16

Ò ð è  ñ ò è õ î ò â î ð å í ³ ÿ  è ç ú  ÿ ï î í ñ ê î é  ë è ð è ê è*

äëÿ ãîëîñà (ñîïðàíî), äâóõú ôëåéòú (2àÿ–ìàë.ôë.), äâóõú êëàðíåòîâú (2îé–áàñ.-êë.), ô-ï³àíî, äâóõú ñêðèïîêú, àëüòà è â³îëîí÷åëè Trois poésies de la lyrique japonaise pour chant (soprano), deux flûtes (la 2 de –pet. fl.), deux clarinettes (la 2 de –cl.bas.), piano, deux violons, alto et violoncelle – Three Japonese Lyrics for sopran and chamber orchestra – Drei japanische Gedichte für Sopran und Kammerorchester – Tre poesie della Lirica giapponese per canto (soprano) e un piccolo complesso da camera formato da due flauti, due clarinetti, pianoforte e quartetto d’archi

 

 

Title: The first edition of the original orchestral version was published before Strawinsky’s own piano transcription in Russian and French but without translation into Russian of the French surtitle. The piano reduction appeared in a trilingual version (Russian — French — English) but with the work title in Russian and French only. That there were originally four songs in planning is a rumour started by M. Ravel which moreover lacks all sound basis, as the song cycle displays a rare unity of form, but yet, as rumours must, it spread. How provisional the contents of the note sent to Hélène Casella on 2nd April 1913 concerning the programme for the concert becomes evident from further errors on Ravel’s part. Thus he declared that the performance time of ‘Pierrot Lunaire’ was 40 minutes, which was far too long; moreover, the piece was not even included in the end. The — still erroneously termed — Four Japanese Lyrics were to have been performed during a total of ten minutes, which would have meant the imaginary fourth Song to be twice as long as the three preceding ones together. Ravel’s own series of songs after Mallarmé consisted of only two according to his letter; in reality there were three songs premièred.

 

Scored for: The list of forces required is part of the main title. [Soprano (high voice); Piccolo (= 2nd Flute), 2 Flutes (2nd Flute = Piccolo), 2 Clarinets in Bb (2nd Clarinet = Bass clarinet in Bb), Bass clarinet in Bb (= 2nd Clarinet), Piano, 1st Violin, 2nd Violin, Viola, Violoncello].

 

Performance requirements: The Japanese Songs are difficult to perform on account of the vocal range required (range I: a1 [sung as B double flat] to a 2 [as B double flat]; range II: a#1 to a2; range III: g#1 to ab2] for one, but also due to their dissonant intonation affecting both vocal line and orchestral accompaniment, sometimes only separated by chromatic intervals or that of a great second. Dershanovsky soon realised this during the negotiations for the Russian première and made mention of it to Strawinsky in a letter dated 3rd November 1913. For the same reason Delage was most satisfied that Galina Nikitina of the Marientheater St. Petersburg was coming to sing the pieces.

 

Summary: The first song ‘Akahito’ tells of white flowers, which the owner cannot show because snow has come making all flowers white. – The second song ‘Mazatsumi’ speaks of a piece of ice floating on the water as a first flower of Spring. – The third song ‘Tsaraiuki’ speaks of the bright clouds shining all across the land; in fact they are flowering cherry trees witnessing the arrival of Spring.

 

Source: Japan, for many years a far-away imaginary land, had given up its self-chosen isolation in the mid-nineteenth century and experienced an unexpected economic expansion. By winning a war against China (1894) and particularly against Russia (1904) it began to create its own artistic style in the wake of which came translations of Japanese lyrical poetry. Without naming his sources, Strawinsky reports that he came across an anthology of Japanese poetry while composing his SACRE DU PRINTEMPS. It is likely to have been the volume ßÀÏÎÍÑÊÀß ËÈÐÈÊÀ (Japonskaja lirika = ‚Japanese lyrics’) published in St. Petersburg in 1912 and translated by a certain A. Brandt. Who he was could never be ascertained, presumably one of the many Germans, who lived in St. Petersburg or at least of German descent. Today the anthology is a very rare specimen indeed. Brandt (or Brant) had translated the poems not from the Japanese, but from the German. His ‘originals’ were publications of the founder of the German, perhaps even European, subject of Japanology and the founder in Japan of Japanese Literary Studies, Karl Florenz, and also a further anthology of Japanese poetry edited by Hans Bethge. He was also acquainted with Karl Enderling. In Bethge’s edition two of the poems are published, in Karl Florenz all three. Brandt therefore did not possess an original but worked from a translation. The difference between Florenz and Bethge is one of approach. The Japanese originals, in this case tantras not haikus, are always based on a certain number of syllables as an ordering principle, seek to condense an entire world of feeling and thought in concentrated form. Thus they frequently become opaque and carry several layers of meaning, often impossible to retain in translation. Florenz follows the Japanese tradition of counted syllables, understanding this outward ordering principle as the essence of this kind of poetry. Bethge on the other hand employs the same metre and rhyme schemes as in German poetry. While the name Brandt does not appear in the original full score of the SONGS published in 1913 nor in the later editions by Boosey & Hawkes, it is printed on the interior frontispiece of the piano reduction, although with the Russian genitive Ðóññê³é òåêñòú À. Áðàíäòà (‘Russian text A. Brandt’s’) often met with in Russian music editions. This led to a falsification of the name, Brandt became ‘Branta’ (= Russian Áðàíäòà) and by way of re-translation ‘Brandta’. Strawinsky named his three songs after the three poets (Akahito, Mazatsumi, Tsaraiuki). Traditionally the family name is given first place in Japan, followed by the connecting syllable ‘no’ follwed by the personal or first name. It is, however, common to call poets by their first names. Akahito, Mazatsumi and Tsaraiuki are first names. Thus Akahito’s surname is Yamabe, Mazatsumi’s Minamoto and Tsaraiuki (correctly, Tsurayuki; the consistently wrong spelling came about through the misspelt version in the first edition; Brandt’s spelling of the name was correct) has the family name Ki. Yamabe no Akahito a master of nature lyrics and the short form, far-travelled courtier of low rank, wrote the main body of his work between 680 and 745 A.D. (so-called Nara Epoch). His objectivity is reported to have remained unequalled for one thousand years. About Minamoto no Mazatsumi’s origins little or nothing is known. Ki no Tsurayuki, courtier in the rank of a governor whose dates are fixed between 800 and 945 A.D. wrote a famous introduction to the first collection of Japanese Poems including works of his own, and left more than 400 poems. He is known as the typical representative of Heian lyrics with their noble stateliness, harmony of feeling and contemplative attitude.

 

Translation: Maurice Delage used the Russian, not the German text for his French version of the poems. There was no rendering into English on account of failing public interest. Only with the new edition of 1922 a trilingual version became available. The translation into English was made by Robert Burness, who also translated the ‘Balmont Songs’ and later ‘Mawra’. A German re-translation became possible when the Japanese Songs and the Balmont Songs were published together in an edition by Boosey & Hawkes after the Second World War, whereby not the original German edition was referred to — that would have been the most obvious thing to do — but a new translation was commissioned by Ernst Roth. Presumably the original German edition was not known in London.

 

Translation synopsis*

* According to: Karl Florenz: Geschichte der japanischen Litteratur, 2. edition, Leipzig, C. F. Amelangs Verlag, 1909, in der Reihe: Die Litteraturen des Ostens in Einzeldarstellungen, Zehnter Band, 642 + X pages, dedicated to the Prince Rupprecht von Bayern. (Bungaku-Hakushi); Japanische Novellen und Gedichte. Verdeutscht und herausgegeben von Paul Enderling, Leipzig, Reclams Universal Bibliothek Nr. 4747, Vorwort Berlin 1905; Hans Bethge: Japanischer Frühling. Nachdichtungen japanischer Lyrik, Leipzig im Inselverlag, MDCCCCXVI (1916), 125 Seiten, 2. Auflage 3.-4. Tausend (contains a dedication from April 1920). The first edition is identical to the 2nd edition, but has however an extended legal statement and does not specifically state the number of copies printed.

 

I Akahito

Florenz S. 99

Dem Liebsten mein                                                        4

Gedacht’ ich sie zu zeigen,                                             7

Die Pflaumenblüten.                                                      5

Nun schneit’s – und ich vermag nicht                              7

Blüten und Schnee zu scheiden.                         7                                              (VIII,9.)

 

Brandt S. 19                                                                                                                 Àêàõèòî

            ß áëûå öâòû âú ñàäó òåᐠõîòëà

ïîêàçàòü.

            Íî ñíãú ïîøåëú. Íå ðàçîáðàòü, ãäú

ñíãú è ãä öâòû!

 

Delage

Avril au jardin je voulais te montre les fleurs blanches.

La neige tombe … Tout est il fleurs ici, ou neige blanche?

 

Burness

I have flowers of white. Come and see where they grow in my garden. But falls the snow: I know not my flowers from flakes of snow.

 

Roth

Meine weißen Blumen wollt’ ich dir im Garten drunten zeigen. Doch der Schnee kam. Weiß sind sie nun alle, Blumen, Flocken!

 

II Mazatsumi

Florenz pp. 143144 (Masazumi)

Durch alle Spalten                                                         5

Des Eises, das im Gießbach /                                        7

Soeben schmilzt,                                                           4

Ersprudeln weiße Wellen                                                7

Als erste Frühlingsblüten.                                               7                                              (I, 12.)

 

Bethge p. 57

die allerersten blüten

MASAZUMI

Froh sprudeln durch die Ritzen nun des Eises,

Das vor dem Lenz zergeht, die weißen Wellen

Des Gießbachs auf: die ersten weißen Blüten

Des lieben Frühlings möchten sie uns sein.

 

Brandt – Original p. 54                                                                                     Ìàçàöóìè

            Âåñíà ïðèøëà; èàú òðåùèíú ëåäÿíîé

êîðû çàïðûãàëï, èãðàÿ âú ð÷ê ïííûÿ

ñòðóè: îí õîòÿòü áûòü ïåðâûìú áëûìú

öâòîìú ðàäîñòíîé âåñíû.

 

Brandt – Score (2 Differences)                                                                                      Mazatsumi

Âåñíà ïðèøëà. Èàú òðåùèíú ëåäÿíîé êîðû çàïðûãàëï, èãðàÿ âú ð÷ê ïííûÿ ñòðóè: îí õîòÿòü áûòü ïåðâûìú áëûìú öâòîìú ðàäîñòíîé âåñíû.

 

Delage

Avril paraît. Brisant la glace de leur écorce bondissent joyeux dans le ruisselet des flots écumeux: Ils veulent être les premières fleurs blanches du joyeux Printemps.

 

Burness

The Spring has come! Though those chinks of prisoning ice the white floes drift. Foamy flakes that sport and play in the stream. How glad they pass, first flowers that tidings bear that Spring is coming.

 

Roth

Kommt der Frühling, ja, dann bricht vom starren Eis eine Scholle, spielend treibt sie auf den wilden Wassern, eine erste Frühlingsblüte, weiß und schön, zu grüßen den Lenz.

 

III. Tsaraiuki

Florenz p. 142 (Tsurayuki)

Der Kirsche Blüten                                                         5

Scheinen erblüht zu sein,                                               7

Denn aus den Gründen                                                  5

Zwischen den Bergen werden                                         7

Weiße Wolken schon sichtbar.                                       7                                              (I, 59.)

 

Bethge p. 59

jubel.

Was seh ich Helles dort? Aus allen Gründen

Zwischen den Bergen quellen weiße Wolken

Verlockend auf, – die Kirschen sind erblüht!

Der Frühling ist gekommen, wunderbar!

 

Brandt – Original p. 58                                                                                     Òñóðàéóêè

            ×òî ýòî áëîå âäàëè? Ïîâñþäó, ñëîâíî

îáëàêà ìåæäó õîëìàìè.

            Òî âèøíè ðàñöâëè; ïðèøëà æåëàííàÿ

âåñíà.

 

Brandt – Score (3 mistakes)                                                                                          Tsaraiuki

            ×òî ýòî áëîå âäàëè! Ïîâñþäó, ñëîâíî îáëàêà ìåæäó õîëìàìè. Òî âèøíè ðàçöâëè; ïðèøëà æåëàííàÿ âåñíà.

 

Delage

Qu’aperçoit on si blanc au loin? On dirait partout des nuages entre les collines: les cerisiers épanouis fêtent enfin l’arrivée du Printemps.

 

Burness

What shimmers so white faraway? Thou would’st say ’twas nought but cloudlet in the midst of hills full blown are the cherries! Thou art come, beloved Spring time.

 

Roth

Siehst du fern den weißen Schimmer? Überall wie helle Wolken leuchtet’s rings im Land. Nein, die Kirschen blühen; sei gesegnet, junger Frühling.

 

Construction: The Japanese Songs could be described as a short programmatical suite in three parts for hight voice and chamber orchestra based on short Japanese poems strictly syllabic in structure, each part bearing as title the name of a poet (I Akahito = Moderato 13 bars with key signature 4 b; II Mazatsumi = Vivo 16 bars, no signature, Largamento assai.. In tempo = 17 bars, no signature; III Tsaraiuki [actually: Tsurayuki] = tranquillo 25 bars incl. unequal quaver upbeat, no signature. The metronome settings were only included in the editions after 1955. The increase in syllables made necessary by the translation into French Strawinsky took care to accommodate by additional singing notes in minuscule, intended only for performances in French.

 

Structure

I

Akahito

            (13 bars key signature 4b)

ß áëûå öâòû …

Descendons au jardin …

Meine weißen Blumen …

I have flowers of white.

II

Mazasumi

Vivo {Crotchet = 80*}

            (16 bars without key signatur = bar 116)

Largamento assai. In tempo

            (17 bars without key signatur = bar 1733)

Âåñíà ïðèøëà; …

Avril parait.

Kommt der Frühling, …

The Spring has come!

Moderato {Crotchet = 58*}

III

Tsaraiuki

Tranquillo {Quaver = 100*}

            (25 bars without key signature including a quaver upbeat which is not balanced out in the final

bar)

×òî ýòî áëîå âäàëí?˜

Qu-‘aperçoit-on si blanc au loin?

Siehst du fern den weißen Schimmer?

What shimmers so white faraway?

{*} The metronome markings are not in the original editions; they were first added in the editions after 1945.

 

Errata / Corrections

 

Edition 161 (1st copy)

1.) 1st song, p. 4, 1st bar, above tempo indication (Moderato): >MM. Viertel = 58<.

2.) 1st song, p. 5, bar 7, Viola: 2nd note should be f3 instead of fb3.

4.) 2nd song, p. 14, last bar, 2nd Violin: a natural enclosed in round brackets has to be added to

            crotchet c3.

5.) 2nd song, p. 15, fourth to last bar, 2nd Violin: a natural enclosed in round brackets has to be added

            to the lower note of two-note chord crotchet a1-c3.

6.) 2nd song, p. 15, third to last bar, 2nd Violin: a natural enclosed in round brackets has to be added

            to the lower note of 2nd two-note chord semiquaver a1-e2

Edition 161 (2nd copy)

1.) 2nd song, p. 8, 3rd bar, Piano bass: a natural without brackets has to be added to 1st note written

            in treble clef e2.

2.) 2nd song, p. 11, at the top of the page left: >Crotchet = Crotchet<.

4.) 2nd song, pS. 15, last but one bar, descant: it should be read (probably) quaver rest / quaver g2 /

            quaver g2 / quaver g2 / quaver rest / quaver four-note chord instead of crotchet rest / crotchet

 

            rest / quaver rest / quaver four-note chord.

13/161

  1.) title page: >9 instruments< instead of >Chamber Orchestra< [>and Chamber Orchestra<] [pencil].

  2.) p. 5, 2. Song 1. bar Soprano: last quaver ligature a#1-b1 [with natural] instead of a#1-bb1.

  3.) p. 6, next to figure C: >in 12<.

  4.) p. 18, 1. bar = last but two bar, Flute: bar end semiquaver e2 — dotted quaver rest instead of

            crotchet rest; Violin II: 2. two-note-chord semiquaver a#1[bracket sharp]-e#2[bracket sharp]

            instead of semiquaver a#1[bracket sharp]-e2.

 

Style: The Songs are tersely built and extremely rich in tone colours. As for the singing voice, Strawinsky restricted himself to quavers and crotchet values and did without accidentals thus ensuring an unhindered, floating quality of singing, free of any textual restraints. Each song by its mood, structure and instrumentation mirrors the Season depicted in the words of the poem that inspired it. Many years after the composition Strawinsky explained that at the time the poems had stirred a similar response in him as had some Japanese woodcuts he had seen. The way in which problems of perspective and figurative representation were solved in Japanese graphic art had made him wish to attempt something similar in music. The Russian rendering of the poems had helped his intentions along and he had reached his goal by metrical and rhythmical means which he did not wish to explain further as they were too complicated. The technique used in the Japanese Songs is shaping the singing part by isometrial means in opposition to the accompanying instrumental parts, thereby creating two independent sound layers, and having the vocal accentuation precede that of the orchestra. A further shift in opposing these two layers happens this way, and indeed a spatial conception is brought about the prolongation of which requires different means from one bar to the next, i.e. it would call for renewed analysis bar by bar. Understandably, therefore, a compacted overall representation of the technique is not possible. Dershanovsky had made early urgent enquiries from Strawinsky shortly after receiving the performance materials on 10th June 1913. He missed any correspondence between words and musical structure of the ‘Songs’ and feared the pieces could not be performed in keeping with their original intention (or meaning) without further information from the composer. Strawinsky, who was ill with typhoid fever at the time and a patient of the Sanatorium Villa Borghese in Paris, answered by return of post, and Dershanovsky thanked him on 11th July, and later, on 24th July commented his reply, which due to its mainly theoretical content had not been completely understood by Dershanovsky. Still, he now had some information at hand which allowed him to give answers. – For the majority of those active in Strawinsky research the Schönberg influence on the Japanese Songs is a foregone conclusion. Particularly the melodramatic ‘Three Times Seven Poems’ based on Albert Giraud’s ‘Pierrot Lunaire’, whose third performance Strawinsky had attended in 1912 is said to have had an impact on him. For Strawinsky, the most impressive aspect of this work was not the satirical make-up, the idea for which had come from cabaret artist Albertine Zehme — incidentally, the composition was premièred in a cabaret — after all it had been Schönberg’s intention to parody the heavily pathetic style of tragedy as performed at the German Schaubühne; what really caught his interest was the attempt to achieve a sound alternating between singing and speech and transcending both, to create a composition in a musical space free of the fetters of tonality never before heard in such consequence by Strawinsky, and, finally, the joint origins of a newly-found linearity without the limitations of harmony or function. This kind of linearity was made use of in both the ‘Japanese Songs’ and in the final act of ‘Le Rossignol’, but very soon afterwards gave way to rotating patterns of sound in the style of ‘Les Noces’. Possibly another interest was the refreshing expressiveness of a reduced chamber orchestra sound at a time when massive orchestral cult was en vogue. Exotism was never looked for. Strawinsky was most probably more familiar with Chinoiserie and its contexts than Schönberg, who had never really taken an interest. When Strawinsky first heard Schönberg in Berlin, he had already composed the ‘Firebird Suite’ and ‘Petrouchka’ as well as the first act of ‘Le Rossignol’. The Strawinsky-Delage connection was not least due to the knowledgeability of both men in matters concerning Far-Eastern culture only equalled by Benois, who directed ‘Le Rossignol’. Delage, and under his influence, Strawinsky, had created a working environment for themselves that would have put the director of a museum for East Asian art to shame. Given the chamber orchestration of both works, echoes may be heard — whether intended or not — as a natural consequence; also, the choice of instruments may have had an after-effect. Further influence by Schönberg was hindered by Schönberg’s polemical assault on him after 1923 which lead to the conscious decision to keep his distance from him, an attitude he upheld until after Schönberg’s death. –

The Suite begins in the stillness of winter (1st Song, moderato) and moves through the turbulences of driving away the winter (2nd Song, vivo) towards a peaceful Spring (3rd Song, tranquillo). – The first Song consisting of 13 bars is the shortest with only 30 syllables divided up between 5 lines (1 : 6 syllables, 2 : 10 syllables; 3 : 4 syllables, 4 : 6 syllables; 5 : 4 syllables). The strict triple time remains unchanged, synonymous with the harshness of winter. Even in the interior structure there is no rhythmic differentiation. The orchestral voices appear regular, almost perfunctory, at the same time condensing the meaning of the words, gradually building up a tutti-mix with a different combination for every bar which may be represented schematically. Bar 1: great flute, 1st clarinet, voice; bar 5: great flute, 2 clarinets, voice; bar 6: great flute, 2 clarinets, piano (descant); bar 7: great flute, piano (descant), 2 violins, viola; bar 8: piccolo flute, great flute, 2 clarinets, piano, tutti strings; bar 9: voice, instrumental tutti; bar 10: tutti without voice; bar 11: piccolo, great flute, piano (descant register), voice, strings; bar 12: voice, instrumental tutti; bar 13: voice, 1st clarinet, piano (descant). Bars 16 consist of quavers only excepting some appoggiaturas; from bar 7 onwards some individual crotchets appear in the piano and strings, in bars 10 and 12 an overall of 4 semiquavers in the strings. The constant change in tone colour is achieved not just by combining different instruments but also by placing accents and — in the strings — by constant changes from pizzicato, bowing and flageolet play. The singing voice whose metrical pattern corresponds to the syllabic build of the poem, departs from the quaver pattern just once, in bar 12, while the other parts determinedly follow it. The central register of the singing voice is used for the first two lines only, telling of the author’s intention to show his flowers. As soon as the poem depicts snow the singing voice moves to the upper register. The melody encircles the central tone, e flat, creates a constant glittering fluctuation between a flat major and a flat minor dominated by diminished fifths and thirds. The orchestral accompaniment proceeds from complementary entries which appear like points in a pattern of broken rhythms that also become visible in the score.The staccato and pizzicato sounds and bright appoggiaturas, later taken on by the piano. create the image of snowflakes falling from the sky. –

The second song is made up of six lines of poetry, making the erratic movements of the ice floe audible by irregular rhythmic patterns like in the Akahito Song (1:4 syllables; 2:12 syllables; 3:10 syllables; 4:8 syllables; 5:3 syllables; 6:5 syllables). The 33 bars in all mainly composed in long demisemiquaver passages across a wide tonal range create a lively mood and the frequent alternation between different time schemes (3/8, 2/4, 5/8 and 3/4), the manifold and varying combinations of instruments and techniques, like bridgeplay, flageolet glissandi and flutter-tonguing, support this impression. Strawinsky creates a strong contrast between rhythmic patterning, the singing voice and the orchestral parts, unlike in the preceding song. The singing voice remains within a regular pattern of quavers and crotchets which never interrupt the metrical syllabic flow. The accompanying instruments on the other hand by long wavy runs and irregular rhythms create the turbulences desired by the composer. Thereby a full 16 bars of the total of 33 are reserved for the introduction which gives the impression of an overture, twice two bars are interludes and one bar is reserved for the postlude. Strawinsky’s setting of the poem is subdivided into three meaningful sections by the two interludes (line 1: bar 17; line 2: bars 2024; line 3: bar 2526; line 4: bars 2930; line 5: bar 31; line 6: bar 32): Expectant Spring mood (line 1), breaking and floating of ice (lines 23); Spring greeting (line 46). The first line, telling of the arrival of Spring rings like a motto, leading to jubilant exclamation among the instruments, the last one contains a soothing commitment followed by a calm final chord in the high range. Characteristically, the vocal part also has all references to Spring in the high register, excepting the motto line which is diatonic and resembles a fanfare, the musical motifs are a mix of diatonic and chromatic elements. The melody is reduced to a series of seconds and thirds. The incipient monotony of the tonal models with continuously circling permutations on single sounds corresponds to the uniformity of streaming water and the ice floes circling therein. There is a line-by-line correspondence between the text as performed by the soprano voice and the accompanying orchestral voices, homophonous, dense harmonic layers and the mainly high register in the Spring motif (line 1). At first there is a transparent homophonous sound, then the colla parte instrumentation becomes agitated in the high register when the ice breaks (line 2); a highly condensed, agitated and colourful instrumentation follows for the water games (line 3); the strings emanate an even deeper, tightly packed sound when the first blossoms of Spring appear (line 4); the theme keeps recurring, interspersed from the highest register on downwards towards D when the flowers are described (line 5); merely a long-held pedalled note in D in the piano bass, like an underlining of the Spring greeting (line 6), and, finally, a sforzato piano strike without arpeggio and a long-held instrumental chord in ppp without the piano. –

Strawinsky followed the syllabic scheme also in the third song (line 1: 8 syllables = bars 57; line 2: 13 syllables = bars 1013; line 3: 6 syllables = bars 1516; line 4: 8 syllables = bars 1719). Strawinsky composes in three self-contained units of meaning. The first consists of the poetic question after the white shimmering in the air; the second refers to the shining clouds; the third recognises the clouds as cherry blossoms by which Spring announces its coming. Again, the self-contained sections are linked by means of instrumental interludes (bars 89 and 1314). Similarly, the poem this time gets an introduction of 4 bars (14) and a postlude (bars 2025).The motifs given to soprano voice are used in a set way and in the first two sections move diatonically in the middle range, the third in the high range in an diatonic/chromatic mix. The first two sections have been composed so as to point towards the third as climax. In the third section Strawinsky does without polyphony and canonic patterns but retains the luscious sound of the strings. The last sung word, ‘Spring’, is intoned by the soprano without accompaniment, thereby receiving greatest possible weight. The postlude follows, which dissolves très lointain in an idyll of naturalistic sound as far as chord of the ninth and the open sound of the octave fifth and fourth of the last bar. The last chord of b sharp2 — c1 — e sharp 1 — in ppp is intoned by the piccolo, 1st clarinet and violin, and the suite rings out into infinity.

 

Dedication: I: A Maurice Delage — {To Maurice Delage*}; II: A Florent Schmitt — {To Florent Schmitt*}; III: A Maurice Ravel — {To Maurice Ravel*}

* Only in the English reprinting, but without in the French version.

 

Duration: 048″, 057″, 122″ [according to Strawinsky* 040”, 100”, 114”].

* 13/161Straw

 

Date of origin: Piano version: I: Ustilug 6.-19. October 1912; II: Clarens 5.-18. December 1912; III.: Clarens 9.-22. January 1913; Chamber orchestra version: I: Clarens 16.-29. December 1912; II: Clarens 8.-21. December 1912; III.: Clarens 9.-22. January 1913.

 

First performance: on 14th January 1914,Paris, Salle Erard, with Galina Nikitina (Soprano) from the Marinsky Theatre in St. Petersburg and a chamber orchestra (Pierre Lucas, Spathy, Merckel, Bigot, Audisio, Jeoffroy, Pascal, Speyer, Dauwe, Baton, Madame Ellie) conducted by Desiré Inghelbrecht. Preparatory coaching at the piano was carried out by Maurice Delage – :The first performance was staged by the Société Musicale Indépendante, a music society founded among others by Maurice Ravel and Charles Koechlin, with Gabriel Fauré as honorary president. Part of the same concert was the world première of Ravel’s Trois Poèsies de Stéphane Mallarmé sung by Jane Bathori. The concert opened with the Piano Quartet No. 1 by Gabriel Fauré with the piano part played by Alfredo Casella. It was to him that Struve, director of the Russian Music Publishers, sent the score and the individual part materials of Strawinsky’s Songs on 9th January, and it was about the rehearsals Maurice Delage reported to Strawinsky. Also, the piano suite for four hands ‘Une Semaine du petit Elfe’, ‘Ferme l’oeil’ by Florent Schmitt and Erik Satie’s composition ‘Chapitres tournés en tous sens’ performed by Ricardo Vines were the other works presented. Although urgently expected by Delage, Strawinsky could not travel to Paris for the première, as he was in Lausanne with his wife, who on 15th January 1914 gave birth to their youngest child Mila at the Clinic Mont-Riant in the Avenue de la Gare.

 

Remarks: In the summer of 1912 Strawinsky read the translation into Russian of A. Brandt’s German rendering of the Japanese poems to which he never referred at any later stage, neither in his Memoirs nor in the various conversations recorded. While still engaged in orchestrating SACRE Strawinsky began working on his ‘Japanese Songs’ during a break from ballet composition. – Struve openly criticised the way in which the Russian première came about in a letter to Strawinsky dated 28th Febr. 1914 from Berlin. Apparently, Dershanovsky had reduced the orchestral parts from the score instead of buying or lending them from the publishers. Struve did not approve and for this reason let Strawinsky know the extremely bad sales figures of his latest composition. – The French première did not have the hoped for impact in musical circles even though Maurice Delage was highly enthusiastic and delighted with its being dedicated to him; in a letter dated 20th January 1913 addressed to Strawinksy he declared that he had bought a frame specially for the autograph bearing the dedication. But the very meagre sales figures dropped even further, now that the pieces had been brought to audition, nearing the no sales point. In St. Petersburg the audience was struck silent after the first song, while the second and third had to be repeated. With other thoughts at the back of his mind, Struve informed Strawinksy on the sales situation: Between May 1913 and February 1914 a total of 8 copies was sold in England, 12 in France and none at all after the première in Paris. Given these circumstances, Struve refused by letter dated 28th February the offer of a translation into English, as the situation did not require it. – Also, there were questions being asked about whether the Japanese Songs were initially meant for piano or orchestral accompaniment: Since Strawinsky had begun work on the Songs with a piano accompaniment but then finished both versions at the same time, some biographers came to the conclusion that he had planned on composing piano songs and decided on an orchestral work as it were ‘on the way’. Like it is with all theses for which there is no direct or even indirect proof, this one too may neither be confirmed nor contradicted. Strawinsky’s ergographical proceeding does however reveal facts which almost force the analogous conclusion upon the Japanese Songs. Thus he would produce (or would have produced) piano reductions of all his works, mostly before working out the orchestral facets in detail, as he was in the habit of considering orchestration as a separate act of composition which he based on a piano version of the work in question. Also, he always published a piano reduction separately from an orchestral work, whereas in cases where he intended composing several independent versions of a work he never spoke of a piano ‘reduction’. The piano version of the Japanese Songs now was expressly published in a piano reduction or transcribed orchestral version (transcription pour chant et piano) as early as 1914.

 

Versions: The full score of the ‘Japanese Songs’ was published by the Russian Music Publishers 1913 and (according to London) became available for sale by 1st August. It appeared in broadside and the name of the translator was misprinted ‘Delace’, while the dedicatee’s name ‘Delage’, because printed in facsimile hand writing, and the name in the front title were spelt correctly. The piano reduction of the Japanese songs, printed in 1913 and made by Strawinsky himself, is one of the rarest editions of a work by Strawinsky. In the following edition of 1922 the mistake was corrected and to the Russian and French vocal part an English text translated by Robert Burness added. The edition was available for purchase by 13th August, as is proved by documentation of the British Museum in London. The copies of the first bound edition contain an order list placed between score and piano reduction failing to list prices in Marks or Roubles (the orchestral materials were priced in roubles). Generally speaking, orchestral parts appeared in rather quick succession in those days. That the price list remained open points to the possible intention of filling it in at a later date, which might have been prevented by the unexpected flop and the outbreak of the World War a short time later. Since nobody intended performing the pieces, printing individual parts was not worth while. From 1922 onwards the ‘Songs’ were however available in full score and as a piano reduction, also the vocal part could be obtained separately. Sales figures were indeed very low. Between 1922 and 1938 the editors sold in ever sinking numbers less than 100 full scores, around 650 piano reductions and not even 40 vocal parts in all. The bulk of the piano reductions was sold between 1925 and 1926 (237 copies). Boosey & Hawkes reprinted the piano reduction shortly after the negotiations with Strawinsky as one of the earliest new acquisitions. A contributory copy could not be located in London, but a copy found its way into the music library of Munich in 1955 (>95/104025<). Obviously only the piano reduction was printed, not the full score as can be seen in the advertising printed in the piano reduction. After the takeover by Boosey & Hawkes (contract concluded May 11th 1955) the ‘Songs’ appeared together with the two ‘Balmont Songs’ in a new arrangement and in single bound copy; this was made possible by Strawinsky’s choice of instruments for the later orchestration of the ‘Balmont Songs’, which, also for practical reasons of performance, was identical to that of the ‘Japanese Songs’. The printing of the full score was finished in January 1955. Orchestral parts were available on loan. The new piano reduction appeared in 1956.

 

Comparison of the versions: Changes compared to the original were restricted to metrical, orthographic and textual matters, aspects of performance, copyright and title, the composition as such remained unchanged. Strawinsky had begun to define the length of each piece by means of the metronome and taken to writing the vocal part changing the single quavers into groups under crossbars. He further decided in favour of a different ordering system within the full score moving the vocal line (which used to be in first place) to occupy the space between the piano and strings. Another novelty was the re-translation into German which Strawinsky left uncommented. He did warn, however, of too many language-versions underneath the musical notation and to this purpose wrote a letter to the editors addressed to Franz Roth and dated 14th September 1954, prompting them to think about a new layout. He felt that three lines of text underneath the music were too many, as the third line was too far removed from the notation for easy reading. The re-print attended to his wishes by showing the soprano line twice with the Russian and French words underneath the first, and the English and German versions underneath the second, identical, soprano line. Another necessary change requested by Strawinsky concerned a re-titling of the edition: Two Poems & Three Japanese Lyrics was to be the new title without any further translation, but the first pages of the ‘Balmont Songs’ and ‘Japanese Songs’ were to show the old title and translations as well as the names of all translators. The full score was published in this form in 1955 under the same serial no. as the recording B & H 17701 with a more detailed exterior title printed in minuscule with ‘w’ spelling of Strawinsky’s name. The piano reduction from the score was published in 1956 under the joint no. B & H 18105.

 

Historical recordings: Hollywood 15th February 1955 with Marni Nixon (Soprano) and an unnamed chamber orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky in the 1954 version, sung in English; Hollywood 10th June 1968 with Evelyn Lear (Soprano) and Members of the Columbia Symphony Orchestra conducted by Robert Craft, sung in Russian.

 

CD-Edition: VIII-2/810 (Recording) 1968.

 

Autograph: The autographs of both the reduction and full score were left with Boosey & Hawkes and today are kept at the British Library.

 

Copyright: There are copyright markings without data on any of the first editions from the ‘Edition Russe du Musique’; 1947 with data assigned to Boosey & Hawkes; 1955 Copyright Arrangement by Boosey & Hawkes New York.

 

Editions

a) Overview

161 1913 Sc; R-F; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 19 pp. obl. 8°; R. M. V. 200.

            161[14] ibd.

                        161[14]-Straw1 ibd. [with annotations]

 

                        161[14]-Straw2 ibd. [with annotations]

162 1913 KlA; R-F; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 10 pp.; R. M. V. 199.

163 (1922) KlA; R-F-E; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 10 pp.; R. M. V. 199.

164St [1922] [unidentified].

165 [1948] KlA; R-F-E; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 10 pp.; R. M. V. 199.

166Alb 1968 Ges.-Kl.; R-F; Musika Moskau; 5 pp.; 5823.

b) Characteristic features

161 IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE. / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE. / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE“, BERLIN, MOSCOU, ST.PÉTERSBOURG. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / POUR / CHANT (SOPRANO), DEUX FLÛTES (la 2 de = fl.), DEUX CLARINETTES / (la 2de = cl.bas), PIANO, DEUX VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE. / TEXTE FRANÇAIS DE MAURICE DELACE* / PARTITION** PR. M. 3.– R. 1.40*** / PARTIES** / TRANSCRIPTION POUR CHANT / ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR** PR. M. 1.50 R. _70*** / [°°] /DROIT D’EXECUTION RÉSERVÉ. / ÑÎÁÑÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] 1913 [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#]**** ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#]**** (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*****) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#]**** BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /****** MAX ESCHIG PARIS // (Score sewn 26.5 x 21.8 oblong (8° obl. [quer 8°]); sung text Russian-French; 19 [16] pages + 4 cover pages dark grey auf creme-white veined [front cover title in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 3 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame, empty page, texts of the poems Russian-French with translator specified >Ðóññê³é òåêñòú À. Áðàíäòà.< [#] >Texte français de Maurice Delage.<] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head as piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< >II< >III< centre centred; song title below piece number flush left >AKAHITO< >MAZASUMI< >TSARAIUKI<; dedications above piece numbers centre centred hand-written printed in line etching p. 4 >A Maurice Delage< p. 6 >A Florent Schmitt< p. 16 >A Maurice Ravel<; author specified [only] 1st page of the score paginated p. 4 next to and below piece title flush right not centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservations without Copyright 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Édition Russe de Musique Berlin, Moscou St.-Pétersbourg.< flush right >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; plate number >R. M. V. 200<; end of score dated p. 18 flush right >Clarens 1913.<) // (1913)

° Dividing horizontal line of 1.8 cm.

°° Dividing horizontal line of 3.6 cm.

* Original mistake in the last name.

** Fill character (dotted line).

*** The price in Rubles is printed under the price in Deutschmarks.

**** Publisher’s emblem 0.9 x 1 sitting woman playing cymbalom, spanning three lines.

***** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

****** Slash original.

 

161[14] IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE. / [+] / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE. / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE“, BERLIN, MOSCOU, ST.PÉTERSBOURG. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / POUR / CHANT (SOPRANO), DEUX FLÛTES (la 2 de = fl.°°), DEUX CLARINETTES / (la 2de = cl.bas), PIANO, DEUX VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE. / TEXTE FRANÇAIS DE MAURICE DELACE* / PARTITION** PR. M. 3.– R. 1.40*** / PARTIES** / TRANSCRIPTION POUR CHANT / ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR** PR. M. 1.50 R. _70*** / [°] / DROIT D’EXECUTION RÉSERVÉ. / ÑÎÁÑÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#]**** ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#]**** (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*****) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#]**** BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /****** MAX ESCHIG PARIS // (Score [library binding] 26.7 x 22 oblong (8° obl. [quer 8°]); sung text Russian-French; 19 [16] pages + 4 cover pages dark grey on beige-grey veined [front cover title in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 3 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame, empty page, sung texts Russian-French with translator specified >Ðóññê³é òåêñòú À. Áðàíäòà.< [#] >Texte français de Maurice Delage.<] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head as piece number in Roman numeral (without dot) >I< >II< >III< centre centred; song title below piece number flush left >AKAHITO< >MAZASUMI< >TSARAIUKI<; dedications above piece numbers centre centred hand-written printed in line etching p. 4 >A Maurice Delage< p. 6 >A Florent Schmitt< p. 16 >A Maurice Ravel<; author specified [only] 1st page of the score paginated p. 4 next to and below piece title flush right not centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservations without Copyright [only] 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Édition Russe de Musique Berlin, Moscou°°° St.-Pétersbourg< flush right >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; plate number >R. M. V. 200<; end of score dated p. 19 flush right >Clarens 1913.<) // [1914]

° In the copy in Basel >65 / STRAW / 5<, and likewise in the copy in Leipzig >8:2483<, there is a typewritten entry in the middle, >Teuerungszuschlag 100%<.

°° The omission of the specification of the instruments is original.

°°° The missing punctuation is original.

* Original mistake in the last name.

** Fill character (dotted line).

*** The price in Rubles is printed under the price in Deutschmarks.

**** Publisher’s emblem 0.9 x 1 sitting woman playing cymbalom, spanning three lines.

***** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

****** Slash original.

+ Dividing line horizontal of 1.8 cm.

 

 161[14]-Straw1

Strawinsky’s copy of his estate is on the outer title above feather frame right with >Igor Strawinsky< signed but not dated. It contains corrections.

162 ÐÎÑѯÉÑÊÎÅ ÌÓ [#*] Russischer / ÇÛÊÀËÜÍÎÅ ÍÇ [#*] — MUSIK — / ÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÎ · [#*] VERLAG. G.M.B.H.** / ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊIÉ [#*] IGOR STRAWINSKY / ÒÐÈ [#]* TROIS / ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß ÈÇÚ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ [#]* POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE / ËÈÐÈÊÈ [#]* JAPONAISE / Òðàíñêðèïö³ÿ äëà ãîëîñà è ô.­ï. [#*] Transcription pour chant et piano. / [+] / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚ ÌÎÑÊÂÀ [#] Berlin Moskau / Ñ · ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#] St. Petersburg // ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊ²É [#]* IGOR STRAWINSKY / ÒÐÈ [#°] TROIS / ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß ÈÇÚ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ [#°] POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE / ËÈÐÈÊÈ [#°] JAPONAISE / äëÿ [#°] pour / Ãîëîñà [ñîïðàíî], äâóõú ôëåéòú*** [#°] chant (soprano), deux flûtes / [2àÿ­ìàë.ôë.], äâóõú êëàðíåòîâú*** [#°] la 2de–pet.fl.), deux clarinettes / [2îé­Áàñ­êë.], ô­ï³àíî, äâóõú ñêðèïîêú,*** [#°] (la 2 de–cl.bas.), piano, deux violons, / àëüòà è â³îëîí÷åëè. [#°] alto et violoncelle. / Òðàíñêðèïö³ÿ [#°] Transcription / äëà ãîëîñà è ô­ï³àíî àâòîðà. [#°] pour chant et piano par l’auteur. / Ðóññê³é*** òåêñòú À. ÁÐÀÍÄÒÀ. [#°] Texte français de MAURICE DELAGE. / Pr.°° M.1.50 / r._70 / [dividing line horizontal] / DROIT D’ÉXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉ. / ÑÎÁÑÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] 1913 [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#****] ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#****] (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*****) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#****] BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /°°° MAX ESCHIG PARIS // (Edition chant-piano [library binding] 26.7 x 33.6 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French; 10 [6] pages + 4 cover pages grey on light grey [front cover title in a feather frame 20 x 14.3 with stylized ornamental Russian text and normal French text, 3 empty pages] + 4 pages front matter [title page with dividing line horizontal of 10,5 and separating publisher’s emblem 1.7 x 1.8 sitting woman playing cymbalom, empty page, sung text Russian-French, empty page]; title head as song number in Roman numeral (without dot) centre with piece titles; dedications hand-written printed in line etching centre above piece number [p. 5:] >A Maurice Delage< [p. 6:] >A Florent Schmitt< [p. 9:] >A Maurice Ravel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 5 next to and below song number flush right ragged alignment >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservation without Copyright 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag Berlin, Moskau, St. Petersburg.< flush right >Eigentum des Verlags.<; plate number >R. M. V. 199<; end of score dated [1. song p. 5:] >Oustiloug 1912<; [2. song p. 8, 3. song p. 10:] >Clarens 1913.<); production indication p. 10 flush right as end mark >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H., Leipzig.<) // (1913)

° Separating line vertical.

°° The Deutschmark and Ruble signs appear one under the other, and the Deutschmark sign is crossed out; the general price mark >Pr.< appears in the middle before the Deutschmark and Ruble signs.

°°° Slash original.

* Continuous, not fastened simple undecorated line, which divides the area of the frame 20 x 14,3 into two equal halves, for the Russian and French texts respectively.

** The smaller M is printed into the G, and the smaller B is printed into the first vertical beam of the H.

*** Hard sign [ú] italic.

**** Separating vignette 1.7 x 1.8 publisher’s emblem sitting woman playing cymbalom, spanning three lines.

***** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

  + Dividing line horizontal of 5.9 in Russian column, 5.8 in French column.

 

163 ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊ²É [#]* IGOR STRAWINSKY / ÒÐÈ [#]* TROIS / ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß ÈÇÚ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ [#]* POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE / ËÈÐÈÊÈ [#]* JAPONAISE / äëÿ [#]* pour / Ãîëîñà [ñîïðàíî], äâóõú ôëåéòú** [#]* chant (soprano), deux flûtes / [2àÿ­ìàë.ôë.], äâóõú êëàðíåòîâú** [#]* la 2de–pet.fl.), deux clarinettes / [2îé­Áàñ­êë.], ô­ï³àíî, äâóõú ñêðèïîêú.*** [#]* (la 2 de–cl.bas.), piano, deux violons, / àëüòà è â³îëîí÷åëè. [#]* alto et violoncelle. / Òðàíñêðèïö³ÿ [#]* Transcription / äëà ãîëîñà è ô­ï³àíî àâòîðà. [#]* pour chant et piano par l’auteur / Ðóññê³é*** òåêñòú À. ÁÐÀÍÄÒÀ. [#]* Texte français de MAURICE DELAGE. / English Text by ROBERT BURNESS. / [dividing line] / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS. / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.****) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN. MOSCOU. LEIPZIG. NEW-YORK. / POUR LA FRANCE ET SES COLONIES: MUSIQUE RUSSE, PARIS, 3 RUE DE MOSCOU. / POUR L’ANGLETERRE ET SES COLONIES: THE RUSSIAN MUSIC AGENCY, LONDRES W. I, 34, PERCY STREET. [*****] // (Vocal score with chant [library binding] 26.5 x 33.6 (2° [4°]) sung text Russian-French-English; 10 [6] pages + 4 cover pages black on grey-white [front cover title in ornamental feather frame with publisher’s emblem 1 x 1,2 sitting woman playing cymbalom, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [sung text Russian-French-English, empty page]; title head as song number in Roman numeral (without dot) centre with piece titles; dedications hand-written printed in line etching above piece numbers [p. 5:] >A Maurice Delage< [p. 6:] >A Florent Schmitt< [p. 9:] >A Maurice Ravel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 5 next to piece number flush right centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Stravinsky.<; legal reservation without Copyright 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag Berlin, Moskau.< flush right >Eigentum des Verlags.<; plate numbers [text and translations:] >R. M. V. 356.< [notes:] >R. M. V. 199.356; end of score dated [1. song p. 5:] >Oustiloug 1912.<; [2. song p. 8, 3. song p. 10:] >Clarens 1913.<); production indication p. 10 flush right as end mark >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H., Leipzig.<) // (1922)

° Separating line vertical.

** Hard sign [ú] italic.

*** The Russian i without an i dot.

***** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

***** The copy Bayerische Staatsbibliothek München >2 Mus.pr. 7955< bears below ornamental feather frame a blue stamp mark >In die / UNIVERSAL-EDITION / aufgenommen No 8029<. The edition number is also stamped under a dotted line.

 

164St [1922] set of parts; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin [unidentified]

 

165 [missing] // igor strawinsky / trois poésies / de la lyrique japonaise / chant et piano / soprano / édition russe de musique · boosey & hawkes // (Edition chant-piano [library binding] 26.3 x 32.2 ([4°]); sung text Russian-French-English; 10 [6] pages + [cover pages missing] + 2 pages front matter [title page, sung text Russian-English-French with translator specified + original legend] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s >Édition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production date >No. 453<]; title head as song title in capital letters above type area flush left next to centred piece number in Roman numeral; dedications hand-written in line etching above piece number [p. 5:] >A Maurice Delage< [p. 6:] >A Florent Schmitt< [p. 9:] >A Maurice Ravel<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 5 next to piece number flush right centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Stravinsky.<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright by Edition Russe de Musique (RUSSISCHER** Musikverlag) / for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; plate number >B. & Hawkes 16308<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in England<; end of score dated p. 5 >Oustiloug 1912.< p. 9 >Clarens 1913.<; end number p. 10 flush right as end mark >H.P.A9297.148<) // [1948]

* In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price information editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge with Frenchen Titeln without Editionsnummern und without Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires.

** The >h< can be read as an >n<, which is presumably not a printing error, rather a defective letter.

 

166Alb È. ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊÈÉ / ÈÇÁÐÀÍÍÛÅ / ÂÎÊÀËÜÍÛÅ / ÑÎ×ÈÍÅÍÈß / [vignette] / · ÌÓÇÛÊÀ · / ÌÎÑÊÂÀ · 1968 / È. ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊÈÉ / ÈÇÁÐÀÍÍÛÅ / ÂÎÊÀËÜÍÛÅ / ÑÎ×ÈÍÅÍÈß / äëÿ ãîëîñà ñ ôîðòåïèàíî / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀ ÌÎÑÊÂÀ 1968 // (Album 21.7 x 28.8 (4° [Lex 8°]; 54 [52] pages + 4 pages bound cardboard [front cover title in ornamental frame with decorative coloured frame with Lyre vignette in the section of the frame on the upper part of the page + vignette initial >M< with a stylized treble clef form italic, 2 empty pages, page with price at the top of the page flush left Russian >70 ê.<] + 2 pages front matter [title page. empty page] + 2 pages back matter unpaginated [content Russian-French >ÑÎÄÅÐÆÀÍÈÅ / INDEX<, imprint Russian >Èíäåêñ 932< with billing of names >Ðåäàêòîð Í. Áîáàíîâà [#] Ëèòåðàòóðíûé ðåäàêòîð À. Òàðàñîâà / Òåõíè÷åñêèé ðåäàêòîð Å. Êðó÷èíèíà [#] Êîððåêòîð À. Ëàâðåíþê< and itemized statements of format and origin]; reprint pp. 2324 (>I<), pp. 2528 (>II<), 2930 (>III<); song numbers in Roman numerals (without dot) I to III; title head [only] p. 23 Russian-French >ÒÐÈ ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß< [#] >TROIS POÉSIES< / >ÈÇ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ ËÈÐÈÊÈ< [#]>DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE <; dedications centre italic p. 23 below title head >Ìîðèñó Äåëàæ< [#] >A Maurice Delage< p. 25 above author specified >Ôëîðåíòó Øìèòòó< [#] >A Florent Schmitt< p. 29 above author specified >Ìîðèñó Ðàâåëþ< [#] >A Maurice Ravel<; author specified Russian-French flush left p. 23 between dedication and song number >I< >Ñëîâà ÀÊÀÕÈÒÎ / Paroles d’AKAHITO / Ðóññêèé òåêñò À. Áðàíäòà / Texte français de M. Delage< p. 25 above, next to and below song number >II< >Ñëîâà ÌÀÖÀÑÓÌÈ / Paroles de MAZATSUMI / Ðóññêèé òåêñò À. Áðàíäòà / Texte français de M. Delage< p. 28 between dedication and song number >III< >Ñëîâà ÑÀÐÀÞÊÈ / Paroles de TSARAIUKI / Ðóññêèé òåêñò À. Áðàíäòà / Texte français de M. Delage<; end of score dated p. 24 >(1912 ã. )< p. 28 >(1913 ã.)< p. 30 >1913 ã.<; plate number >5823<; without legal reservations; without acknowledging the original publishers on the pages of the score; without end marks) // 1968

 

13/161 ® Nr. 13

 

13/162 ® Nr. 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16

Ò ð è  ñ ò è õ î ò â î ð å í ³ ÿ  è ç ú  ÿ ï î í ñ ê î é  ë è ð è ê è*

äëÿ ãîëîñà (ñîïðàíî), äâóõü ôëåéòú (2àÿ–ìàë.ôë.), äâóõú êëàðíåòîâú (2îé–áàñ.-êë.), ô-ï³àíî, äâóõú ñêðèïîêú, àëüòà è â³îëîí÷åëè Trois poésies de la lyrique japonaise pour chant (soprano), deux flûtes (la 2 de –pet. fl.), deux clarinettes (la 2 de –cl.bas.), piano, deux violons, alte et violoncelle – Three Japonese Lyrics for sopran and chamber orchestra – Drei japanische Gedichte für Sopran und Kammerorchester – Tre poesie della Lirica giapponese per canto (soprano) e un piccolo complesso da camera formato da due flauti, due clarinetti, pianoforte e quartetto d’archi

 

 

Titel: Die originale Erstausgabe der Orchesterfassung erschien vor der Strawinskyschen Klaviertranskription russisch-französisch, aber ohne russischen, nur mit französischem Obertitel; der Klavierauszug erschien russisch-französisch-englisch, aber mit russisch-französischem Obertitel. Daß möglicherweise vier Lieder angedacht waren, ist ein auf Ravel zurückgehendes Gerücht, das zumal bei der Geschlossenheit des Zyklus der Grundlage entbehrt, aber zitierfähig wurde. Wie provisorisch ins Unreine der fragliche Brief vom 2. April 1913 an Hélène Casella betreffend Konzertprogrammplanung geschrieben war, geht allein schon aus den weiteren Irrtümern hervor, die Ravel unterliefen. So gab er mit 40 Minuten die Zeit für die Aufführung von Pierrot lunaire zu lang an; außerdem wurde das Stück dann nicht gespielt. Die angeblich vier Japanlieder sollten zusammen zehn Minuten dauern, was bedeutet hätte, daß das imaginäre vierte Lied doppelt so lang wie alle drei anderen zusammen hätte dauern müssen. Seine eigene Lieder-Serie nach Mallarmé bestand diesem Brief zufolge aus zwei Liedern; in Wirklichkeit waren es deren drei, die dann aufgeführt wurden.

 

Besetzung: Die Besetzungsangabe ist Bestandteil des Haupttitels. [Sopran (hohe Stimme); kleine Flöte (= 2. große Flöte), 2 große Flöten (2. große Flöte = kleine Flöte), 2 Klarinetten in B (2. Klarinette = Baßklarinette in B), Baßklarinette in B (= 2. Klarinette), Klavier, Erste Violine, Zweite Violine, Bratsche, Violoncello].

 

Aufführungspraxis: Die Japan-Lieder sind wegen der hohen Stimmlage (Ambitus I: a1 [als heses] bis a2 [als heses]; Ambitus II: ais1 bis a2; Ambitus III: gis1 bis as2) und vor allem wegen der Intonationsreibungen zwischen Singstimme und Orchester mitunter im chromatischen Intervallabstand oder dem einer großen Sekunde schwierig zu singen, was übrigens Derschanowsky bei den Vorverhandlungen für eine russische Erstaufführung erkannte und mit Brief vom 3. November 1913 Strawinsky gegenüber anklingen ließ. Aus demselben Grund war Delage sehr zufrieden, für die Pariser Uraufführung Galina Nikitina vom St.Petersburger Marien-Theater gewonnen zu haben.

 

Inhalt: Das erste Lied Akahito spricht von weißen Blumen, die der Besitzer nicht mehr zeigen kann, weil der Schnee gekommen ist und alle Blumen weiß gemacht hat. – Das zweite Lied Mazatsumi spricht von einer abgebrochenen weißen Eisscholle, die als erste Frühlingsblüte auf dem Wasser treibt. – Das dritte Lied Tsaraiuki spricht von den hellen Wolken, die überall im Land leuchten, aber keine Wolken, sondern blühende Kirschen sind und die Ankunft des Frühlings bezeugen.

 

Vorlage: Japan, über lange Zeit eine Art fernes Traumland, hatte Mitte des 19. Jahrhunderts seine Selbstisolierung aufgegeben und expandierte in einem nie erwarteten Ausmaß. Mit dem gewonnenen Krieg gegen China (1894) und vor allem gegen Rußland (1904) erzeugte es eine eigene künstlerische Mode, in deren Folge die Lyrikübersetzungen standen. Strawinsky berichtet ohne Quellennennung, er sei während der Arbeiten am Sacre auf eine Anthologie japanischer Lyrik gestoßen. Es muß sich dabei um den 1912 in St. Petersburg erschienenen Band ßÀÏÎÍÑÊÀß ËÈÐÈÊÀ (Japonskaja lirika = Japanische Lyrik) gehandelt haben, für den ein A. Brandt (À. Áðàíäò) als Übersetzer zeichnete. Wer Brandt gewesen ist, hat sich bislang nicht feststellen lassen, vermutlich war er einer der vielen in St. Petersburg lebenden Deutschen oder doch deutschstämmig. Die Anthologie bildet heute eine kaum nachzuweisende Rarität. Brandt hatte nicht aus dem Japanischen, sondern aus dem Deutschen übersetzt. Seine Vorlagen bildeten die Veröffentlichungen des Begründers der deutschen, vielleicht sogar europäischen Japanologie und Begründers der japanischen Literaturwissenschaft in Japan selbst, Karl Florenz, sowie eine japanische Lyrikausgabe von Hans Bethge. Er kannte auch Karl Enderling. Bei Bethge finden sich zwei der von Strawinsky komponierten Gedichte, bei Florenz alle drei. Brandt hatte also kein Original, sondern seinerseits eine Übersetzung übersetzt. Der Unterschied zwischen Florenz und Bethge ist der unterschiedliche Ansatz. Die japanischen Originale, in diesem Falle nicht Haikus, sondern Tantras, die immer von Silbenzählungen ausgehen, beruhen auf der Vorgabe, über wenige Silben eine ganze Gefühls-Gedanken-Welt auszudrücken. Dadurch werden sie häufig unverständlich und in Folge davon mehrdeutig und unübersetzbar. Florenz folgt der japanischen Silbenzählung als dem eigentlichen Sinn dieser Lyrik, Bethge verläßt sie und formt Verse nach deutschem Metrik– und Reimverständnis. Während der Name Brandt in der originalen Partiturausgabe von 1913 und auch in den späteren Boosey-Ausgaben nicht erscheint, wurde er auf dem Innentitelblatt des Klavierauszugs genannt, allerdings mit der russischen Genitivbildung Ðóññê³é òåêñòú À. Áðàíäòà (Russischer Text A. Brandt’s), wie es bei russischen Ausgaben üblich ist. Das führte vielfach zu einer falschen Namensbildung, indem man aus Brandt Branta (= russisch Áðàíäòà) und daraus rückübersetzt Brandta machte. Strawinsky hat seine drei Lieder (Akahito, Mazatsumi, Tsaraiuki) nach den japanischen Dichtern benannt, von denen die Dichtungen stammen. Der Familienname wird in Japan traditionell an den Anfang gesetzt. Dann folgt ihm das Bindewort no, dem sich der Personennamen anschließt. Doch ist es in Japan auch durchaus üblich, Dichter mit ihrem Vornamen zu nennen. Akahito, Mazatsumi und Tsaraiuki sind Vor-, keine Familiennamen. So heißt Akahito mit Nachnamen Yamabe, Mazatsumi mit Nachnamen Minamoto und Tsaraiuki (richtig: Tsurayuki; die konstant gebliebene falsche Schreibweise geht auf den Notenerstdruck zurück; bei Brandt findet sich der Name richtig geschrieben) mit Nachnamen Ki. Yamabe no Akahito, Meister der Naturlyrik und des Kurzgedichts, von Hause aus weitgereister Höfling niederen Ranges, dichtete zwischen 680 und 745 nach Christus (Nara-Zeit). Seine Objektivität soll tausend Jahre lang nicht erreicht worden sein. Die Herkunft von Minamoto no Mazatsumi ist als Person augenscheinlich nicht bekannt. Ki no Tsurayuki, Hofbeamter im Statthalterrang, der zwischen 860 und 945 lebte, schrieb ein berühmt gewordenes Vorwort zur ersten Sammlung japanischer Gedichte, an deren Zusammenstellung er beteiligt war, und hinterließ mehr als 400 Gedichte. Er gilt als der klassische Vertreter der Heian-Lyrik mit ihrer vornehmen Statik und der Harmonie von Gefühl und Nachdenklichkeit.

 

Übersetzungen: Maurice Delage benutzte den russischen, nicht den deutschen Text als Vorlage für seine Übertragung in das Französische. Eine englische Übertragung kam wegen des Mißerfolges beim Publikum nicht zustande. Erst mit der Neuauflage von 1922 wurde die Edition dreisprachig. Die englische Übertragung besorgte Robert Burness, der auch die Balmont-Lieder und später Mawra übersetzte. Eine deutsche Rückübersetzung kam erst mit der kombinierten Balmont– und Japan-Lieder-Ausgabe durch Boosey & Hawkes nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg heraus, wobei man nicht, was an sich nahegelegen hätte, auf die deutsche Urausgabe zurückgriff, die man in London vermutlich gar nicht kannte, sondern Ernst Roth neu übersetzen ließ.

 

Übersetzungs-Synopse*

* Nach: Karl Florenz: Geschichte der japanischen Litteratur, 2. Ausgabe, Leipzig, C. F. Amelangs Verlag, 1909, in der Reihe: Die Litteraturen des Ostens in Einzeldarstellungen, Zehnter Band, 642 + X Seiten, gewidmet dem Prinzen Rupprecht von Bayern. (Bungaku-Hakushi); Japanische Novellen und Gedichte. Verdeutscht und herausgegeben von Paul Enderling, Leipzig, Reclams Universal Bibliothek Nr. 4747, Vorwort Berlin 1905; Hans Bethge: Japanischer Frühling. Nachdichtungen japanischer Lyrik, Leipzig im Inselverlag, MDCCCCXVI (1916), 125 Seiten, 2. Auflage 3.-4. Tausend, enthält eine Widmung aus April 1920, 1. Auflage identisch, nur erweiterter Rechtsschutz, ohne Auflagenhöhe.

 

I Akahito

Florenz S. 99

Dem Liebsten mein                                                        4

Gedacht’ ich sie zu zeigen,                                             7

Die Pflaumenblüten.                                                      5

Nun schneit’s – und ich vermag nicht                              7

Blüten und Schnee zu scheiden.                         7                                              (VIII,9.)

 

Brandt S. 19                                                                                                                 Àêàõèòî

            ß áëûå öâòû âú ñàäó òåᐠõîòëà

ïîêàçàòü.

            Íî ñíãú ïîøåëú. Íå ðàçîáðàòü, ãäú

ñíãú è ãä öâòû!

 

Delage

Avril au jardin je voulais te montre les fleurs blanches.

La neige tombe … Tout est il fleurs ici, ou neige blanche?

 

Burness

I have flowers of white. Come and see where they grow in my garden. But falls the snow: I know not my flowers from flakes of snow.

 

Roth

Meine weißen Blumen wollt’ ich dir im Garten drunten zeigen. Doch der Schnee kam. Weiß sind sie nun alle, Blumen, Flocken!

 

II Mazatsumi

Florenz S. 143144 (Masazumi)

Durch alle Spalten                                                         5

Des Eises, das im Gießbach /                                        7

Soeben schmilzt,                                                           4

Ersprudeln weiße Wellen                                                7

Als erste Frühlingsblüten.                                               7                                              (I, 12.)

 

Bethge S. 57

die allerersten blüten

MASAZUMI

Froh sprudeln durch die Ritzen nun des Eises,

Das vor dem Lenz zergeht, die weißen Wellen

Des Gießbachs auf: die ersten weißen Blüten

Des lieben Frühlings möchten sie uns sein.

 

Brandt – Original S. 54                                                                                     Ìàçàöóìè

            Âåñíà ïðèøëà; èàú òðåùèíú ëåäÿíîé

êîðû çàïðûãàëï, èãðàÿ âú ð÷ê ïííûÿ

ñòðóè: îí õîòÿòü áûòü ïåðâûìú áëûìú

öâòîìú ðàäîñòíîé âåñíû.

 

Brandt – Notendruck (2 Abweichungen)                                                             Mazatsumi

Âåñíà ïðèøëà. Èàú òðåùèíú ëåäÿíîé êîðû çàïðûãàëï, èãðàÿ âú ð÷ê ïííûÿ ñòðóè: îí õîòÿòü áûòü ïåðâûìú áëûìú öâòîìú ðàäîñòíîé âåñíû.

 

Delage

Avril paraît. Brisant la glace de leur écorce bondissent joyeux dans le ruisselet des flots écumeux: Ils veulent être les premières fleurs blanches du joyeux Printemps.

 

Burness

The Spring has come! Though those chinks of prisoning ice the white floes drift. Foamy flakes that sport and play in the stream. How glad they pass, first flowers that tidings bear that Spring is coming.

 

Roth

Kommt der Frühling, ja, dann bricht vom starren Eis eine Scholle, spielend treibt sie auf den wilden Wassern, eine erste Frühlingsblüte, weiß und schön, zu grüßen den Lenz.

 

III. Tsaraiuki

Florenz S. 142 (Tsurayuki)

Der Kirsche Blüten                                                         5

Scheinen erblüht zu sein,                                               7

Denn aus den Gründen                                                  5

Zwischen den Bergen werden                                         7

Weiße Wolken schon sichtbar.                                       7                                              (I, 59.)

 

Bethge S. 59

jubel.

Was seh ich Helles dort? Aus allen Gründen

Zwischen den Bergen quellen weiße Wolken

Verlockend auf, – die Kirschen sind erblüht!

Der Frühling ist gekommen, wunderbar!

 

Brandt – Original S. 58                                                                                     Òñóðàéóêè

            ×òî ýòî áëîå âäàëè? Ïîâñþäó, ñëîâíî

îáëàêà ìåæäó õîëìàìè.

            Òî âèøíè ðàñöâëè; ïðèøëà æåëàííàÿ

âåñíà.

 

Brandt – Notentext (3 Fehler)                                                                                        Tsaraiuki

            ×òî ýòî áëîå âäàëè! Ïîâñþäó, ñëîâíî îáëàêà ìåæäó õîëìàìè. Òî âèøíè ðàçöâëè; ïðèøëà æåëàííàÿ âåñíà.

 

Delage

Qu’aperçoit on si blanc au loin? On dirait partout des nuages entre les collines: les cerisiers épanouis fêtent enfin l’arrivée du Printemps.

 

Burness

What shimmers so white faraway? Thou would’st say ’twas nought but cloudlet in the midst of hills full blown are the cherries! Thou art come, beloved Spring time.

 

Roth

Siehst du fern den weissen Schimmer? Überall wie helle Wolken leuchtet’s rings im Land. Nein, die Kirschen blühen; sei gesegnet, junger Frühling.

 

Aufbau: Die Japanlieder bilden eine dreiteilige, programmatisch angelegte Klein-Suite für hohe Stimme und Kammerorchester auf japanische Kurzgedichte in strenger Syllabik mit Dichter-Vornamen als Titelüberschriften (I Akahito = Moderato 13 Takte mit 4 b; II Mazatsumi = Vivo 16 Takte vorzeichenlos, Largamento assai. In tempo = 17 Takte vorzeichenlos; III Tsaraiuki [richtig eigentlich: Tsurayuki] = Tranquillo 25 Takte einschließlich nicht ausgeglichenem Achtel-Auftakt vorzeichenlos). Die Metronomangaben wurden erst für die Ausgaben nach 1955 eingefügt. Auf die in der französischen Übersetzung in einigen wenigen Fällen auftretende Silbenerweiterung nimmt Strawinsky durch zusätzliche, klein gedruckte und nur für eine Aufführung in französische Sprache gedachte Singnoten Rücksicht.

 

Aufriß

I

Akahito

            (13 Takte Vorzeichen 4b)

ß áëûå öâòû …

Descendons au jardin …

Meine weißen Blumen …

I have flowers of white.

II

Mazasumi

Vivo {Viertel = 80*}

            (16 Takte vorzeichenlos = Takt 116)

Largamento assai. In tempo

            (17 Takte vorzeichenlos = Takt 1733)

Âåñíà ïðèøëà; …

Avril parait.

Kommt der Frühling, …

The Spring has come!

Moderato {Viertel = 58*}

III

Tsaraiuki

Tranquillo {Achtel = 100*}

            (25 Takte einschließlich nicht ausgeglichenem Achtel-Auftakt vorzeichenlos)

×òî ýòî áëîå âäàëí?˜

Qu-‘aperçoit-on si blanc au loin?

Siehst du fern den weißen Schimmer?

What shimmers so white faraway?

{*} Metronomisierung nicht in den Original-Ausgaben; erst für die Ausgaben nach 1945 eingefügt

 

Errata / Korrekturen

Ausgabe 161 (Erstes Exemplar)

1. ) 1. Lied, S. 4, 1. Takt oberhalb Tempoangabe (Moderato): >MM. Viertel = 58<.

2.) 1. Lied, S. 5, Takt 7, Bratsche: die 2. Note ist richtig f3 statt fes3 zu lesen.

3. ) 2. Lied, S. 12, Takt 2+3 [Gesamt Takte 2122], 2. Violine: das >sino al segno +< vom Taktende 21

            ist an das Taktende von Takt 23 zu verschieben.

4. ) 2. Lied, S. 14, letzter Takt, 2. Violine: vor die Viertelnote c3 soll ein rund geklammertes

            Auflösungszeichen gesetzt werden.

5. ) 2. Lied, S. 15, viertletzter Takt, 2. Violine: vor die untere Note des Zweitonakkordes Viertel a1-c3

            soll ein rund geklammertes Auflösungszeichen gesetzt werden.

6.) 2. Lied, S. 15, drittletzter Takt, 2. Violine: vor die untere Note des 2. Zweitonakkordes Sechzehntel

            a1-e2 soll ein rund geklammertes Auflösungszeichen gesetzt werden.

Ausgabe 161 (Zweites Exemplar)

1.) 2. Lied, S. 8, Takt 3, Klavier Baß: 1. Note violingeschlüsselt e2 soll ein nicht geklammertes Auflösungszeichen erhalten.

2.) 2. Lied, S. 11, seitenoberhalb links: >Viertel = Achtel<.

3.) 2. Lied. S. 11. Takt 2: die erste Septole soll hinter der 5. Note durch ein g2 ergänzt werden, die 3. Note soll ein Auflösungszeichen erhalten, und die (jetzt) 7. Note ein Vorzeichen, dessen Bleistifteintragung als Kreuz wie als Auflöser gelesen werden kann.

 

4.) 2. Lied, S. 15, vorletzter Takt, Diskant: statt Viertelpause-Viertelpause-Achtelpause-Achtel-Viertonakkord soll es (vermutlich) Achtelpause-Achtel(g2)- Achtel(g2)- Achtel(g2)-Achtelpause-Achtelviertonakkord heißen

13/161

  1.) Innentitelei: >Chamber Orchestra< ist durchgestrichen und mit Bleistift durch >9

            instruments< [>and Chamber Orchestra<] ersetzt.

  2.) 2. Lied, S. 5, 1. Takt, Sopran: die taktletzte Achtelligatur ist statt falsch ais1-b1 richtig ais1-h1 [mit

            Auflöser] zu lesen.

  3.) S. 6 neben Ziffer C steht >in 12<.

  4.) S. 18, 1. Takt = drittletzter Takt: in der Flötenstimme ist am Taktende statt falsch Viertelpause

            richtig Sechzehntel e2 — punktierte Achtelpause zu lesen; in der Violinstimme II der zweite

            Zweitonakkord statt falsch Sechzehntel ais1[geklammertes Kreuzchen]-e2 richtig Sechzehntel

            ais1[geklammertes Kreuzchen]-eis2 [mit geklammertem Kreuzchen] zu lesen.

 

Stilistik: Die Lieder zeigen eine knappe und klangfarbenprächtige Faktur von großer Eigenwilligkeit. Für die Gesangsstimme verwendete Strawinsky nur akzentfreie Achtel– und Viertelwerte, so daß die ohnehin vom Text gelöste Stimme frei im Raum zu schweben scheint. Jedes der Stücke verdeutlicht durch Stimmung, Strukturierung und Instrumentierung die im Gedicht genannte Jahreszeit. In einer Selbsterläuterung aus erheblich späterer Zeit protokollierte Strawinsky rückschauend, ihm sei damals aufgefallen, daß die Gedichte in ähnlicher Weise auf ihn wirkten wie die Kunst des japanischen Holzschnitts. Die Art, wie man in der japanischen Graphik die Probleme der Perspektive und der körperlichen Darstellung gelöst habe, hätte ihn gereizt, etwas Ähnliches für die Musik zu erfinden. Der russische Text sei seinem Vorhaben entgegengekommen, und sein Ziel habe er durch metrische und rhythmische Mittel erreicht, die er, weil zu kompliziert, nicht näher erklären mochte. Dazu paßt die Technik der japanischen Lieder, die Singstimme im Gegensatz zu den Begleitstimmen isometrisch zu gestalten, um eine Zweiflächigkeit zu erreichen, und dann die Singstimmenakzentuierung der Instrumentalstimmenakzentuierung vorauslaufen zu lassen, weil dieses Verfahren die Flächen zusätzlich gegeneinander verschiebt. Auf diese Weise entsteht in der Tat eine Raumkonzeption, deren Herstellungsweise aber von Takt zu Takt verschieden ist, von Takt zu Takt neu erläutert werden müßte und sich daher tatsächlich einer kurzen Darstellung entzieht. Schon Derschanowsky hatte am 10. Juni 1913 kurz nach Erhalt der Noten eindringlich nachgefragt, weil er in den Liedern keine Korrespondenz zwischen Musik– und Text-Struktur erkannte und man ohne Erläuterung die Stücke nicht nach ihrer gebührenden Eigenheit werde aufführen können. Strawinsky, der damals typhuskrank im Sanatorium Villa Borghese in Paris lag, antwortete postwendend, und Derschanowsky bedankte sich bereits am 11. Juli und äußerte sich zur Antwort, die er, als zu theoretisch, offensichtlich immer noch nicht ganz verstanden hatte, am 24. Juli. Immerhin hatte er jetzt etwas in der Hand und konnte selbst Antworten geben. – Für einen Großteil der Strawinsky-Forschung gilt die Beeinflussung der Japan-Lieder durch Schönberg, insbesondere durch dessen Melodramenzyklus dreimal sieben gedichte nach albert giraud’s pierrot lunaire, dessen dritte Berliner Aufführung Strawinsky 1912 gehört hatte, für selbstverständlich. Es war nicht die satirische Zurüstung dieser von der Kabarettistin Albertine Zehme angeregten und in einem Kabarett uraufgeführten Komposition mit der Absicht, den schweren pathetischen Tragödienstil der deutschen Schaubühne zu parodieren, was Strawinsky beeindruckte, sondern Schönbergs Versuch, einmal über die singsprechend nicht singende Sprechstimme an Grenzklänge zu gelangen, zum anderen eine tonalitätsfreie Komposition von Musik zu schaffen, wie sie Strawinsky noch nie in solcher Konsequenz gehört hatte, und schließlich die gemeinsame jugendstilistische Herkunft einer neu entdeckten Linearität ohne harmonisch-funktionale Begrenzung. Diese Linearität wurde in den Japanliedern und im letzten Akt von le rossignol verwertet, gleich danach aber schon mit den rotierenden Kombinationsklängen im Stile von les noces wieder abgestoßen. Möglicherweise ging es auch um die Anregung, sich im Zeitalter der Mammutorchester mit einem klein besetzten Kammerorchester auszudrücken. Um Exotik ging es nie. Die Chinoiserie und was damit zusammenhing kannte Strawinsky vermutlich besser als Schönberg, der sich damit nie abgegeben hatte. Als Strawinsky Schönberg in Berlin hörte, hatte er Feuervogel und Petruschka und den ersten Akt der Oper Die Nachtigall schon komponiert. Die Verbindung zwischen Strawinsky und Delage beruhte nicht zuletzt auf Asienkenntnissen, wie sie nachher erst wieder Benois mitbrachte, als er Le Rossignol inszenierte. Delage und von ihm beeinflußt Strawinsky hatten sich Arbeitszimmer geschaffen, deren sich ein Direktor eines Museums für Ostasien nicht hätte zu schämen brauchen. Daß sich bei der kammermusikalischen Besetzung beider Werke gewollt oder ungewollt Anklänge einstellen können, ist dabei selbstverständlich; daß möglicherweise die Wahl der Instrumente nachgewirkt hat, ebenfalls. Durch die polemische Auseinandersetzung nach 1923 hielt Strawinsky weiteren Schönbergeinfluß bewußt von sich fern und gab den Widerstand erst nach Schönbergs Tod auf. –

Die Suite geht von der Winterstille aus (1. Lied: Moderato) und führt über die Turbulenzen der Wintervertreibung (2. Lied: Vivo) in den Frieden des Frühlings (3. Lied: Tranquillo). –

Das erste Lied aus 13 Takten ist mit nur 30 Silben, die sich auf 5 Zeilen verteilen (1: 6 Silben; 2: 10 Silben; 3: 4 Silben; 4: 6 Silben; 5: 4 Silben), das kürzeste der Suite. Der vorgezeichnete Dreiviertel-Takt bleibt als Synonym der winterlichen Starre unverändert. Auch innerhalb der Takte gibt es keine rhythmischen Differenzierungen. Die Instrumentalstimmen treten gleichmäßig-formelhaft begleitend und gleichzeitig textverdichtend auf, indem sie nach und nach eine Tutti-Mixtur aufbauen, aber doch für jeden Takt eine andere Kombination suchen, die sich tabellarisch darstellen läßt. Takt 1: große Flöte, 1. Klarinette; Takt 24: große Flöte, 1. Klarinette, Singstimme; Takt 5: große Flöte, 2 Klarinetten, Singstimme; Takt 6: große Flöte, 2 Klarinetten, Klavier (Diskantregister); Takt 7: große Flöte, Klavier (Diskantregister), 2 Violinen, Bratsche; Takt 8: Piccolo-Flöte, große Flöte, 2 Klarinetten, Klavier, Streicher-Tutti; Takt 9: Singstimme, Instrumental-Tutti; Takt 10: Tutti ohne Singstimme; Takt 11: Piccolo, große Flöte, Klavier (Diskantregister), Singstimme, Streicher; Takt 12: Singstimme, Instrumental-Tutti; Takt 13: Singstimme, 1. Klarinette, Klavier (Diskantregister). Takt 1 bis 6 besteht ausschließlich einiger Vorschläge nur aus Achtelnoten; ab Takt 7 kommen einige Einzel-Viertelnoten in Klavier und Streichern hinzu, in Takt 10 und 12 insgesamt 4 Sechzehntel-Noten in den Streichern. Der ständige Farbwandel wird außer durch die Instrumentenkombination durch Akzentuierung und bei den Streichern durch Wechsel von Pizzicato-, Bogen– und Flageolett-Spiel erreicht. Die Singstimme, deren Metrik der Silbenmetrik des Gedichts entspricht, weicht nur ein einzigesmal in Takt 12 vom Achtelnoten-Muster ab, das gleichzeitig das Muster der anderen Stimmen bestimmt. Die Mittellage der Singstimme wird nur für die ersten beiden Zeilen benutzt, die von der Absicht des Erzählers künden, seine Blumen zeigen zu wollen. Sobald das Gedicht vom Schnee handelt, geht die Singstimme in die Oberlage. Die Melodie kreist um den Zentralton es2, erzeugt ein ständiges glitzerndes Fluktuieren zwischen As-Dur und as-moll und wird von verminderten Quinten und kleinen Terzen bestimmt. Die Orchesterbehandlung geht von komplementären Einsätzen aus, die wie Punkte in einem Muster von durchbrochener Rhythmik erscheinen und auch visuell das Notenbild überziehen. Mit ihren Staccato– und Pizzicato-Tönen und den hellen Vorschlägen, die nachher vom Klavier übernommen werden, erscheinen sie wie Schneeflocken, die vom Himmel herabsinken. –

Das zweite Lied gliedert sich in sechs Textabschnitte, wobei das wilde Treiben der Eisscholle wie im Akahito-Lied unregelmäßig gehalten wird (1: 4 Silben; 2: 12 Silben; 3: 10 Silben; 4: 8 Silben; 5: 3 Silben; 6: 5 Silben). Die 33 Takte, vorwiegend in langen Zweiunddreißigstel-Passagen in einem großen Tonraum auskomponiert, wirken äußerst lebhaft, und der häufige Wechsel verschiedener Taktarten (Dreiachtel-, Zweiviertel-, Fünfachtel– und Dreiviertel-Metrum), die vielfältigen Instrumentalkombinationen und Spielarten vom Stegspielen über Flageolettglissandi bis zur Flatterzunge unterstützen diesen Eindruck. Dabei erzeugt Strawinsky, anders als im Akahito-Lied, einen betont starken Kontrast zwischen der Rhythmusführung der Singstimme und der der Begleitstimmen. Die Gesangsstimme ist wie im ersten Lied in gleichmäßige Achtel– und Viertelwerte unterteilt, die in keinem Fall die Silbenmetrik unterbrechen. Die Begleitstimmen dagegen erregen durch lange Wellenläufe und irreguläre Rhythmen die gewollten Turbulenzen. Dabei entfallen von den 33 Takten allein 16 Takte auf das instrumentale Vorspiel, das wie eine Ouvertüre wirkt, zweimal 2 Takte auf die Zwischenspiele, und ein Takt auf das Nachspiel. Den Text vertonte Strawinsky in drei durch die beiden Zwischenspiele getrennten Sinn-Abschnitten (Zeile 1: Takt 17; Zeile 2: Takt 2024; Zeile 3: Takt 2526; Zeile 4: Takt 2930; Zeile 5: Takt 31; Zeile 6: Takt 32): Frühlingserwarten (Zeile 1), brechende und treibende Eisschollen (Zeile 23), Frühlingsgruß (Zeile 46). Dabei wirkt die erste Textzeile vom Kommen des Frühlings wie ein Motto, nach dem der instrumentale Jubel ausbricht, die letzte wie eine begütigende Zusicherung, hinter der ein sanfter hoher Abschlußakkord steht. Auch in der Singstimme sind alle Motive, die mit dem Frühling zu tun haben, durch Verlagerung in das hohe Vokalregister charakterisiert. Ausgenommen die Motto-Zeile, die diatonisch fanfarenartig erklingt, besteht die Motivbildung aus einer diatonisch-chromatischen Mischung. Die Melodie ist auf eine Sekund-Terz-Folge zurückgenommen. Die sich einschleichende Monotonie der Tonmodelle mit ihren sich ständig drehenden Einzeltonpermutationen entspricht der Einförmigkeit der strömenden Wasser und der in ihnen kreisenden Eisschollen. Zwischen dem vom Sopran vorgetragenen Text und der Begleitstimmenmusik besteht eine zeilenbezogene Verbindung: Homophonie, dichte Harmonik und vorwiegend hohe Lage beim Frühlingsmotto (Zeile 1); zunächst homophone Transparenz, dann bewegte Begleitung in hoher Lage beim Schollenbruch (Zeile 2); dichte, bewegte und bunte Instrumentation für das Wasserspiel (Zeile 3); noch dichterer Streichersatz in allen Lagen beim Erscheinen der ersten Frühlingsblüte (Zeile 4); durchbrochene Thematik vom obersten Register an abwärts in Richtung D bei der Blütenbeschreibung (Zeile 5); nur noch ausgehaltener Orgelpunkt auf D im Klavierbaßregister wie eine Unterstreichung der Frühlingsbegrüßung (Zeile 6), und abschließend ein nicht arpeggierter Sforzato-Klavierakkordschlag und ein fermatierter Instrumentalakkord im dreifachen piano ohne Klavier. –

Auch im dritten Lied folgt Strawinsky dem vorgegebenen Silbenschema (Zeile 1: 8 Silben = Takt 57; Zeile 2: 13 Silben = Takt 1013; Zeile 3: 6 Silben = Takt 1516; Zeile 4: 8 Silben = Takt 1719). Strawinsky komponiert in drei Sinnabschnitten. Der erste besteht aus der Frage, ob man den weißen Schimmer sehe; der zweite bezieht sich auf die leuchtenden Wolken; der dritte erkennt die Wolken als Kirschblüten, durch die sich der Frühling angezeigt hat. Wieder werden die Sinnabschnitte durch instrumentale Zwischenspiele getrennt (Takt 89 und 1314), und auch dieses Gedicht erhält ein Vorspiel (Takt 14) und ein Nachspiel (Takt 2025). Die Sopranmotivik ist formelhaft, in den ersten beiden Sinnabschnitten diatonisch in Mittellage, im dritten Sinnabschnitt diatonisch-chromatisch gemischt in hoher Lage. Die beiden ersten Sinnabschnitte sind so vertont, daß sie auf den dritten als Höhepunkt vorverweisen. Im dritten Abschnitt verzichtet Strawinsky bei dichtem Streichersatz auf Polyphonie und kanonische Wendungen. Das letzte Textwort Frühling wird von der Singstimme ohne Begleitung vorgetragen und erhält dadurch höchstes Gewicht. Anschließend setzt das Nachspiel ein, das sich très lointain naturidyllisch bis zur Nonole und dem offenen Oktav-Quint-Quart-Klang des letzten Taktes gibt. Den letzten Akkord aus his2-c1-eis1 im dreifachen piano bilden Piccolo, 1. Klarinette und Violine, mit dem die Suite wie in die Unendlichkeit hinein verrinnt.

 

Widmung: I: A Maurice Delage — {To Maurice Delage*} [Für Maurice Delage]; II: A Florent Schmitt — {To Florent Schmitt*} [Für Florent Schmitt]; III: A Maurice Ravel — {To Maurice Ravel*} [Für Maurice Ravel]

{*} nur im englischen Neudruck; ohne französische Fassung.

 

Dauer: 048″, 057″, 122″.

 

Entstehungszeit: Klaviertranskription: I: Ustilug 6. bis 19. Oktober 1912; II: Clarens 5. bis 18. Dezember 1912; III.: Clarens 9. bis 22. Januar 1913; Kammerorchesterfassung: I: Clarens 16. bis 29. Dezember 1912; II: Clarens 8. bis 21. Dezember 1912; III.: Clarens 9. bis 22. Januar 1913.

 

Uraufführung: am 14. Januar 1914 in der Pariser Salle Erard durch die Sopranistin Galina Nikitina vom St. Petersburger Marien-Theater und einem Instrumentalensemble (Pierre Lucas, Spathy, Merckel, Bigot, Audisio, Jeoffroy, Pascal, Speyer, Dauwe, Baton, Madame Ellie) unter der Leitung von Desiré Inghelbrecht. Die Voreinstudierung am Klavier besorgte Maurice Delage. – Das Uraufführungskonzert war eine Veranstaltung der Société Musicale Indépendante, einer unter anderen von Maurice Ravel und Charles Koechlin begründeten Musikgesellschaft mit Gabriel Fauré als Ehrenpräsidenten. Im selben Konzert sang Jane Bathori die Uraufführung von Ravels Trois Poèsies de Stéphen Mallarmé. Das Konzert wurde mit dem ersten Klavierquartett von Gabriel Fauré eröffnet, dessen Klavierpart Alfredo Casella spielte. An Casella wiederum hatte Struve, der Direktor des Russischen Musikverlages, am 9. Januar Partitur und Stimmen der Strawinskyschen Lieder abgeschickt, über deren Einstudierung Maurice Delage an Strawinsky berichtete. Außerdem kamen die vierhändige Klavier-Suite Une semaine du petit elfe, Ferme-l’Oeil von Florent Schmitt und die von Ricardo Viñes vorgetragene Komposition Chapitres tournés en tous sens von Erik Satie zur Aufführung. Obwohl von Delage dringend erwartet, konnte Strawinsky nicht zur Uraufführung nach Paris reisen, weil er in Lausanne bei seiner Frau weilte, die in der Klinik Mont-Riant in der Avenue de la Gare am 15. Januar 1914 ihr jüngstes Kind Mila zur Welt brachte.

 

Bemerkungen: Im Sommer 1912 hatte Strawinsky die von A. Brandt aus dem Deutschen in das Russische übertragene Ausgabe japanischer Lyrik gelesen, die er weder in den Lebenserinnerungen noch in den verschiedenen Gesprächen näher kennzeichnete. Noch während der Endorchestrierung von sacre nahm Strawinsky im Oktober 1912 in einer Ballett-Kompositionspause die Arbeit an den Japanliedern auf. – An der Verfahrenstechnik der russischen Erstaufführung übte Struve deutliche Kritik, wie sein Brief an Strawinsky vom 28. Februar 1914 aus Berlin zeigt. Derschanowsky hatte die Stimmen statt ordnungsgemäß beim Verlag zu kaufen oder auszuleihen aus der Partitur ausgezogen. Struve fand das nicht in Ordnung und klärte aus diesem Grund Strawinsky über die katastrophalen Verkaufszahlen seines neuen Stückes auf. – Die französische Uraufführung blieb ohne nennenswerte Wirkung, auch wenn sich Maurice Delage hell begeistert und über die Zueignung hoch erfreut zeigte und sich im Januar 1913 eigens für das ihm gewidmete Stück einen passenden Rahmen kaufte, wie er Strawinsky mit Brief vom 20. Januar mitteilte; im Gegenteil, der ohnehin spärliche Verkaufserfolg verringerte sich jetzt, da man die Stücke gehört hatte, zur Nullgrenze hin. In St. Petersburg machte das erste Lied das Publikum sprachlos, während die Lieder zwei und drei wiederholt werden mußten. Unter Hintergedanken klärte Struve Strawinsky über die Verkaufslage auf: zwischen Mai 1913 und Februar 1914 wurden in England 8, in Frankreich 12 Exemplare verkauft, und nach der Pariser Uraufführung kein einziges mehr. Unter diesen Umständen lehnte Struve mit Brief vom 28. Februar 1914 eine von Evans angebotene englische Übersetzung ab, weil man sie bei dieser Verkaufslage nicht brauche. – Desgleichen sind Vermutungen darüber angestellt worden, ob die Urfassung der Japanlieder für Klavier oder für Orchester gedacht war. Da Strawinsky mit einer Klavierfassung begann, dann aber mit beiden Fassungen gleichzeitig aufhörte, kamen einige Biographen zu dem Schluß, er habe ursprünglich ein Klavierwerk geplant und sich während der Arbeit dann umentschlossen. Wie alle Thesen, für die es keine mittel– oder unmittelbaren Beweise gibt, läßt sich auch diese zunächst weder bestätigen noch widerlegen. Strawinskys Ergographie legt jedoch Tatsachen offen, die einen Analogieschluß auch auf die Japanlieder zulassen. So hat Strawinsky von allen Orchesterwerken Klavierauszüge hergestellt oder herstellen lassen und mit diesen Klavierauszügen in den meisten Fällen vor der Orchesterarbeit begonnen, weil er die Orchestrierung als selbständigen Kompositionsakt in der Regel an einer Klavierfassung vornahm. Sodann hat er Klavierauszüge von Orchesterwerken immer als Klavierauszüge erscheinen lassen, während er dort, wo er von vorne herein mehrere selbständige Fassungen plante, bei der Veröffentlichung nie von Klavierauszug sprach. Die Klavierfassung der Japanlieder nun ist ausdrücklich als Klavierauszug und zwar als Transkription einer Orchesterfassung (Transcription pour chant et piano) schon 1914 veröffentlicht worden.

 

Fassungen: Die Orchesterpartitur erschien 1913 in einem Querformat. Sie war laut London-Stempel spätestens am 1. August käuflich. Der im Innentitel des Klavierauszuges richtig geschriebene Übersetzer-Name wurde im Außentitel als Delace verdruckt, während man den Widmungsnamen Delage, weil faksimiliert-handschriftlich, richtig schrieb. Der ebenfalls 1913 gedruckte und von Strawinsky selbst angefertigte Klavierauszug der Japan-Lieder zählt zu den seltensten Ausgaben der Werke Strawinskys überhaupt. Die Folgeauflage von 1922 verbesserte den Namensfehler und ergänzte den russisch-französischen Singtext mit der englischen Übersetzung von Burness. Sie war, wie die Unterlagen der Bibliothek des Britischen Museums beweisen, spätestens ab dem 13. August käuflich. Die Erstdrucke enthalten zwischen Partitur (Partition) und Klavierauszug (Transcription pour chant et piano par l’auteur) eine nicht mit einer Preisangabe Mark-Rubel ausgefüllte Bestellreihe Orchesterstimmen (Parties). Im allgemeinen wurden damals schneller als in späterer Zeit Orchesterstimmen käuflich angeboten. Daß man die Leiste offen ließ, könnte darauf schließen lassen, daß man sie füllen wollte, aber davon durch den unerwarteten Mißerfolg und den kurz darauf ausbrechenden Weltkrieg abgehalten wurde. Da niemand die Stücke aufzuführen gedachte, lohnte sich ein Stimmendruck auch nicht. Seit 1922 lagen die Lieder aber als Partitur, als Klavierauszug und als selbständige Stimme vor. Der Verkauf war nicht nennenswert. Zwischen 1922 und 1938 setzte der Verlag mit sinkenden Verkaufszahlen ab 1933 unter 100 Partituren, um die 650 Klavierauszüge und nicht einmal 40 Stimmen ab. Der Hauptanteil an Klavierauszugsabgängen lag mit 237 Exemplaren in den Jahren 1925 und 1926. Boosey & Hawkes druckte den Klavierauszug gleich nach den Verhandlungen mit Strawinsky als eine der frühesten Neuerwerbungen nach. Ein Belegexemplar hat sich in London nicht nachweisen lassen, doch gelangte 1955 ein Exemplar in die Münchner Musikbibliothek (>95/104025<). Offensichtlich wurde nur der Klavierauszug, nicht aber die Orchesterpartitur gedruckt, die auch nicht in der zur Klavierausgabe gehörenden Werbung erscheint. Nach dem Übergang in den Verlag Boosey & Hawkes (Vertragsschluß: 11. Mai 1955) wurden die Lieder im Rahmen eines Arrangements zusammen mit den beiden balmont-liedern zu einer einzigen Ausgabe verbunden, was deshalb möglich war, weil Strawinsky für die von ihm nachträglich angefertigte Orchestrierung der Balmont-Lieder auch aus aufführungspraktischen Gründen dieselbe Besetzung wie die für die japanischen Lieder gewählt hatte. Der Druckvorgang der Orchester-Ausgabe war im Januar 1955 abgeschlossen. Die Stimmensätze blieben leihweise erhältlich. Die neue Klavierfassung erschien 1956.

 

Fassungsvergleich: Veränderungen gegenüber der Originalfassung gab es nur für den metronomischen, den orthographischen, den sprachlichen, den aufführungspraktischen, den rechtlichen und den Titel-Bereich, darüber hinaus blieb die kompositorische Struktur unverändert. Strawinsky definierte jetzt die Länge der Stücke über zugegebene Metronomzahlen und schrieb die Singnoten nicht mehr als Einzelachtel mit Fähnchen, sondern bündelte sie unter durchgehende Balken. Desweiteren entschied er sich für eine andere Partituranordnung, indem er die Singstimme, die ursprünglich das erste Notensystem besetzte, zwischen Klavier und Streicher einstellte. Neu war die Rückübersetzung in die deutsche Sprache, in die sich Strawinsky nicht einschaltete. Wohl meldete er Bedenken gegen zu viele Sprachzeilen unterhalb einer Notenzeile an und veranlaßte deshalb den Verlag mit Schreiben an Ernst Roth vom 14. September 1954, unter anderem auch über eine neue äußere Gestaltung nachzudenken. Strawinsky schrieb, ihm seien schon drei Sprachzeilen unter einem Notensystem zu viel, weil die dritte Sprachzeile zu weit von den Notenlinien entfernt zu stehen komme. Der Neudruck bringt dann die Sopran-Stimme zweimal und schreibt unter die erste Stimme den russischen und den französischen, unter die identische zweite Stimme den englischen und den deutschen Singtext. Notwendig war auch eine neue Haupttitelei, die auf Strawinskys Wünsche zurückgeht: Two Poems & Three Japanese Lyrics sollte der Arrangement-Ausgabe ohne weitere Übersetzung voranstehen, dann aber sollten die ersten Seiten der balmont-lieder und der japanischen Lieder den alten Haupttitel nebst Übersetzung und Namensnennung aller Übersetzer tragen. Die Partitur-Ausgabe erschien 1955 in dieser Form unter der gemeinsamen Platten-Nummer B. & H. 17701 mit leicht ergänzter Außentitelei nach damaligem Druckbild der Außentitelei im Minuskel-Druck und mit w-Schreibung des Namens Strawinsky. Der zugehörige Klavierauszug von 1956 kam unter der ebenfalls gemeinsamen Platten-Nummer B. & H. 18105 heraus.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: Hollywood 15. Februar 1955 mit der Sopranistin Marni Nixon und einem unbenannten Kammerorchester unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky in der Fassung von 1954 in englischer Singsprache; Hollywood 10. Juni 1968 mit der Sopranistin Evelyn Lear und Mitgliedern des Columbia Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Robert Craft in russischer Singsprache

 

CD-Edition: VIII-2/810 Aufnahme 1968

 

Autograph: Klavier– und Orchester-Autograph befanden sich bei Boosey & Hawkes in London und lagern heute in der British Library.

 

Copyright: Kein Erstdruck aus dem Russischen Musikverlag trägt eine Copyright-Markierung; 1947 Rechte-Übertragung an Boosey & Hawkes; 1955 Copyright für Arrangement durch Boosey & Hawkes New York

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

161 1913 P; r-f; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 19 S.; R. M. V. 200.

            161[14] ebd.

                        161[14]-Straw1 ibd. [mit Eintragungen]

 

                        161[14]-Straw2 ibd. [mit Eintragungen]

 

162 1913 KlA; r-f; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 10 S.; R. M. V. 199.

163 (1922) KlA; r-f-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 10 S.; R. M. V. 199.

164St [1922] [nicht identifiziert].

165 [1948] KlA; r-f-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 10 S.; R. M. V. 199.

116Alb 1968 Ges.-Kl.; r-f; Musika Moskau; 5 S.; 5823.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

161 IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE. / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE. / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE“, BERLIN, MOSCOU, ST.PÉTERSBOURG. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / POUR / CHANT (SOPRANO), DEUX FLÛTES (la 2 de = fl.), DEUX CLARINETTES / (la 2de = cl.bas), PIANO, DEUX VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE. / TEXTE FRANÇAIS DE MAURICE DELACE* / PARTITION** PR. M. 3.– R. 1.40*** / PARTIES** / TRANSCRIPTION POUR CHANT / ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR** PR. M. 1.50 R. _70*** / DROIT D’EXECUTION RÉSERVÉ. / ÑÎÁÑÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] 1913 [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#]**** ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#]**** (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*****) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#]**** BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES  BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /****** MAX ESCHIG PARIS // (Partitur fadengeheftet 26,5 x 21,8 quer (8° obl. [quer 8°]); Vertonungstext russisch-französisch; 19 [16] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelgrau auf cremeweiß gemasert [Außentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 3 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, Leerseite, Gedichttexte russisch-französisch mit Übersetzernennung >Ðóññê³é òåêñòú À. Áðàíäòà.< # >Texte français de Maurice Delage.<] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; unpunktiert römische Stücknumerierung mittenzentriert neben linksbündigem Liedtitel als Kopftitel; Widmungen oberhalb römischer Stücknumerierung mittenzentriert handschriftlich in Strichätzung S. 4 >A Maurice Delage< S. 6 >A Florent Schmitt< S. 16 >A Maurice Ravel<; anstelle Kopftitel numerierte Stücktitel; Autorenangabe [nur] 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 4 neben linksbündigem Stücktitel rechtsbündig nicht zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Édition Russe de Musique Berlin, Moscou St.-Pétersbourg< rechtsbündig >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 200<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 18 rechtsbündig >Clarens 1913.<) // (1913)

* Namensschreibfehler original

** Distanzpunkte

*** Rubelangabe unter Markangabe gedruckt

**** dreizeilige Vignette 0,9 x 1 Mann auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung

***** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt

****** Schrägstrich original

 

161[14] IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE. / [+] / PARTITION  D’ORCHESTRE. / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE“, BERLIN, MOSCOU, ST.PÉTERSBOURG. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / TROIS / POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISEPOUR / CHANT (SOPRANO), DEUX FLÛTES (la 2 de = fl.°°), DEUX CLARINETTES / (la 2de = cl.bas), PIANO, DEUX VIOLONS, ALTO ET VIOLONCELLE. / TEXTE FRANÇAIS DE MAURICE DELACE* / PARTITION** PR. M. 3.– R. 1.40*** / PARTIES** / TRANSCRIPTION POUR CHANT / ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR** PR. M. 1.50 R. _70*** / [°] / DROIT D’EXECUTION RÉSERVÉ. / ÑÎÁÑÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#]**** ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#]**** (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*****) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#]**** BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES  BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /****** MAX ESCHIG PARIS // (Partitur nachgeheftet 26,7 x 22 quer (8° obl. [quer 8°]); Vertonungstext russisch-französisch; 19 [16] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelgrau auf beigegrau gemasert [Außentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 3 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, Leerseite, Singtexte russisch-französisch mit Übersetzernennung >Ðóññê³é òåêñòú À. Áðàíäòà.< # >Texte français de Maurice Delage.<] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; unpunktiert römische Stücknumerierung mittenzentriert neben linksbündigem Liedtitel als Kopftitel; Widmungen oberhalb Stücknumerierung mittenzentriert handschriftlich in Strichätzung S. 4 >A Maurice Delage< S. 6 >A Florent Schmitt< S. 16 >A Maurice Ravel<; Autorenangabe [nur] 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 4 neben linksbündigem Stücktitel rechtsbündig links geschlossen >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright [nur] 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Édition Russe de Musique Berlin, Moscou°°° St.-Pétersbourg< rechtsbündig >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 200<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 19 rechtsbündig >Clarens 1913.<) // [1914]

° Im Basler Exemplar >65 / STRAW / 5<, desgleichen im Leipziger Exemplar >8:2483< steht mittig eine Eintragung im Schreibmaschinenschriftdruck >Teuerungszuschlag 100%<.

°° fehlende Instrumentenspezifizierung original.

°°° fehlende Interpunktion original.

* Namensschreibfehler original

** Distanzpunkte

*** Rubelangabe unter Markangabe gedruckt

**** dreizeilige Vignette 0,9 x 1 Mann auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung

***** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt

****** Schrägstrich original

 + Trennstrich 1,8 cm waagerecht.

 

161[14]-Straw1

 

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf dem Außentitel oberhalb Federzierrahmen rechts mit >Igor Strawinsky< gezeichnet, aber nicht datiert. Es enthält Korrekturen.

 

 161[14]-Straw2

Strawinskys zweites Nachlaßexemplar enthält auf dem Außentitel oberhalb Zierfederrahmen links einen mit Schreibmaschine beschrifteten Aufkleber 7,5 x 2,9 >PARTIE du PIANO<, unten rechts >Major temporaire / 200 %<, sowie Bleistiftkorrekturen und zahlreiche aufführungspraktisch-spieltechnische Einträge.

162 ÐÎÑѯÉÑÊÎÅ ÌÓ [#*] RUSSISCHER / ÇÛÊÀËÜÍÎÅ ÍÇ [#*] — MUSIK — / ÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÎ · [#*] VERLAG. G.M.B.H.** / ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊIÉ [#*] IGOR STRAWINSKY / ÒÐÈ [#]* TROIS / ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß ÈÇÚ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ [#]* POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE / ËÈÐÈÊÈ [#]* JAPONAISE / Òðàíñêðèïö³ÿ äëà ãîëîñà è ô.­ï. [#*] Transcription pour chant et piano. / [+] /ÁÅÐËÈÍÚ  ÌÎÑÊÂÀ [#] Berlin  Moskau / Ñ · ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#] St. Petersburg // ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊ²É [#]* IGOR STRAWINSKY / ÒÐÈ [#°] TROIS / ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß ÈÇÚ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ [#°] POÈSIES DE LA LYRIQUE / ËÈÐÈÊÈ [#°] JAPONAISE / äëÿ [#°] pour / Ãîëîñà [ñîïðàíî], äâóõú ôëåéòú*** [#°] chant (soprano), deux flûtes / [2àÿ­ìàë.ôë.], äâóõú êëàðíåòîâú*** [#°] la 2de–pet.fl.), deux clarinettes / [2îé­Áàñ­êë.], ô­ï³àíî, äâóõú ñêðèïîêú,*** [#°] (la 2 de–cl.bas.), piano, deux violons, / àëüòà è â³îëîí÷åëè. [#°] alto et violoncelle. / Òðàíñêðèïö³ÿ [#°] Transcription / äëà ãîëîñà è ô­ï³àíî àâòîðà. [#°] pour chant et piano par l’auteur. / Ðóññê³é*** òåêñòú À. ÁÐÀÍÄÒÀ. [#°] Texte français de MAURICE DELAGE. / Pr.°° M.1.50 / r._70 / [Trenn-Querstrich] / DROIT D’ÉXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉ. / ÑÎÁÑÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] 1913 [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#****] ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#****] (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*****) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#****] BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES  BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /°°° MAX ESCHIG PARIS // (Klavierauszug Gesang-Klavier [nachgeheftet] 26,7 x 33,6 (2° [4°]); Singtexte russisch-französisch; 10 [6] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag mittelgrau auf hellgrau [Außentitelei im Federrahmen 20 x 14,3 mit stilisierter russischer Zierschrift und französischer Normalschrift, 3 Leerseiten] + 4 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei mit Trenn-Querstrich 10,5 und Trennvignette 1,7 x 1,8 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung, Leerseite, Vertonungstext russisch-französisch, Leerseite]; unpunktierte römische Liednummern mittig mit Stücküberschriften linksbündig als Kopftitel; Widmungen handschriftlich in Strichätzung mittig oberhalb römischer Stücknummern [S. 5:] >A Maurice Delage< [S. 6:] >A Florent Schmitt< [S. 9:] >A Maurice Ravel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 5 neben und unterhalb römischer Liednummer rechtsbündig Flattersatz >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag Berlin, Moskau, St. Petersburg.< rechtsbündig >Eigentum des Verlags.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 199<; Kompositionsschlußdatierungen [1. Lied S. 5:] >Oustiloug 1912<; [2. Lied S. 8, 3. Lied S. 10:] >Clarens 1913.<); Herstellungshinweis S. 10 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H., Leipzig.<) // (1913)

° senkrecht durchgehender Strich.

°° Mark– und Rubelanzeigen sind untereineinander gesetzt, die Markanzeige ist unterstrichen; die allgemeine Preisanzeige >Pr.< ist mittig vor de Mark-Rubelanzeige angebracht.

°°° Schrägstrich original.

* durchlaufender, nicht angebundener einfacher unverzierter Strich, der den Federrahmenspiegel 20 x 14,3 in zwei deckungsgleiche Spiegelhälften jeweils für den russischen und den französischen Text trennt.

** das verkleinerte M ist in das G, das verkleinert B in den ersten senkrechten Balkenstrich des H eingedruckt.

*** Härtezeichen kursiv.

**** dreizeilige Trennvignette 1,7 x 1,8 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung.

***** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

+ Trennlinie waagerecht 5,9 cm unter der russischen, 5,8 cm unter der französischen Kolumne.

 

163 ÈÃÎÐÜ ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊ²É [#]* IGOR STRAWINSKY / ÒÐÈ [#]* TROIS / ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß ÈÇÚ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ [#]* POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE / ËÈÐÈÊÈ [#]* JAPONAISE / äëÿ [#]* pour / Ãîëîñà [ñîïðàíî], äâóõú ôëåéòú** [#]* chant (soprano), deux flûtes / [2àÿ­ìàë.ôë.], äâóõú êëàðíåòîâú** [#]* la 2de–pet.fl.), deux clarinettes / [2îé­Áàñ­êë.], ô­ï³àíî, äâóõú ñêðèïîêú.*** [#]* (la 2 de–cl.bas.), piano, deux violons, / àëüòà è â³îëîí÷åëè. [#]* alto et violoncelle. / Òðàíñêðèïö³ÿ [#]* Transcription / äëà ãîëîñà è ô­ï³àíî àâòîðà. [#]* pour chant et piano par l’auteur / Ðóññê³é*** òåêñòú À. ÁÐÀÍÄÒÀ. [#]* Texte français de MAURICE DELAGE. / English Text by ROBERT BURNESS. / [langer Querstrich] / [Vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS. / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.****) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN. MOSCOU. LEIPZIG. NEW-YORK. / POUR LA FRANCE ET SES COLONIES: MUSIQUE RUSSE, PARIS, 3 RUE DE MOSCOU. / POUR L’ANGLETERRE ET SES COLONIES: THE RUSSIAN MUSIC AGENCY, LONDRES W. I, 34, PERCY STREET. [*****] // (Klavierauszug Gesang-Klavier [nachgeheftet] 26,5 x 33,6 (2° [4°]); Singtexte russisch-französisch-englisch; 10 [6] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf grauweiß [Außentitelei im Zierfederrahmen mit Vignette 1 x 1,2 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Vertonungstext russisch-französisch-englisch, Leerseite]; anstelle Kopftitel numerierte Stücktitel; Widmungen handschriftlich in Strichätzung oberhalb römischer Stücknumerierungen [S. 5:] >A Maurice Delage< [S. 6:] >A Florent Schmitt< [S. 9:] >A Maurice Ravel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 5 neben Stücknummer rechtsbündig zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Stravinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag Berlin, Moskau.< rechtsbündig >Eigentum des Verlags.<; Platten-Nummern [Text– und Übersetzungsseite:] >R. M. V. 356.< [Notentextseiten:] >R. M. V. 199.356; Kompositionsschlußdatierungen [1. Lied S. 5:] >Oustiloug 1912.<; [2. Lied S. 8, 3. Lied S. 10:] >Clarens 1913.<); Herstellungshinweis S. 10 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H., Leipzig.<) // (1922)

* senkrecht durchgehender Strich.

** Härtezeichen kursiv.

*** russisches i ohne i-Punkt.

**** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

***** Im Münchner Exemplar >2 Mus.pr. 7955< befindet sich unterhalb des Zierfederrahmens ein blauer Stempelaufdruck >In die / UNIVERSAL-EDITION / aufgenommen No 8029<. Die Editionsnummer ist oberhalb einer Linie aus Distanzpunkten zusätzlich eingestempelt.

 

164St [1922] Stimmen-Satz; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin [nicht identifiziert]

 

165 [fehlt] // igor strawinsky / trois poésies / de la lyrique japonaise / chant et piano / soprano / édition russe de musique · boosey & hawkes // (Klavierauszug [nachgeheftet] 26,3 x 32,2 [4°]; Singtext russisch-französisch-englisch; 10 [6] Seiten + [fehlt] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Vertonungstext russisch-englisch-französisch mit Übersetzernennungen + originale Orchesterlegende] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener >Édition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<* Stand >No. 453<], statt Kopftitel Liedtitel in Majuskelschrift oberhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig neben mittiger römischer Stücknummer; Widmungen handschriftlich in Strichätzung oberhalb römischer Stücknummern [S. 5:] >A Maurice Delage< [S. 6:] >A Florent Schmitt< [S. 9:] >A Maurice Ravel<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 5 neben römischer Stücknummer rechtsbündig zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Stravinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer** Musikverlag) / for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Platten-Nummer >B. & Hawkes 16308<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Kompositionsschlußdatierungen S. 5 >Oustiloug 1912.< S. 9 >Clarens 1913.<; Ende-Nummer S. 10 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >H.P.A9297.148<) // [1948]

* editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / LeSacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise  / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original].

Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires angegeben.

** das >h< ist als >n< lesbar, vermutlich nicht Druckfehler, sondern fehlerhafter Buchstabe.

 

166Alb È. ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊÈÉ / ÈÇÁÐÀÍÍÛÅ / ÂÎÊÀËÜÍÛÅ / ÑÎ×ÈÍÅÍÈß / [Vignerte] / · ÌÓÇÛÊÀ · / ÌÎÑÊÂÀ · 1968 / È. ÑÒÐÀÂÈÍÑÊÈÉ / ÈÇÁÐÀÍÍÛÅ / ÂÎÊÀËÜÍÛÅ / ÑÎ×ÈÍÅÍÈß / äëÿ ãîëîñà ñ ôîðòåïèàíî / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀ ÌÎÑÊÂÀ 1968 // (Album 21,7 x 28,8 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 54 [52] Seiten + 4 Seiten Einband Karton [Außentitelei im Zierrahmen mit Lyra-Vignette im oberseitigen Rahmenteil + Vignette an kursiv >M< angelehntem stilisiertem Violinschlüssel, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit Preisangabe oberseits linksbündig russisch >70 ê.<] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei. Leerseite] + 2 Seiten Nachspann unpaginiert [Inhaltsverzeichnis russisch-französisch >ÑÎÄÅÐÆÀÍÈÅ / INDEX<, Impressum russisch >Èíäåêñ 932< mit Namensnennungen >Ðåäàêòîð Í. Áîáàíîâà [#] Ëèòåðàòóðíûé ðåäàêòîð À. Òàðàñîâà / Òåõíè÷åñêèé ðåäàêòîð Å. Êðó÷èíèíà [#] Êîððåêòîð À. Ëàâðåíþê< und aufgeschlüsselten Format– und Herstellungsangaben]; Nachdruck S. 2324 (>I<), S. 2528 (>II<), 2930 (>III<); Liedtitel als unpunktiert römische Ziffern I bis III; Kopftitel [nur] S. 23 russisch-französisch >ÒÐÈ ÑÒÈÕÎÒÂÎÐÅÍIß< [#] >TROIS POÉSIES< / >ÈÇ ßÏÎÍÑÊÎÉ ËÈÐÈÊÈ< [#]>DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE <; Widmungen mittig kursiv S. 23 unterhalb Kopftitel >Ìîðèñó Äåëàæ< [#] >A Maurice Delage< S. 25 oberhalb Autorenangabe >Ôëîðåíòó Øìèòòó< [#] >A Florent Schmitt< S. 29 oberhalb Autorenangabe >Ìîðèñó Ðàâåëþ< [#] >A Maurice Ravel<; Autorenangabe russisch-französisch linksbündig S. 23 zwischen Widmung und Liednummer >I< >Ñëîâà ÀÊÀÕÈÒÎ / Paroles d’AKAHITO / Ðóññêèé òåêñò À. Áðàíäòà / Texte français de M. Delage< S. 25 oberhalb, neben und unterhalb Liednummer >II< >Ñëîâà ÌÀÖÀÑÓÌÈ / Paroles de MAZATSUMI / Ðóññêèé òåêñò À. Áðàíäòà / Texte français de M. Delage< S. 28 zwischen Widmung und Liednummer >III< >Ñëîâà ÑÀÐÀÞÊÈ / Paroles de TSARAIUKI / Ðóññêèé òåêñò À. Áðàíäòà / Texte français de M. Delage<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S.24 >(1912 ã. )< S. 28 >(1913 ã.)< S. 30 >1913 ã.<; Platten-Nummer >5823<; ohne Rechtsschutzvorbehalte und Originalverlegernennung auf den Notentextseiten, ohne Endevermerke) // 1968

 

13/161 ® number 13

 

13/162 ® number 13

 

 

 

 

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM