with the German language, the Bach edition was reproduced with Hebrew text. Oedipus Rex is obviously never performed in a language other than Latin. Strawinsky, who had a lot of concert experience, intentionally composed Abraham and Isaac without chorus and thus ensured performances outside Israel. While Hebrew-singing choirs outside Israel and America are the exception, the highly developed singing culture of the Jewish Synagogue Cantors enables a performance of this cantata for baritone anywhere where there are synagogues. Strawinsky wanted no translation of the Ballad into another language to be made because the music was specifically written with an understanding of the sound of the Hebrew language in mind. The fact that he came up with several possibilities for specific syllables (for the word Abraham alone he developed around eighteen different musical versions and in doing so clearly set the Hebrew language according to the same process that he had used previously with other languages), appears to relate to this theory that they are untranslatable.

 

Construction: Abraham and Isaac is a cantata for baritone in one movement which is continuous and can be divided either into six, seven or ten sections depending on the counting method; the bar numbering is counted in groups of five, there is a metronome mark and it is in ballad form in Hebrew language with English phonetics. The numbering in the score gives 254 bars. The ballad however consists of 258 bars because the six-bar cadenza at bar 89 is miscounted in the score as only two bars. The counting of six goes back to Strawinsky, who presumably only counted sections of the text. The counting of seven refers back to the score itself. The counting of eight includes the introduction (bars 110), and the counting of nine includes the introduction and interlude (bars 89104) self standing. The separate sections can also be sub-divided. The row is handled in a non-formal manner with repeats and developed in the first five bars by the violas (10 notes) and the first bassoon (2 notes).

 

Allocation of line to bar

Vers   1: Bars   11–  25

Vers   2: Bars   26–  45

Vers   3: Bars   52–  72

Vers   4: Bars   73–  79

Vers   5: Bars   80–  88

Vers   6: Bars 105111

Vers   7: Bars 112128

Vers   8: Bars 128138

Vers   9: Bars 138156

Vers 10: Bars 157162

Vers 11: Bars 163169

Vers 12: Bars 170180

Vers 13: Bars 184194

Vers 14: Bars 197205

Vers 15: Bars 207210

Vers 16: Bars 211219

Vers 17: Bars 220228

Vers 18: Bars 229239

Vers 19: Bars 245254 

 

Structure

[1.]

Semiquaver = 132

            (72 bars = bar 172)

[2.]

(stesso tempo)

            (18 bars = bar 7390*)

                        (Bar 89: Cadenza quasi rubato)

[3.]

Quaver = 120

            (14 bars = bar 91104)

[4.]

Meno mosso Quaver = 9296

            (58 bars = bar 105162)

[5.]

Meno mosso Quaver = 76

            (19 bars = bar 163181)

[6.]

Meno mosso Quaver = 72

            (58 bars = bar 182239)

[7.]

Andante Quaver = 60

            (15 bars = bar 240254)

* Bar 90 is made up of 5 bars that are counted as 1 bar

 

Row: g1-g#1-a#1-b#1-c#2-a1-b1-d#2-d2-e2-f#2-f2. The prime row is developed in the first 5 bars by the violas (10 notes) and the first bassoon (2 notes) and developed subsequently by the bassoon in inversion/retrograde.

 

Errata

Full score 1013

  1.) p. 7, bar 72: last note e1 instead of d1.

  2.) p. 10, bar 91: above the metronom marking quaver = 120 the bar number 91 has to be added.

  3.) p. 12, bar 105: a >low< above the second for he last semiquaver should be noted.

  4.) p. 12, bar 107: a >high< above the third from last note semiquaver fis should be noted.

  5.) p. 12, bar 109+110: a >high< above the last note from bar 109 and the first note from bar 110 (d1) should be noted.

  6.) p. 13, bar 116: grace-note a2 natural instead of f#1.

  7.) p. 14, bars 120+121: the slure from the semiquaver g (bar 120) to minim a (bar 121) should be removed.

  8.) p. 14, bar 132: the setting of the text across the barlines >the lamb, the | lamb = d1 to d#1should have a phrasing mark.

  9.) p. 15, bars 140141: the lyrics from >which< to >told<, from >told< to >God< and from >God< up to the break mark shoud each have a phrasing mark.

10.) p. 17, bar 165 instruments: after bar 165 time signature 4/16 instead of 4/8.

11.) p. 17) bar 166 instruments: before bar 166 time signature 4/16 instead of 4/8.

12.) p. 17, bar 168: Tuba: the time signature 3/16 instead of 9/16; the same applies to bar 177 p. 18.

13.) p. 18, bar 175: the last ligature-note e instead of f#.

14.) p. 22, bars 202204: the notes e1 (>mount<) to d#1 (>is<) should be have a phrasing mark.

 

Style: Abraham and Isaac is a technically freely handled twelve-tone work in the stylistic area of The Flood. The type of row follows that of A Sermon and Double Canon. Two chromatic groups at an interval of a third and varying notes of polarisation are symmetrically held in the balance. Abraham and Isaac is one of Strawinsky’s rare settings of language in which the spoken accents and sung accents fall together. The declamation, which is as much syllabic as melismatic, wavers between arioso singing and half recitative, intervallic syllabic speech. When words are repeated, the music is not, rather the declamation and melody line are changed. The word ‘Abraham’ appears seventeen times (Bars: 18, 20/21, 53, 75, 81, 105, 114, 128, 143, 158, 168, 184, 189, 198, 209, 246, 252) and is the most frequent word, and each time is set and orchestrated differently. Abraham and Isaac is, according to Strawinsky, an exclusively serial setting without textual meaning or cryptographic symbolism. Visual-, gestural– or movement orientated correspondences between text and music are never a constituent part of the compositional planning, but always only a coincidental, and thus interpretationally meaningless result of the serial structure. The unaccompanied soloistic repetition of the word ‘Abraham’ at the beginning is one of the few intended exceptions; the type of instrumentation, which has a dark and dull effect at specific moments, such as the final path to the mountain peak before the sacrifice. There is behaviour and dramatic effect of the baritone voice and, as is usual with Strawinsky, the differentiation of the respective intervallic ranges. Furthermore, Strawinsky avoided suggesting dramatic images. Even the moment at which Abraham raises the knife to kill his child is depicted by Strawinsky in a declamatory fashion without gesture or effect. The allocation of a three-voice passage to Abraham’s departure to the mountain with two companions should therefore be understood as the consequence of the row construction and not numerically symbolic. Furthermore, a depiction of the ballad leads to a description of the declamatory events inside the sections, whether one recognises five, six or ten, and to an identification of the rows, the breaking of the rows and the basic figures which are not handled in a formal fashion. There are people who wish to see things differently. Strawinsky however would have had sufficient reason in the sensitive area of a probably Christian debatable central point of the Old Testament to read into the results of rows and declamation.

 

Dedication: >ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk – Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<.

 

Duration: 1026″.

 

Date of origin: 1962 up to 3. März 1963.

 

First performance: The première took place on 23rd August 1964 in Jerusalem with the baritone Ephraim Biran and the Israeli Festival Orchestra under the direction of Robert Craft for the occasion of the 4th Israeli Music Festival, the executive director of which was A. Z. Propes. This was in the context of a Strawinsky evening which also contained the première of the Symphony of Psalms and the Capriccio for piano and orchestra with Frank Peleg as the soloist. There was a repeat performance on 24th August 1964 in Caesarea; the first European performance came a month later during the Berlin Festival week (17th September).

 

Remarks: The Israeli Echo for Germany gave a rather restrained response. Peter Gradenwitz, who is known in Germany as a specialist for new music, wrote a report for the November 1964 edition of Melos which quotes from Strawinsky’s programme note but does not even mention the date of the première, the baritone soloist, the orchestra or the performance venue (‘Twelve Notes for Abraham by Igor Strawinsky’, p. 364a – 365b) and omitted any remarks about the piece or performance. Since Gradenwitz only behaved in such a way for Strawinsky’s piece, it can be assumed that he did not like it. – In a letter from New York of 12th December 1964 to Rufina Ampenov, Strawinsky writes of the success of his concerts with the audience and its lack of success with the American critics. The only thing that the New York newspaper journalists, whose reports he described as ‘abusive’, knew how to say about the cantata was the description ‘monotonous and minor’. ‘And I really tried!’ not everyone could have the same success as Benjamin Britten with the critics. – In the programme for the Israeli Music Festival for July–August 1964, Strawinsky’s explanations of his piece were printed, but they later had to be revised because they contained errors. The most serious concerned the structural division of the piece and the word Abraham. Strawinsky described the large form as being in one movement but in five sections. In the subsequent printing (programme notes in: The London Magazine, February 1964) he changed five-part into six-part. The Ballad is indicated in the score as being in seven sections. Strawinsky further revised the section of the text in which he stated that the word ‘Abraham’ is the most frequently sung word and is always set unaccompanied, which does not correspond to the score. He revised this saying that it ‘is sung the first time without instruments’. – On the invitation of the board of the Israeli Music Festival, Strawinsky visited Israel for the first time in 1962. Along with Robert Craft, the then 80-year-old Strawinsky conducted a concert with the Philharmonic Orchestra. His reception was very friendly and the plan was put to him of writing a composition with biblical content for Israel. Strawinsky agreed and chose the story of Abraham and Isaac. On 10th March 1963, he said to Ernst Roth that he had completed Abraham and Isaac a week before. The score has the end date, 3rd March 1963. With his usual insistence on secrecy, he asked Roth not to show the score, which had been sent to him by Special Delivery, to anon apart from Leopold Spinner, who had to complete the piano reduction. Strawinsky had the ambition of setting the original Masorete text and synchronising it with the English text from the St. James’s Bible by means of English phonetics, although he could not understand a word of Hebrew. For this reason, he avoided the Hebrew intonation and constrained himself to the identification of the accentuation of words and music. His friend Sir Isaiah Berlin was helpful to Strawinsky to understand the text. He also consulted other Hebrew speakers however, although with unsatisfactory results. In a letter that was not intended for publication of 23rd September 1964 to Ernst Roth, he wrote, in connection with the corrections for the piano score, that the reduction should be sent to Israel in order that the Hebrew symbols be inserted with the English phonetics according to the official rules of the university there. Each Hebrew authority – and Strawinsky used the words ‘Hebrew authority’ ironically in quotation marks – that he had asked for advice in the United States and in England had told him something different, and that could lead to annoyance later on. Strawinsky asked Roth to make contact with Berlin, who was living in Oxford, regarding this matter. In a subsequent letter of 11th March, he once again gave instruction that the Hebrew text should only be printed in Hebrew script. The problem was the distribution of the Roman-alphabet transliteration.He recommended to Roth that he look at Schoenberg’s De profundis in order to see how the problem of the distribution of the underlying transliteration had been solved there. Strawinsky had earlier been interested in this piece. In a letter of 22nd May 1961, he had asked Roth at that time to consult Dr. Otto Tomek at the West German Radio, Cologne and to oversee a recording with the Radio choir at Cologne. The Cologne Radio had performed the first German performance of Schoenberg’s choral work with the Rundfunk choir of Cologne with musical training by the choir director, Bernhard Zimmerman, on 29th January 1954 in one of the >musik der zeit< concerts under the direction of Wolfgang Sawallisch. This recording was broadcast on18th March 1954 by Herbert Eimert on the Musical Night Programme (>Musikalisches Nachtprogramm<) and was located in the archive. This can only have referred to this recording. Tomek was in charge of the New Music department at the time. The long awaited corrections for the orchestral score were received by Strawinsky on 27th January 1964. A performance of the Ballad with the Philadelphia Orchestra that was planned for January 1965 came to nothing because the vinyl recording that Strawinsky had in mind did not come to fruition. On 4th July 1964, he sent the piano reduction back to Spinner with a catalogue of questions and answers. The problems with the transliteration still remain unresolved. The question was that of Hebrew speakers who had to be heard before the first printing. In a letter of 13th December 1964 from New York to the publishers, Strawinsky had the printing temporarily interrupted because he was occupied with the final corrections.

 

Versions: All editions — pocket score, the piano reduction produced by (who remained unnamed) Leopold Spinner and the conducting score — were published in 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes, the piano reduction and conducting score in February and the pocket score in March. The British Library received its contributory copies on 25th February 1965 (piano reduction and conductor’s score). The parts were available to hire. The publishing contract with Boosey & Hawkes was signed on 10th May 1963. The later pocket score editions no longer contain Edidit information.

 

Historical Record: 24th January/11th July 1967 in Hollywood, Richard Frisch (Baritone) and the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Robert Craft.

 

CD-Edition: XII/5.

 

Autograph: The original is located at Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A copy has been sent to Dr. Paul Sacher. The sketches are at the Paul Sacher Foundation Basel.

 

Copyright: 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.

 

Editions

a) Overview

1011 1965 VoSc; H; Boosey & Hawkes London; 19 pp.; 19162.

                        1011Straw 1965 [no annotations]

1012 1965 PoSc; H; Boosey & Hawkes London; 28 pp.; 19197; 762.

            101268 1968 ibd.

1013 1965 FuSc; h; Boosey & Hawkes London; 28 pp.; 19197.

                        1013Straw ibd. [with annotations].

b) Characteristic features

1011 Igor Stravinsky / Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for Baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Vocal Score / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for Baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Vocal Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Vocal score with chant sewn in red 23,5 x 31 (4° [4°]); sung text Hebrew English [capital letters] and translation English (not to sing); 19 [19] pages + 4 cover pages light tomato red on grey beige [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page English, empty page, title page Hebrew, text set to music English, text set to music Hebrew, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + transposition mark italic >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + duration data [12′] English + note on performance] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head in connection with dedication Hebrew-English >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for Baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 above and below English dedication flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; without translator specified; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; note with asterisc 1st page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush left italic >The English text is not to be sung. It is intended merely as a guide to the original Hebrew text.<; plate number >B. & H. 19162<; end number p. 19 flush right as end mark >2. 65. E<) // (1965)

 

1011Straw

Strawinsky’s copy (Basel >IS / PM / 2298<) is without annotations.

 

1012 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 762 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad / for Baritone and Chamber Orchestra / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / LONDON · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · SYDNEY · TORONTO · NEW YORK / MADE IN ENGLAND [#] NET PRICE // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Pocket score stapled 14,1 x 18,9 (8° [8°]); sung text Hebrew with transliteration English [capital letters] and translation English (not to sing); 28 [28] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper dark green on dark beige [front cover title with frame 9,6 x 3,6 dark beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical works / and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* production date >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] + 6 pages front matter [title page English, empty page, title page Hebrew, text set to music English, text set to music Hebrew, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + transposition mark italic >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + duration data [12′] English + note on performance italic >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] without back matter; title head in connection with dedication Hebrew-English >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for Baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below English dedication flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; without translator specified; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; note with asterisc 1st page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush left italic >The English text is not to be sung. It is intended merely as a guide to the original Hebrew text.<; plate number >B. & H. 19197<; end of score dated p. 28 next to last bar oblong >March 3, / 1963<; end number >3. 65. E<) // (1965)

^ ^ = Text in frame.

* Compositions are advertised in three columns from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Wagner, Richard< , amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni< angezeigt. After London following the places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

 

101268 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 762 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad / for Baritone and Chamber Orchestra / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / LONDON · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · SYDNEY · TORONTO · NEW YORK / MADE IN ENGLAND [#] NET PRICE // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Pocket score [library binding] 14 x 19 (8° [8°]); sung text Hebrew with Transliteration English [capital letters] and translation English (not to sing); 28 [28] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper dark green on dark beige [front cover title with frame 9,6 x 3,6 dark beige on dark green, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following list is but a selection of the many items included in this extensive library of miniature scores / containing both classical works and an ever increasing collection of outstanding modern compositions. A / complete catalogue of Hawkes Pocket Scores is available on request.<* production date >No. I6<] + 6 pages front matter [title page English, empty page, title page Hebrew, text set to music English, text set to music Hebrew, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + transposition mark italic >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + duration data [12′] English + note on performance italic >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] without back matter; title head in connection with dedication Hebrew-English >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for Baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below English dedication flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; without translator specified; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; note with asterisc 1st page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush left italic >The English text is not to be sung. It is intended merely as a guide to the original Hebrew text.<; plate number >B. & H. 19197<; end of score dated p. 28 next to last bar oblong >March 3, / 1963<; end number >9. 68. E<) // (1968)

^ ^ = text in frame.

* Compositions are advertised in three columns without edition numbers and without specification of places of printing from >Bach, Johann Sebastian< to >Tchaikovsky, Peter<, amongst these >Stravinsky, Igor / Abraham and Isaac / Agon / Apollon musagète / Concerto in D / The flood / Introitus / Oedipus rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Piano concerto / Pulcinella suite / The rake’s progress / The rite of spring / Le rossignol / A sermon, a narrative and a prayer / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphonies of wind instruments / Threni / Variations<.

 

1013 Igor Stravinsky / Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for Baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for Baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Full score sewn in red 23.5 x 30.9 (4° [4°]); sung text Hebrew with Transliteration English [capital letters] and translation English (not to sing); 28 [28] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper tomato red on green beige [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page English, empty page, title page Hebrew, text set to music English, text set to music Hebrew, legend >Instrumentation< Italian + transposition mark italic >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + duration data [12′] English + note on performance italic >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] without back matter; title head in connection with dedication Hebrew-English >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for Baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below dedication flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; without translator specified; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< flush right >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; note with asterisc 1st page of the score below type area above legal reservation flush left italic >The English text is not to be sung. It is intended merely as a guide to the original Hebrew text.<; plate number >B. & H. 19197<; end of score dated p. 28 next to last bar oblong >March 3, / 1963<; end number >2. 65. E<) // (1965)

 

1013Straw

Strawinsky’s copy is signed and dated >IStr / March 2765< [° slash original] on the right of the outer title page between the last line of the italic subtitle and >Full Score<. The copy contains numerous performance entries (in pencil). On the back side of the outer title page, there is a review in four columns by Felix Aprahamian, >Stravinsky at his most obscure< from the >Sunday Times< from 23rd July 1965 that has been glued in.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

101

e j m h u  o v r c t

‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc – Abraham and Isaac. A Sacred Ballad for baritone and Chamber Orchestra — Abraham und Isaak. Geistliche Ballade für Bariton und Kammerorchester – Abraham et Isaac. Une Ballade sacrée pour baryton et orchestre de chambre – Abramo e Isacco. Ballata sacra per baritono ed orchestra da camera

 

 

Titel: Das Stück sollte ursprünglich >A Sacred Cantata< heißen. Strawinsky strich >Cantata< durch und schrieb statt dessen >Ballad<, vermutlich, weil er unter Ballade eine dramatische Erzählung verstand.*

* Wohl stellt er die Frage nach „Sinn und Bestimmung eines Israel-Festivals, die immer noch unbeantwortet blieb“. Sollte ursprünglich im Untertitel lediglich >Cantata< heißen, in einer korrigierten Art von Reinschrift sogar nur >ABRAHAM and ISAAC / for Baritone and / Chamber Orchestra< ohne Untertitel. In diesem Manuskript steht auch ein Copyright auf den eigenen Namen. 

 

Besetzung: a) Erstausgabe: 2 Flauti grandi, Flauto alto, Oboe, Corno inglese, Clarinetto, Clarinetto basso, 2 Fagotto, Corno, 2 Trombe, 2 Tromboni (ten. e bass.), Tuba, Archi [2 große Flöten, Altflöte, Oboe, Englischhorn, Klarinette, Baßklarinette, 2 Fagotte, Horn, 2 Trompeten, 2 Posaunen (Tenor und Baß), Tuba, Streicher]; b) Aufführungsanforderungen: Solo-Bariton, 2 große Flöten, Altflöte, Oboe, Englischhorn, Klarinette, Baßklarinette, 2 Fagotte, Horn, 2 Trompeten, Tenor-Posaune, Baß-Posaune, Tuba, Solo-Bratsche, Solo-Violoncello, Solo-Kontrabaß, Streicher* (Erste Violinen**, Zweite Violinen**, Bratschen**, Violoncelli, Kontrabässe).

* 24 Streicher.

** zweifach geteilt.

 

Partitur: Reformpartitur in moderner Partituranordnung aus verschobenen Blöcken mit Systembeschränkung auf die jeweils benötigten Stimmen in C-Notierung; keine Einzelschlüsselvorzeichnung mehr, wenn das nachfolgende System denselben Schlüssel wie das vorhergehende hat. Statt des Schlüssels ist eine durchgezogene senkrechte Linie bis zum nächsten, den Schlüssel wechselnden System angebracht. 

 

Fachpartie: Die Fachpartie ist ein hoher Bariton mit Stimmumfang c (His) bis e1.

 

Inhalt: Abraham erhält von Gott den Befehl, ihm seinen Sohn Isaak zum Opfer zu bringen. Abraham will gehorchen. Als er das Messer hebt, um seinen Sohn zu schlachten, gebietet ihm der Engel Gottes Einhalt.

 

Vorlage: Der dem Partiturdruck mitgegebene englische Text entstammt der King-James-Bibel. Die von Strawinsky vertonte Stelle besteht aus den ersten 19 Versen von Kapitel 22 des ersten Buches Moses (Genesis = B’reshit) aus dem Alten Testament der Bibel. Ihre theologische Bedeutung ist einmal die Bedingungslosigkeit, mit der der Mensch Gott zu gehorchen hat, zum anderen die Festschreibung der Ablehnung von Menschenopfern.

 

Unübersetzbarkeit: Für einige seiner Kompositionen hat Strawinsky die These vertreten, sie seien unübersetzbar, weil unmittelbar mit der Sprache verbunden. Er bezog sich dabei insbesondere auf Renard, das nur russisch, Oedipus rex, das nur lateinisch, Vom Himmel hoch, da komm’ ich her, das nur deutsch, und auf Abraham und Isaak, das nur hebräisch gesungen werden dürfe. Wenn es allerdings für ihn zweckmäßig war, setzte sich Strawinsky ohne Zögern über seine eigenen Forderungen hinweg. Seine offizielle Schallplattenaufnahme vom Fuchs, die in die CD-Ausgabe einging, wurde unter seiner Leitung nicht russisch, sondern englisch gesungen. Als die Israeli Probleme mit der deutschen Sprache hatten, wurde die Bachbearbeitung ebenfalls mit hebräischem Text wiedergegeben. Oedipus rex ist offensichtlich niemals anders als lateinisch aufgeführt worden. Der konzerterfahrene Strawinsky hat Abraham und Isaak wohl bewußt ohne Chor komponiert und sich damit Aufführungen auch außerhalb Israels gesichert. Während hebräisch singende Chöre außerhalb Israels und Amerikas die Ausnahmen sind, ermöglicht die hoch entwickelte Gesangskultur der jüdischen Synagogen-Kantoren überall dort, wo Synagogen stehen, eine Aufführung der Bariton-Kantate. Strawinsky wünschte für die Ballade keine Übersetzung in eine andere Sprache, weil die Musik ausschließlich aus dem hebräischen Klangverständnis heraus entwickelt worden sei. Daß er dabei für einzelne Sprachsilben vielfältige Möglichkeiten erfand, allein für das Wort Abraham rund anderthalb Dutzend unterschiedliche Klangversionen entwickelte und damit die hebräische Sprache offensichtlich nach demselben Verfahren vertonte, wie vordem schon andere Sprachen, scheint die These von der Unübersetzbarkeit zu relativieren.

 

Aufbau: Abraham und Isaac ist eine einsätzig durchzuspielende, je nach Zählweise sechs-, sieben– oder zehnteilig binnengegliederte, in Fünfereinheiten taktgezählte, metronomisierte Bariton-Kantate in Balladenform in hebräischer Singsprache mit englischer Phonetik. Die Partiturzählung ergibt 254 Takte. Die Ballade besteht aber aus 258 Takten, weil die sechstaktige Kadenz von Takt 89 in der Partitur mit nur 2 Takten verrechnet wird. Die Sechserzählung geht auf Strawinsky zurück, der vermutlich nur die Textkomplexe zählte. Die Siebener-Zählung beruft sich auf den Partiturbefund. Die Achter-Zählung zählt die Introduktion (Takt 110) hinzu, die Neuner-Zählung Introduktion und Zwischenspiel (Takt 89104) selbständig. Die einzelnen Absätze sind untergliederbar. Die Reihe wird unformalistisch mit Wiederholungen gehandhabt und in den ersten 5 Takten von den Bratschen (10 Töne) und dem 1. Fagott (2 Töne) entwickelt.

 

Zuordnung Vers-Takt

Vers   1: Takt   11–  25

Vers   2: Takt   26–  45

Vers   3: Takt   52–  72

Vers   4: Takt   73–  79

Vers   5: Takt   80–  88

Vers   6: Takt 105111

Vers   7: Takt 112128

Vers   8: Takt 128138

Vers   9: Takt 138156

Vers 10: Takt 157162

Vers 11: Takt 163169

Vers 12: Takt 170180

Vers 13: Takt 184194

Vers 14: Takt 197205

Vers 15: Takt 207210

Vers 16: Takt 211219

Vers 17: Takt 220228

Vers 18: Takt 229239

Vers 19: Takt 245254 

 

Aufriß

[1.]

Sechzehntel = 132

            (72 Takte = Takt 172)

[2.]

(stesso tempo)

            (18 Takte = Takt 7390*)

                        (Takt 89: Cadenza quasi rubato)

[3.]

Achtel = 120

            (14 Takte = Takt 91104)

[4.]

Meno mosso Achtel = 9296

            (58 Takte = Takt 105162)

[5.]

Meno mosso Achtel = 76

            (19 Takte = Takt 163181)

[6.]

Meno mosso Achtel = 72

            (58 Takte = Takt 182239)

[7.]

Andante Achtel = 60

            (15 Takte = Takt 240254)

* Takt 90 besteht aus 5 Takten, die als 1 Takt gezählt werden

 

Reihe: g1-gis1-ais1-his1-cis2-a1-h1-dis2-d2-e2-fis2-f2. – Die Grundreihe wird in den ersten 5 Takten von den Bratschen (10 Töne) und dem 1. Fagott (2 Töne) entwickelt und vom Fagott anschließend reversiv weitergeführt.

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Full score 1013

  1.) S. 7, Takt 72: die letzte Note ist statt falsch d1 richtig e1 zu lesen.

  2.) S. 10, Takt 91: oberhalb der Metronomangabe Viertel = 120 ist die Taktzahl 91 einzufügen.

  3.) S. 12, Takt 105: über der vorletzten Sechzehntelnote ais ist ein >low< notiert.

  4.) S. 12, Takt 107: über der drittletzten Note Sechzehntel fis ist ein high notiert; von der mittleren Triolennote aus zur high überschriebenen fis-Note ein Bindebogen gezogen.

  5.) S. 12, Takt 109+110: über der letzten Note von Takt 109 und der ersten Note von Takt 110 (d1ist ein high notiert.

  6.) S. 13, Takt 116: die Vorschlagnote ist statt falsch f#1 richtig a2 zu lesen.

  7.) S. 14, Takt 120+121: der Bindebogen Sechzehntel g von Takt 120 zur Halben a ist zu entfernen.

  8.) S. 14, Takt 132: die Textnoten oberhalb des Taktstrichs >the lamb, the | lamb = d1 to dis1< sind mit einem Phrasierungsbogen zu versehen.

  9.) S. 15, Takts 140141: die Textnoten von >which< zu >told<, von >told< zu >God< und von >God< bis zum Atemzeichen sind jeweils mit einem Phrasierungsbogen zu versehen.

10.) S. 17, Takt 165 instruments: after bar 165 ist die 4/8-Metrum-Angabe durch 4/16 zu ersetzen.

11.) S. 17) Takt 166 Instrumente: vor Takt 166 ist die 4/8-Metrum-Angabe durch 4/16 zu ersetzen.

12.) S. 17, Takt 168: Tuba: die 9/16-Metrumangabe ist durch drei 3/16-Metren zu ersetzen; dasselbe´gilt für Takt 177 (S. 18).

13.) S. 18, Takt 175: die letzte Ligaturnote ist statt falsch fis richtig e zu lesen.

14.) S. 22, Takts 202204: die Textnoten e1 auf >mount< ist mit der Textnote dis1 auf >is< mit einem Phrasierungsbogen versehen

 

Stilistik: Abraham and Isaac ist ein technisch frei gehandhabtes Zwölftonwerk im stilistischen Umfeld von The Flood. Der Reihentyp folgt dem von a sermon und dem vom double canon. Zwei chromatisch geführte Gruppen mit Terzabstand und unterschiedlichen Polarisationstönen werden symmetrisch in der Schwebe gehalten. abraham und isaak gehört zu den seltenen Strawinskyschen Sprachwerkvertonungen, bei denen Sprach– und Singakzent zusammenfallen. Die sowohl syllabische wie melismatische Deklamation schwankt zwischen ariosem Singen und halb rezitativisch-intervallischem Silben-Sprechen. Im Falle von Wortwiederholungen kommt es nicht zu Musikwiederholungen, sondern Deklamation beziehungsweise Melodielinie werden geändert. Das Wort Abraham als das am häufigsten vorkommende Wort erscheint siebzehnmal (Takt 18, 20/21, 53, 75, 81, 105, 114, 128, 143, 158, 168, 184, 189, 198, 209, 246, 252), jedesmal anders vertont und anders instrumentiert. Abraham und Isaak ist nach Strawinsky eine ausschließlich seriell geordnete Sprachvertonungskomposition ohne Textdeutung oder kryptographische Symbolik. Bild-, gestik– oder bewegungsorientierte Übereinstimmungen zwischen Text und Musik sind in keinem einzigen Falle Bestandteil der kompositorischen Planung, sondern immer nur zufälliges und damit interpretatorisch bedeutungsloses Ergebnis der seriellen Struktur. Zu den wenigen gewollten Ausnahmen gehört die unbegleitet solistische Wiedergabe des Wortes Abraham zu Beginn, die Art der Instrumentierung, die an besonderen Stellen, wie dem letzten Weg zum Bergesgipfel vor dem Opfer, dunkel und dumpf wirkt, Verhaltenheit und Dramatik der Bariton-Stimme und, wie üblich bei Strawinsky, die Differenzierung über den jeweiligen Intervallambitus. Darüber hinaus verzichtete Strawinsky auf sich anbietende dramatische Bilder. Selbst den Augenblick, in dem Abraham das Messer erhebt, um sein Kind abzuschlachten, schildert Strawinsky deklamatorisch und ohne Gestus oder Effekt. Auch der Aufbruch Abrahams zum Berg mit zwei Begleitern und die Zuordnung einer dreistimmigen Passage wären demnach Ergebnis der Reihenkonstruktion und nicht zahlensymbolisch zu verstehen. Eine Darstellung der Ballade liefe somit auf eine Beschreibung der deklamatorischen Vorgänge innerhalb der Abschnitte hinaus, ob man deren nun fünf, sechs oder zehn erkennt, und auf eine Registrierung der Reihen, Reihenbrechungen und Grundgestalten, die unformalistisch gehandhabt werden. Es gibt Stimmen, die das anders sehen wollen. Doch hätte Strawinsky im empfindlichen Umfeld einer möglicherweise christologisch umzudeutenden Zentralstelle des Alten Testamentes Gründe genug gehabt, sich auf Reihenergebnisse und Deklamatorik hinauszureden.

 

Widmung: >ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk – Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel< [Gewidmet dem Volk des Staates Israel].

 

Dauer: 1026″.

 

Entstanden: 1962 bis 3. März 1963.

 

Uraufführung: Die Uraufführung fand am 23. August 1964 in Jerusalem mit dem Baritonisten Ephraim Biran und dem Israelischen Festspiel-Orchester unter der Leitung von Robert Craft aus Anlaß des 4. Israelischen Musikfestes, dessen organisatorischer Leiter A. Z. Propes war, im Rahmen eines Strawinsky-Abends statt, der neben der Uraufführung die Psalmen-Symphonie und das Capriccio für Klavier und Orchester mit Frank Peleg als Solisten enthielt, mit einer Wiederholungsaufführung am 24. August 1964 in Caesarea; die europäische Erstaufführung kam einen Monat später (17. September) während der Berliner Festwochen zustande.

 

Bemerkungen: Das israelische Echo wirkte für Deutschland eher verhalten. Der in Deutschland als Spezialist für Neue Musik anerkannte Peter Gradenwitz schrieb für die November-Nummer 1964 von Melos einen Bericht, der aus Strawinskys Programmbuch-Notiz zitierte, aber nicht einmal das Datum der Uraufführung, den Bariton-Solisten, das Orchester und den Aufführungsort mitteilt (>Zwölf Töne für Abraham von Igor Strawinsky< S. 364a-365b) und jeden Vermerk über Stück und Aufführung unterläßt. Da Gradenwitz sich nur dem Strawinsky-Stück gegenüber in dieser Weise verhielt, ist anzunehmen, daß es ihm nicht gefallen hat. – In einem Brief aus New York vom 12. Dezember 1964 an Rufina Ampenoff spricht Strawinsky über den Erfolg seiner Konzerte beim Publikum und den Mißerfolg bei den amerikanischen Kritikern. Das einzige, was die New Yorker Zeitungsleute, deren Berichte er „schimpfend“ (abusive) nennt, über die Kantate zu sagen gewußt hätten, seien die Bezeichnungen „monoton und unbedeutend“ (monotonous and minor) gewesen. And I really tried! Aber nicht jeder könne bei den Kritikern einen solchen Erfolg haben wie Benjamin Britten. – Im Programmbuch des Israelischen Musikfestes vom Juli-August 1964 druckte man Erklärungen Strawinskys zum Stück ab, die später revidiert werden mußten, weil sie Fehler enthielten. Die wichtigsten betrafen die Stückeinteilung und das Abraham-Wort. Strawinsky bezeichnete die Großform als einsätzig, aber fünfteilig. Im Nachdruck (Programme Notes in: The London Magazine, Februar 1964) änderte er fünfteilig in sechsteilig. Die Ballade kennzeichnet sich in der Partitur mit 7 Abschnitten. Ferner revidierte Strawinsky die Textstelle, in der er mitgeteilt hatte, das Wort Abraham als das am häufigsten zitierte Wort werde immer unbegleitet gesungen, was mit dem Partiturbefund nicht übereinstimmt. Er verbesserte, dies gelte nur für das erste mal (is sung the first time without instruments). – Auf Einladung der Direktion des Israelischen Musikfestes besuchte Strawinsky im Jahre 1962 zum ersten Mal Israel. Gemeinsam mit Robert Craft leitete der damals achtzigjährige Strawinsky ein Konzert des Philharmonischen Orchesters. Er wurde sehr freundlich empfangen, und man unterbreitete ihm den Plan, für Israel eine Komposition biblischen Inhaltes zu schreiben. Strawinsky sagte zu und wählte die Abraham-Isaak-Geschichte. Am 10. März 1963 teilte er Ernst Roth mit, eine Woche zuvor die Komposition Abraham und Isaak beendet zu haben. Die Partitur trägt das Ende-Datum 3. März 1963. Mit dem üblichen Hang zur Geheimnisbewahrung bat er Roth, die mit gesonderter Post zugehende Orchester-Partitur niemandem außer Leopold Spinner zu zeigen, der den Klavierauszug anfertigen sollte. Strawinsky hatte den Ehrgeiz gehabt, den originalen Masoretentext zu vertonen und über englische Phonetik mit dem englischen Text der King James Bibel zu synchronisieren, obwohl er kein Wort Hebräisch verstand. Aus diesem Grund wich er der hebräischen Intonation aus und beschränkte sich auf eine Identifizierung von Wort– und Musikakzent. Beim Verständnis des Originaltextes war ihm sein jüdischer Freund Sir Isaiah Berlin behilflich. Doch zog er auch andere Hebraisten, allerdings mit unbefriedigendem Erfolg, zu Rate. In einem nicht für die Öffentlichkeit bestimmten Brief vom 23. September 1964 an Ernst Roth schrieb er im Zusammenhang mit den Korrekturen des Klavierauszugs, man solle den Auszug nach Israel schicken, um die hebräischen Zeichen einzufügen und die englische Phonetik nach den offiziellen Regeln der dortigen Universität einzutragen. Jede hebräische Autorität — und Strawinsky setzte das “Hebrew authority” ironischerweise in Anführungsstriche -, die er in den Vereinigten Staaten und in England um Rat gefragt habe, hätte ihm etwas anderes erzählt, und das könne später zu Ärger führen. Strawinsky bittet Roth, in dieser Sache mit dem im englischen Oxford wohnenden Berlin Verbindung aufzunehmen. Mit nachfolgendem Brief vom 11. März wies er neuerlich an, den hebräischen Text nur ja in hebräischer Schrift zu drucken. Das Problem sei die Zuordnung der lateinischen Transliteration. Er empfielt Roth, Schönbergs De Profundis heranzuziehen, um zu sehen, wie dort das Problem der Unterlegung der Transliteration gelöst worden sei. Für dieses Stück interessierte sich Strawinsky schon früher. Mit Schreiben vom 22. Mai 1961 hatte er seinerzeit Roth gebeten, sich an Dr. Otto Tomek vom Westdeutschen Rundfunk Köln zu wenden, um ihm eine Tonbandaufnahme des Kölner Rundfunk-Chors zu besorgen. Der Kölner Rundfunk hatte am 29. Januar 1954 im Rahmen der Konzerte musik der zeit unter der Leitung von Wolfgang Sawallisch die deutsche Erstaufführung von Schönbergs Chorwerk mit dem Kölner Rundfunkchor in der Einstudierung des Chordirektors Bernhard Zimmermann gebracht. Diese Aufnahme war am 18. März 1954 von Herbert Eimert im Musikalischen Nachtprogramm gesendet worden und befand sich im Archiv. Es kann sich eigentlich nur um diese Aufnahme gehandelt haben. Tomek betreute damals die Abteilung Neue Musik. – Die lang ersehnten Orchesterpartiturkorrekturen erhielt Strawinsky am 27. Januar 1964. Eine mit dem Philadelphia-Orchester für Januar 1965 geplante Aufführung der Ballade zerschlug sich, weil die von Strawinsky in Aussicht genommene Plattenaufnahme nicht zustande kam. Am 4. Juli 1964 schickte er Spinner den Klavierauszug mit einem Fragen-Antwort-Katalog zurück. Die Transliterationsproblematik stand immer noch offen. Von Hebraisten ist die Rede, die vor dem Erstdruck noch gehört werden müssen. Mit Brief vom 13. Dezember 1964 aus New York an den Verlag ließ Strawinsky den Druck vorerst abbrechen, weil er mit Schlußkorrekturen beschäftigt war.

 

Fassungen: Alle Ausgaben – Taschenpartitur, der von (dem ungenannt bleibenden) Leopold Spinner angefertigte Klavierauszug und die Dirigierpartitur – erschienen 1965 im Verlag Boosey & Hawkes, Klavierauszug und Dirigierpartitur im Februar, die Taschenpartitur im März. Die British Library erhielt ihre Belegstücke am 25. Februar 1965 (Klavierauszug und Dirigierpartitur). Die Stimmen waren leihweise erhältlich. Der Verlagsvertrag mit Boosey & Hawkes wurde am 10. Mai 1963 geschlossen. Die späteren Taschenpartitur-Ausgaben enthalten keine Edidit-Angaben mehr.

 

Historische Aufnahme: am 24. Januar/11. Juli 1967 in Hollywood mit dem Baritonisten Richard Frisch und dem Columbia Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Robert Craft.

 

CD-Edition: XII/5.

 

Autograph: Das Originalmanuskript lagert in der Hebräischen Universität von Jerusalem, ein Faksimile wurde an Dr. Paul Sacher geschickt. Die Skizzen befinden sich in der Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel.

 

Copyright: 1965 durch Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

1011 1965 KlA; h; Boosey & Hawkes London; 19 S.; 19162.

                        1011Straw 1965 [ohne Eintragungen].

1012 1965 Tp; h; Boosey & Hawkes London; 28 S.; 19197; 762.

            101268 1968 ibd.

1013 1965 Dp; h; Boosey & Hawkes London; 28 S.; 19197.

                        1013Straw ibd.  [mit Eintragungen].

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

 

1011 Igor Stravinsky / Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Vocal Score / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Vocal Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York  // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ,hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc //  (Klavierauszug mit Gesang rotfadengeheftet 23,5 x 31 (4°[4°]); Singtext hebräisch mit Transliteration englisch [Majuskelschreibung] und nicht zum Singen bestimmter englischer Übersetzung; 19 [19] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag helltomatenrot auf graubeige [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei englisch, Leerseite, Innentitelei hebräisch, Vertonungstext englisch, Vertonungstext hebräisch, Orchesterlegende >Instrumentation< italienisch + Transpositionsvermerk kursiv >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + Spieldauerangabe [12′] englisch + Hinweis zur Aufführungspraxis kursiv >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel in Verbindung mit Widmung hebräisch-englisch >ejmhu ovrct / ,hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 ober– und unterhalb englischer Widmung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; ohne Übersetzernennung; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 19162<; Ende-Nummer S. 19 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >2. 65. E<) // (1965)

 

1011Straw 

Strawinskys Exemplar (Basel >IS / PM / 2298<) enthält keine Eintragungen.

 

1012 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 762 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad / for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / LONDON · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · SYDNEY · TORONTO · NEW YORK / MADE IN ENGLAND [#] NET PRICE // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Taschenpartitur klammergeheftet 14,1 x 18,9 (8° [8°]); Singtext hebräisch mit Transliteration englisch [Majuskelschreibung] und nicht zum Singen bestimmter englischer Übersetzung; 28 [28] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier dunkelgrün auf dunkelbeige [Außentitelei mit Spiegel 9,6 x 3,6 dunkelbeige auf dunkelgrün, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / An extensive library of miniature scores containing both classical works / and a representative collection of outstanding modern compositions<* Stand >No. I6< [#] >I/6I<] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei englisch, Leerseite, Innentitelei hebräisch, Vertonungstext englisch, Vertonungstext hebräisch, Orchesterlegende >Instrumentation< italienisch + Transpositionsvermerk kursiv >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + Spieldauerangabe [12′] englisch + Hinweis zur Aufführungspraxis kursiv >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel in Verbindung mit Widmung hebräisch-englisch >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb englischer Widmung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; ohne Übersetzernennung; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 19197<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 28 neben letztem Takt quergesetzt >March 3, / 1963<; Ende-Nummer >3. 65. E<) // (1965)

* Angezeigt werden dreispaltig Kompositionen von >Bach, Johann Sebastian< bis >Wagner, Richard<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Stravinsky, Igor / Agon / Canticum Sacrum / Le Sacre du Printemps / Monumentum / Movements / Oedipus Rex / Pétrouchka / Symphonie de Psaumes / Threni< angezeigt. After London following the places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Johannesburg-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

 

101268 HAWKES POCKET SCORES / ^IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC^ / BOOSEY & HAWKES / No. 762 // HAWKES POCKET SCORES / IGOR STRAVINSKY / ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad / for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / BOOSEY & HAWKES / MUSIC PUBLISHERS LIMITED / LONDON · PARIS · BONN · JOHANNESBURG · SYDNEY · TORONTO · NEW YORK / MADE IN ENGLAND [#] NET PRICE // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Taschenpartitur [nachgeheftet] 14 x 19 (8° [8°]); Singtext hebräisch mit Transliteration englisch [Majuskelschreibung] und nicht zum Singen bestimmter englischer Übersetzung; 28 [28] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag steifes Papier dunkelgrün auf dunkelbeige [Außentitelei mit Spiegel 9,6 x 3,6 dunkelbeige auf dunkelgrün, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >HAWKES POCKET SCORES / The following list is but a selection of the many items included in this extensive library of miniature scores / containing both classical works and an ever increasing collection of outstanding modern compositions. A / complete catalogue of Hawkes Pocket Scores is available on request.<* Stand >No. I6<] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei englisch, Leerseite, Innentitelei hebräisch, Vertonungstext englisch, Vertonungstext hebräisch, Orchesterlegende >Instrumentation< italienisch + Transpositionsvermerk kursiv >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + Spieldauerangabe [12′] englisch + Hinweis zur Aufführungspraxis kursiv >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel in Verbindung mit Widmung hebräisch-englisch >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb englischer Widmung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; ohne Übersetzernennung; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 19197<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 28 neben letztem Takt quergesetzt >March 3, / 1963<; Ende-Nummer >9. 68. E<) // (1968)

* Angezeigt werden ohne Editionsnummern dreispaltig Kompositionen von >Bach, Johann Sebastian< bis >Tchaikovsky, Peter<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Stravinsky, Igor / Abraham and Isaac / Agon / Apollon musagète / Concerto in D / The flood / Introitus / Oedipus rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Piano concerto / Pulcinella suite / The rake’s progress / The rite of spring / Le rossignol / A sermon, a narrative and a prayer / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphonies of wind instruments / Threni / Variations<. Es wird keine Niederlassungsfolge angegeben.

 

1013 Igor Stravinsky/ Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for baritone and / Chamber Orchestra / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky/ Abraham and Isaac / A Sacred Ballad / for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Full Score / Boosey & Hawkes / Music Publishers Limited / London · Paris · Bonn · Johannesburg · Sydney · Toronto · New York // hexchuuryx rudht / ejmhu ovrct / asue-,sktc / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck / xevu hiuc // (Dirigierpartitur rotfadengeheftet 23,5 x 30,9 (4° [4°]); Singtext hebräisch mit Transliteration englisch [Majuskelschreibung] und nicht zum Singen bestimmter englischer Übersetzung; 28 [28] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier tomatenrot auf grünbeige [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei englisch, Leerseite, Innentitelei hebräisch, Vertonungstext englisch, Vertonungstext hebräisch, Orchesterlegende >Instrumentation< italienisch + Transpositionsvermerk kursiv >All instruments are written at actual pitch< + Spieldauerangabe [12′] englisch + Hinweis zur Aufführungspraxis kursiv >All appogiature to be played before the beat. / A line with a dot ( · ) indicates a sharp attack.<] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel in Verbindung mit Widmung hebräisch-englisch >ejmhu ovrct / ‚hrnte ‚runz,u izyhrtck asue-,sktc / ktrah ‚bhsn ka vngk< / [#] / >ABRAHAM AND ISAAC / A Sacred Ballad for baritone and Chamber Orchestra / Dedicated to the people of the State of Israel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Widmung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 196263<; ohne Übersetzernennung; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© 1965 by Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved / Tonsättning förbjudes<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Anmerkung mit Asterisk 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notrenspiegel über Rechtsschutzvorbehalt linksbündig kursiv >The English text is not to be sung. It is intended merely as a guide to the original Hebrew text.<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 19197<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 28 neben letztem Takt quergesetzt >March 3, / 1963<; Ende-Nummer >2. 65. E<) // (1965)

 

1013Straw 

Strawinskys Exemplar ist auf dem Außentitel zwischen der letzten Zeile des kursiven Untertitels und >Full Score< rechts mit >IStr / March 2765< [° Schrägstrich original] signiert und datiert. Das Exemplar enthält zahlreiche Aufführungseintragungen in Bleistift. Auf der Außentitel-Rückseite ist eine vierspaltige Kritik von Felix Aprahamian >Stravinsky at his most obscure< aus der >Sunday Times< vom 23. Juli 1965 eingeklebt.

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM