27

E t u d e

pour pianola – Studie für Pianola – Study for pianola – Studio per Pianola

 

 

Pianola: The word Pianola (Phonola) denotes a pneumatic automatophon which uses card containing holes, and comes from the family of the electric piano. There is practically no difference in construction between the pianola and the phonola. The names pianola and phonola refer to the different product names of competing companies, for which the greater historical worth came to the pianola, thanks to a different marketing strategy. Strictly speaking, the pianola is not an electric piano because the entire sound production is driven by pneumatic bellows and only the motor runs on electricity. The first commercially valid record of music played in this way dates back to an invention by the German firm Welte & Mignon which was based in Freiburg; this took place in 1904 by using a strip of holes to record the playing of a pianist so completely that not only the duration of the notes and the pitches but also the original dynamics and agogics could be reproduced up to the finest nuance. This process by Welte & Mignon was accepted worldwide. Numerous companies were created and there were virtually no pianists of note between the turn of the century and the end of the ‘20s who did not record their playing on hole cards. Furthermore, many contemporary composers saw in this instrument capable of recording and reproducing music a long-desired method of delivering their music authentically to the outside world. With the rise of the vinyl record these self-playing pianos lost their most important function. It was the English Music scientist Edwin Evans, born 1874, who in Autumn 1917 made the proposition to the London firm, Aeolian, of not only using the pianola to reproduce music that had already been composed, but also to convince contemporary composers to write music directly for this automatophon. On 22nd September 1917, he informed Strawinsky, with whom he had been acquainted since 1913, of his initiative to the direction. He said that since Alfredo Casella was already staying in London, the permission had been given to him to negotiate a composition of this sort with the Italian. He asked Strawinsky to consider something similar and if he was interested, he would discuss the matter further. He further suggested to the board that existing compositions be arranged by contemporary composers for pianola. Contact between Strawinsky and Evans had been broken for three and a half years due to the war. Since the opera Le Rossignol and the Japanese Songs, Evans had heard nothing from Strawinsky but had learnt of some small pieces represented by Adolphe Henn which he greatly wanted to obtain. This can only refer to the four-hand compositions, the Cat’s Cradle Songs or Pribautki. Evans was of the opinion that it was high time that Strawinsky re-introduced himself in England with performances. Strawinsky was very enamoured of this proposal for several reasons and wrote the Studie pour Pianola, unusually quickly for him, presumably to beat Casella to it. Bearing in mind that Evans was also looking to win other composers for the pianola, he would have been less happy.

 

Prospects of success: Success and hope for commercial success cannot have been particularly great, because otherwise the London firm would not have let almost 4 years pass before bringing the pianola rolls onto the market.

 

Style: Independently from the central requirement of producing a composition authentically which would quite generally be appropriate for the pianola, he needed the contract from the company in order to look for an idea of the composition; this was in order that it be as right for the instrument, in this case the pianola, as was possible at the time. What he came up with in this special case was trying to conjure up a Spanish style transferred to the pianola with three-note cadenzas/cadences coloraturas and the audible medley of sounds of Madrid at night and encapsulating the noisy cacophony of mechanical instruments in a small composition, to assimilate with the Spanish style of singing and in a completely different manner to emulate Glinka with this contribution. The Study for Pianola incorporates elements of ‘Española’ from the Five Easy Pieces and the ‘King’s March’ from the Soldier’s Tale.

 

Dedication: According to Paul Collaer, the Study was dedicated to Madame Eugenia de Errazuriz.

 

Duration: 245″.

 

Date of origin: Le Diablerets / Morges, in the summer 1917 up to 28. Oktober 1917. It is possible that the arrangement for Pianola was drawn out beyond the 10th November 1917.

 

First performance: 13th October 1921, London, Aeolian Hall.

 

History of origin: Establishing the exact dates for the compositional period for the Study for Pianola creates questions because Strawinsky included the copy of the new work in a letter to Evans dated 28th October 1917, but he on his side dated a 6-system short score, which is today located in the Paul Sacher archive in Basel, with 10./11. 1917. Since Strawinsky at that time had not yet started writing his dates in the English style with the number of the month placed before, this must mean that he had made a mistake, and had meant 11 to be the day instead of the month or meant 10 to be the month and not the day; because the idea that he had sent Evans manuscripts and then himself continued work until the acceptance of the contract or arranged the piece onto 6 systems, is highly unlikely. Craft printed a fragment of an undateable draft letter in which he states that he was in the process of producing certain pages in a special arrangement, and that he would send these pages on in approximately 10 days. This draft sounds as if he was not referring to the Study for Pianola, but probably to the Petrushka arrangement, for which he had compiled a small list of metronome marking errors and other things. By 11th November 1917 however, the manuscripts had still not reached Evans. What the Germans had to do with this cannot be discovered. Evans wrote on 11th November to Strawinsky that he presumed that the manuscript was still with the censor, which did not shock him, as the “boches” at the time mistrusted even their own music. An observation by Craft regarding this reference proves that the manuscript reached Evans 2 days later, so on 13th November 1917.

In order to resolve the two contradictory statements, it must be discovered whether there was an earlier letter from Strawinsky to Edwin Evans offering his Study for Pianola, before the letter from Edwin Evans to Strawinsky dated 22nd September 1917. Such a letter was also not documented by Craft.In March 1916, Strawinsky travelled to Spain for the first time in order to meet Diaghilev, who had returned safe and sound from his journey to North America, but was still very afraid of the German submarines. The Germans had found out that the Italian passenger ship which was bringing him home, was in fact one of the many munitions transporters belonging to the Americans intended for England or France which were disguised as civilian and that they therefore wanted to sink the ship. Strawinsky wrote fully about his Spanish experiences and impressions in his calendar biography as was otherwise not his manner. Still quite fascinated by futuristic noises and sounds, with which Strawinsky was also familiar in 1915 when he awed Russolos Russolophon, he was so impressed ‘by the droll and unexpected musical chaos of the mechanical piano and musical automata in the streets at night and the small taverns of Madrid’ that he was enthused by the offer of writing a piece for pianola, independent of all other reasons. This is because it gave him the possibility of capturing the world of mechanical musical instruments in a composition for a mechanical musical instrument, an idea which presented itself and which had been developed with classical collections of instruments and by other composers at appropriate points, but which had never been taken back to a mechanical instrument. When the London-based Aeolian Company then asked him in 1917 for an original composition for pianola he fulfilled this wish just as happily as when he recorded the especially touching impressions of his first visit to Spain and at the same time was able to deliver a completely new type of composition in its own right. The motivation for this came with a letter from Edwin Evans of 22nd December 1917. It was the English music scientist Edwin Evans (18741945) who put Strawinsky in contact with Aeolian. Strawinsky became acquainted with the medium of the pianola after he had attended a demonstration of the instrument by the London firm in Summer 1914. On 28th October 1917, he sent the manuscript to Evans, who only received it on 13th November due to the events of the War. It can be ruled out, despite a surviving sketch, that Strawinsky still was working on the composition of the study after this date. Strawinsky was composing the study as a piece for two pianos, as surviving sketches prove and was writing it on a six-line particell with 4 treble and 2 bass systems. The arrangement for pianola was carried out by in-house specialists, including Esther Willis, who was highly regarded by Philip Heseltine, the owner of Aeolian. The technicians clearly had problems in transferring Strawinsky’s music on to the holed cards. The original score was too complicated for what they had done before, so that some differences between the original and the mechanical realization had to be proposed, especially as Strawinsky was using all the registers of the pianola and writing the chords so densely that they could only be executed using the capabilities of an electric piano. Strawinsky’s Study for Pianola must also have suffered from the technical difficulty of holding on single notes for longer periods of time. With respect to this, it can be established by examination of the current condition of surviving pianola roles that Strawinsky’s compositions was not in hindsight a technically elaborate or even problematic piece. The difficulties posed by Strawinsky can therefore only refer to problems which have their basis in the newness of the arrangement and with increasing experience with elaborately-constructed compositions, became groundless.

When he sent the piece to Evans on 28th October 1917, Strawinsky demanded for himself, along with a fee of 500 Swiss francs, the right to arrange his Study for a different ensemble at any time and to retain the author’s rights to such an arrangement, publication and performance. For the fee, the company had to transfer the work onto pianola or different mechanical instruments, and in doing so gain the right of publication. Furthermore, he gave up a financial portion of the income from the demonstration of the rolls. The negotiations around the contract, which can now be seen in detail, came upon ever new difficulties. The English firm Orchestrelle Company was basically in agreement, but according to the specifications of the English rights, new problems arose. Whether this was the reason why the piece was first published in 1921, although Evans had confirmed in a letter of 17th November 1917 that the rolls would be made as soon as possible, bearing in mind that this was in the final phase of the First World War, cannot be said without an insight into the files. Evans wrote further that it must be confirmed that the amount of 500 Swiss francs would be a one-off payment for the Study for Pianola and the company would not be entering into any obligation for the future which would depend on the success of this experimental venture. On 24th November 1917 Strawinsky compiled a putative plan for the deciding passage of the contract, which even then had not been signed. According to this, the firm should pay 500 Swiss francs and have for this the exploitation right for mechanical instruments, but only for private and not public performances, Strawinsky would have the right to produce a different version and to sell it. Evans responded on 11th December 1917 with new thoughts. Strawinsky’s new demands would create new difficulties and would bring him only minimal gains. For Evans, this was all too complicated. He advised Strawinsky to give up this point and to accept the money from the company along with a simple contract. If the matter were successful and this type of music were to be a success , he would be able to arrange advantageous conditions in the future, but until that time, he would have to wait a little longer. At this same time, the negotiations for the arrangement of Petrushka and Sacre for pianola were taking place. The state of English law allowed the mechanical reproduction of works of musical art free of any fee once they had first been published. A composer would not be able to derive any financial rights from such a reproduction. This matter gave rise to disputes about the subrogation rights, which were incomprehensible to Strawinsky, between Aeolian (Orchestrelle Company) and Strawinsky, so that Strawinsky entered discussions with his lawyer in Geneva, Philippe Dunant. For Petrushka, he was guaranteed 2.5%, and for Sacre 5% per roll sold, but the former was published not by Aeolian but by Pleyela, and the latter by Pleyela and the Aeolian Company. The matter was further delayed and a fragment of the letter from Strawinsky to Ernest Ansermet from 6th June 1919 shows the entire extent of Strawinsky’s irritation that had arisen in the meantime. A solid contract was however made as a result of the negotiations with Aeolian in 1923 which arranged for him to be able to rework a large part of his printed works complete or in excerpts for reproduction for pianola, which he had already been doing for two years in the Parisian Maison Pleyel in a separate Studio; he confirmed this in a letter to Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz in a letter of 18th August 1921 and mentioned proudly that the matter interested him a great deal and that he had invented some special tricks. For Pianola, Pleyela published in the series of piano etudes, Op. 7: Firebird with an autobiographical sketch about Strawinsky’s life in the year 1910 along with a literary and musical analysis and in a complete version of the ballet, Le Sacre du Printemps, played by Strawinsky, the first movement of the Piano Concerto, again played by Strawinsky, as well as the first movement of the Piano Sonata, performed by the composer, with commentaries by Edwin Evans, Pulcinella, the Piano-Rag-Music, along with the 3 and the 5 Simple Pieces for Four Hands, Petrushka, the Five Fingers, the Song of the Nightingale, the Stories for Children, the Four Russian Songs, the Concertino and Les Noces Villageoises.

 

Table of Strawinsky transcriptions for player piano

 

a) Duo-Art (Aeolian)

Four Studies for piano Op.7      Pianola T 22596A

                                                Pianola T 22597B

                                                Pianola T 22598A

                                                Pianola T 22599B

Firebird*                                    Duo-Art D 759

                                                Duo-Art D 761

                                                Duo-Art D 763

                                                Duo-Art D 765

                                                Duo-Art D 767

                                                Duo-Art D 769

                                                Pianola D 760

                                                Pianola D 762

                                                Pianola D 764

                                                Pianola D 766

                                                Pianola D 768

                                                Pianola D 770

Sacre                                        Pianola T 24150/53C

Study for Pianola                      Pianola D 967B

Concerto for piano**                  Duo-Art D 528G

Sonata pour piano***                 Duo-Art D 231

                                                Pianola D 232

* An autobiographical sketch of Strawinsky’s life in 1910 with a literary and musical analysis and a complete reproduction of the ballet played by Strawinsky.

** Only the first movement, played by Strawinsky.

*** Only the first movement, played by Strawinsky, with observations by Edwin Evans.

 

b) Pleyela

Pulcinella                                  84218428

Sacre                                        84298437

Piano-Rag-Music                       8438

Three easy pieces                     8439

Five easy pieces                       8440

Petruschka                                84418447

The five fingers                         84488449

The Song of the Nightingale       84518453

Tales for children                       8454

Four Russian Songs                  8455

Concertino                                8456

Les Noces Villageoises             84318434

 

 

 

Situationsgeschichte: The interest in the pianola stems just as much from the cause at the time as from Strawinsky’s striving for unconditional authenticity, which made him at the time regard every interpreter as someone who disturbs the original idea, insofar as he did not reproduce the musical conception of the author in this respect (he later changed his mind on this). One even went so far as to translate the Italian play on words “traduttore-traditore” (translator-traitor) onto the reproducing musicians. As the only method of demonstration for conveying the actual compositional idea in an authentic version, there was only the pianola at the time, and some of his compositions in the time before vinyl were published on pianola rolls.Strawinsky was certainly not the only composer to toy with this idea. The attempts of Paul Hindemith or other composers (Ernst Toch, Haas) in Berlin to notate directly onto rolls or later onto wax discs and thus produc soundworlds, which were authentic and would overcome the technical limitation of an original keyboard were also part of this concept. These are seen nowadays as the forerunners of electronic music. The actual problem of the pianola was ended with the rise of the vinyl record. In the end, Strawinsky followed a strongly rhythmic style after Sacre which was based around sounds but without being futurist, like that of Balla, whom he met in the year of composition of the Study. At the same time as the Study for Pianola, he had already completed the composition of the majority of the Les Noces project, for which he was considering writing a score for ‘polyphonic units’, i.e. combining mechanical musical instruments, such as the electric piano and electric harmonium, with voice parts and standard orchestral instruments, which was turned out a short time later to be unachievable. When things did not proceed as Strawinsky had imagined and Evans was certainly not at fault for it, Evans received the usual negative comments for such situations. In his anthology of letters, Craft characterized Evans as an early friend of Strawinsky. The works in the early time that he wrote about Strawinsky would have met with Strawinsky’s agreement. In a letter from Strawinsky to Ansermet of 6th June 1919, one reads something different, with Strawinsky characterizing Evans as ‘brave’ but, as he defines the word ‘brave’ in the subsequent parenthesis, as a naïve and under-intelligent man (naïve et pas très intelligent), which did not prevent Strawinsky from having him write the commentary to the arrangement of the Firebird for Pianola a short time later. At the time of the letter to Ansermet however, the dispute over the priority of ideas was already raging. No-one had given him the commission for the composition of the Study for Pianola. Futhermore, Evans had learnt of the existence of the piece from a letter which he had written to him in Autumn 1917 with the request of helping him find a representative for it. Soon after this, the curious idea (drôles d’idées) of building up an entire pianola repertoire in a short time in order to give talks about it and to depict themselves publicly as the originators of the matter. Strawinsky declared (Je déclare = Craft translates ‘déclare’ as swear, which certainly does not correspond to the meaning), that no one had given him a commission for the composition and that this was happening without objection over his contract with Aeolian. Casella’s contribution to this matter clearly demonstrates Evans’s finesse, in that he had taken care of the commission, for which it remained for Ansermet to reconcile the ‘brave’ and ‘finesse’ of Evans. Naturally, Evans did not give a commission to Strawinsky, and he was not legitimated to do so. What is certain is that Casella was consulted before Strawinsky was and that Casella’s composition was also publicized before Strawinsky’s. Finally, it is correct that Evans had made Strawinsky aware of his idea of creating such a series of pianola works, and that he had discussed the matter with Casella; he had offered the latter enough so that he could turn to him if he were interested in the matter or prepared to take into account the peculiarities of the pianola. This does not sound like the answer to a previous letter. Strawinsky’s letter of 28th October 1917 does not in any case sound like the fulfillment of a commission, rather in fact an offer under conditions, as it had been represented by Strawinsky to Ansermet; in any case, there was no request made to Evans that he make efforts to find a representative, because the representative had already been known for a long time. On the other hand, Strawinsky, who was full of ideas, could also have fallen through on it independently of Evans of developing a specific composition for the pianola. It is also believable that Strawinsky, afraid of an exceptional position, was up against a series of composers in which he would have been one name among many others who would presumably have been very small-fry. As long as no other pieces that prove this appear or the pieces that are in dated order are not be brought into question, it can be assumed that: 1. Evans informed Strawinsky of the possibility of the production of one or several compositions for pianola and was already in discussion with Casella about the same matter; 2. Strawinsky received no commission but rather a proposal or invitation; 3. Strawinsky, on the lookout for new representatives and new sources of income, used the opportunity to begin discussions in England and to offer a fresh composition; 4. Strawinsky reacted very quickly, which could have had three reasons, separate or in combination: a) he had an already written composition to hand; b) he needed money; c) he knew that he was up against Casella, who wrote more easily than him, and he wanted to offer his piece earlier than the latter, which he managed. The contract, concerning which Strawinsky consulted Ansermet, is no proof of this, because it was signed after the delivery of the manuscripts. It was presumably the suggestion to Casella that caused Strawinsky to complete his work so unusually quickly for his methods. In fact, he finished a month before Alfredo Casella and thus established a reputation of being a priority. In a letter from Casella to Strawinsky of 1st December 1917, Casella stated that he had been invited to write several pieces for pianola during his stay in England, with which he had been occupying himself with since then. Casella however was too late. His suite Tre pezzi per Pianola, which consisted of a prelude, waltz and ragtime, was published in 1918. Strawinsky certainly accepted the friendly wishes of Casella, who was amicable towards him, with satisfaction.

 

Significance: The study for pianola is the first composition written directly for an electronic, mechanical instrument in music history.

 

Versions: The Study for Pianola was orchestrated by 1929 at the latest and was taken up with the subtitle ‘Madrid’ as the fourth number into the Quatre Études pour Orchestre. Soulima Strawinsky completed a transcription for two pianos of the work which was published by Boosey & Hawkes in 1951. The piano transcription was not made from the pianola version, but as a piano reduction of the fourth Etude for orchestra (Quatre Études pour Orchestre).

 

Historical Record: Pianola T 967 B, 1921.

 

CD-Edition: only the orchestral version together with the four Orchestral Studies.

 

Autograph: The manuscript went to the dedicatee, Madame Eugenia Errazuriz. At the same opportunity, he also gave her the sketch book for the Five Simple Pieces for Four Hands. Since Strawinsky, as a Russian could not pass from Switzerland to France, the transfer of the material was made by Alfred Cortot, who at the time was a sort of State Undersecretary in the Ministry of Art in Paris. The letter does not state whether Madame Errazuriz received the autograph score or the neat copy of the manuscript intended for London, or whether Strawinsky copied the manuscript for London, as there is no printed version. Strawinsky presumably produced or had produced several copies, one of which went to Errazuriz, another was sent to London and another he kept himself. This copy, which Strawinsky must still have had in 1917 according to Robert Craft, must then have gone missing, because it was not in the estate. Strawinsky himself was not in possession of any copies after 1918.

 

Publisher: The Aeolian Company Ltd., London, als Pianola-Rolle T 967 B [1921].

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

E t u d e

pour pianola – Studie für Pianola – Study for pianola – Studio per Pianola

 

Pianola: Unter Pianola (Phonola) versteht man ein pneumatisch über Lochkarten gesteuertes Automatophon aus der Familie der elektrischen Klaviere. Zwischen dem Pianola und dem Phonola gibt es praktisch keine Bauunterschiede. Die Namen Pianola und Phonola beziehen sich auf unterschiedliche Produktmarken konkurrierender Firmen, wobei dem Pianola dank einer andersartigen künstlerischen Geschäftsstrategie der größere historische Stellenwert zukommt. Organologisch streng genommen ist das Pianola kein elektrisches Klavier, weil die gesamte Tongebung über pneumatische Bälge gesteuert und nur der Motor elektrisch betrieben wird. Die erste künstlerisch gültige Aufzeichnung gespielter Musik geht auf eine Erfindung der in Freiburg ansässigen deutschen Firma Welte & Mignon zurück, der es im Jahre 1904 gelang, mittels Einsatz eines Lochstreifens das Klavierspiel eines Pianisten so vollkommen festzuhalten, daß nicht nur Tondauer und Tonhöhe, sondern auch die originale Dynamik und Agogik bis in die feinste Abstufung hinein wiedergegeben werden konnten. Dieses Welte-Mignon-Verfahren setzte sich weltweit durch. Es entstanden zahlreiche Firmen, und es gibt zwischen dem Jahrhundertanfang und dem Ende der zwanziger Jahre so gut wie keinen bedeutenden Pianisten, der nicht sein Spiel über Lochstreifen festgehalten hätte. Darüber hinaus sahen viele zeitgenössische Komponisten in dem Aufnahme– und Wiedergabe-Instrument ein lang ersehntes Mittel, ihre Musik der Nachwelt authentisch zu überliefern. Mit dem Aufkommen der Schallplatte verloren die selbstspielenden Klaviere ihre künstlerisch wichtigste Funktion. Es war der 1874 geborene englische Musikwissenschaftler Edwin Evans, der im Herbst 1917 der Direktion der Londoner Firma Aeolian den Vorschlag unterbreitete, das Pianola nicht nur zur Wiedergabe bereits komponierter Musik einzusetzen, sondern zeitgenösssische Komponisten dafür zu gewinnen, Musik unmittelbar für das Automatophon zu schreiben. Am 22. September 1917 unterrichtete er Strawinsky, mit dem er seit 1913 bekannt war, über seinen Vorstoß bei der Direktion. Da sich Alfredo Casella gerade in London aufhalte, sei ihm die Erlaubnis zuteil geworden, mit dem Italiener über eine derartige Komposition zu verhandeln. Er bat Strawinsky, sich etwas Ähnliches zu überlegen, und wenn er interessiert sei, werde er das Weitere für ihn besorgen. Ferner habe er der Direktion nahe gelegt, bestehende Kompositionen zeitgenössischer Komponisten für Pianola einzurichten. Die Verbindung zwischen Strawinsky und Evans war kriegsbedingt seit dreieinhalb Jahren abgerissen. Seit der Oper Le Rossignol und den japanischen Liedern hatte Evans nichts mehr von Strawinsky gehört, wohl aber Kenntnis einiger bei Adolphe Henn verlegter kleiner Stücke bekommen, die er gerne besitzen wollte. Es kann sich hier nur um die vierhändigen Kompositionen, die Katzenwiegenlieder oder die Pribautki handeln. Evans war der Meinung, es sei höchste Zeit, daß sich Strawinsky in England mit Aufführungen zurückmelde. Strawinsky war aus mancherlei Gründen von der Sache sehr angetan und schrieb, für seine Verhältnisse ungewöhnlich schnell, vermutlich um Casella zuvorzukommen, die Etude pour PianolaVon dem Umstand, daß Evans auch andere Komponisten für das Pianola zu gewinnen suchte, wird er weniger erfreut gewesen sein.

 

Erfolgsaussichten: Erfolg und Hoffnung auf geschäftlichen Erfolg können nicht besonders groß gewesen sein, weil anders nicht die Londoner Firma beinahe 4 Jahre hätte ins Land gehen lassen, bevor sie die Pianola-Rollen auf den Markt brachte.

 

Stilistik: Unabhängig von dem zentralen Anliegen, eine Komposition authentisch zu überliefern, das ihn ganz allgemein pianolafreundlich sein ließ, nötigte ihn der Firmenauftrag, nach einer Kompositionsidee zu suchen, die sowohl instrumentengerecht, in diesem Falle pianolagerecht, wie zeitentsprechend war. Was lag in diesem besonderen Falle näher, als sich mit dreitönigen Kadenzen, pianolaübertragenen Koloraturen auf spanische Art und dem Klanggewirr des nächtlichen Madrider Rummels zu entsinnen und das bruitistische Durcheinander mechanischer Spielinstrumente in einer eigenen kleinen Komposition einzufangen, mit Verfremdungen spanischer Singweise zu versetzen und mit diesem Beitrag auf (s)eine ganz andere Weise ausdrücklich Glinka nachzueifern. Die Pianola-Studie übernimmt Elemente der Española aus den fünf leichten Stücken und des Königsmarsches aus der Geschichte vom Soldaten.

 

Widmung: Nach Paul Collaer wurde die Studie Madame Eugenia de Errazuriz gewidmet.

 

Dauer: 245″.

 

Entstehungszeit: Le Diablerets / Morges Sommer 1917 bis 28. Oktober 1917. Es ist möglich, daß sich die Einrichtung für Pianola noch über den 10. November 1917 hinauszog.

 

Uraufführung: am 13. Oktober 1921 in der Londoner Aeolian Hall.

 

Entstehungsgeschichte: Die genauere Datierung der Entstehungszeit der Studie für Pianola wirft Fragen auf, weil Strawinsky die Kopie des neuen Werkes einem Brief an Evans vom 28. Oktober 1917 beilegte, er andererseits eine sechssystemige Particell-Skizze, die sich heute im Paul Sacher-Archiv von Basel befindet, mit 10./11. 1917 datierte. Da Strawinsky damals noch nicht nach englischer Art mit vorangestellter Monatszahl datierte, müsste das heißen, daß er sich verschrieben, mit der 11 einen Tag, statt einen Monat oder gegebenenfalls doch mit der 10 einen Monat und keinen Tag gemeint hat. Denn daß er Evans ein Manuskript geschickt und dann selbst noch bis zur Vertragsbildung weiter gearbeitet oder das Stück auf 6 Systemen eingerichtet haben soll, ist höchst unwahrscheinlich. Craft druckte ein Fragment eines nicht datierbaren Briefentwurfs ab, in dem es heißt, er sei dabei, einige Seiten in einem Spezialarrangement herzustellen, und er sende diese Seiten in etwa 10 Tage ab. Dieser Briefentwurf klingt aber so, als bezöge er sich nicht auf die Pianola-Studie, sondern möglicherweise auf die Petruschka-Einrichtung, für die er eine kleine Liste von Metronomzahlfehlern und anderen Dingen zusammengestellt hatte. Am 11. November 1917 allerdings war das Manuskript noch nicht in Händen von Evans. Was die Deutschen damit zu tun gehabt haben sollen, bleibt unerfindlich. Evans schrieb am 11. November an Strawinsky, er vermute, das Manuskript befinde sich noch beim Zensor, was ihn deshalb nicht erstaune, als die „boches“ inzwischen ihrer eigenen Musik mißtrauten. Eine Anmerkung Crafts zu diesem Bezug besagt, das Manuskript sei zwei Tagen später, also am 13. November 1917, bei Evans eingetroffen.

Zur Klärung der sich widersprechenden beiden Aussagen müßte herausgefunden werden, ob es vor dem Brief von Edwin Evans an Strawinsky vom 22. September 1917 einen früheren Brief Strawinskys an Edwin Evans gegeben hat, in dem er seine Pianola-Studie anbot. Ein solcher Brief ist auch von Craft nicht dokumentiert worden. Im März 1916 reiste Strawinsky zum ersten Mal nach Spanien, um sich in Madrid mit Diaghilew zu treffen, der von seiner Nordamerika-Reise wohlbehalten zurückgekehrt war, aber noch voller Angst vor den deutschen Unterseebooten steckte. Die Deutschen hatten herausgefunden, daß es sich bei dem italienischen Passagierschiff, das ihn heimbrachte, in Wahrheit um einen der vielen zivil getarnten, von den Amerikanern für England oder Frankreich bestimmten Munitionstransporter handelte, und wollten das Schiff versenken. Über seine spanischen Erlebnisse und Eindrücke schrieb Strawinsky in den kalenderbiographischen Erinnerungen ausführlicher als es sonst seine Art war. Noch ganz futuristisch von Geräuschklängen fasziniert, mit denen Strawinsky 1915 zusätzlich vertraut wurde, als er Russolos Russolophon bewunderte, war er „durch das drollige und unerwartete musikalische Durcheinander der mechanischen Klaviere und Musikautomaten in den nächtlichen Straßen und kleinen Tavernen von Madrid“ so beeindruckt worden, daß ihn der Vorschlag, ein Stück für Pianola zu schreiben, unabhängig von allen anderen Gründen auch deshalb besonders begeisterte, weil er darin eine Möglichkeit sah, die Welt der mechanischen Musikinstrumente in einer Komposition für ein mechanisches Musikinstrument zu beschwören. Diese Idee bot sich an. Sie war schon mit klassischem Instrumentarium und auch von anderen Komponisten an dazu passenden Stellen entwickelt, aber noch nie auf ein mechanisches Instrument rückbezogen worden. Als dann die Londoner Firma Aeolian Company 1917 an ihn mit der Bitte um eine Originalkomposition für Pianola herantrat, erfüllte er diesen Wunsch um so lieber, als er auf diese Weise die ihn besonders berührenden Eindrücke seiner ersten Spanienreise niederlegen und gleichzeitig eine in ihrer Art gänzlich neuartige Komposition liefern konnte. Die Anregung dazu kam mit Brief von Edwin Evans vom 22. September 1917. Der englische Musikwissenschaftler Edwin Evans (18741945), war es, der Strawinsky mit Aeolian in Berührung brachte. Das Medium Pianola kannte Strawinsky, nachdem er einer Pianola-Vorführung durch die Londoner Firma im Sommer 1914 beigewohnt hatte. Am 28. Oktober 1917 schickte er das Manuskript an Evans ab, der es infolge der Kriegsläufte erst am 13. November erhielt. Es ist trotz einer erhaltenen Skizze auszuschließen, daß Strawinsky noch nach diesem Datum an der Studie kompositorisch gearbeitet hat. Strawinsky entwickelte die Studie als Stück für zwei Klaviere, wie erhaltene Skizzen beweisen, und schrieb sie dann auf einem Sechslinien-Particell mit 4 Diskant– und 2 Baßsystemen aus. Die Einrichtung für Pianola erfolgte durch hauseigene Spezialisten, zu denen beispielsweise die von Philip Heseltine, dem Besitzer von Aeolian, sehr geförderte Esther Willis gehörte. Die Techniker bekamen bei der Übertragung der Strawinsky-Musik auf die Lochstreifen offensichtlich Probleme. Die originale Partitur war für das, was sie bisher gemacht hatten, zu kompliziert, so daß von einer Differenz zwischen Original und mechanischer Realisierung ausgegangen werden muß, zumal Strawinsky alle Register des Pianolas ausnutzte und die Akkorde in einer Weise füllig setzte, wie sie nur mit den Möglichkeiten eines elektrischen Klaviers zu erzielen waren. Auch soll Strawinskys Pianola-Studie unter der technischen Schwierigkeit gelitten haben, Einzeltöne länger auszuhalten. Demgegenüber ist anhand des erhaltenen Bestandes an Pianola-Rollen festzustellen, daß Strawinskys Komposition jedenfalls aus späterer Sicht keineswegs zu den technisch aufwendigsten oder auch nur technisch problematischsten Stücken zählt. Die von Strawinsky überlieferten Schwierigkeiten können sich also nur auf Probleme bezogen haben, die ihren Grund in der Neuheit der Einrichtung hatten und mit zunehmender Erfahrung vor allem mit aufwendiger entworfenen Kompositionen gegenstandslos wurden. Mit der Zusendung des Stückes an Evans am 28. Oktober 1917 forderte Strawinsky neben einem Honorar von 500 Schweizer Franken für sich das Recht, seine Studie jederzeit für ein anderes Ensemble umschreiben und die Autorenrechte an einer solchen Bearbeitung, Veröffentlichung und Aufführung zu behalten. Für das Honorar durfte die Firma das Stück auf Pianola oder andere mechanische Instrumente übertragen und erhielt damit das Veröffentlichungsrecht. Darüber hinaus verzichtete er auf eine finanzielle Beteiligung an den Einnahmen aus der Vorführung der Rollen. Die jetzt im Detail zu führenden Vertragsverhandlungen stießen auf Schwierigkeiten. Zwar war die englische Firma Orchestrelle Company im Grundsätzlichen einverstanden, doch nach den Vorschriften des englischen Rechtes ergaben sich immer wieder neue Probleme. Ob das der Grund dafür war, daß das Stück erst 1921 herausgebracht wurde, obwohl Evans mit Brief vom 17. November 1917 zugesichert hatte, die Rolle erscheine so bald wie möglich, was zeitbezogen hieß, in der Endphase des Ersten Weltkrieges, läßt sich ohne Akteneinsicht nicht sagen. Evans schrieb ferner, es müsse sichergestellt sein, daß es sich bei dem Betrag von 500 Schweizer Franken um eine Einmalzahlung für die Pianolastudie handele und die Gesellschaft damit keine Bindung für die Zukunft eingehe, die vom Erfolg dieses experimentellen Wagnisses abhänge. Am 24. November 1917 verfaßte Strawinsky einen Probeentwurf für den entscheidenden Passus des immer noch nicht geschlossenen Vertrages. Danach sollte die Firma 500 Schweizer Franken zahlen, dafür das Verwertungsrecht für mechanische Instrumente erhalten, aber offensichtlich nur für Vorführungen im privaten, nicht im öffentlichen Bereich, Strawinsky weiterhin berechtigt sein, eine andere Fassung herzustellen und zu verkaufen. Evans antwortete am 11. Dezember 1917 mit neuen Bedenken. Strawinskys neue Forderungen schüfen neue Schwierigkeiten und brächten nur minimale Erträge. Evans war das alles zu kompliziert. Er riet Strawinsky, auf diesen Punkt zu verzichten und die Summe von der Gesellschaft in Verbindung mit einem ganz einfachen Vertrag anzunehmen. Wenn die Sache Erfolg habe und man diese Art von Musik durchsetzen könne, vermöchte er zukünftig vorteilhaftere Bedingungen erfahren, aber bis dahin müßte er noch ein bißchen warten. Nun liefen zur selben Zeit die Verhandlungen über die Einrichtung von Petruschka und Sacre für Pianola. Die englische Gesetzgebung erlaubte die tantiemefreie mechanische Vervielfältigung von Werken der Tonkunst, wenn diese erst einmal erschienen waren. Aus einer solchen Produktion konnte ein Komponist keine finanziellen Rechte ableiten. Es muß zwischen Äolian (Orchestrelle Company) und Strawinsky zu für Strawinsky unverständlichen Disputen über die Abtretungsrechte gekommen sein, so daß Strawinsky über seinen Genfer Anwalt Philippe Dunant verhandelte. An Petruschka sicherte man ihm zweieinhalb Prozent, an Sacre fünf Prozent pro verkaufter Rolle zu, wobei das erste Ballett nie bei Aeolian, sondern bei Pleyela erschien, das zweite bei Pleyela und Aeolian Company. Die Sache zögerte sich immer weiter hinaus und das Fragment eines Briefes Strawinskys an Ernest Ansermet vom 6. Juni 1919 zeigt das ganze Ausmaß der Verärgerung, die bei Strawinsky inzwischen eingetreten war. Doch kam es als Folge der mit Aeolian aufgenommenen Beziehungen 1923 zu einem festen Vertrag, der ihn veranlaßte, einen großen Teil seiner gedruckten Stücke ganz oder in Ausschnitten für Pianola-Wiedergabe umzurüsten, was er bereits seit zwei Jahren in der Pariser Maison Pleyel in einem eigenen Studio betrieb, wie er am 18. August 1921 in einem Brief an Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz festhielt und dabei stolz mitteilte, die Sache interessiere ihn sehr und er habe einige besondere Tricks erfunden. Für Pianola beziehungsweise Pleyela erschienen in der Folge die Klavier-Etüden Op. 7, Feuervogel mit einer autobiographischen Skizze über Strawinskys Leben im Jahre 1910 mit einer literarischen und musikalischen Analyse und in einer vollständigen, von Strawinsky gespielten Wiedergabe des Balletts, Le Sacre du Printemps, der erste, von Strawinsky gespielte Satz des Klavierkonzertes, ebenfalls der erste, von Strawinsky gespielte Satz der Klaviersonate 1924 mit Anmerkungen von Edwin Evans, Pulcinella, die Piano-Rag-Music, sowohl die drei wie die fünf leichten vierhändigen Stücke, Petruschka, Die fünf Finger, der Gesang der Nachtigall, die Geschichten für Kinder, die Vier russischen Lieder, das Concertino und Les Noces Villageoises.

 Tabelle der Strawinsky-Transkriptionen für selbstspielendes Klavier

 

a) Duo-Art (Aeolian)

Klavier-Etüden Op. 7     Pianola T 22596A

                                                Pianola T 22597B

                                                Pianola T 22598A

                                                Pianola T 22599B

Feuervogel*                              Duo-Art D 759

                                                Duo-Art D 761

                                                Duo-Art D 763

                                                Duo-Art D 765

                                                Duo-Art D 767

                                                Duo-Art D 769

                                                Pianola D 760

                                                Pianola D 762

                                                Pianola D 764

                                                Pianola D 766

                                                Pianola D 768

                                                Pianola D 770

Frühlingsweihe                          Pianola T 24150/53C

Studie für Pianola                      Pianola D 967B

Klavierkonzert**             Duo-Art D 528G

Klaviersonate***            Duo-Art D 231

                                                Pianola D 232

* Eine autobiographische Skizze über Strawinskys Leben im Jahre 1910 mit einer literarischen und musikalischen Analyse und einer vollständigen, von Strawinsky gespielten Wiedergabe des Balletts.

** nur der 1. Satz, gespielt von Strawinsky.

*** nur der 1. Satz, gespielt von Strawinsky, mit Anmerkungen von Edwin Evans.

 

b) Pleyela

Pulcinella                                  84218428

Sacre                                        84298437

Piano-Rag-Music                       8438

Drei leichte Stücke                    8439

Fünf leichte Stücke                    8440

Petruschka                                84418447

Die Fünf Finger                         84488449

Chant du Rossignol                   84518453

Geschichten für Kinder              8454

Vier Russische Lieder                8455

Concertino                                8456

Les Noces Villageoises             84318434

 

Situationsgeschichte: Das Interesse am Pianola steht ebensosehr in Verbindung mit dem aktuellen Anlaß wie mit Strawinskys Streben nach unbedingter Authentizität, das ihn damals (später änderte sich auch dieses) fast jeden Interpreten als Störer der Originalidee erfahren ließ, sofern er nicht die Klangvorstellung des Autors unter dessen Aufsicht wiedergibt. Man ging dabei so weit, das italienische Wortspiel „traduttore-traditore“ (Übersetzer-Verräter) auf den reproduzierenden Musiker zu übertragen. Als einziges Demonstrationsmittel zur Überlieferung der eigenen Kompositionsidee in authentischer Fassung gab es damals nur das Pianola, und so sind etliche seiner Kompositionen in der Zeit vor der Schallplatte auf Pianolawalzen erschienen.Strawinsky war keineswegs der einzige Komponist, der mit diesem Gedanken umging. Die Berliner Versuche Paul Hindemiths oder anderer Komponisten (Ernst Toch, Haas), unmittelbar auf Walze oder nachher auf Wachsplatte zu notieren und dabei Klangbilder zu erzeugen, die neben ihrer Authentizität am herkömmlichen Tasteninstrument grifftechnisch nicht möglich sind, gehören ebenfalls hierhin. Sie zählen heute zu den Vorläufern der elektronischen Musik. Das eigentliche Pianolaproblem erledigte sich mit dem Aufkommen der Schallplatte. Schließlich verfolgte Strawinsky nach dem Sacre streckenweise einen stark rhythmisch geräuschorientierten Stil, ohne Futurist zu sein, wie Balla, dem er im Entstehungsjahr der Studie begegnete. Zur selben Zeit wie die Pianolastudie hatte er kompositorisch bereits den größten Teil des Projektes Les Noces fertiggestellt, bei dem ihm vorschwebte, eine Partitur für „polyphone Einheiten“ zu schreiben, also mechanische Musikinstrumente wie elektrisches Klavier und elektrisches Harmonium mit Vokalstimmen und herkömmlichen Orchesterinstrumenten zu verbinden, was sich kurze Zeit später als undurchführbar herausstellte. Als die Dinge dann nicht so liefen, wie sich Strawinsky das vorstellte und woran Evans mit Sicherheit am wenigsten die Schuld trug, trafen Evans die in solchen Fällen üblichen negativen Kommentare. In seiner Briefanthologie charakterisierte Craft Evans als einen frühen Freund Strawinskys. Seine in der Frühzeit über Strawinsky geschriebenen Arbeiten hätten die Zustimmung Strawinskys gefunden. In einem Brief Strawinskys an Ansermet vom 6. Juni 1919 liest man es etwas anders, charakterisierte Strawinsky Evans als einen zwar rechtschaffenen (brave), aber, so definierte er seinen Begriff von brave in der nachfolgenden Klammer, naiven und wenig intelligenten Menschen (naïve et pas très intelligent), was Strawinsky nicht hinderte, ihn kurze Zeit später den Feuervogel-Kommentar zur Pianola-Feuervogel-Einspielung schreiben zu lassen. Aber zum Zeitpunkt des Briefes an Ansermet war bereits der Streit über die Ideenpriorität entbrannt. Niemand habe ihm einen Auftrag zur Komposition der Pianola-Studie gegeben. Vielmehr habe Evans von der Existenz dieses Stückes aus einem Brief erfahren, den er ihm im Herbst 1917 mit der Bitte geschrieben habe, ihm dafür zu einem Verleger zu verhelfen. Bald danach sei Evans die seltsame Idee (drôles d’idées) gekommen, in einer kurzen Zeit ein ganzes Pianola-Repertoire aufzubauen, um darüber Vorträge zu halten und sich in der Öffentlichkeit als der Urheber der Sache darzustellen. Strawinsky versicherte (Je déclare = Craft übersetzt „déclare“ mit swear = schwören, was gewiß sinnunangemessen ist), niemand habe ihm einen Kompositionsauftrag erteilt und dies gehe einwandfrei aus seinem Vertrag mit Aeolian hervor. Casellas Teilnahme an dieser Sache beweise deutlich die finesse von Evans, der diesen Auftrag besorgt habe, wobei es Ansermet überlassen blieb, das brave und die finesse von Evans zusammenzubringen. Natürlich hat Evans keinen Auftrag an Strawinsky erteilt, dazu war er vermutlich auch gar nicht berechtigt. Gesichert ist, daß man mit Casella früher als mit Strawinsky verhandelte, und daß man Casellas Komposition auch vor derjenigen Strawinskys publizierte. Richtig ist schließlich, daß Evans Strawinsky von seinem Bestreben in Kenntnis setzte, eine solche Pianola-Reihe ins Leben zu rufen, mit Casella dieserhalb verhandelt zu haben und ihn deutlich genug aufforderte, sich an ihn zu wenden, wenn er an der Sache interessiert und bereit sei, ein wenig auf die Besonderheiten des Pianolas Rücksicht zu nehmen. Das klingt nicht nach Antwort auf einen vorangegangenen Brief. Aber Strawinskys Brief vom 28. Oktober 1917 klingt ebenfalls nicht nach Auftragserfüllung, sondern tatsächlich nach einem Angebot unter Bedingungen, wie es Strawinsky Ansermet gegenüber dargestellt hat, allerdings ohne eine Bitte an Evans, sich für ihn um einen Verleger zu bemühen, weil der Verleger ja längst bekannt ist. Umgekehrt könnte der ideenreiche Strawinsky auch unabhängig von Evans durchaus darauf verfallen sein, für das Pianola eine eigene Komposition zu entwickeln. Glaubhaft ist es auch, daß ein um seine Sonderstellung fürchtender Strawinsky gegen eine Reihe gewesen ist, in der er ein Name unter vielen anderen und vermutlich sehr minderrangigen gewesen wäre. Aber solange keine anderen Beweisstücke auftauchen oder die Beweisstücke in der datierten Reihenfolge nicht in Frage gestellt werden können, ist davon auszugehen, daß 1. Evans Strawinsky über die Möglichkeit der Herstellung einer oder mehrerer Kompositionen für Pianola unterrichtete und schon vorher in derselben Sache mit Casella verhandelte; 2. Strawinsky keinen Auftrag, wohl eine Anregung oder eine Einladung erhielt; 3. Strawinsky, ohnehin auf der Suche nach neuen Verlegern und neuen Erwerbsquellen die Gelegenheit nutzte, in England wieder ins Gespräch zu kommen und eine frische Komposition anbot; 4. Strawinsky sehr schnell reagierte, was drei getrennte oder gemeinsame Gründe gehabt haben kann: a) er hatte eine vorbereitete Komposition zur Hand; b) er brauchte Geld; c) er wußte, daß der leichter schreibende Casella mit im Spiel war, und er wollte früher als dieser sein Stück anbieten, was ihm ja auch gelang. Der Vertrag, auf den sich Strawinsky Ansermet gegenüber berief, bildet deshalb keinen Beweis, weil er erst nach der Ablieferung des Manuskriptes geschlossen wurde. Vermutlich war es der Hinweis auf Casella, der Strawinsky veranlaßte, seine Arbeit für seine Verhältnisse so außergewöhnlich schnell fertigzustellen. Tatsächlich kam er Alfredo Casella um einige Monate zuvor und sicherte sich damit den Ruhm der Priorität. In einem Brief Casellas an Strawinsky vom 1. Dezember 1917 bestätigte Casella, daß man ihn während seines Aufenthaltes in England zu mehreren Pianola-Stücken eingeladen habe, mit denen er sich seitdem beschäftige. Aber Casella kam zu spät. Seine kleine aus Präludium, Walzer und Ragtime bestehende Suite Tre pezzi per Pianola erschien 1918. Den Glückwunsch des ihm freundlich gesinnten Casella nahm Strawinsky gewiß mit Genugtuung entgegen.

 

Bedeutung: Die Etude pour pianola ist die erste unmittelbar für ein elektromechanisches Instrument geschriebene Komposition der Musikgeschichte.

 

Fassungen: Die Etude pour pianola wurde spätestens 1929 instrumentiert und mit dem Untertitel Madrid als vierte Nummer in die Quatre Études pour Orchestre aufgenommen. Davon fertigte Soulima Strawinsky eine Klavierübertragung für zwei Klaviere an, die 1951 bei Boosey & Hawkes erschien. Die Klaviertranskription erfolgte nicht nach der Pianola-Fassung, sondern als Klavierauszug der vierten Orchester-Etüde.

 

Historische Aufnahme: Pianola T 967 B von 1921.

 

CD-Edition: nur als Orchesterfassung als vierte der Vier Orchester-Etüden.

 

Autograph: Das Manuskript ging an die Widmungsträgerin Madame Eugenia Errazuriz. Er schenkte ihr bei selbiger Gelegenheit auch das Skizzenbuch der Fünf leichten vierhändigen Stücke. Da Strawinsky zu der Zeit als Russe von der Schweiz aus Frankreich nicht betreten durfte, erfolgte die Übersendung durch Alfred Cortot, der damals eine Art von Unterstaatssekretär im Pariser Kunstministerium war. Der Brief sagt nichts darüber aus, ob Frau Errazuriz das Autograph oder eine Reinschrift des für London bestimmten Manuskriptes erhielt, oder ob Strawinsky das Manuskript für London kopierte, da es keine Druckfasssung gibt. Vermutlich hat Strawinsky mehrere Abschriften hergestellt oder herstellen lassen und eine davon an Errazuriz, eine andere nach London geschickt und eine weitere selbst behalten. Dieses Exemplar, das, nach Robert Craft, Strawinsky 1917 noch gehabt haben muß, müßte dann verschollen sein, weil es sich nicht mehr im Nachlaß befand. Strawinsky selbst besaß nach 1918 kein Exemplar mehr.

 

Verlag: The Aeolian Company Ltd., London, als Pianola-Rolle T 967 B [1921].

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM