69

S c è n e s  d e  b a l l e t

for orchestra – Ballett-Szenen für Orchester – Scènes de ballet pour orchestre – Scene di balletto per orchestra

 

Title: Strawinsky stated that he knew nothing of the existence of Glazunov’s composition of the same name. This announcement, which was intended for a publication, suggests a change in title on Strawinsky’s part. From a letter to Gretl Urban of 31st August 1944, it can be seen that the decision of the title was not Strawinsky’s, but was reached in agreement between Winter and Dolin, with whom he was connected. In his known correspondence up to the letter to Urban of 31st August, the title ‘Scènes de ballet’ does not appear once, although the question of the title had already been under consideration since 30th June. When Strawinsky mentions the ballet scenes, he always speaks of his ‘new’ ballet. The question of the title was already a theme in the letter to Urban. Strawinsky reminded her to come to a decision on the title of his new ballet in accordance with the conversation that Hugo Winter had with Anton Dolin as the author of the ballet libretto, and the result of which Winter wanted to advise him on a promise given in a letter on 30th June. Up to then, he had heard nothing on the matter from Winter. This point in the letter suggests that Strawinsky was fairly indifferent to the title and that he had given the decision to Winter as the representative of the publishers and Dolin as the representative of the commissioner; he, in the meantime, was becoming restless because he had already finished his score a week ago and urgently needed the title. This point of view is supported by the fact that the reduced orchestral score in Strawinsky’s estate, from which the neat copy was produced, does not bear a title. Whether the actual title finders, especially Dolin, were copying Glazunov’s work, is a moot question which concerns Strawinsky, and the answer of which would be meaningless if one had to confirm it.

 

Scored for: a) First edition: Piccolo (also Flute II), 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in A (and Bb), Bassoon, 2 Horns in F, 3 Trumpets in C (and Bb), 3 Trombones, Tuba, Timpani, Piano, Violin I, Violin II, Viola, Violoncello, Double Bass; b) Performance requirements: Corps de ballet; Piccolo Flute (= 2nd Flute),2 Flutes (2nd Flute = Piccolo Flute, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets (changing Bb and A), Bassoon, 2 Horns in F, 3 Trumpets (changing C and Bb), 3 Trombones, Tuba, Timpani, Piano, 3 Solo Violins, 4 Solo Violas, 2 Solo Violoncellos, 2 x 4 first and second Tutti Violins, Strings* (1st and 2nd Violins, Violas, Violoncellos, Double Basses)

* All divided in two

 

Libretto: In a letter to Gretl Urban dated 31st August 1944, Strawinsky still named Anton Dolin as the author of the ballet libretto. This was in regard to the title, which Winter and Dolin were attempting to come to an agreement on. Strawinsky later set himself against an attribution that would see Dolin named exclusively as the author of the libretto.

 

Construction: The Ballet Scenes are an eleven-part orchestral piece without numbers which is through-composed, and has figures and metronome markings; there are no pauses between the sections, but there are choreographical suggestions in the titles, Italian markings and, in the printed editions, French-Italian-English multi-lingual names for the instruments. They make up an abstract ballet in a classical style with instructions for the choreography, but without specification for the plot or staging. The idea for it stemmed from the later choreographer, Anton Dolin. In spite of Dolin however, the choreography was Strawinsky’s property in a sense, as he designed ‘the chronology, the character and the proportions of the dance numbers himself, and had the entire choreographical framework of this plotless, “abstract” ballet strongly in mind during the period of composition’. After the raising of the curtain at figure 5, the ballet begins immediately. Four ballerinas are represented by four solo violas. At figure 9, the groups unite, and at figure 40, they distance themselves from each other once again and the solo female dancer enters. The ‘Pantomime’ (figure 54) had been conceived by Strawinsky as group movement synchronised with the music. The dancers should be on stage in different groups, each coordinated with one of the arpeggio figures in the score and should enter the stage from different sides. He conceived the Andantino within it (figure 58) as a solo dance for the ballerina. She should wear a black tutu set with diamond sequins and her partner should wear a classic gilet. Figures 6069 (to the end of figure 68) is again dedicated to the corps de ballet. The trumpet solo in the Pas de deux (figure 69) is given to the male dancer, and the horn to the ballerina. The rippling phrasing at the end of the Allegretto must give the ballerina the opportunity for a pirouette. In the two final bars of this number, the solo dancers leave the stage on opposite sides. The second ‘Pantomime’ (figure 82) serves as an arrangement for the corps de ballet. The subsequent orchestral tutti (figure 89) is for the solo male dancer, the violoncello duet (figure 96) to the solo ballerina. The final ‘Pantomime’ (figure 103) brings the solo dancers together, and the rest of the score (from figure 106) from the jazz-like movement in 3/8 until the 5 bars in 4/8 (figure 118) before the ‘apotheosis’ (figure 119) unites all the performers. Strawinsky imagined the finale as a spinning group tableau of different moving groups, delirando (demoniacally).

 

Structure

Introduction*

            Andante Quaver = 92 (figure 31 up to the end of figure 4 [without interruption attacca unward

To Figure 5])

DANSES / Corps de Ballet (figure 5 [without interruption attacca from figure 43] up to the end of

                        Figure 41)

            Moderate Quaver = 148 (figure 5 up to the end of figure 14)

            Più mosso Crotchet = 112 (figure 15 up to the end of figure 27)

            L’istesso tempo (figure 28 up to the end of figure 32)

            Tempo I. Quaver = 148 (figure 33 up to the end of figure 40)

            Con moto dotted Crotchet = 74 (figure 41 [without interruption onward to figure 42])

VARIATION / Ballerina

            L’istesso tempo dotted Crotchet = 74 (figure 42 [without interruption from figure 41] up to the

end of figure 53 [without interruption attacca onward to figure 54])

PANTOMIME (figure 54 [without interruption attacca from figure 533] up to the end of figure 68)

            Lento dotted Crotchet = 74 (figure 54 up to the end of figure 59)

            Andantino Crotchet = 66 (figure 58 up to the end of figure 59)

            Più mosso Quaver = 132 (figure 60 up to the end of figure 68 [without interruption attacca

            onward to figure 69])

PAS DE DEUX (figure 69 [without interruption attacca from figure 683] up to figure 813)

            Adagio Crotchet = 58 (figure 69 up to the end of figure 71)

            Allegretto Quaver = 96 (figure 72 up to the end of figure 76)

            Tempo I (Adagio) Crotchet = 58 (figure 77 up to figure 813)

PANTOMIME

            Agitato ma tempo giusto Crotchet = 74 (figure 182 [814] up to the end of figure 88 [without

                        interruption attacca onward to figure 89])

VARIATION / Dancer

            Risoluto Crotchet = 86 (figure 89 [without interruption attacca from figure 883] up to the end of

figure 95 [without interruption onward to figure 96])

VARIATION / Ballerina

            Andantino Crotchet = 63 (figure 96 [without interruption from figure 955] up to the end of   Figure

102 [without interruption attacca onward to figure 103])

PANTOMIME

            Andantino Crotchet = 72 (figure 103 [without interruption attacca from figure 1025] up to    the

end of figure 105 [without interruption attacca onward to figure 106])

DANSES / Corps de Ballet

            Con moto Quaver = 108 (figure 106 [without interruption attacca from figure 1054] up to the

end of figure 118 [without interruption attacca onward to figure 119])

APOTHÉOSE

            Poco meno mosso Quaver = 100, Crotchet = 50 (figure 119 [without interruption attacca from

Figure 1185] up to figure 1274)

* In the Ashton choreography, the introduction is repeated.

 

Corrections / Errata

Pocket score 691

1.) p. 33, figure 555, 1. Horn: semibreve db1 >is correct / (see parts, if it is right)<.

2.) p. 34, figure 572, 2. Horn: dotted minim f#1 instead of dotted minim e#1.

3.) p. 34, figure 573, 1. Horn: crotchet d2-c#2-d#2 instead of crotchet d2-c#2-d2.

4.) p. 41, figure 723, Violas: the first both notes of the 1. semiquaver ligature c2 instead of bb1.

5.) p. 43, figure 753, Violas: the last note a of the 2. semiquaver ligature >is right (see in the parts, if so)<

6.) p. 61, figure 1001, 1. Clarinet: 2. ligature semiquaver bb1 — semiquaver rest — quaver eb1 is >correct (see in the part where / it is wrong)<

7.) p. 68, figure 1182, 1. Violins: two-note chord minim d2-f#2 is >correct (in parts there is / one C which / is wrong)<

 

Style: The Ballet Scenes are regarded as a stylistically inconsistent composition, in which, despite many examples of Strawinsky’s hallmarks, the different elements are mixed without coming together as a whole. Strawinsky begins with a original Blues cell of a 5/8 bar which is stated in the introduction but is not retained. Much of the work sounds like Tchaikovsky, other sections like the schmaltzy Broadway music typical of the period. The stylistic proximity to the ballet The Kiss of the Fairy or the Four Norwegian Moods is unmistakable and the reason for this is that Strawinsky liked to conduct the work alongside these mood pieces. Echoes of vulgar and folk-song-like writing are present, and over many numbers, it displays a sentimentality unusual for Strawinsky, especially at the entry of the solo trumpet at figure 693.

 

Dedication: non traceable.

 

Date of origin: Summer up to 23rd August 1944 in Hollywood.The last piece of the Ballet scenes, the apotheosis, was composed by Stravinsky on 23rd August 1944. That was the day on which the German troops had to vacate Paris in the Second World War. Strawinsky interrupted his work frequently to listen to the radio broadcasts of this event. The shortened autograph score for this reason carries the closing remark “Paris no longer belongs to the Germans”. Strawinsky later spoke of his hope that his personal rejoicing about this event would be heard in the apotheosis.

 

Duration: about 1638″ = 052″ (Introduction) + 414″ (Danses) + 206″ (Pantomime) + 249″ (Pas de deux) + 031″ (Pantomime) + 224″ (Danses) + 027″ (Pantomime) + 103″ (Danses) + 212″ (Apothéose)

 

First performance: scenic: Philadelphia, 24th November 1944, Forrest Theater, in the series of the Billy Rose-Revue, The Seven Lively Arts, and was a production by Billy Rose, with the soloist dancers Alicia Markowa and Anton Dolin; stage design by Norman Bel Geddes, costumes by Paul Dupont, Choreographiy by Anton Dolin, conducted by Maurice Abravanel; scenic: New York ( greatly shortened): 7th December 1944, Ziegfeld Theater, Broadway (same forces required); original version concertante: 2nd [3rd] February 1945, Carnegie Hall New York, with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; original version scenic: 11th February 1948*, London, Covent Garden, with Margot Fonteyn and Michael Somes, the Sadler’s Wells Ballet, the stage design and the costumes by André Beaurepaire; Choreography by Frederick Ashton.

* In the German-influenced Strawinsky literature, the date of the London staged première is given as 1938 instead of 1948. This comes from a printing error in the German translation (1950) of White’s book on Strawinsky (1947), which White later has corrected.

 

Problems with the première: Neither the Rose Revue in Philadelphia nor the subsequent one in New York can probably be called the real première of the Ballet Scenes. In New York, the music had already been shortened, and from the events surrounding the orchestral score, it can be inferred that the situation was not much different in Philadelphia; it was not the composition in the piano reduction, but the original instrumentation that seems to have been unfeasible for the intended purpose. The plea rejected by Strawinsky to allow Robert Russell Bennett to re-orchestrate the ballet for New York, i.e. to allow it to be arranged to suit the Revue, confirms this. There still remains the question of whether the performances of the Ballet Scenes in Philadelphia and New York can be seen as premières in the traditional sense at all. Strawinsky neither attended nor had any control over either of them. In both places, an additional piano reduction was requested but no orchestral score, which Strawinsky grumpily commented on in a letter to Hugo Winter of 8th October 1944, with the remark that neither the publishers nor Billy Rose had mentioned to him who would conduct his ballet, and that he did not know the name Maurice Abravanel. It cannot be disputed that he had heard Abravanel conduct two operas by Kurt Weill in Paris in 1933, as Craft discovered. The unreasonable request for three additional piano scores irritated him however, because the conductor should request an orchestral score and not a piano reduction, and Gretl Urban had said nothing to him about this, only mentioning conducting scores. It cannot be ruled out that they were unable to get to grips with the orchestral score in Philadelphia, and sought other ways to resolve the situation which were never authorised by Strawinsky, with the knowledge of the publishers. It is therefore almost certain that the Rose Revue did not follow Strawinsky’s orchestral score. There were also problems surrounding the date of the New York concert première. The Ballet Scenes should have been premièred on 3rd February 1945 and then repeated the next day, finally being recorded by Columbia on 5th February. A letter from Strawinsky to Nadia Boulanger on 25th October 1945 retrospectively gives the performance date as 2nd February.

 

Remarks: In the early part of 1944, the great Broadway producer, Billy Rose*, had a telephone conversation with Strawinsky and commissioned him to write a ballet suite of a length of approximately 15 minutes, for which he would receive a fee of 5,000 dollars and a cut of 200 dollars for each performance. It was intended for a revue which Rose wanted to bring to Broadway in New York under the name ‘The Seven Lively Arts’; as is usual with such productions, it would be performed first in a provincial run as a form of rehearsal run, in this case, in Philadelphia. Alicia Markova and Anton Dolin were named as the solo dancers, and Dolin was to take on the choreography. The contract was signed on 27th June 1944. Strawinsky assented to this and obviously began work without delay. It proceeded so easily that he was able to complete the orchestral score by 23rd August. The search for a title took place between 31st August and 15th September. Alongside this, Ingolf Dahl produced the piano reduction. Strawinsky however obviously held back the manuscripts in order to clear up the matter of the publishing rights, as an urgently written letter to Gretl Urban seems to show. He proceeded to send the orchestral score and piano reduction to his friend Hugo Winter of Associated Music Publishers on 15th September 1944, and he subsequently sent two orchestral scores to Gretl Urban on 6th October. It can be seen from a letter from Strawinsky to Arthur Mendel from the same publishers, dated 13th December 1944, that the publishers were not yet occupied with the production of the score at that point, which was produced by Chappell in England, and the printing of which took place in 1945. – While Rose liked the composition itself, as he learnt it from the piano reduction, he was dismayed by Strawinsky’s instrumentation. The reasons for this have never been made known, but can be postulated. The Ballet Scenes demand a very large orchestra and above all, many instrumental soloists who must be classically trained. In spite of the sweetness of many moments, the unmistakeable rhythmic writing of Strawinsky, present even here, struggles against the gentle flow of the Revue music; furthermore, the numerous solo instrumental parts, for example the four violas, which here are inserted as choreographical guidance, definitely contradict the artistic possibilities of a Broadway orchestra, which rather functions as a collective sound in connection with varying distinctive single sound colours. The result was the widespread abandonment of Strawinsky’s original version of the Ballet Scenes and, following this inevitable unsuccessful attempt to come to an agreement with the composer for the work to be arranged, i.e. its mutilation. In fact, the arrangement would have been bearable from the point of view of the composer if it had taken on the choreographical elements of the orchestration. Unfortunately, no outsider could have done this, only Strawinsky himself or someone trusted by him, because a style of arrangement typical of a musical would have avoided exactly that which Strawinsky’s orchestration wanted to demonstrate. – After the première of the Ballet Scenes in the Billy Rose Revue in Philadelphia, Strawinsky received a telegram which he, as can be seen in the Strawinsky literature, answered quite wittily, and therefore is in every popular biography of him as a remark typical of his wit. It was Strawinsky himself who, responding to questions on the Ballet Scenes, publicized both texts. When seen in context, Strawinsky’s joke is less funny when one considers that Rose had paid 5,000 dollars for a work not considered good, which could not be performed in this form and which, by creating a new arrangement geared to its performance situation, he was trying not to lose entirely. [Rose: YOUR MUSIC GREAT SUCCESS STOP COULD BE SENSATIONAL SUCCESS IF YOU WOULD AUTHORISE ROBERT ROUSSEL BENNETT RETOUCH ORCHESTRATION STOP BENNETT ORCHESTRATES EVEN THE WORKS OF COLE PORTER – Strawinsky: SATISFIED WITH GREAT SUCCESS]. – Confusingly, the diary entry of one of Schoenberg’s pupils of 16th September 1944 states that Schoenberg related that Ingolf Dahl had orchestrated a work written for Billy Rose ‘for Strawinsky’. Schoenberg’s answer was ‘I do not understand this, to orchestrate for Strawinsky, for I have shown you how I compose for orchestra’, which was certainly not an expression of momentary confusion but a typical musician’s pun on the word ‘for’.

* Billy Rose, who enjoyed a legendary reputation in the United States, was in fact called William Samuel Rosenberg (born 6/9/1899 in New York, died 10/2/1966 in Jamaica). He was called the ‘little Napoleon of showmanship’. He achieved his greatest success in 1940 with Carmen Jones, while the Revue ‘The Seven Lively Arts’ was received, according to American opinion, as a cross between ‘disappointment and disaster’. In the third version of the American Encyclopedia of Popular Music by Colin Larkin (1998), Strawinsky’s name is not once mentioned in connection with Rose.

 

Significance: Following the Danses Concertantes, the Ballet Scenes are the second, but also the weakest of the three plotless ballets by Strawinsky, which, by employing the expressly advertised technique of using instruments as choreographical guidance, look forward to Agon. If the Danses Concertantes had been an instrumental work for chamber orchestra whose separate movements could be seen as pieces to dance to, as is suggested by the title, then Strawinsky developed a choreography in the forefront for the Ballet Scenes. The Ashton choreography of 1948 enhanced the work considerably, without being able to make it popular outside London. Strawinsky himself did not think much of the Ballet Scenes, even if he avoided speaking badly of them, although he especially saw the second ‘Pantomime’ as the weakest part of the composition. According to him, the ballet music was a piece of its time and a portrait of Broadway in the final years of the war; it was lightweight and sugar-coated (Strawinsky used the phrase in order to reference his sweet tooth, which was not yet troubled by plaque) but at least it was well done. He thought the ‘apotheosis’ was the best part of the score, and it pleased him even in later years. The instrumentation shows what he meant when he said it was ‘well done’.

 

Ashton’s choreography 1948: Ashton’s choreography was based on Strawinsky’s preconceptions. He had tried at first to have a new libretto produced by the English critic, Richard Buckle. When this fell through for laborious metaphysical reasons, Ashton took up Strawinsky’s proposal of using classical dance forms without literary content. On Buckle’s advice, he engaged André Beaurepaire for the set, but there were also difficulties here. Firstly, two main sets were designed: a viaduct which should be replaced at the end of the ballet by a pavilion clashed horribly. and the machinery used for the transformation also didn’t work. Therefore it remained with the pavilion, which, after a short while, was replaced by the viaduct. Even later, the ballet was danced without scenery. Ashton set a geometric choreography of figures against Strawinsky’s music, and it was designed so that it could be watched from all sides. In doing so, he laid the ground plan for the kaleidoscopic sequence of movements which work best with abstract ballets and which were also thought up by Balanchine for Agon. For this reason, the Ashton choreography is seen today as being bound to the work.

 

Versions: In 1945, it is certain that only the pocket score was published, and were produced in an American version by Associated Music Publishers, New York and an English edition by Chappell in London each with a different disc number. The contract for the Ballet Scenes was settled on 17th November 1944 with Associated Music Publishers. The publishing connections are difficult to disentangle. The conductor’s score was published on 14th July, but remained for hire only and did not succeed in terms of sales; the pocket score was published on 10th September 1945 in a run of 1,015 copies. Of these, the publishers sold 425 up to 30th June 1946, with 147 of these being complementary; up to the middle of 1947, a further 119 pocket scores were sold, seven of which were complementary, There had clearly been a parallel edition by Chappell in 1947 at the latest under a different disc number. Also the distribution was carried out differently for both hemispheres, so that, for example, in the British Library, there is only one copy of the English edition (entry of the contributory copy: 9th May 1947), but not the American edition. Chappell began in the same way as with the Sonata for Two Pianos, the Onnou Elegy and the Scherzo à la Russe, with a collective explanation from Chappell and Strawinsky regarding the contract for the Ballet Scenes, which was dated 21st September 1950. The distribution for Germany was taken on after the war by Schott Publishers in Mainz, who in any case were represented in the United States by Associated Music Publishers. The pocket score was reprinted in this form. The rights however remained with Chappell, who renewed the copyright in 1973, but then surrendered them to Boosey & Hawkes. Boosey & Hawkes included the score in an American printed version under the number HPS 938 in its series of pocket scores. This link is worthy of mention because in general, the works by Strawinsky which were represented by Associated Music Publishers and Chappell ended up in the hands of Schott and not Boosey & Hawkes. The Ballet Scenes are therefore an exception. Despite several mentions in the correspondence, a piano reduction by Ingolf Dahl was not printed.

 

Historical recordings: New York, 5th February 1945 with the New York Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 28th March 1963, Massey Hall with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky. – The concert première of the original version on 2nd February 1945 followed a vinyl recording for Columbia on 5th February with the same orchestra under Strawinsky. Up till now, the records for the LP companies have only been available for inspection in a few cases; in the case of the Ballet Scenes however, we are informed of the extraordinary success of this production. From a transcript of a telephone conversation that Strawinsky had with Gretl Urban on 20th August 1945, we learn that Columbia sold 25,000 copies in the first three months after the release of the disc and Strawinsky, with his 3% cut, had earned 600 dollars, while Associated Music Publishers, with their 2% cut, earned 400 dollars. ‘It is a success! Lieberson happy?’ inquired Strawinsky. Regarding the difficulties surrounding the new ballet score and, not for the last time, the criticism which arose regarding his style, Strawinsky allowed his enthusiasm for the success to be noticed, especially as this must also have influenced his business relationship with Godard Lieberson of Columbia in a lasting manner. Strawinsky’s joyful telephone call must in any case be put into perspective since it is not certain to which disc he is referring. There seems not to have been a release with only the Ballet Scenes, so there was a combination of the Ballet Scenes with Ode and Four Norwegian Moods, which were recorded on 5th February 1945 (he had conducted the Ode in concerts on 1st and 2nd February and the Four Norwegian Moods alongside the Circus Polka in all four concerts), just as the Ballet Scenes were recorded on 29th April 1940 with the Ballet Suite from Petrushka, in the version with the concert ending, with the same orchestra. It is therefore not at all certain whether it was the Ballet Scenes or their combination with the two other new works, (especially, the music from Petrushka, which was still popular in that version) that caused the successful sales; the number of sold copies in such a short time suggests the latter. In any case, this historic recording of the Ballet Scenes needs to be revised at two points. The solo violoncellists in the ‘Variation of the Ballerina’ from Figure 98 play with a vibrato specifically forbidden by Strawinsky, which caused him great annoyance; he then had to lower the tempo between figures 108 and 111, because otherwise the slightly older solo clarinettist would have been unable to play the notes cleanly enough.

 

CD-Edition: II-2/19.

 

Autographs: By all appearances, Dolin or Rose only received copies. In Strawinsky’s estate, there were two autographs of the orchestral score alongside the complete sketch material: the typically Strawinskian short score with four to ten systems and all the necessary instrumental indications bears the final mark, referring to the politics of the day, ‘Paris n’est plus aux allemands’ (Stravinsky composed the final section of the Ballet Scenes, the apotheosis, on 23rd August 1944, the day on which the German troops had to evacuate Paris in the Second World War. Strawinsky interrupted his work for a couple of minutes in order to listen to the radio reports of this event. Strawinsky later expressed his hope that his personal joy from this event might be heard in the apotheosis). There is also a second dated and signed autograph. The majority of the works in Strawinsky’s estate are today stored in the Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel, and some in the Public Library, New York and in the Paris National Library.

 

Copyright: 1945 (MCMXLV) by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York.

 

Editions

a) Overview

691 1945 PoSc; Associated Music Publishers New York; 79 pp.; A. C. 194440.

                        691Straw ibd. [with corrections].

            691[56+] [1956+] ibd.

692 1945 PoSc; Chappell & Co. London; 58 pp.; 38448.

693 1945 FuSc; Chappell & Co. New York; 79 pp..

                        693Straw ibd. [with annotations]

b) Characteristic features

691 Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / [vignette] / Miniature Score .…. $2.50 / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // (Pocket score sewn 15.2 x 22.7 (8° [gr. 8°]) 79 [77] pages + 4 cover pages brown red on green beige [front cover title with vignette 5,2 x 5,7 female head crowned with a lyra centre on stage with raised curtain facing the audience, 2 empty pages, empty page with vignette 2 x 2.5 >AMP-Music<*] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >SCÈNES DE BALLETT<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title >Introduction< flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY (1944)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area centre centred >Copyright, 1945, by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York / Sole Selling Agents / For the Western Hemisphere: Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / Elsewhere: Chappell & Co., Ltd., London<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in U.S.A.<; plate number >A.C. 194440<; without end mark) // (1945)

* The word >Music< stands against the letter >P< vertically underneath the bulge and has as a syllable the same font size as half the single letter.

 

691Straw

Copy on the front cover title above >Igor Stravinsky< signed and dated >Igor Stravinsky / Sept 8/45<; with corrections in red; at figure 554 (page 33, 1. Horn, note db1) annotation in red >this is correct (see parts if / it is right)<

 

691[56+] Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / [Vignette] / Miniature Score .…. $ 2.50 / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // [text on spine:] IGOR STRAVINSKY: Scènes de Ballet // (Pocket score sewn 0.5 x 15.2 x 22.4 (8° [8°]); 79 [77] pages + 4 cover pages thin cardboard tomato red on light greying [front cover title with vignette 5.1 x 5.6 female head crowned with a lyra centre on stage with raised curtain facing the audience, 2 empty pages, page with oval 3.1 x 1.8 centre centred AMP-publishers’ emblem made up of letters] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >AMP STUDY SCORES / ORCHESTRA MUSIC<* without production data]; title head [hollow font] >SCÈNES DE BALLETT<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title >Introduction< flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY (1944)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area inside left centre centred >© Copyright 1945 by Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / All rights reserved, including the right of public performance for profit.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in U.S.A.<; plate number >A.C. 194440<; without end mark) // [1956+]**

* Compositions are advertised behind fill character (dotted line) with price information from >ARNELL, RICHARD< to >VILLA-LOBOS, HEITOR<; Strawinsky not mentioned [>Exclusive American agents for PHILHARMONIA Pocket Scores<].

** According to acquisition date Bayerische Staatsbibliothek >8 Mus.pr. 6908< 1965.

 

692 IGOR STRAVINSKY / Scènes de Ballet / FOR ORCHESTRA / [Vignette] / CHAPPELL & CO. LTD. / 50 New Bond Street, London, W.1 [#] Sydney and Paris / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS INC. NEW YORK / [flush left in the text box contained] 1873 / MADE IN ENGLAND // IGOR STRAVINSKY / Scènes de Ballet / FOR ORCHESTRA / Miniature Score / Price 7/6 net / CHAPPELL & CO. LTD. / 50 New Bond Street, London, W.1 [#] Sydney and Paris / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS INC., NEW YORK 50 // [without text on spine] // (Pocket score sewn 0.4 x 15.6 x 24 (8° [gr. 8°]); 58 [58] pages + 4 cover pages black on light beige sand coloured [front cover title with vignette 4 x 5.2 a back view of the conductor on a half-shaded background , 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s emblem 3,3 x 2,5 an opened-up grand piano on a five-line stave with the publishers’ name running diagonally from bottom to top over the instrument] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page]; title head SCÈNES DE BALLET<: author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 between title head and movement title >Introduction< flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / (1944)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area centre flush left >Copyright MCMXLV by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York / Sole Selling Agents: {[*] For the Western Hemisphere: Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / Elsewhere: Chappell & Co. Ltd., 50, New Bond Street, London. W.1. Sydney & Paris<; plate number >38448< 1st page of the score below production indication flush right, pp. 258 below type area flush left with flush right >Chappell<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area above plate number flush right >MADE IN ENGLAND<; without end mark) // [-1947]

[*] The bracket follows at the centre and encompasses the two following lines.

 

693 [missing] // [missing] // (Full score [rebound] 27.4 x 33.8 ([4°]); 79 [77] pages without cover pages, without front matter + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >SCÈNES DE BALLET<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title >Introduction< flush right centred >Igor Stravinsky / (1944)<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area centre centred >Copyright, 1945, by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York / Sole Selling Agents: / For the Western Hemisphere — Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / Elsewhere — Chappell & Co., Ltd., London<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in U.S.A.<; without plate number; without end mark) // (1945)

 

693Straw

The copy from Strawinsky’s estate is a hire material issue by Associated Music Publishers, and thereby only contains pages 3 to 79 without cover, without front matter, but with 1 page back matter (empty page). It has been rebound in a 24.5 x 32.2 cm cardboard, punched for the spiral at the left margin. The annotations of performance were written with pencil.

 

 

 

 

 

69

S c è n e s  d e  b a l l e t

for orchestra – Ballett-Szenen für Orchester – Scènes de ballet pour orchestre – Scene di balletto per orchestra

 

 

Titel: Strawinsky erklärte, von der Existenz einer Glazunow-Komposition gleichen Titels nichts gewußt zu haben. Diese für eine Veröffentlichung bestimmte Verlautbarung suggeriert eine Titelwahl durch Strawinsky. Aus einem Schreiben an Gretl Urban vom 31. August 1944 geht jedoch hervor, daß die Titelgebung keine Strawinskysche Sache gewesen ist, sondern in Übereinstimmung mit Abmachungen zwischen Winter und Dolin erfolgte, denen er sich lediglich anschloß. In seinen bekannt gewordenen Briefen bis zum Brief an Urban vom 31. August taucht ein Titel ‚Scènes de ballet’ nicht ein einziges mal auf, obwohl die Titelfrage bereits seit dem 30. Juni aktuell war. Wenn Strawinsky auf die Ballett-Szenen abhebt, spricht er immer nur von seinem „neuen” Ballett. Erst im Urban-Brief wird die Titelfrage thematisiert. Strawinsky mahnt an, nunmehr eine Entscheidung über den Titel seines neuen Balletts und zwar in Übereinstimmung mit einem Gespräch herbeizuführen, das Hugo Winter mit Anton Dolin als dem Autor des Ballett-Librettos gehabt habe und über dessen Ergebnis ihn Winter gemäß einem schon am 30. Juni brieflich gegebenen Versprechen unterrichten wollte. Bis heute habe er in dieser Sache aber nichts von Winter gehört. Diese Briefstelle läßt sich nur so verstehen, daß Strawinsky der Titel ziemlich gleichgültig gewesen zu sein scheint und er die Entscheidung darüber Winter als Verlagsvertreter und Dolin als Auftragsvertreter überließ, daß er aber inzwischen unruhig wurde, weil er seine Partitur seit einer Woche fertig hatte und nun dringend (s)einen Titel brauchte. Diese Sichtweise wird noch dadurch bestätigt, daß die im Strawinsky-Nachlaß befindliche verkürzte Orchesterpartitur, die der Reinschrift vorausging, keine Titelüberschrift aufweist. Ob die dann eigentlichen Titelfinder, allen voran Dolin, Glazunows Arbeit nachgeschrieben haben, ist daher eine, was Strawinsky anbelangt, spekulative Frage, deren Beantwortung selbst dann bedeutungslos wäre, wenn man sie bejahen müßte.

 

Besetzung: a) Erstausgabe: Piccolo (also Flute II), 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in A (and Bb), Bassoon, 2 Horns in F, 3 Trumpets in C (and Bb), 3 Trombones, Tuba, Timpani, Piano, Violin I, Violin II, Viola, Violoncello, Double Bass [Kleine Flöte (auch 2. Flöte), 2 Flöten, 2 Oboen, 2 Klarinetten in A (und B), Fagott, 2 Hörner in F, 3 Trompeten in C (und B), 3 Posaunen, Tuba, Pauken, Klavier, 1. Violinen, 2. Violinen, Bratschen, Violoncelli, Kontrabässe]; b) Aufführungsanforderungen: Corps de ballet; kleine Flöte (= 2. große Flöte), 2 große Flöten (2. große Flöte = kleine Flöte), 2 Oboen, 2 Klarinetten (wechselnd B und A), Fagott, 2 Hörner in F, 3 Trompeten (wechselnd C und B), 3 Posaunen, Tuba, Pauken, Klavier, 3 Solo-Violinen, 4 Solo-Bratschen, 2 Solo-Violoncelli, zweimal 4 erste und zweite Tutti-Violinen, Streicher* (erste und zweite Violinen, Bratschen, Violoncelli, Kontrabässe)

* zweifach geteilt

Libretto: Im Schreiben an Gretl Urban vom 31. August 1944 nannte Strawinsky noch Anton Dolin als den Autor des Ballett-Librettos. Es ging dabei zunächst um den Titel, auf den sich Winter und Dolin einigen sollten. Später hat sich Strawinsky gegen eine Zuschreibung gewehrt, die ausschließlich in Dolin den Autor des Librettos sehen wollte.

 

Aufbau: Die Ballett-Szenen, ein elfteilig betiteltes, nicht numeriertes, durchkomponiertes, beziffertes, metronomisiertes Orchesterstück ohne Zwischenpausen mit choreographischen Hinweisen in den Titeln, italienischen Vortragsbezeichnungen und einer in den Druckausgaben französisch-italienisch-englisch gemischtsprachigen Instrumentenbezeichnung, sind ein abstraktes Ballett klassischen Stils mit Choreographieanweisungen ohne Handlungs– oder Bühnenbildvorgabe. Die Idee dazu stammte von dem späteren Choreographen Anton Dolin. Aber trotz Dolin ist die Choreographie in dem Sinne Strawinskys Eigentum gewesen, als er „die Abfolge, den Charakter und die Proportionen der Tanzeinlagen selbst entwarf und das ganze choreographische Gerüst dieses handlungslosen, ‘abstrakten’ Balletts während des Komponierens stets vor Augen hatte”. Nach dem Öffnen des Vorhangs bei Ziffer 5 tritt sofort das Ballett auf. Dem von vier Solo-Bratschen gespielten Part sollen vier Ballerinen zugeordnet werden. Bei Ziffer 9 vereinigen sich die Gruppen, bei Ziffer 40 entfernen sie sich wieder und die Solotänzerin tritt auf. Die Pantomime (Ziffer 54) hatte sich Strawinsky als mit der Musik synchronisierte Gruppenbewegung gedacht. Die Tänzer sollten, jeweils mit einer der Arpeggio-Stellen der Partitur koordiniert, in verschiedenen Gruppen und von verschiedenen Seiten her die Bühne betreten. Das Andantino darin (Ziffer 58) entwarf er als Solotanz für die Ballerina. Sie sollte ein mit diamantenen Pailletten besetztes schwarzes Tutu tragen und ihr Partner ein klassisches Gilet. Ziffer 60 bis 69 (Ende Ziffer 68) ist wieder dem Corps de Ballet gewidmet. Das Trompeten-Solo im Pas de deux (Ziffer 69) ist dem Tänzer, das Horn der Tänzerin zugeordnet. Die gekräuselte Phrasierung am Ende des Allegrettos soll der Ballerina die Möglichkeit zum Pirouettentanz geben. In den beiden letzten Takten dieser Nummer verlassen die Solotänzer die Bühne an einander gegenüberliegenden Seiten. Die zweite Pantomime (Ziffer 82) dient als Arrangement für das Corps de Ballet. Das nachfolgende Orchester-Tutti (Ziffer 89) gilt dem Solotänzer, das Violoncello-Duett (Ziffer 96) der Solotänzerin. Die Schlußpantomime (Ziffer 103) führt die Solotänzer zusammen, und der Rest der Partitur (ab Ziffer 106), von der jazzartigen Bewegung im Dreiachtel-Takt an bis zu den 5 Takten im Vierachtel-Takt (Ziffer 118) vor der Apotheose im Vierviertel-Takt (Ziffer 119), vereinigt alle Darsteller. Das Finale stellte sich Strawinsky als ein wirbelndes Gruppenbild aus verschieden bewegten Einzelgruppen delirando (rasend) vor.

 

Aufriß

Introduction*

            Andante Achtel = 92 (Ziffer 31 bis Ende Ziffer 4 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca nach Ziffer 5

weiter])

DANSES / Corps de Ballet (Ziffer 5 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von Ziffer 43 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 41)

            Moderate Achtel = 148 (Ziffer 5 bis Ende Ziffer 14)

            Più mosso Viertel = 112 (Ziffer 15 bis Ende Ziffer 27)

            L’istesso tempo (Ziffer 28 bis Ende Ziffer 32)

            Tempo I. Achtel = 148 (Ziffer 33 bis Ende Ziffer 40)

            Con moto punktierte Viertel = 74 (Ziffer 41 [ohne Unterbrechung nach Ziffer 42 weiter])

VARIATION / Ballerina

            L’istesso tempo punktierte Viertel = 74 (Ziffer 42 [ohne Unterbrechung von Ziffer 41 aus] bis

Ende Ziffer 53 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca nach Ziffer 54 weiter])

PANTOMIME (Ziffer 54 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von Ziffer 533 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 68)

            Lento punktierte Viertel = 74 (Ziffer 54 bis Ende Ziffer 57)

            Andantino Viertel = 66 (Ziffer 58 bis Ende Ziffer 59)

            Più mosso Achtel = 132 (Ziffer 60 bis Ende Ziffer 68 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca nach Ziffer

            69 weiter])

PAS DE DEUX (Ziffer 69 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von Ziffer 683 aus] bis Ziffer 813)

            Adagio Viertel = 58 (Ziffer 69 bis Ende Ziffer 71)

            Allegretto Achtel = 96 (Ziffer 72 bis Ende Ziffer 76)

            Tempo I (Adagio) Viertel = 58 (Ziffer 77 bis Ziffer 813)

PANTOMIME

            Agitato ma tempo giusto Viertel = 74 (Ziffer 182 [814] bis Ende Ziffer 88 [ohne Unterbrechung

attacca nach Ziffer 89 weiter])

VARIATION / Dancer

            Risoluto Viertel = 86 (Ziffer 89 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von Ziffer 883 aus] bis Ende Ziffer

95 [ohne Unterbrechung nach Ziffer 96 weiter])

VARIATION / Ballerina

            Andantino Viertel = 63 (Ziffer 96 [ohne Unterbrechung von Ziffer 955 aus] bis Ende Ziffer 102

[ohne Unterbrechung attacca nach Ziffer 103 weiter])

PANTOMIME

            Andantino Viertel = 72 (Ziffer 103 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von Ziffer 1025 aus] bis Ende

Ziffer 105 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca nach Ziffer 106 weiter])

DANSES / Corps de Ballet

            Con moto Achtel = 108 (Ziffer 106 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von Ziffer 1054 aus] bis Ende

Ziffer 118 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca nach Ziffer 119 weiter])

APOTHÉOSE

            Poco meno mosso Achtel = 100, Viertel = 50 (Ziffer 119 [ohne Unterbrechung attacca von

Ziffer 1185 aus] bis Ziffer 1274)

* in der Ashton-Choreographie wird die Introduktion wiederholt.

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Taschenpartitur 691

  1. Ziffer 555 (Seite 33) 1. Horn: die Ganznote des1 ist richtig >is correct / (see parts, if it is right)<

  2.) Ziffer 572 (Seite 34) 2. Horn: statt falsch punktierte Halbe eis1 ist richtig punktierte Halbe fis1 zu lesen

  3.) Ziffer 573 (Seite 34) 1. Horn: statt falsch Viertel d2-cis2-d2 ist richtig d2-cis2-dis2 zu lesen

  4.) Ziffer 723 (Seite 41) Bratschen: die ersten beiden Noten der Sechzehntel-Ligatur sind statt falsch h1 richtig c2 zu lesen

  5.) Ziffer 753 (Seite 43) Bratschen: die letzte Taktnote der 2. Sechzehntel-Ligatur ist richtig a >is right (see in the parts, if so)<

  6.) Ziffer 1001 (Seite 61) 1. Klarinette: die 2. Ligatur übergebunden Sechzehntel b1 – Sechzehntelpause – Achtel es1 ist richtig >correct (see in the part where / it is wrong)<

  7.) Ziffer 1182 (Seite 68) 1. Violinen: der Zweitonakkord Halbe d2-fis2 ist richtig >correct (in parts there is / one C which / is wrong)<

 

 

Stilistik: Die Ballett-Szenen gelten als stilistisch gebrochene Komposition, in der sich trotz vielfach unverkennbarer Strawinskyscher Handschrift die verschiedensten Elemente mischen, ohne sich miteinander zu verbinden. Strawinsky geht von einer Blues-Keimzelle im Fünfachtel-Takt aus, die in der Introduktion vorgestellt, aber nicht beibehalten wird. Vieles klingt nach Tschaikowsky, anderes nach der zeittypischen süßlichen Broadway-Musik. Die stilistische Nähe zum Ballett Kuß der Fee oder den Vier Norwegischen Stimmungen ist unverkennbar, und es hatte seinen Grund, daß Strawinsky das Stück gerne in Verbindung mit den Stimmungsbildern dirigierte. Vulgäre Anklänge fehlen ebensowenig wie volksliedhafte, und über vielen Nummern liegt eine für Strawinsky an sich untypische Sentimentalität, etwa beim Einsatz der Solo-Trompete in Ziffer 693.

 

Widmung: keine Widmung nachweisbar.

 

Entstehungszeit: Sommer bis 23. August 1944 in Hollywood.Das letzte Stück der Ballett-Szenen, die Apotheose, komponierte Strawinsky am 23. August 1944. Das ist der Tag, an dem die deutschen Truppen im Zweiten Weltkrieg Paris räumen mussten. Strawinsky unterbrach seine Arbeit alle paar Minuten, um den Radiosendungen über dieses Ereignis zuzuhören. Das verkürzte Autograph trägt aus diesem Grunde den Schlußvermerk „Paris gehört nicht mehr den Deutschen“. Strawinsky sprach später seine Hoffnung aus, daß man in der Apotheose seinen persönlichen Jubel über dieses Ereignis heraushören möchte.

 

Dauer: etwa 1638″ = 052″ (Introduction) + 414″ (Danses) + 206″ (Pantomime) + 249″ (Pas de deux) + 031″ (Pantomime) + 224″ (Danses) + 027″ (Pantomime) + 103″ (Danses) + 212″ (Apothéose).

 

Uraufführung: szenisch Philadelphia: 24. November 1944 im Forrest Theater von Philadelphia im Rahmen der Billy Rose-Revue The Seven Lively Arts als Produktion von Billy Rose mit den Tanzsolisten Alicia Markowa und Anton Dolin, dem Bühnenbild von Norman Bel Geddes, den Kostümen von Paul Dupont, in der Choreographie von Anton Dolin und unter der Musikalischen Leitung von Maurice Abravanel; szenisch New York (stark gekürzt): 7. Dezember 1944 im Ziegfeld Theater am Broadway in New York (gleiche Besetzung); Originalfassung konzertant: 2. [3.] Februar 1945 in der Carnegie Hall New York mit dem New York Philharmonic Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Originalfassung szenisch: 11. Februar 1948* im Covent Garden von London mit den Tanzsolisten Margot Fonteyn und Michael Somes, dem Sadler’s Wells Ballet, dem Bühnenbild und den Kostümen von André Beaurepaire, in der Choreographie von Frederick Ashton

* In der deutsch beeinflußten Strawinsky-Literatur wird mitunter als Datum der Londoner szenischen Uraufführung das Jahr 1938 statt 1948 genannt. Dies geht auf einen Druckfehler in der deutschen Übersetzung (1950) von Whites Strawinsky-Buch (1947) zurück, den White später verbesserte.

 

Uraufführungsproblematik: Möglicherweise kann weder die Rose-Revue in Philadelphia noch diejenige anschließend in New York als echte Uraufführung der Ballett-Szenen gewertet werden. In New York war die Musik bereits heruntergekürzt worden, und es ist angesichts der Vorgänge um die Orchesterpartitur davon auszugehen, daß es in Philadelphia nicht viel anders gewesen ist, da nicht die Komposition als solche in der Klavierauszugsfassung, wohl aber die Originalinstrumentierung für den gedachten Zweck unbrauchbar gewesen zu sein scheint. Die von Strawinsky abgelehnte Bitte, das Ballett durch Robert Russell Bennett für New York uminstrumentieren, das heißt revuepassend arrangieren zu dürfen, macht dies deutlich. Es bleibt also die Frage bestehen, ob die Aufführungen der Ballett-Szenen in Philadelphia und New York überhaupt als im üblichen Sinne Uraufführungen gewertet werden können. Strawinsky hat keiner einzigen beigewohnt oder sie kontrolliert. Für beide Plätze hatte man zusätzliche Klavierauszüge, aber keine Orchesterpartituren angefordert, was Strawinsky in einem Brief an Hugo Winter vom 8. Oktober 1944 etwas brummig mit der Bemerkung kommentierte, weder Verlag noch Billy Rose hätten ihm eine Mitteilung darüber gemacht, wer sein Ballett dirigieren werde, und mit dem Namen Maurice Abravanel verbände er keine Vorstellungen. Dies wird auch nicht dadurch widerlegt, daß er, wie Craft herausfand, im Jahre 1933 Abravanel in Paris als Orchesterleiter zweier Opern von Kurt Weill gehört hatte. Ihn irritierte aber die uneinsichtige Forderung nach drei zusätzlichen Klavierauszügen, weil ein Dirigent nach einer Orchesterpartitur und nicht nach einem Klavierauszug frage und Gretl Urban dies ihm gegenüber verschwiegen und nur von Dirigenten-Partituren (conductor’s scores) gesprochen habe. Es ist nicht auszuschließen, daß man in Philadelphia mit der Orchesterpartitur nicht zurechtkam und sich auf andere, von Strawinsky niemals autorisierte Weise zu helfen suchte, und der Verlag dies wußte. Deshalb ist die Vermutung naheliegend, daß die Rose-Revue nicht der Strawinskyschen Orchesterpartitur folgte. Datierungsprobleme hat es auch für die New Yorker konzertante Uraufführung gegeben. Die Ballett-Sszenen sollten am 3. Februar 1945 uraufgeführt, am folgenden Tag wiederholt und am 5. Februar durch Columbia auf Platte genommen werden. Ein Brief Strawinskys an Nadia Boulanger vom 25. Oktober 1945 nennt im nachhinein den 2. Februar als Aufführungsdatum.

 

Bemerkungen: Im Frühjahr 1944 telephonierte der Broadway-Großunternehmer Billy Rose* mit Strawinsky und schlug ihm vor, gegen ein Honorar von fünftausend Dollar und einer Beteiligung von 200 Dollar für jede Aufführung eine Ballettsuite im Umfang von etwa 15 Minuten Dauer zu schreiben. Sie war für eine Revue gedacht, die Rose unter dem Namen The Seven Lively Arts an den Broadway in New York bringen wollte und, wie bei solchen Produktionen als Probelauf üblich, zunächst in der Provinz zeigte, im vorliegenden Falle in Philadelphia. Als Solotänzer wurden ihm Alicia Markowa und Anton Dolin genannt, wobei Dolin die Choreographie übernehmen sollte. Strawinsky willigte ein und der Vertrag wurde am 27. Juni 1944 geschlossen. Strawinsky begann offensichtlich ohne Verzögerung mit der Arbeit. Sie schritt so zügig voran, daß er die Orchesterpartitur bereits am 23. August abschließen konnte. Die Titelfindung erfolgte erst zwischen dem 31. August und dem 15. September. Parallel dazu stellte Ingolf Dahl den Klavierauszug her. Strawinsky hielt die Manuskripte offensichtlich aber noch zurück, um die vertraglichen Rechte zu klären, wie ein dringend gemachtes Schreiben an Gretl Urban zu beweisen scheint. Orchesterpartitur und Klavierauszug übersandte er dann am 15. September 1944 an seinen Freund Hugo Winter von Associated Music Publishers, zwei Orchesterpartituren an Gretl Urban folgten am 6. Oktober. Aus einem Schreiben Strawinskys an Arthur Mendel vom selben Verlag mit Datum 13. Dezember 1944 geht hervor, daß der Verlag zu diesem Zeitpunkt noch mit der Herstellung der Partitur beschäftigt war, die durch Chappell in England erfolgte und 1945 vorlag. – Während Rose die eigentliche Komposition, wie er sie zunächst aus dem Klavierauszug kennenlernte, gefiel, war er über die Strawinskysche Instrumentierung bestürzt. Die Gründe dafür sind bislang nicht bekannt gemacht worden, lassen sich aber vermuten. Die ballett-szenen verlangen ein sehr großes Orchester und vor allen Dingen viele Instrumentalsolisten, die klassisch geschult sein müssen. Trotz der Süßlichkeit vieler Stellen wehrt sich die auch hier unverkennbare Strawinskysche Rhythmik gegen den leichten Fluß einer Revue-Musik; mehr noch, die zahlreichen, hier bereits als choreographisches Steuerungselement eingesetzten Soloinstrumentalpartien, etwa vier Solo-Bratscher, widersprachen mit Sicherheit den künstlerischen Möglichkeiten eines Broadway-Orchesters, das lieber auf den versammelten Klang in Verbindung mit abwechselnden aparten Einzelfarben setzt. Das Ergebnis war der weitgehende Verzicht auf die Strawinskysche Originalgestalt der Ballett-Szenen und nach dem zwangsläufig erfolglosen Versuch, eine Arrangement-Übereinkunft mit dem Komponisten zu erzielen, ihre Verstümmelung. In der Tat wäre ein Arrangement im Sinne des Komponisten nur dann duldbar gewesen, wenn dieses die choreographischen Elemente der Orchestrierung übernommen hätte. Das aber wiederum konnte kein Außenstehender, sondern nur Strawinsky selbst oder ein mit ihm Vertrauter tun, weil ein musical-typischer Arrangementstil genau das aufgehoben hätte, was die Strawinskysche Orchestrierung herausstellen wollte. – Nach der Uraufführung der Ballett-Szenen in der Billy Rose Revue Philadelphia erhielt Strawinsky ein Telegramm, das er, wie die Strawinsky-Literatur meint, besonders witzig beantwortete und daher als strawinsky-typisch in keiner Populärbiographie fehlt. Strawinsky selbst war es, der auf Fragen nach den Ballett-Szenen beide Texte bekanntmachte. Situationsgeschichtlich gesehen ist der Strawinsky-Witz an dieser Stelle weniger witzig, wenn man bedenkt, daß Rose 5000 Dollar für ein auch als Werk nicht einmal gutes Stück bezahlt hatte, das er in dieser Form nicht gebrauchen konnte und das er durch ein auf seine Verhältnisse abgestelltes neues Arrangement wenigstens nicht ganz verlieren wollte [Rose: YOUR MUSIC GREAT SUCCESS STOP COULD BE SENSATIONAL SUCCESS IF YOU WOULD AUTHORISE ROBERT ROUSSEL BENNETT RETOUCH ORCHESTRATION STOP BENNETT ORCHESTRATES EVEN THE WORKS OF COLE PORTER; Strawinsky: SATISFIED WITH GREAT SUCCESS (Bin mit großem Erfolg zufrieden).

* Billy Rose, der in den Vereinigten Staaten einen legendären Ruf genoß. hieß eigentlich William Samuel Rosenberg (geb. 6. 9. 1899 in New York, gest. 10. 2. 1966 in Jamaica). Man nannte ihn den little Napoleon of showmanship. Seinen größten Erfolg erzielte er 1940 mit Carmen Jones, während die Revue The Seven Lively Arts nach amerikanischer Vorstellung ein Mittelding zwischen disappointment und disaster darstellte. Noch in der 3. Auflage 1998 der amerikanischen Encyclopedia of Popular Music von Colin Larkin wird der Name Strawinsky im Zusammenhang mit Rose nicht einmal genannt.

 

Bedeutung: Nach den Danses Concertantes bilden die Ballett-Szenen das zweite, gleichzeitig auch das schwächste der drei handlungslosen Ballette Strawinskys, die allerdings mit der ausdrücklich bekannt gegebenen Technik der Instrumentenführung als choreographischem Steuerungselement auf den Agon vorausweisen. Waren die Danses Concertantes noch ein Instrumentalstück für Kammerorchester gewesen, dessen Einzelsätze sich als vertanzbare Stücke bereits vom Titel her zu erkennen gaben, so entwickelte Strawinsky für die Ballett-Szenen schon im Vorfeld eine Choreographie. Die Ashton-Choreographie von 1948 wertete das Stück beträchtlich auf, ohne es außerhalb Londons populär machen zu können. Strawinsky selbst hielt von den Ballett-Szenen nicht viel, auch wenn er es ablehnte, schlecht über sie zu sprechen, wobei er offensichtlich ausgerechnet die zweite Pantomime als den schwächsten Teil der Komposition empfand. Die Ballettmusik sei ein Zeitstück und ein Porträt des Broadways in den letzten Kriegsjahren, sie sei leichtgewichtig und überzuckert (Strawinsky benutzte das Gespräch, um auf seine damals noch nicht durch Karies getrübte Vorliebe für Süßigkeiten hinzuweisen), aber doch wenigstens ganz gut gemacht. Die Apotheose hielt er für das beste Stück der Partitur, sie gefiel ihm auch noch in späteren Jahren. Was er mit dem “gut gemacht” meint, zeigt die Instrumentierung.

 

Ashton-Choreographie 1948: Ashtons Choreographie gründet auf den Vorangaben Strawinskys. Er hatte zunächst versucht, durch den englischen Kritiker Richard Buckle ein neues Libretto entwerfen zu lassen. Als dieses zu umständlich-metaphysisch ausfiel, griff Ashton Strawinskys Anregung auf, die Formen des klassischen Tanzes ohne literarische Inhalte zu verwenden. Auf Buckles Rat hin verpflichtete er André Beaurepaire für die Ausstattung; doch auch hier gab es Schwierigkeiten. Zunächst entwarf man zwei Hauptbühnenbilder: ein Viadukt, das am Ballettende durch einen Pavillon ersetzt werden sollte. Die Bilder bissen sich stilistisch, außerdem versagte die für die Verwandlung benutzte Maschinerie. Also blieb es beim Pavillon, den man nach kurzer Zeit wieder durch den Viadukt ersetzte. Noch später tanzte man das Ballett ganz ohne Bühnenbild. Ashton stellte der Strawinsky-Musik eine geometrische Figurenchoreographie entgegen, die so gestaltet war, daß man sie von allen Seiten betrachten konnte. Damit legte er die Grundrisse für die kaleidoskopartigen Bewegungsverläufe, die am besten zu abstrakten Balletten passen und die sich nachher auch Balanchine für den Agon ausdachte. Aus diesem Grund gilt die Ashton-Choreographie heute als werkverbindlich.

 

Fassungen: Offensichtlich erschien 1945 nur die Taschenpartitur, und zwar jeweils mit verschiedenen Platten-Nummern in einer amerikanischen Fassung durch Associated Music Publishers New York und einer englischen durch Chappell in London. Der Vertrag über die Ballett-Szenen wurde am 17. November 1944 mit Associated Music Publishers geschlossen. Die Verlagszusammenhänge sind schwer zu durchschauen. Die Dirigierpartitur erschien am 14. Juli, blieb aber Leihmaterial und gelangte nicht in den Handel, die Taschenpartitur erschien am 10. September 1945 in einer Auflage von 1015 Exemplaren. Davon setzte der Verlag bis zum 30. Juni 1946 425 Partituren ab, darunter 147 als Freistücke, und bis Mitte 1947 weitere 119 Taschenpartituren, darunter 7 als Freistücke. Offensichtlich gab es spätestens seit 1947 eine Chappell-Parallelausgabe und zwar mit unterschiedlicher Platten-Nummer. Auch der Vertrieb erfolgte für die beiden Hemisphären getrennt, so daß sich beispielsweise in der british library nur ein Exemplar der englischen, nicht aber der amerikanischen Ausgabe findet (Eingang des Pflichtexemplars: 9. Mai 1947). Chappell trat in derselben Weise wie für die Sonate für zwei Klaviere, die Onnou–Elegie und das Scherzo à la Russe mit einer 21. September 1950 datierten gemeinsamen Erklärung Chappells und Strawinskys in den Ballett-Szenen –Vertrag ein. Die Auslieferung für Deutschland übernahm nach dem Krieg der Schott-Verlag in Mainz, den ja ohnehin Associated Music Publishers in den Vereinigten Staaten vertrat. Die Taschenpartitur wurde in dieser Form weiter gedruckt. Die Rechte blieben jedoch beim Chappell-Verlag, der 1973 das Copyright erneuerte, dann aber an Boosey & Hawkes abtrat. Boosey & Hawkes stellte die Partitur in einer amerikanischen Druckfassung unter der Nummer HPS 938 in seine Taschenpartitur-Reihe ein. Dieser Zusammenhang ist deshalb erwähnenswert, weil im allgemeinen die bei Associated Music Publishers und bei Chappell verlegten Strawinsky-Werke in den Schott-Verlag und nicht in den Verlag Boosey & Hawkes übergingen. Die Ballett-Szenen bilden also eine Ausnahme. Trotz mehrfacher Erwähnungen im Briefwechsel ist ein Klavierauszug von Ingolf Dahl nicht gedruckt worden.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: New York, 5. Februar 1945 mit dem New York Philharmonic Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 28. März 1963, in der Massey Hall mit dem Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky. – Der konzertanten Uraufführung der Originalfassung vom 2. Februar 1945 folgte am 5. Februar mit demselben Orchester unter Strawinsky eine Schallplattenaufnahme für Columbia. Bis jetzt liegen nur in wenigen Fällen Schallplatten-Geschäftsunterlagen zur Einsicht offen; im Falle der Ballett-Szenen jedoch sind wir über den außergewöhnlichen Erfolg dieser Produktion unterrichtet. Aus einem aufnotierten Telephongespräch, das Strawinsky am 20. August 1945 mit Gretl Urban führte, geht hervor, daß Columbia in den ersten drei Monaten nach Erscheinen der Schallplatte fünfundzwanzigtausend Stück verkaufte und Strawinsky bei einem Drei-Prozent-Anteil somit 600 Dollar, Associated Music Publishers bei einem Zwei-Prozent-Anteil 400 Dollar verdient hatten. It is a success! Lieberson happy? (Das ist ein Erfolg! Lieberson zufrieden?) notierte Strawinsky. Angesichts der Schwierigkeiten um die neue Ballettpartitur und nicht zuletzt auch der Kritik, die sie wegen ihrer Stilistik auslöste, läßt sich Strawinskys Begeisterung über den Erfolg nachvollziehen, zumal dieser ja auch die Geschäftsbeziehungen zu Godard Lieberson von Columbia nachhaltig beeinflussen mußte. Strawinskys Jubel-Telephonat muß allerdings relativiert werden; denn aus ihm geht nicht hervor, auf welche Plattenausgabe es sich bezieht. Eine Ausgabe nur mit den Ballett-Szenen scheint es nicht gegeben zu haben, wohl kam es zu den Kombinationen Ballett-Szenen mit Ode und Four Norwegian Moods, die gleichfalls an jenem 5. Februar 1945 aufgenommen wurden (die Ode dirigierte er in New York in den Konzerten vom 1. und 2. Februar, die Four Norwegian Moods zusammen mit der Zirkus-Polka in allen vier Konzerten), sowie Ballett-Szenen mit der Ballett-Suite Petruschka in der Konzertschluß-Originalfassung in einer Aufnahme mit demselben Orchester vom 29. April 1940. Es ist somit keineswegs sicher, ob die Ballett-Szenen und nicht doch eher die Kombination mit den beiden anderen neuen Stücken oder vor allem — was bei dieser Verkaufsstückzahl in so kurzer Zeit naheliegt — die immer wieder erfolgreiche Petruschka-Musik gleich in welcher Fassung den eigentlichen Verkaufserfolg auslöste. Allerdings weist diese historische Aufführung der Ballett-Szenen an zwei Stellen Unzulänglichkeiten auf. So spielen die Solo-Violoncellisten in der Variation der Ballerina ab Ziffer 98 ein von Strawinsky ausdrücklich untersagtes Vibrato, über das er sich sehr geärgert hat; sodann mußte er zwischen Ziffer 108 und 111 das Tempo etwas zurücknehmen, weil der schon ältere Solo-Klarinettist sonst die Noten nicht sauber genug hätte wiedergeben können.

 

CD-Edition: II-2/19.

 

Autographe: Allem Anschein nach haben Dolin oder Rose nur Kopien erhalten. Im Strawinsky-Nachlaß verblieben jedenfalls neben dem gesamten Skizzen-Material zwei Orchesterautographe: die typisch Strawinskysche Kurzpartitur mit vier bis zehn Systemen und allen erforderlichen Instrumentenangaben mit dem tagespolitischen Schlußvermerk Paris n’est plus aux allemands (das letzte Stück der Ballett-Szenen, die Apotheose, komponierte Strawinsky am 23. August 1944, dem Tag, an dem die deutschen Truppen im Zweiten Weltkrieg Paris räumen mußten. Strawinsky unterbrach seine Arbeit alle paar Minuten, um den Radiosendungen über dieses Ereignis zuzuhören. Strawinsky sprach später seine Hoffnung aus, daß man in der Apotheose seinen persönlichen Jubel über dieses Ereignis heraushören möchte.) und ein zweites datiertes und signiertes Autograph. Die meisten Nachlaßstücke lagern heute in der Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel, Teilstücke in der public library New York und in der Pariser Nationalbibliothek. – Für Verwirrung sorgte die Tagebucheintragung eines Schönberg-Schülers vom 16. September 1944. Dieser erzählte Schönberg, Ingolf Dahl habe ein für Billy Rose geschriebenes Stück „für Strawinsky“ orchestriert. Schönbergs Antwort I do not understand this, to orchestrate for Stravinsky, for I have shown you how I compose for orchestra war gewiß nicht Ausdruck einer Augenblicksverwirrung, sondern ein aus der Situation geborener typischer Musiker-Sprachwitz, der die Präposition „für“ umdeutet.

 

Copyright: 1945 (MCMXLV) durch Chappell & Co., Inc., New York.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

691 1945 Tp; Associated Music Publishers New York; 79 S.; A. C. 194440.

                        691Straw ibd. [mit Korrekturen].

            691[56+] [1956+] ibd.

692 1945 Tp; Chappell & Co. London; 58 S.; 38448.

693 1945 Dp; Chappell & Co. New York; 79 pp..

                        693Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen]

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

691 Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / [Vignette] / Miniature Score .…. $2.50 / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // (Taschenpartitur fadengehetet 15,2 x 22,7 (8° [gr. 8°]); 79 [77] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag braunrot auf grünbeige [Außentitelei mit Vignette 5,2 x 5,7 lyragekrönter Frauenkopf mittig auf vorhanggeöffneter Bühne mit Blick zum Betrachter, 2 Leerseiten, Leerseite mit Vignette 2 x 2,5 >AMP-Music<*] + 2 pages Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >SCÈNES DE BALLETT<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unter Satzbezeichnung >Introduction< rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY (1944)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig zentriert >Copyright, 1945, by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York; Vertriebs-Vermerk Sole Selling Agents / For the Western Hemisphere: Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / Elsewhere: Chappell & Co., Ltd., London; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in U.S.A.<; Platten-Nummer >A.C. 194440<; ohne Ende-Vermerk) // (1945)

* das Wort >Music< steht gegen den Buchstaben >P< unterhalb von dessen Bauch senkrecht und hat als Silbe dieselbe Punktgröße wie der halbe Einzelbuchstabe.

 

691Straw

Das Nachlaßexemplar ist auf der Außentitelseite oberhalb >Igor Stravinsky< mit >Igor Stravinsky / Sept 8/45< signiert und datiert und enthält Korrekturen in rot sowie zu Ziffer 554 (Seite 33, 1. Horn, des1) den ebenfalls rot eingetragenen Vermerk >this is correct (see parts if / it is right)< [das ist korrekt (man sehe in den Stimmen nach, ob / es richtig ist)]

 

691[+56] Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / [Vignette] / Miniature Score .…. $ 2.50 / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // Igor Stravinsky / Scènes de Ballet / for orchestra / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U.S.A. // [Rückendeckelbeschriftung:] IGOR STRAVINSKY: Scènes de Ballet // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 0,5 x 15,2 x 22,4 (8° [8°]); 79 [77] pages + 4 pages Umschlag dünner Karton tomatenrot auf hellgrau meliert [Außentitelei mit Vignette 5,1 x 5,6 lyragekrönter Frauenkopf mittig auf vorhanggeöffneter Bühne mit Blick zum Betrachter, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit oval 3,1 x 1,8 mittenzentriertem AMP-Buchstaben-Verlagsemblem] + 2 pages Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >AMP STUDY SCORES / ORCHESTRA MUSIC<* ohne Stand]; Kopftitel [in Hohlschrift] >SCÈNES DE BALLETT<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Satzbezeichnung >Introduction< rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY (1944)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halblinks mittig zentriert >© Copyright 1945 by Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / All rights reserved, including the right of public performance for profit.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in U.S.A.<; Platten-Nummer >A.C. 194440<; ohne Endevermerk) // [+1956]**

* Angezeigt werden mit Preisen nach Distanzpunkten Kompositionen von >ARNELL, RICHARD< bis >VILLA-LOBOS, HEITOR<; keine Strawinsky-Nennung [>Exclusive American agents for PHILHARMONIA Pocket Scores<].

** Erwerbsdatum Bayerische Staatsbibliothek >8 Mus.pr. 6908< 1965.

 

692 IGOR STRAVINSKY / Scènes de Ballet / FOR ORCHESTRA / [Vignette] / CHAPPELL & CO. LTD. / 50 New Bond Street, London, W.1 [#] Sydney and Paris / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS INC. NEW YORK / [linksbündig gekastet] 1873 / MADE IN ENGLAND // IGOR STRAVINSKY / Scènes de Ballet / FOR ORCHESTRA / Miniature Score / Price 7/6 net / CHAPPELL & CO. LTD. / 50 New Bond Street, London, W.1 [#] Sydney and Paris / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS INC., NEW YORK 50 // [ohne Rückentext] // (Taschenpartitur fadengeheftet 0,4 x 15,6 x 24 (8° [gr. 8°]); 58 [58] pages + 4 pages Umschlag schwarz auf hellbeige-sandfarben [Außentitelei mit Vignette 4 x 5,2 Rückenansicht Dirigent auf halbschraffiertem Untergrund, 2 Leerseiten, Rückseite mit Verlagsvignette 3,3 x 2,5 geöffneter Flügel mit schräg >CHAPPELL< beschriftetem Klaviaturdeckeloberteil vor einzeiligem Fünfliniensystem] + 2 pages Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite]; Kopftitel SCÈNES DE BALLET<: Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 zwischen Kopf– und Satztitel >Introduction< rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / (1944)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright MCMXLV by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York / Sole Selling Agents: {[*] For the Western Hemisphere: Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / Elsewhere: Chappell & Co. Ltd., 50, New Bond Street, London. W.1. Sydney & Paris<; Platten-Nummer >38448< 1. Notentextseite unter Herstellungshinweis rechtsbündig, S. 258 unter Notenspiegel linksbündig mit rechtsbündig gegenüberstehendem Verlagsnamen >Chappell<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel oberhalb Plattennummer rechtsbündig >MADE IN ENGLAND<; ohne Endevermerk) // [-1947]

[*] die Klammer folgt mittig und umfaßt die beiden nachfolgenden Zeilen.

 

693 [fehlt] // [fehlt] // (Dirigierpartitur [nachgeheftet] 27,4 x 33,8 (4° [4°]); 79 [77] Seiten ohne Umschlag, ohne Vorspann + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >SCÈNES DE BALLET<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unter Satzbezeichnung >Introduction< rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Stravinsky / (1944)<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig zentriert >Copyright, 1945, by Chappell & Co., Inc., New York / Sole Selling Agents: / For the Western Hemisphere — Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York / Elsewhere — Chappell & Co., Ltd., London<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in U.S.A.<; keine Platten-Nummer, kein Ende-Vermerk) // (1945)

 

69Straw 

Das Nachlaßexemplar ist eine Leihmaterial-Ausgabe von Associated Music Publishers, enthält also nur die Notentextseiten 3 bis 79 ohne Umschlag, ohne Vorspann und mit 1 Leerseite als Nachspann. Es wurde in einen Karton 24,5 x 32,2 eingebunden und am linken Rand für die Spirale gelocht. Die aufführungspraktischen Anmerkungen wurden mit Bleistift eingetragen.

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM
 | PRIVACY POLICY | TERMS OF USE