74

E b o n y  C o n c e r t o

for jazz orchestra – Ebony-Concerto für Jazz-Orchester – Ebony Concerto pour orchestre de jazz – Ebony Concerto per un’ orchestra di jazz

 

 

Title: The English-American word ‘ebony’ is in this context an euphemism for Negro and is not taken from the material of Herman’s clarinet. Until well into the second half of the century, jazz was predominantly taken from negro music. Strawinsky reused the term in his dialogues as a synonym for African. Strawinsky had also only heard jazz played by Negro bands, and the Herman band, for which he wrote the Ebony Concerto, was a negro band. The term ‘negro’ is in Europe an ethnological term and at first was not used in a political or sociological negative manner. It was reinterpreted in the times of slave handlers as an allusion to the black skin colour of the negro as ‘Ebony’ or also ‘Black Ivory’. As with the majority of all of Strawinsky’s compositions which are not derived from Italian performance markings or formal templates, the title of this work should also be understood cryptically. The title probably comes not from Strawinsky, but from Aaron Goldmark, as can be clearly seen from a letter from Goldmark of January 1946. This is also supported by the fact that Strawinsky spoke about this title but did not make it known that he had come up with or discovered it.

 

Scored for: First edition (Legend): Solo Clarinet Bb, 5 Saxophones (2 Altos Eb, 2 Tenors Bb, Baritone Eb), Bass Clarinet Bb, French horns*, 5 Trumpets Bb, 3 Trombones, Piano, Harp, Guitar, Bass, Tom-Tom, Cymbals, Drums; b) Performance requirements: Solo Bb Clarinet, 2 Altos Saxophones Eb, 2 Tenors Saxophones Bb, 1 Baritone Saxophone Eb, 1 Bass Clarinet Bb, 3 Clarinets°, 1 French Horn°, 5 Trumpets Bb, 3 Trombones, Piano, Harp, Guitar°, Double Bass, 3 Tom-Toms, Cymbals, 2 Drums.

* French horn is the English term for ‘Waldhorn’. In the original score is the plural ‘French horns’ without stipulating the transposition, but the part has only one line; in a German translation, this becomes ‘Französische Hörner’, which is not in fact a type of instrument, analogous to the type of oboe, English horn. In his contributory copy, Strawinsky crossed out the plural >s<; this error is in the first two editions.

° Clarinets, French horn, and the harp are obviously added by Strawinsky to the Woody Herman’s original orchestra (THE FIRST HERD).

 

Construction: The Ebony Concerto is a three-movement instrumental work that is not typical for jazz and has separate sets of figures in each movement; it does not have titles or numbering for the movements, but does have Italian performance instructions and metronome markings. It is written in a jazz style with clause-like repeated structural sections in the first and second movements. – The three movements of the Ebony Concerto have no characterizing movement names or centred movement numbers. The Concerto is conceived in three movements with a fast first movement, a slow second and another fast third movement, thus following the classical concerto form. –

The first movement is based on the ragtime rhythm which is so prized by Strawinsky and is in an A-B-A-C form, in which the A section is a repeated section with two different phrases. The first A section reaches to the end of figure 8 and at figure 9, goes into the first transition section, the B section. At the end of figure 17, there is a da Capo sign indicating the repetition of the A section. For the second transition, Strawinsky does not continue the figures of the C section with figure 18, but with figure 9a sequentially. In comparison with the first interlude B, the second interlace C is shortened. The end of the movement is reached at the end of figure 14a. The trumpet quintet opens the movement. At bar 6 (figure 3), it is displaced by the saxophones. The other instruments gradually enter, the tom-toms at figure 4. The rhythmic music, which is emphasized by the percussion has the role of a prelude and leads into the B section, which is composed for the solo clarinet, which here has its first large entry with trumpet and trombone accompaniment, while the saxophones have rests. The interlude comes out of the prelude, and the coda comes out of the second repeated section. After a few bars of the transition section in the previous style without the solo clarinet, the 1st trumpet takes over the melody as a solo trumpet accompanied by the saxophones, while the trumpets and trombones are now silent. The list of instruments intended by Strawinsky is clear. In the changing relationship of solo clarinet + metal and solo trumpet + woodwind, the other instruments serve both the coloration and the rhythmic definition accented by the percussion with small solo entries brought forward towards the beginning, for example by the piano. –

The second movement, which is not described as such like the first one, represents the central movement of the Ebony Concerto as the slow movement with its central blues section and is 5 pages of the score and 5 figures (3145 + 4a14) in length, and so the shortest. Structurally, it can be defined in different ways: as an A-B-A form with an introduction and Coda, as an A-A1–B-A1–C form, as an A-A1–B-A1–B1 form, as an A-A1 form or also as an A-B form. If one follows Strawinsky’s musical construction and takes into account the repeat barlines and transition phrases, a three-bar introduction can be supposed, the motivic working of which is taken up by a repeated section which contains two different final sections for the first and second transition sections respectively. After the introduction, which intones the blues, the typical blues game follows with a call (3 bars of saxophones and trombones predominantly) and answer (1 bar of muted trumpets). This is connected to 5 bars in which, in keeping with Strawinsky’s manner, the motifs are compressed and interwoven. The call-and-response process in the trumpets repeats itself twice in a shortened form in this way. The final answering call leads into the 10 bars of the first phrase. It consists of harp accompaniment exposed at first over 2 bars and the rest of the answer is in the trumpets; at the 2nd bar, the clarinets enter for a further 2 bars. The section ends in the 5th bar with the solo clarinet with a single note over a background of clarinets and harp. The trumpet and trombone chorus answers antiphonally for 4 bars. The final bar of the phrase, tied to the final crotchet of the penultimate bar, is taken by the solo clarinet and the bass clarinet with a harp and double bass accompaniment. After the repetition of the 9 bars after the introduction, it continues into the 4 bars of the second clause, which at the same time complete the movement as a coda. There is a brilliant final phrase in the solo clarinet, firstly by the 1st clarinet and the baritone saxophone, then accompanied by clarinets and French horn, which are joined by the Soprano saxophone and harp in the final bar. –

The third movement is in a two-part variation form with a repeated section and coda featuring a ten-bar, peaceful bass clarinet melody in an approximate blues style flow in an eleven-bar theme. The structure is an A-B-A-C-A1 form = Theme / Variation I / Theme / Variation II / Coda with a reworked theme. The first variation enters with the Con moto at figure 3. It lasts until the end of figure 20 and develops the framework, started by the bass clarinet interval, in predominantly downward combinations of seconds in the clarinets, while the tenor saxophone is used as a solo part. The harp, guitar, bass and percussion form the rhythmic framework. After the repetition of the theme at figure 21 until the end of figure 23, the second variation begins at the Vivo at figure 24. It serves the solo clarinet above all as a composed-out improvisatory cadenza which takes on a supporting role in relation to the other instruments. At figure 33, the music flows into the 17 coda bars in the same tempo which binds the theme together into heavy combinations of chords in the style of a chorale. The work concludes with a seven-bar tutti section repeated three times with a parallel high note in the solo clarinet.

 

Structure

[I]

Allegro moderato Minim = 88 (figure 41 up to the end of figure 14a5)

            [figure 1 up to the end of figure 8; figure 9 up to the end of figure 146; figure 9a up to the

                        end of figure 14a]

[II]

Andante Crotchet = 84 (figure 31 up to the end of figure 3a4)

            [figure 311; Repeated section figure 1 up to the end of figure 45 with second clause figure

                        3a14 in place of figure 3 and 4]

[III]

Moderato Minim = 84 (figure 41 up to the end of figure 23)

Con moto Minim = 132 (figure 3 up to the end of figure 204)

Moderato Minim = 84 (figure 21 up to the end of figure 233)

Vivo Crotchet = 132 (figure 24 up to the end of figure 324)

Same Tempo Minim = 64, Crotchet = 132 (figure 33 up to the end of figure 373)

 

Corrections / Errata

742

1st Movement

  1.) Legend, Horn: French Horn instead of French Horns.

  2.) Legend, Percussion: Cymbals has to be removed.

  3.) p. 15, figure 14a34 , 1.-5. Trumpets, performance practice: indication >pluncers< has to be added;

            >+ ° + ° / rest + ° instead of >° + ° + / rest ° +<.

2nd Movement

  4.) p. 19, figure 35, Harp bass: The Bass notes A-c should be removed from the four-note chord and

only the notes d-f# (flageolet) should be played.

  5.) p. 20, figure 3a12: the 7 semiquaver ligatures should be played by the bass clarinet

instead of the baritone saxophone.+++

 3rd Movement

  6.) p. 21, figure 41, legend: >Sn. dr. instead of Cymbals.

  7.) p. 21, figure 41, legend: >Bass Drums< instead of >Drums<.

  8.) p. 40, figure 363: breath mark has to be added between the two minims.

  9.) p. 40, figures 361, 362 and 371  Clarinet solo: figure 361 minim e3, figure 362 2nd minim e3, figure

            371 semibreve e3 have to be marked with accents (>).

10.) p. 40, figure 373, Clarinet: staccato-dot + >off<.

 

Style: In the Ebony Concerto, classical concerto sections and jazz elements are combined, not as a unit but as a progression; the jazz element of the blues only appears in its pure form in the second movement. The composition is regarded as untypical for jazz.

 

Dedication: >Dedicated to Woody Herman<.

 

Duration: about 301″ + 234″ + 341″.

 

Date of origin: 1945, completed 1th December 1945 in Hollywood.

 

First performance: 21st March 1946 in New York, Carnegie Hall, Woody Herman (Clarinet) und the Woody Herman’s Band conducted by Walter Hendl.

 

Remarks: The composition of the Ebony Concerto for the clarinettist and bandleader Woody Herman, who was evidently admired by Strawinsky, took place in a fairly narrow instrumental and temporal, but also compositional framework. The contract was settled on 17th October 1945 and gave Strawinsky a flat fee of $1,000. The specified band, The First Herd by Woody Herman, which was made up of a solo clarinet played by himself, saxophones, trumpets and trombones with piano, guitar, double bass and percussion; Strawinsky added to this not only a French horn, as he said, but probably also the clarinets and harp. Since the performance date 21st March 1946 already stood at the statement of the commission by Aaron Goldmark of Leeds Music Corporation with a connection to Woody Herman and his band, little time remained for Strawinsky for work. He studied recordings of Herman in order to familiarise himself with the playing style of the bandleader. Presumably this must have been in reference to the records which were published in 1945, such as Laura, I Wonder, Apple Honey or Caldonia. The connections were analysed in 1972 by Jürgen Hunkemöller, who got his details from the foreword of the second American printing of the Ebony Concerto of 1946 (‘Igor Strawinsky’s Jazz Portrait’, Archiv für Musikwissenschaft 1972, 29th volume p.4563, Franz Steiner Publishers, Wiesbaden). He then consulted an instrumentalist, in his well known manner, who made familiarised him with the playing style of the saxophone, which was the most important for Herman as it acted as a replacement for the string family. He did not require a similar consultation for the choral treatment of the brass instruments. His concept of form was based on a jazz-orientated Concerto grosso with a Blues as the slow middle section, since the blues was for him the epitome of the African-American music scene. The composition caused him effort due to the unusual ensemble. His letter to Boulanger about the difficulties which he had with it speaks for itself. Since he was also writing the Ebony Concerto in parallel with the Symphony in Three Movements, he was inevitably working on two different stylistic levels simultaneously.

 

Significance: The Ebony Concerto, in spite of its frequent quotation, is, unlike the Piano-Rag-Music and Tango, not one of Strawinsky’s more meaningful pieces on the border between Classical and constructed, everyday Gebrauchsmusik. Nevertheless, the popular Strawinsky and Jazz literature focuses on this piece again and again.

 

Situationsgeschichte: His migration to the United States of America which was caused by the War plunged Strawinsky once again into financial need. He therefore took on a set of commissions which in fact were not suitable for him and which he later snidely recorded as ‘Jazz Commercials’ and in which he had no interests other than financial. Accordingly, all these works from the American years, with the exception of Rag-time, which, like the Piano-Rag-Music does not belong to this group, but especially Scherzo à la Russe, the Ebony Concerto are the results of a desire for income caused by the financial need of an emigrée and as a result, were generally composed quickly and even on the site.

 

Understanding of Jazz: Since Strawinsky, as the only one of the great serious composers of the 20th Century, if one discounts Ernst Krenek, gave his opinion publicly several times on Jazz and demonstrated several pieces and sections of pieces set under a Jazz title, it was already being cited from the early 20’s as proof of the substantial influence of jazz on New Music. Strawinsky himself brought this back to the facts, which can be verified in the biography and work. According to this, Strawinsky received acknowledgement for the first time from the direction of American music when Ernest Ansermet brought back with him music and scores of Ragtime music from his tour of America in 1918, which Strawinsky immediately delved into and which caused him to incorporate Ragtime as a dance form in the Soldier’s Tale. In the subsequent time period, it was not actually jazz as a musical genre that Strawinsky incorporated, but Ragtime as a special and thus culturally and stylistically detached rhythmic phenomenon. In this sense, Strawinsky’s few compositions that refer expressly to jazz in the title were not the expression of his affinity to the style, rather to the rhythmic impulse coming from Ragtime, which became a strong influence in works that had objectively nothing to do with jazz and jazz style, and in which one would not seek or expect such elements at first. It is not true that Strawinsky loved Jazz in its entirety. It is also worth separating specific comments aimed at the public from what he actually thought. That Strawinsky concerned himself with Herman’s records was also probably not because he regarded the clarinetist and bandleader so highly, rather because he had received a financially rewarding commission and wanted to execute it properly, which was the reason for his concern with the preserved playing style of the performers for whom it was intended. His real knowledge of Jazz music was restricted, apart from having studied sheet music of Ragtime, to his experiences of having heard Negro bands in Harlem, Chicago and New Orleans, so that for him, Jazz music was always Black music. He admired Tatum, Charlie Parker and the guitarist Charles Christian. But Strawinsky was vehemently opposed to the basic, structurally typical features of Jazz. For him, the equation of Ragtime equalling Jazz was not true, rather Blues equalling Jazz, and the Blues can only be found in the Ebony Concerto. The Blues in turn was identical for him, and he made this absolutely clear, to the African as an expression of Afro-American culture, but also identical to the prevalent term of entertainment music, which he actually wanted to have nothing to do with, even if he enjoyed the occasionally Broadway Revue. Strawinsky absolutely could not reconcile himself with the improvisatory element of Jazz style. Strawinsky later explained that Jazz has nothing in common with ‘composed music’, and one cannot combine Jazz and composed music. He who tries this will produce bad music in both styles. It is for this reason that differences must have arisen between him and the commissioners, because Strawinsky rejected the attempt to incorporate improvisation in the Ebony Concerto, mostly for the solo clarinetist Herman, but also for the band members, who were evidently uneducated improvisatory musicians. Strawinsky even reported that he had to rewrite the first movement of his concerto in quavers because the band members were unable to read semiquavers. Goldmark’s offended-sounding letter from the beginning of 1946 on an entirely different matter and Strawinsky’s scornful twisting of his name into ‘Mister Goldfarb’ and his handwritten note in the margin ‘cheek’ demonstrate sufficiently that in spite of the audience’s benevolent response at the premiére of the Ebony Concerto in the Carnegie Hall filled with light effects, deep-reaching resentment had arisen that prevented a friendly relationship. In fact, there is no greater danger for such a constructed, ordered music as that of Strawinsky, than the insertion of improvisations that are vary according on the mood, which can inevitably sabotage carefully considered levels of montage. Strawinsky’s excursions into the commercial world of a music scene that did not make much sense to him; these were made necessary predominantly by reasons of time and money, ended with the Ebony Concerto. Strawinsky had an ear for improvisational sections throughout, but only if they were formed beforehand, which would thus mean that they were no longer improvisations in the real sense of the word, but only sounded like them, of his time in the Soldier’s Tale so weightily that his violin cadenzas became of importance for the musical and scientific history of improvisation by Ernst Ferand. Strawinsky therefore differentiated pointedly between jazz compositions, for which he did not care of, and jazz pastiches, which fascinated him because they struck a chord with him, and he cultivated this over a long period of time into his changing metres and cadenza-like solos. In 1919 however, the process came to his attention thanks to his hearing jazz music and this formed the basis for the unmetrical sections in the Piano-Rag-Music of 1919 or the Trois Pieces pour Clarinette Seule, also from 1919.

 

Versions: The only dateable printed American edition of the Ebony Concerto was published in 1946 at the price of one-and-a-half dollars as a pocket-score edition in octave format. According to American dating. it was also published in the same year at a price of 4 dollars with a different design in quarto format, originally called a Miniature Score, both times without plate number. in the publishing house of Charling Music Corporation based in New York, for which Morris was attributed for the conducting score. Strawinsky received the contributory copy of the quarto-format edition in January 1947. A new edition was published in 1954 by Edwin H. Morris & Co. in London under the name of Charling Music Corporation. The sale was not worth mentioning at any time apart from in the first half year after publication until 30th June 1947. At that time, 212 copies were sold and the largest part in a half-year period of accounting. Between the 1st June 1947 and 30th September 1966, the publishers sold a further 900 copies. In some half-year periods, not more than ten scores were sold worldwide. From a letter of 1st June 1967 which Sol Reiner enthusiastically send to Strawinsky, it emerges that the second movement of the concerto by Mischa Portnoff for solo piano had already been edited and presumably also published. In European libraries, no copies of this edition seem to have appeared. Strawinsky was annoyed and wrote cuttingly on the side: ‘Why not Sasha Bolwanov or Moishe Schneiderson?’.

 

Production: In 1957, Alan Carter brought together the Ebony Concerto, Fireworks, Circus Polka and Ode for a ballet production Feuilleton, choreographed at the Munich State Opera House.

In 1960, the Ebony Concerto was choreographed by John Taras for the New York City Ballet with set and costumes by David Haysand included in a dance evening under the title ‘Jazz Concert’. In the first movement, the dancers appeared only as silhouettes while the second movement was set as a Pas de deux, and the third as an energetic staccato dance.

 

Historical Recordings: Hollywood 19th August 1946, Woody Herman (Clarinet) and the Orchestra Woody Herman under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Hollywood 27th April 1965, Benny Goodman (Clarinet) and the Columbia Jazz Ensemble under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: VII-1/1214 (Recording 27th April 1965).

 

Autograph: Library of Congress, Washington.

 

Copyright: 1946 by Charling Music Corporation in New York.

 

Editions

a) Overview

741 1946 PoSc; Charling Music Corporation New York; 40 pp.; – .

                        741Straw ibd. [signed and dated, no annotations].

742 (1946) FuSc; Charling Music Corporation / Morris & Company New York; 40 pp.; – .

                        742Straw ibd. [with annotations].

743 1954 PoSc; Morris & Company London / Charling Music Corporation; 40 pp.; 2514 E.M.

b) Characteristic features

741 Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / On Columbia Record No. 7479M / Price / $1.50 / in U. S. A. / [**] / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents / MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. / 1619 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. // Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / On Columbia Record No. 7479 M / Price / $1.50 / in U. S. A. / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents / MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. // (Pocket score stapled 15.1 x 23.1 (8° [gr. 8°]); 40 [40] pages + 4 cover pages brown-red on dark beige [front cover title laid out with the name of the composer printed sloping upwards in script, an extended ergographical preface >FOREWORD< English, 2 empty pages] without front matter and without back matter; title head >EBONY CONCERTO<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] below title head flush right italic >By Igor Stravinsky<; legal reservation in connection with production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre centred >Copyright 1946 by CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agent, MAYFAIR MUSIC CORP., 1619 Broadway. New York, N. Y. / International Copyright Secured< [#] Made in U.S.A.< [#] >All Rights Reserved<; without plate number; without end mark) // (1946)

* Printed upward angularly in quasi handwritten script.

** In the copy gifted to the British Museum 31. Januar 1947 >c.133.f.1.<, there is [only] at this position parallel to and to the right of the three-line statement of the price a stamp Stempelvermerk >CHAPPELL & CO. LT / 50. NEW BONDD STREET. LONDON / NEW YORK & SYDNEY.<.

 

741Straw

The copy from Strawinsk’s estate is signed and dated >IStr Jan 47< on the front cover title page between >EBONY CONCERTO< and >Miniature Score<. The copy contains no annotations.

 

742 EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Price / $4.00 / in U. S. A. / CHARLING MUSIC CORP.° / SOLE DISTRIBUTOR: / EDWIN. H. MORRIS & COMPANY, INC. / 31 WEST 54th STREETNEW YORK 19, N. Y. // Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / On Columbia Record No. 7479M / Price / $4.00 / in U. S. A. / CHARLING MUSIC CORP.° / 31 WEST 54th STREET NEW YORK 19, N. Y. // (Full score stapled 21.7 x 28 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 40 [39] pages + 4 cover pages dark blue on hellgrey gemasert [front cover title laid out with schräg gestelltem Komponistennamen in Schreibschrift, page with biography >STRAVINSKY< half a page-flush left, continuation page half a page flush right with a reference to the author >THE PUBLISHER.<, empty page with imprint >a publication of / EDWIN H. MORRIS & COMPANY, INC. / # 0700543-1364<** below 2 ornamental lines 0.4 x 10.8 at a distance of 1.5] + 1 page front matter [title page with identical layout without colour] without back matter; title head >EBONY CONCERTO<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] below [in connection with] title head flush right italic >By Igor Stravinsky<; legal reservation in connection with production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre centred >Copyright 1946 by CHARLING MUSIC CORP° / 31 WEST 54th STREETNEW YORK 19, N. Y. / International Copyright Secured< [#] >Made in U.S.A.< [#] >All Rights Reserved<; without plate number; without end mark) // (1946)

° Different spelling (dot) original.

* Printed upward angularly in quasi handwritten script.

** #-sign original.

 

742Straw

The copy from Strawinsky’s estate is signed and dated (in blue) >IStr / April 2765< [° slash original] on the front cover title above, next to and below >Miniature Score<. The copy contains corrections (in red) and many notes on performance.

 

743 Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / EDWIN. H. MORRIS & CO. LTD. / 52 Maddox Street, London, W. 1 / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents: MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. / 1619 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. / [in the text box contained:] 4245 [#] This edition is authorised for sale in British Empire (except Canada) and continent of Europe [#] Made in England. // Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / Price / 5/- / net / EDWIN. H. MORRIS & CO. LTD. / 52 Maddox Street, London, W. 1 / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents: MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. / 1619 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. / This edition is authorised for sale in British Empire (except Canada) and Continent of Europe // (Pocket score [library binding] 13.8 x 21.6 (8° [8°]); 40 [39] pages + 4 cover pages brown-red on dark beige [front cover title laid out the name of the composer printed sloping upwards in script and an extended ergographical preface, [missing] , [missing] ] + 1 page front matter [title page laid out] without back matter; title head >EBONY CONCERTO<; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 2] below title head flush right italic >By Igor Stravinsky<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1946 by Charling Music Corp. / Sole Selling Agent, Mayfair Music Corp., 1619 Broadway New York, N. Y. / Edwin H. Morris & Co. Ltd., 52 Maddox Street, London, W. 1< [#] flush right partly in italics >International Copyright Secured< ?/? [#] flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number [unpaginated p. 2:] >2514< [paginated pp. 340 in connection with publisher’s initials:] >2514 [#] E.M.<; production indications 1st page of the score below type area flush right >PRINTED IN ENGLAND< p. 40 centre between plate number und publisher’s initials >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1954)

* Printed upward angularly in quasi handwritten script.

 

 

 

 

74

E b o n y  C o n c e r t o

for jazz orchestra – Ebony-Concerto für Jazz-Orchester – Ebony Concerto pour orchestre de jazz – Ebony Concerto per un’ orchestra di jazz

 

 

Titel: Das englisch-amerikanische Wort ‚ebony’ bedeutet Ebenholz und bildet in diesem Zusammenhang ein Deckwort für Neger, ist also nicht vom Material der Herman-Klarinette abgeleitet. Bis weit über die Jahrhundertmitte hinaus wurde Jazz überwiegend von Negermusikern ausgeführt. Strawinsky umschrieb den Terminus in seinen Dialogen als Synonym für Afrikanisch. Auch Strawinsky hat den Jazz nur von Negerkapellen gespielt gehört, und die Herman-Band, für die er das Ebony Concerto schrieb, war ebenfalls eine Neger-Band. Der Begriff Neger ist in Europa ein ethnologischer Fachbegriff und zunächst nicht politisch oder gesellschaftskritisch negativ besetzt gewesen. Man umschrieb ihn in Sklavenhändlerzeiten unter Anspielung auf die schwarze Hautfarbe der Neger mit Ebenholz oder auch Schwarzes Elfenbein. Wie die Mehrheit aller nicht von italienischen Vortragsbezeichnungen oder von Formbildern abgeleiteten Strawinsky-Kompositionen ist auch dieser Werktitel hintergründig zu verstehen. Der Titel stammt vermutlich nicht von Strawinsky, sondern von Aaron Goldmark; jedenfalls läßt sich eine briefliche Äußerung Goldmarks vom Januar 1946 so verstehen. Dafür spricht auch, daß Strawinsky zwar über diesen Titel gesprochen, sich aber nie berühmt hat, ihn er– oder gefunden zu haben.

 

Besetzung: a) Erstausgabe (Legende): Solo Clarinet Bb, 5 Saxophones (2 Altos Eb, 2 Tenors Bb, Baritone Eb), Bass Clarinet Bb, French horns*, 5 Trumpets Bb, 3 Trombones, Piano, Harp, Guitar, Bass, Tom-Tom, Cymbals, Drums [Solo-Klarinette in Bb, 5 Saxophone (2 Alt-Saxophone in Eb, 2 Tenor-Saxophone in Bb, Bariton-Saxophon in Eb), Baßklarinette in Bb, Waldhörner*, 5 Trompeten in Bb, Klavier, Harfe, Gitarre, Kontrabaß, Tom-Tom, Becken, Trommeln]; b) Aufführungsanforderungen: Solo-Klarinette in B, 3 Klarinetten°, 2 Alt-Saxophone in Es, 2 Tenor-Saxophone in B, 1 Bariton-Saxophon in Es, 1 Baßklarinette in B°, 1 Waldhorn*°, 5 Trompeten in B, 3 Posaunen, Klavier, Harfe°, Gitarre, Kontrabaß, 3 Tom-Toms, Becken, 2 Trommeln.

* Die englische Bezeichnung für Waldhorn lautet French Horn. In der Original-Partitur wurde French Horn in den Plural gesetzt (French Horns), obwohl nur ein einzelnes Horn ohne Transpositionsangabe Verwendung findet. In einer deutschen Übersetzung wurden daraus, vermutlich im Analogieverfahren zum Oboentypus Englischhorn, „Französische Hörner“ gemacht, die es als Typus nicht gibt. In seinem Belegexemplar hat Strawinsky das Mehrzahl-s weggestrichen; der Fehler befindet sich in beiden Erstausgaben.

° Klarinetten, Waldhorn und Harfe sind augenscheinlich von Strawinsky der Stammbesetzung Woody Hermans (the first herd) hinzugefügte Instrumente.

 

Aufbau: Das Ebony-Concerto ist ein einzeln beziffertes, ohne Satzüberschriften und ohne Satznumerierungen, aber mit italienischen Vortragsbezeichnungen versehenens, metronomisiertes dreisätziges Instrumentalstück im Jazz-Stil mit klausulierten Binnenwiederholungsteilen im ersten und zweiten Satz. – Die drei Teile des Ebony-Konzertes tragen keine charakterisierenden Satzbezeichnungen oder mittig zentrierte Satznummern. Das Konzert ist mit schnellem erstem, langsamem zweiten und wieder schnellem dritten Satz der klassischen Konzertform nachgedacht. –

Der erste Satz beruht auf dem von Strawinsky so geschätzten Ragtime-Rhythmus und ist formtypologisch eine A-B-A-C-Form, wobei A ein Wiederholungsteil mit zwei verschiedenen Klauseln darstellt. Der erste A-Teil reicht bis Ende Ziffer 8 und geht bei Ziffer 9 in den dem ersten Durchgang vorbehaltenen B-Teil über. Am Ende von Ziffer 17 steht das Da-capo-Zeichen für die Wiederholung von A. Für den zweiten Durchgang beziffert Strawinsky den C-Teil nicht mit Ziffer 18, sondern mit Ziffer 9a folgend weiter. Gegenüber dem ersten Durchgang B ist der zweite Durchgang C verkürzt. Das Ende des Satzes wird bei Ende Ziffer 14a5 erreicht. Den Satz eröffnet das Trompetenquintett. Mit Takt 6 = Ziffer 3 wird es von den Saxophonen abgelöst. Nach und nach setzen die anderen Instrumente ein, bei Ziffer 4 die Tom-toms. Die schlagzeugbetonte Rhythmusmusik hat Vorspielfunktion und drängt auf den B-Teil hin, der für die Soloklarinette ausgelegt ist, die hier ihren ersten großen Einsatz vor allem unter Trompeten– und Posaunenbegleitung hat, während die Saxophone pausieren. Aus dem Vorspiel wird das Zwischenspiel, aus dem zweiten Wiederholungsteil die Koda. Nach wenigen Takten des Übergangs im bisherigen Stil ohne Soloklarinette übernimmt die 1. Trompete als Solotrompete unter Begleitung der Saxophone die Stimmführung, während es jetzt die Trompeten und Posaunen sind, die schweigen. Die von Strawinsky beabsichtigte instrumentale Zuordnung ist offensichtlich. Im Wechselverhältnis Solo-Klarinette + Metall und Solo-Trompete + Holz dienen die anderen Instrumente sowohl der Färbung wie der schlagzeugakzentuierten Rhythmusmarkierung mit ganz kleinen nach vorne geschobenen Soloeinlagen etwa vom Klavier. –

Der zweite, ebenfalls nicht so bezeichnete Satz ist mit seinem zentralen Blues das Kernstück des Ebony-Konzertes, vertritt den langsamen Teil und ist räumlich gesehen mit nur 5 Partiturseiten und 5 Ziffern (3145 + 4a14) der kürzeste. Formtypologisch läßt er sich je nach Zuordnung auf verschiedene Weise definieren, als A-B-A-Form mit Introduktion und Koda, als A-A1–B-A1–C-Form, als A-A1–B-A1–B1–Form, als A-A1–Form oder auch als A-B-Form. Folgt man dem Strawinskyschen Notenbild und berücksichtigt Wiederholungsstrich und Durchgangsklauseln, so ist er von einer dreitaktigen Introduktion ausgegangen, deren Motivik von einem Wiederholungsteil aufgenommen wird, der zwei verschiedene Schlußformen je für den ersten und für den zweiten Durchgang besitzt. Nach der den Blues intonierenden Introduktion folgt das typische Bluesspiel mit Ruf (3 Takte überwiegend Saxophone und Posaunen) und Antwort (1 Takt gestopfte Trompeten). Es schließen sich 5 Takte an, die nach Strawinskyart Motive ineinander stauchen. Das Verfahren Ruf und Antwort durch die Trompeten wiederholt sich auf diese Weise zweimal verkürzt. Der letzte Antwortruf leitet in die 10 Takte der ersten Klausel ein. Sie besteht bei zunächst exponierter Harfenbegleitung aus 2 Takten Restantwort der Trompeten; mit dem 2. Takt setzen die Klarinetten für weitere 2 Takte ein. Der Abschnitt wird im 5. Takt von der Soloklarinette mit einem einzigen Ton auf der Grundlage von Klarinetten und Harfe beendet. Der Trompeten– und Posaunenchor antwortet antiphonal für 4 Takte. Der letzte Takt der Klausel, rückbezogen auf den letzten Viertelwert des vorletzten Taktes, gehört der Soloklarinette und der Baßklarinette unter Begleitung von Harfe und Kontrabaß. Nach der Wiederholung der 9 Takte nach der Introduktion geht es in die 4 Takte der zweiten Klausel, die gleichzeitig den Satz als Koda beendet. Es ist eine brillante Schlußphrase der Soloklarinette, zuerst von 1. Klarinette und Bariton-Saxophon, dann von Klarinetten und Waldhorn begleitet, zu dem sich im letzten Takt noch Sopran-Saxophon und Harfe gesellen. –

Der dritte Satz ist ein zweifaches Variationenwerk mit Wiederholungsteil und Koda über eine zehntaktige ruhige Baßklarinettenmelodie im angenäherten Blues-Duktus in einem elftaktigen Thema. Formtypologisch handelt es sich um eine A-B-A-C-A1–Form = Thema / Variation I / Thema / Variation II / Koda als umgearbeitetes Thema. Die erste Variation setzt mit dem Con moto von Ziffer 3 ein. Sie reicht bis Ende Ziffer 20 und komponiert den vom Baßklarinettenintervall vorgegebenen Rahmen in überwiegend abwärtsgerichteten Sekundkombinationen in den Klarinetten aus, während das Tenor-Saxophon solistisch beschäftigt ist. Harfe, Gitarre, Baß und Schlagzeug bilden die rhythmische Grundlage. Nach der Themenwiederholung Ziffer 21 bis Ende Ziffer 23 beginnt bei Ziffer 24 Vivo die zweite Variation. Sie dient vor allem der Soloklarinette als auskomponierte improvisatorische Kadenz, der gegenüber die anderen Instrumente die Funktion der Unterstützung übernehmen. Bei Ziffer 33 mündet sie in die 17 Koda-Takte gleichen Tempos, die das Thema in getragenen Akkordkombinationen choralartig bündeln. Das Stück schließt im Tutti siebentaktig dreifach akkordisch mit einem parallel geführten Hochton der Soloklarinette.

 

Aufriß

[I]

Allegro moderato Halbe = 88 (Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 14a5)

            [Ziffer 1 bis Ende Ziffer 8; Ziffer 9 bis Ende Ziffer 146; Ziffer 9a bis Ende Ziffer 14a]

[II]

Andante Viertel = 84 (Ziffer 31 bis Ende Ziffer 3a4)

            [Ziffer 311; Wiederholungsteil Ziffer 1 bis Ende Ziffer 45 mit Schlußklausel Ziffer 3a14 für Ziffer

3 und 4]

[III]

Moderato Halbe = 84 (Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 23)

Con moto Halbe = 132 (Ziffer 3 bis Ende Ziffer 204)

Moderato Halbe = 84 (Ziffer 21 bis Ende Ziffer 233)

Vivo Viertel = 132 (Ziffer 24 bis Ende Ziffer 324)

Same Tempo Halbe = 64, Viertel = 132 (Ziffer 33 bis Ende Ziffer 373)

 

Korrekturen / Errata

742

1. Satz

  1.) Orchesterlegende: Mehrzahl French Horns ist in Einzahl French Horn umzuschreiben

  2.) Orchesterlegende: Im Schlagzeugbereich ist Cymbals oberhalb Drums durchzustreichen

  3.) Ziffer 14a34 (S. 15) 1.-5. Trompeten: die Spielanweisung >pluncers< ist einzufügen, und

statt aufführungspraktisch falsch ° + ° + / Pause ° + ist richtig + ° + ° / Pause + ° zu lesen

2. Satz

  4.) p. 19, figure 35, Harp bass: Die Baßnoten A-c sind aus dem Viertonakkord zu streichen und nur

die Noten d-f# (Flageolett) zu spielen

  5.) p. 20, figure 3a12, die 7 Sechzehntelligaturen sind statt vom Bariton-Saxophon von der

Baßklarinette zu spielen +++

  

3. Satz

  6.) S. 21, Ziffer 41, Orchesterlegende: >Sn. dr. anstatt of Cymbals.

  7.) S. 21, Ziffer 41, Orchesterlegende: >Bass Drums< instead of >Drums<.

  8.) S. 40, Ziffer 363: zwischen den beiden Halbenoten ist ein Atemzeichen anzubringen.

  9.) S. 40, Ziffer 361, 362 and 371  Solo-Klarinette: Ziffer361 Halbe e3, Ziffer362 2. Halbe e3, Ziffer 371

            Ganznote e3 sind jeweils mit einem Akzent (>) zu versehen.

10.) S. 40, Ziffer 373, Klarinette: staccato-Punkt + >off<.

 

Stilistik: Im Ebony Concerto mischen sich klassische Konzertteile und Jazz-Elemente nicht als Einheit, sondern als Abfolge, wobei das Jazzelement des Blues nur im zweiten Satz rein hervortritt. Die Komposition gilt als jazzuntypisch.

 

Widmung: >Dedicated to Woody Herman> [Gewidmet Woody Herman].

 

Dauer: etwa 301″ + 234″ + 341

 

Entstehungszeit: im Jahre 1945, abgeschlossen am 1. Dezember in Hollywood.

 

Uraufführung: 21. März 1946 in der New Yorker carnegie hall mit dem Klarinettisten Woody Herman und der woody herman’s band unter der Leitung von Walter Hendl.

 

Bemerkungen: Die Komposition des Ebony Concerto für den von Strawinsky offensichtlich bewunderten Klarinettisten und Bandleader Woody Herman erfolgte in einem besonders engen instrumentalen und zeitlichen, aber auch kompositorischen Rahmen. Der Vertrag wurde am 17. Oktober 1945 geschlossen und brachte Strawinsky ein festes Honorar von tausend Dollar. Das vorgegebene Orchester war die Band The First Herd von Woody Herman, die aus der von ihm selbst gespielten Soloklarinette, aus Saxophonen, Trompeten, Posaunen mit Klavier, Gitarre, Kontrabaß und Schlagzeug bestand und der Strawinsky nicht nur ein Waldhorn einfügte, wie er sagte, sondern möglicherweise auch die Klarinetten und die Harfe. Weil bei der Auftragserteilung durch Aaron Goldmark von Leeds Music Corporation mit Bindung an Woody Herman und dessen Band der Aufführungstermin 21. März 1946 schon feststand, blieb Strawinsky für seine Arbeit wenig Zeit. Er studierte Herman-Aufnahmen, um die Spielweise des Bandleaders kennen zu lernen. Vermutlich dürfte es sich dabei um Platten gehandelt haben, die 1945 erschienen, wie Laura oder I Wonder oder Apple Honey oder Caldonia. Die Zusammenhänge sind 1972 von Jürgen Hunkemöller untersucht worden, der seine Details dem Vorwort der zweiten amerikanischen Auflage des Ebony-Concertos von 1946 entnahm (>Igor Strawinskys Jazz-Porträt<, Archiv für Musikwissenschaft 1972, 29. Jahrgang S. 4563, Franz Steiner Verlag Wiesbaden). Dann setzte er sich nach seiner bekannten Art mit einem Instrumentalisten zusammen, der ihn mit der Spielweise der für Herman wichtigsten, weil die Streicherfamilie ersetzenden Saxophone vertraut machte. Für die chorische Behandlung von Blechblasinstrumenten bedurfte er einer solchen Unterrichtung nicht. Seine Formvorstellung richtete sich auf ein jazzorientiertes Concerto grosso mit einem Blues als langsamen Mittelsatz, da der Blues für ihn der Inbegriff der afrikanisch-amerikanischen Musik-Szene bildete. Die Komposition bereitete ihm wegen des ungewohnten Ensembles Mühe. Sein Brief an Boulanger über die Schwierigkeiten, die er damit hatte, spricht für sich. Da er zudem das Ebony Concerto zeitgleich mit der Symphonie in drei Sätzen schrieb, bewegte er sich damals zwangsläufig auf zwei unterschiedlichen stilistischen Ebenen.

 

Bedeutung: Das Ebony Concerto zählt trotz seiner häufigen Zitierung anders als die Piano-Rag-Music und der Tango nicht zu den bedeutenderen Stücken Strawinskys auf der Grenze zwischen klassischer und wie immer gearteter Alltags-Gebrauchsmusik. Jedoch geht eine populäre Strawinsky– und Jazz-Literatur immer wieder gerne auf dieses Stück zu.

 

Situationsgeschichte: Mit der kriegsbedingten Übersiedlung in die Vereinigten Staaten von Nordamerika geriet Strawinsky neuerlich in Finanznot. So nahm er eine Reihe von Aufträgen an, die eigentlich nicht zu ihm paßten und die er selbst später abfällig pauschal als Jazz Commercials (Jazz-Geschäfte) überschrieb und bei denen ihn keine anderen als finanzielle Interessen leiteten. Dementsprechend sind, den frühen Rag-Time ausgenommen, der wie die Piano-Rag-Music nicht dazugehört, alle diese Stücke der ersten amerikanischen Jahre, vor allem Scherzo à la Russe und Ebony-Concerto Ergebnisse eines von der finanziellen Bedrängnis des Emigranten bestimmten Erwerbssinnes und folglich mehr oder weniger schnell und gegebenenfalls sogar nebensächlich gearbeitet.

 

Jazz-Verständnis: Da sich Strawinsky als einziger der großen seriösen Komponisten des 20. Jahrhunderts, sieht man von Ernst Krenek einmal ab, mehrfach offen zum und über den Jazz geäußert und mehrere Stücke und Stückteile unter Jazztitel gesetzt hat, wurde er schon seit den frühen zwanziger Jahren als Beweis für einen erheblichen Einfluß des Jazz auf die Neue Musik in Anspruch genommen. Diese pauschalierende Zuordnung normalisierte Strawinsky selbst auf die Fakten hin, die sich an Biographie und Werk überprüfen lassen. Danach bekam Strawinsky zum ersten Mal von der amerikanischen Musikrichtung Kenntnis, als ihm Ernest Ansermet von seiner Amerika-Reise des Jahres 1918 Noten und Partituren mit Ragtime-Musik mitbrachte, in die sich Strawinsky sofort vertiefte und die ihn veranlaßten, den Ragtime als Tanzform mit in die Geschichte vom Soldaten aufzunehmen. In der Folgezeit ist es nicht eigentlich der Jazz als musikalische Gattung gewesen, auf den Strawinsky abhob, sondern der Ragtime als besonderes und dabei kulturstilistisch abgelöstes rhythmisches Phänomen. In diesem Sinne sind denn nicht die wenigen, im Titel ausdrücklich auf Jazz hin bezogenen Kompositionen Strawinskys Ausdruck seiner Neigung gewesen, sondern der vom Ragtime ausgehende rhythmische Impuls, der sich stark auch in Werke hinein fortsetzte, die objektiv mit Jazz und Jazzstil nichts zu tun hatten und in denen man zunächst solche Elemente nicht suchen und erwarten würde. Es stimmt nicht, daß Strawinsky den Jazz als Ganzes uneingeschränkt bewundert hat. Es gilt auch hier, geschäftsbedingt publikumswirksame Äußerungen vom Gemeinten zu trennen. Strawinsky hat sich möglicherweise auch nicht mit den Schallplatten Hermans beschäftigt, weil er den Klarinettisten und Bandleader Herman so schätzte, sondern weil er einen dotierten Auftrag erhalten hatte und ihn sachgerecht ausführen wollte, wozu nun einmal die Beschäftigung mit dem konservierten Spielstil der Ausführenden gehörte, für die er gedacht war. Seine reale Kenntnis von Jazzmusik beschränkte sich bis dahin, wieder vom in Noten studierten Ragtime abgesehen, auf Hörerlebnisse von Negerbands in Harlem, Chicago und New Orleans, so daß für ihn bis zuletzt Jazz-Musik immer Schwarzen-Musik war. Er schätzte Tatum, Charlie Parker und den Gitarristen Charles Christian. Aber gegen die wesentlichen, strukturtypischen Merkmale des Jazz hat sich Strawinsky vehement gewehrt. Für ihn galt nicht die Gleichung Ragtime gleich Jazz, sondern Blues gleich Jazz, und der Blues ist nur im Ebony Concerto zu finden. Der Blues wiederum war für ihn, daran hat er keinen Zweifel gelassen, mit dem Afrikanischen als Ausdruck der afroamerikanischen Kultur identisch, identisch aber auch mit dem gängigen Begriff der Unterhaltungsmusik, mit der er eigentlich nie etwas zu tun haben wollte, auch wenn er sich mitunter in Broadway-Revuen vergnügte. Ganz und gar nicht konnte sich Strawinsky mit dem Improvisationselement des Jazzstils abfinden. Strawinsky erklärte später, Jazz habe nichts mit „komponierter Musik“ zu tun und man könne Jazz und komponierte Musik auch nicht miteinander verbinden. Wer es versuche, erzeuge in beiden Bereichen schlechte Musik. Es müssen aus diesem Grund wohl auch Differenzen zwischen ihm und den Auftraggebern entstanden sein, weil Strawinsky so strikt das Begehren nach Improvisationsteilen im Ebony Concerto vor allem für den Solo-Klarinettisten Herman, aber auch für die Bandmitglieder ablehnte, die offensichtlich ungebildete Improvisationsmusiker waren. Jedenfalls berichtet Strawinsky, er habe den ersten Satz seines Konzertes in Achtelnoten umschreiben müssen, weil die Bandmitglieder keine Sechzehntelnoten hätten lesen können. Goldmarks beleidigt klingender Brief von Anfang 1946 in ganz anderer Sache und Strawinskys höhnische Namensveralberung vom „Mister Goldfarb” und seine handschriftliche Marginalie cheek (Unverschämtheit) am Rande zeigen zur Genüge, daß trotz des wohlwollenden Publikumsechos bei der Uraufführung des Ebony Concerto in einer mit Lichteffekten erfüllten Carnegie Hall tief greifende Verstimmungen entstanden waren, die einen freundlicheren Umgang ausschlossen. In der Tat gibt es für eine so durchkonstruierte Ordnungs-Musik wie derjenigen Strawinskys keine größere Gefahr als die Einbringung von stimmungsabhängigen Improvisationen, mit denen zwangsläufig sorgsam überlegte Montagepläne zunichte gemacht werden. Mit dem Ebony Concerto enden Strawinskys überwiegend zeit– und geldbedingte Ausflüge in die Geschäftswelt einer für ihn nicht mehr sinngebenden Musikszene. Dabei hatte Strawinsky durchaus ein Ohr für improvisatorische Einschübe, aber nur dann, wenn die Improvisationen vorab gestaltet und damit im eigentlichen Sinne keine Improvisationen mehr waren, sondern nur noch wie solche klangen, wie er es seinerzeit in der Geschichte vom Soldaten so gewichtig vorgeführt hatte, daß seine dortigen Violinkadenzen noch für die musikwissenschaftliche Improvisationsgeschichte eines Ernst Ferand von Bedeutung wurden. Strawinsky unterschied deshalb pointiert zwischen Jazzkompositionen, für die er nichts übrig hatte, und Jazzdarbietungen, die ihn faszinierten, weil sie eine klingende Saite trafen, die er längst in seinen wechselnden Metren und kadenzierenden Soli kultivierte. Aber 1919 wurde ihm das Verfahren dank gehörter Jazzmusik bewußt und bildete den Grund für die nichtmetrischen Teile in der Piano-Rag-Music von 1919 oder den Trois Pièces pour Clarinette seule ebenfalls von 1919.

 

Fassungen: Die einzige datierbare gedruckte amerikanische Ausgabe des Ebony Concerto erschien 1946 zum Preis von anderthalb Dollar als Taschenpartiturausgabe im Oktavformat und (nach amerikanischer Datierung vermutlich) noch im selben Jahr zum Preis von 4 Dollar mit anderer Aufmachung im Quartformat, original ebenfalls als Taschenpartitur (Miniature Score) bezeichnet, beide male ohne Platten-Nummer im Verlag der New Yorker Charling Music Corporation, wobei für die Dirigierpartitur schon Morris mitzeichnete. Strawinsky erhielt das Belegexemplar der Quartformatausgabe im Januar 1947. Eine Neuauflage kam 1954 bei Edwin H. Morris & Co. in London unter Nennung von Charling Music Corporation heraus. Der Verkauf war zu keiner Zeit außer im ersten halben Jahr nach Erscheinen bis 30. Juni 1947 nennenswert. Damals wurden 212 Exemplare verkauft, das größte Kontingent in einem halbjährigen Abrechnungszeitraum überhaupt. Zwischen dem 1. Juli 1947 und dem 30. September 1966 setzte der Verlag weitere etwa 900 Exemplare ab. In manchen Halbjahresphasen wurden weltweit nicht einmal zehn Partituren verkauft. Aus einem Brief vom 1. Juni 1967, den Sol Reiner sehr erfreut an Strawinsky richtete, geht hervor, daß der zweite Satz des Konzertes von Mischa Portnoff für Klavier-Solo bearbeitet und vermutlich auch herausgegeben worden ist. In europäischen Bibliotheken scheint bislang kein Exemplar dieser Ausgabe aufgetaucht zu sein. Strawinsky ärgerte sich und schrieb bissig an den Rand: „Warum nicht Sascha Bolwanoff oder Moishe Schneiderson?“ (‘Why not Sasha Bolwanov or Moishe Schneiderson?’),

 

Produktion: Im Jahre 1957 stellte Alan Carter Ebony Concerto, Feuerwerk, Circus-Polka und Ode für eine an der Münchner Staatsoper choreographierte Ballettproduktion ‚Feuilleton’ zusammen. – Im Jahre 1960 wurde das Ebony Concerto von John Taras für das New York City Ballet choreographiert und mit Ausstattung und Kostümen von David Hays in einen Tanzabend eingestellt, den man unter dem Obertitel ‚Jazz Concert’ veranstaltete. Im ersten Satz erschienen die Tänzer nur als Schattenrisse, der zweite Satz war als Pas de deux angelegt, der dritte als aufgeregter Staccato-Tanz.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: Hollywood 19. August 1946 mit dem Klarinettisten Woody Herman und dem Orchester Woody Herman unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Hollywood 27. April 1965 mit dem Klarinettisten Benny Goodman und dem columbia jazz ensemble unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky

 

CD-Edition: VII-1/1214 (Aufnahme 27. April 1965).

 

Autograph: Library of Congress, Washington.

 

Copyright: 1946 durch Charling Music Corporation in New York.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

741 1946 Tp; Charling Music Corporation New York; 40 S.; – .

                        741Straw ibd. [datiert; ohne Eintragungen].

742 (1946) Dp; Charling Music Corporation / Morris & Company New York; 40 S.; – .

                        742Straw ebd. [mit Eintragungen].

743 1954 Tp; Morris & Company London / Charling Music Corporation; 40 S.; 2514 E.M.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

741 Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / On Columbia Record No. 7479M / Price / $1.50 / in U. S. A. / [**] / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents / MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. / 1619 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. // Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / On Columbia Record No. 7479 M / Price / $1.50 / in U. S. A. / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents / MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. // (Taschenpartitur klammergeheftet 15,1 x 23,1 (8° [gr. 8°]); 40 [40] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag braunrot auf dunkelbeige [aufgemachte Außentitelei mit schräg gestelltem Komponistennamen in Schreibschrift, ausgedehntes ergographisches Vorwort >FOREWORD< englisch, 2 Leerseiten] ohne Vor– und ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >EBONY CONCERTO<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig kursiv >By Igor Stravinsky<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt in Verbindung mit Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig zentriert >Copyright 1946 by CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agent, MAYFAIR MUSIC CORP., 1619 Broadway. New York, N. Y. / International Copyright Secured< [#] Made in U.S.A.< [#] >All Rights Reserved<; ohne Platten-Nummer; ohne Endevermerk) // (1946)

* Schräg hochlaufend in Schreibschrift.

* Im Londoner Geschenkexemplar vom 31. Januar 1947 >c.133.f.1.< befindet sich an dieser Stelle [nur der Außentitelei] rechts parallel zur dreizeiligen Preisangabe ein Stempelvermerk >CHAPPELL & CO. LT / 50. NEW BONDD STREET. LONDON / NEW YORK & SYDNEY.<

 

741Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf dem Außentitel zwischen >EBONY CONCERTO< und >Miniature Score< mit >IStr Jan 47< gezeichnet und datiert.

 

742 EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Price / $4.00 / in U. S. A. / CHARLING MUSIC CORP / SOLE DISTRIBUTOR: / EDWIN. H. MORRIS & COMPANY, INC. / 31 WEST 54th STREETNEW YORK 19, N. Y. // Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / On Columbia Record No. 7479M / Price / $4.00 / in U. S. A. / CHARLING MUSIC CORP.° / 31 WEST 54th STREET NEW YORK 19, N. Y. // (Dirigierpartitur klammergeheftet 21,7 x 28 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 40 [39] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelblau auf hellgrau gemasert [aufgemachte Außentitelei mit schräg gestelltem Komponistennamen in Schreibschrift, Seite mit Biographie >STRAVINSKY< halbseitig-linksbündig, Fortsetzungsseite halbseitig-rechtsbündig mit Verfassernachweis >THE PUBLISHER.<, Leerseite mit Impressum >a publication of / EDWIN H. MORRIS & COMPANY, INC. / # 0700543-1364<** unter 2 Zierbalken 0,4 x 10,8 im Abstand 1,5] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei mit identischer Aufmachung ohne Farbe] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >EBONY CONCERTO<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] unterhalb [in Verbindung mit] Kopftitel rechtsbündig kursiv >By Igor Stravinsky<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt in Verbindung mit Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig zentriert >Copyright 1946 by CHARLING MUSIC CORP° / 31 WEST 54th STREETNEW YORK 19, N. Y. / International Copyright Secured< [#] >Made in U.S.A.< [#] >All Rights Reserved<; ohne Platten-Nummer; ohne Endevermerk) // (1946)

° Unterschiedliche Schreibweise (Punkt) original).

* schräg hochlaufend in Schreibschrift.

** #-Zeichen original.

 

742Straw

Strawinskys Exemplar ist auf dem Außentitel oberhalb, neben und unterhalb >Miniature Score< mit >IStr / April 2765< [° Schrägstrich original] mit Blaustift signiert und datiert. Das Nachlaßexemplar ist mit aufführungspraktischen Hinweisen durchsetzt und enthält Korrekturen (rot).

 

743 Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / EDWIN. H. MORRIS & CO. LTD. / 52 Maddox Street, London, W. 1 / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents: MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. / 1619 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. / [gekastet:] 4245 [#] This edition is authorised for sale in British Empire (except Canada) and continent of Europe [#] Made in England. // Dedicated to Woody Herman / EBONY CONCERTO / Miniature Score / by* / Igor Stravinsky* / Recorded by / The Woody Herman Orchestra / Conducted by IGOR STRAVINSKY / Price / 5/- / net / EDWIN. H. MORRIS & CO. LTD. / 52 Maddox Street, London, W. 1 / CHARLING MUSIC CORP. / Sole Selling Agents: MYFAIR MUSIC CORP. / 1619 Broadway, New York 19, N. Y. / This edition is authorised for sale in British Empire (except Canada) and Continent of Europe // (Taschenpartitur [nachgebunden] 13,8 x 21,6 (8° [8°]); 40 [39] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag braunrot auf dunkelbeige [aufgemachte Außentitelei mit schräg gestelltem Komponistennamen in Schreibschrift, Seite mit >FOREWORD<, [fehlt] , [fehlt] ] + 1 Seite Vorspann [aufgemachte Innentitelei] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >EBONY CONCERTO<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 2] unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig kursiv >By Igor Stravinsky<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1946 by Charling Music Corp. / Sole Selling Agent, Mayfair Music Corp., 1619 Broadway New York, N. Y. / Edwin H. Morris & Co. Ltd., 52 Maddox Street, London, W. 1< [#] rechtsbündig teilkursiv >International Copyright Secured< [#] rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer [unpaginiert S. 2:] >2514< [paginiert S. 340 in Verbindung mit Verlagsinitialen:] >2514 [#] E.M.<; Herstellungshinweise 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >PRINTED IN ENGLAND< S. 40 mittig zwischen Plattennummer und Verlagsinitialen >Lowe and Brydone (Printers) Limited, London<) // (1954)

* schräg hochlaufend in Schreibschrift.

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM