65

F o u r  N o r w e g i a n  M o o d s

for orchestra – Vier Stücke nach norwegischer Art (Vier norwegische Impressionen = Vier norwegische Stimmungsbilder) für Orchester – Quatre Pièces à la norvégiennes (Quatre Impressions norvégiennes) pour orchestre – Impressioni Norvegesi. [Quattro episodi alla norvegese] per orchestra

 

 

Title: When Strawinsky came to America in 1939, his knowledge of English was deficient. An incorrect title therefore slipped in for these Norwegian pieces, as by the word mood, he meant the Latin word Modus. As a result, all the translations that have become common for this, which translate mood as ‘Impressions’ or ’Atmospheres’, even with gentle adjectives, are incorrect. The title that corresponds to the actual original is in French and is ‘Quatre Piéces á la Norvegiennes’. There is also the matter of the original English title for the ‘Four Norwegian Moods’, which does not reproduce the sense, and of a strictly incorrect French translation, which was however authorised as the actual original, which is in fact a correct translation of the sense and which had to be followed accordingly for translations into other languages.

 

Scored for*: a) First edition: Piccolo Flute, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, English horn, 2 Clarinets in Bb (also in A), 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in Bb, 2 Trombones, Tuba, Timpani, Strings (Violins I, Violins II, Violas, Violoncellos, Double Basses; b) Performance requirements: Piccolo Flute (= 2nd Flute), 2 Flutes (2nd Flute = Piccolo Flute), 2 Oboes (2nd Oboe = English horn), English horn (= 2nd Oboe), 2 Clarinets in Bb (also in A), 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in Bb, 2 Trombones, Tuba, 3 Timpani, 2 Solo Violins, 1 Solo Viola, Strings (Violins I**, Violins II**, Violas**, Violoncellos**, Double Basses)

* The list gives the complete catalogue of all instruments to be used; the pieces themselves have different individual orchestrations.

** Divided in two.

 

Source: The collection of folksongs, hunted down by Vera Strawinsky in Los Angeles and alluded to by Strawinsky in his letter to Nabokov dated 5th October 1943 but which he in fact did not name explicitly, that he used for his works were identified in 1972 by Uwe Kraemer* as Norges Melodier. Although there are many of the numerous editions of Norwegian folksongs in which one or other of the seven folksongs and folkdances used by Strawinsky can be found, the only place in which all seven tunes can be found together is in the Norges Melodier. The four volumes were published at different intervals between 1875 and 1924. The first volume was published anonymously by Edvard Grieg, and the other three by Eyvind Alnaes. The publishers responsible for it, Wilhelm Hansen Musik-Forlag in Copenhagen and Leipzig along with Norsk Musikforlag in Stockholm and later Oslo, were very well known to Strawinsky as his own publishers (Concertino) and Schönberg’s publishers (Serenade). Kraemer’s speculations were first confirmed by the name of the publishers Hansen to Nabokov. The four volumes contain five-hundred Norwegian folksong tunes in total with a very simple piano accompaniment without figures either for each song or across the whole collection. The first volume contains 123, the second 120, the third 125 and the fourth 132 pieces, all with text underlayed. The edition fulfils a documentary purpose in the context of Scandinavian nationalism, but makes no claims at musicological accuracy. It is through and through a practical edition for appreciators of folksong with little pianistic ability, without a preface, without remarks on the edition and also without the explanation of the principles upon which they were collected. Kraemer discovered in it all the folksongs used by Strawinsky and listed them. Allegedly it should be not this original four-volume edition that Vera Strawinsky brought to her husband, but a single-volume American reprinted version from 1930 (The Norway Music Album, Publishers O. Ditson, Boston), from which Strawinsky took his originals. That does not diminish the importance of Kraemer’s work if it turns out to be trueWhether Vera Strawinsky already owned the Norwegian anthology and referred Strawinsky to it, or whether she, after the first dealings with the film company was looking with her husband expressly for Norwegian folk songs, because the orchestration of an appropriate original would speed up the work; whether Strawinsky’s conception was heading towards Norwegian folk songs or whether the availability of such songs guided the idea into a certain path, are all questions which must remain unanswered.

 

* Uwe Kraemer: „Four Norwegian Moods“ von Igor Strawinsky, Melos, Februar-Heft 1972, S. 80[b]-84[a].

 

 Table of incorporated folk songs

Intrada

     Brurelaat

          Norges Melodier Volume III, p. 1617

               original Moderato with repetition 24 4/4-bars G major

     Underjordisk musik

          Norges Melodier Volume IV, p. 186

               original Andante with repetitions 32 2/4-bars A major

Song

     Eg rodde meg ut pas selagrunnen (I put out to sea and have found)

          Norges Melodier Volume I, p. 39

               original Andante 19 3/4-bars a minor

     En liten gutifra Tiste dal´n

          Norges Melodier Volume I, p. 42

               original Con moto 14 3/4-bars without upbeat a minor

Wedding Dance

     Brudeslaaten

          Norges Melodier Volume I, p. 20

               original Allegro moderato with repetition 20 2/4-bars d minor

Cortège

     Reise laat for brudefolget, near det kommer fra kirken

          Norges Melodier Volume II, p. 124

               original Moderato with repetitions 20 4/4-bars G major with modulation 2. section after D major

     Halling

          Norges Melodier Volume II, p. 59

               original Moderato with repetitions 16 2/4-bars G major

Construction: The works are a sequence of four short, distinctively orchestrated pieces which have titles and are not numbered, and are in the most simple Major-Minor tonality in the style of simple Norwegian folk music.

 

Structure

Intrada

            Crotchet = 106 (77 bars [without upbeat] = figure 41 up to the end of figure 203 [structural A–

                                    B-A1-C-A2])

                        [B flat major-section] (16 bars [without upbeat] = figure 41 up to the end of figure 3)

                                    {A}*

                        [F major-section] (25 bars = figure 4 up to the end of figure 9) {B}*

                        [B flat major-section] (10 bars = figure 10 up to the end of figure 12) {C = shortened

version of A}*

                        Trio** [C major-section] (17 bars = figure 13 up to the end of figure 17) {D}*

                        [B flat major –section] (9 bars = figure 18 up to the end of figure 20) {E = shortened

version of A}*

Scored for Tutti without English horn***, without 3rd/4th Horn***, B-Clarinets without changing to

A***, without Solo Strings, 1st/2nd Violins and Violas divided

                                                * { } Analytical identificatory letter

                                                ** Scored for 1 Clarinet in B flat and 2 Bassoons

                                                *** English horn, 4 Horns, Clarinets in B flat and A specified in the instrumental list on the first

page of the piece

 

Song (Lied)

            Crotchet = 66 ([C major] 50 bars = figure 21 up to the end of figure 305 [structural A-B-A1])

                        [a minor-section] (24 bars = figure 21 up to the end of figure 24) {A}*

                        [aeolian a minor-section] (17 bars = figure 25 up to figure 291) {B}*

                        [a minor-section] (9 bars = figure 292 up to the end of figure 30) {C = shortened

version of A}*

Scored for 2 Flutes, 1 Oboe, English horn, 1 Bassoon, 1 Solo Violin, 1 Solo Viola, Strings (1st/2nd Violins divided)

                                                * { } Analytical identificatory letter

 

Wedding Dance (Hochzeitstanz)

            Crotchet = 124 (70 bars = figure 31 up to the end of figure 457 [structural A-B-A1–A2])

                        [d minor-section] (20 bars = figure 31 up to the end of figure 34) {A}*

                        Meno mosso Crotchet = 108

                        [G major-section] (23 bars = figure 35 up to the end of figure 40**) {B}*

                        [d minor-section] (13 bars = figure 41 up to the end of figure 44) {C = slightly altered

version of A}*

                        [d minor-section] (7 bars = figure 45) {C = verkürzt A with Coda-Charakter}*

Scored for Tutti with Piccolo Flute, 2 Oboes without English horn, Clarinets in B flat without changing to A, without 2nd Trombone, without Solo Strings, Violoncellos divided

                                                * { } Analytical identificatory letter

                                                ** Figure 40 = 4014 Instruction to make an accelerando

 

Cortège (Festzug)

            Crotchet = 88 {A}* (53 bars = figure 46 up to the end of figure 605 [structural A-B-A1])

                        [G major-section] (17 bars = figure 46 up to the end of figure 49)

                        Più mosso Crotchet = 120 {B}*

                        [D major-section] (20 bars = figure 50 up to the end of figure 54)

                        Tempo Imo Crotchet = 88 {C = erweitert und durchgeführt A}*

                        [G-major-section] (26 bars = figure 55 up to the end of figure 60)

Scored for Tutti with Piccolo-Flute, 2 Oboes without English horn, Clarinets in A without changing to B flat, without 4. Horn, without Trumpets, without Trombones, without Tuba, 2 Solo Violins, without Solo Viola, 1st/2nd Violins divided

                                                * { } Analytical identificatory letter

 

Style: I. The 56 bars of the two original songs ‘Brurelaat’ and ‘Underjordisk’ musik are expanded by Strawinsky by 21 bars to reach 77 bars in totals; the first song is transposed from G major to B major, and the second song from A major to C major. The original time signature 4/4 of the first song is retained, while the 2/4 of the second song was changed to 4/4 and thus fits in with the first time signature. From the 16 bars of the first song (without counting the repeat), he uses only the first 6 bars, and from the 16 bars of the second song (without counting the repeat), he uses the first 4. From these 10 original bars, he constructs the piece in an A-B-A1–C-A2 structure. The first section (A) is taken exclusively from the first song, and bars 5 and 6 of the original are extended each time. The B section is based on the freely manipulated rhythm of the original bars from A, which are used in sequence. The C section consists of a shortened A section (A1). Strawinsky writes the three-part woodwind movement of the Trio (D section) using bars from the second song original. The final section (E) consists of an again shortened and slightly changed A section (A2), which, apart from one bar in the Flute part (Figure 201), smooths off the characteristic dotted rhythms, but retains the just-as-characteristic triplet rhythm. –

II. The songs that were used which have text (therefore presumably Strawinsky’s title Song) ‘Eg rodde meg’ and ‘En liten’ consist originally of 19 or, without counting the upbeats, 14 bars, so 33 in total, which Strawinsky extends to form the the 50 bars of his three-section piece. Structurally, Song is an A-B-A1 form, from which A is taken from the first and B from the second song. In the first section (A), the A minor tonality is retained, as is the original 3/4 time signature. After an introductory bar in the violins, which sets up their accompanying function in the next bar, the English Horn enters with the melody of the song, which follows the original for 9 bars with an alteration that is scarcely worth mentioning in the 4th bar. Bars 11/12 interrupt it with a string interlude. The melody line then transfers to the oboe with bassoon accompaniment, but only follows the original fragmentarily. Strawinsky changes the rhythmic stresses of the song without changing the length of the work. The extension of this section by 5 bars to 24, while leaving out a whole bar containing three calls of joy from the original written with 3 triplets goes back to an introductory bar, the two bars of instrumental interlude, bars 11 and 12, and to the 2 bars of transition from the A to the B section, bars 23 and 24. Section B, which actually begins by using the end of bar 25 as an upbeat but without the original leap of a fourth, makes 14 (15 including the upbeat) bars of the A-minor original into a 17-bar mixture of Aeolian and A minor while retaining the original 3/4 time signature. The entire melodic line is given to the 1st Flute. It faithfully follows the melody of the song from the original including the alternation between g# and g, and only omits the 4th bar (counted excluding the upbeat bar), and shortens the final bar at figure 28 by a crotchet length, in order to connect to a repetition of the first 4 bars (excluding the upbeat bar) but with the upbeat bar omitted. What therefore occurs is one of Strawinsky’s characteristic compressions, as he brings forward the rhythmic stresses of the original by a crotchet as a result of his having shortened the music by a crotchet. In order to remain true to the original in spite of this, he begins bar 16 (figure 28) with a crotchet rest, and thus ends one bar later (figure 291) again in the rhythm of the original. Section C consists of 9 bars taken from the first song, which shorten the first A section. The melodic line of the first 4 bars is given to the English Horn against split violin string accompaniment, and the following three bars are given to the two Flutes accompanied by the Solo Violin and Solo Viola. The two final chords are at first played by the divisi violins (figure 304), then the two flutes, oboe and English Horn (figure 305). The first 4 bars correspond to the original, for which Strawinsky, as before, rewrites the first note of the song, which appears in the original as a crotchet with a fermata (to be understood as one whole bar long), as a minim with a crotchet rest preceding it. The next three bars take up the characteristic triplet motif of the song alternately between the solo strings and winds (flutes, oboe), before the final chords, played pianissimo, are heard. –

III. In this wedding-dance piece, Strawinsky only uses 15 bars (20 including the repeat) of the folksong Brudeslaaten, and he makes the A section into a 70-bar-long A-B-A form with Coda. In no other piece in the Four Norwegian Moods does Strawinsky follow the original so truly. The first 20 bars of the A section retain the D minor tonality and the 2/4 time signature of the original. The repeat of the first 5 bars is written out fully. The same is true for the subsequent 7 bars, which are taken from the postlude of the folksong, the melody of which he gives to the bassoons. He only changes the final 3 bars because he needs to modulate to G major for his own middle section. This middle section (B), which is 23 bars long, was clearly freely composed, and does not use a folksong. It is probable that it has only not yet been found up to this point, and Strawinsky builds the music over a rhythmic framework (quaver rest, 2 semiquavers, 2 semiquavers + quaver) that seems to have been derived from the Brudeslaaten piece. The subsequent C section, which begins after a short accelerando which modulates back to D minor and which spans 20 bars, takes on the first 5 bars (10 including the repeat) of the original with very slight departures from it and it accumulates at the beginning in the melody, and at the end colours it, and there then follows note-for-note the 7 bars of the postlude of the original, which forms a sort of coda after a further 3 bars derived from bar 7. The Coda (D) consists of the first 4 bars of A, which correspond note-for-note to the original, and a modulatory step to A which is left open with the final chords. –

IV. Strawinsky uses 2 Norwegian songs in this processional piece. The first, Reise, spans 10 bars without repeat, but with the two repeats of the prelude and postlude 20 bars; the second, Halling, spans 8 bars without repeat, but with the three repeats of the prelude, middle section and postlude, 16 bars. Strawinsky constructs his 53 bar-long work from these 18, or 36, bars. As in his original compositions, he works with building blocks that he rotates in different orders. Structurally, Cortège is again an A-B-A1 form. However it appears as though Strawinsky was loath to always follow the original in the folksong style. In Cortège, it is not therefore a case of simple structures imitating the original, but inside the bars he on several occasions combines the end of a bar melody with the beginning of another one, which was not particularly difficult to do inside the tonal simplicity of the original. He constructs the first section, after a two-bar introduction without upbeat, from the rhythmic elements of the original with fragments from the first song. The original key of G major remains, and the original 4/4 time signature alternates in places between 4/4, 3/4 and 2/4. He takes note-for-note only the first two bars of the original as bars 3 and 4 with the melodic line in the violins, and allows the characteristic bassoon accompaniment to continue on, the quaver-semiquaver rhythm of which binds the entire section together; he reuses the two bars as bars 6 and 7, and the imitates the melody in bars 7 and 8 in the oboes and bassoons. Bars 9 to 12 reuse bars 3,4, 5 and 6 from the original with the melody in the 1st Horn, and he again reuses the first two bars of the original with identical orchestration from the second half of bar 12, which due to the change of bar up to that point reach into the 14th bar, and he uses bar 7 of the original, again with a horn melody, for this bar, and he still continues using bars 5 and 6 of the original as bars 15 and 16, still with the horn. The final bar, 17, corresponds to the first quaver of the repeated section 6 in the original and fills the remaining time with pauses. Strawinsky practically jumbles up with the original in an appropriate manner. The process can be depicted diagrammatically. The middle section, B, transposes the G major original to D major, retains the 2/4 time signature up to a point (bar 17 = figure 541) and makes 8 (including the repeat, 16) bars of the original into 20 bars. The process is the same as in the A section. Strawinsky cuts single bars, fragments and rhythmic elements out of the original and reassembles them in a different way. The first 4 bars are the first two bars of Halling which are already repeated in the original. The following sequence of bars 5 to 7 consist of bar 1 of the original and three, permuting, separated figures of four semiquavers which are taken from bar 6 of the original, but with the interposition of a single semiquaver value gives the effect of internal rhythmic dislocation. He recombines bars 1 and 2 of the original to make bars 8 to 12. Bar 13 (up to and including bars 16, a clarinet dialogue) is a combination of the 2nd half bar of bar 3 with the 1st half bar of bar 4 of the original. The second half bar of bar 4 of the original forms the first half bar of bar 14. For the rest of bar 14 up to the first half of bar 16, he reuses the permutation figure of bar 6 = bar 6 of the original. The rest of bar 16 is a running-off figure into bar 17, which is extended by a crotchet, in which bar 2 of the original is combined with accompaniment figures. The remaining bars, 18 to 20, correspond again to the first two bars of the original. Here too a diagram that makes clear these connections can be produced, depending on whether one thinks that Strawinsky either breaks off or compresses single bars from the original in this middle section. The final section, C, returns to the first melody, but extends the original substantially by 26 bars. The charm is created by the combination of different bars from the original and at the same time their ordering. The process cannot be shown so easily in a diagram because the bars interpenetrate one another. The tonality remains unaltered, and the original bar scheme is interrupted less often and only by units of three quavers. Bar 1 corresponds to the original. Bar 2 is a repetition of this, and the melody part alternates between the bassoon and the 1st Oboe. Bar 3 corresponds to bar 2 in the 1st Oboe, and bar 3 in the 2nd Oboe corresponds to bar 9 in the original. Bar 4 connects numerous very short melodic and rhythmic fragments from all of the bars used as the basis of this process. Bars 5 to 8 are, as previously in A, constructed using the repeat of the first two bars of the original. Bar 9 forms, with bar 8, the imitation of the first two bars in the 1st oboe. Bars 10 to 13 in the horn part correspond to bars 3 to 6 of the original. In bar 13 of the violin part therefore, the second half of bar 1 of the original is incorporated and is continued with a rhythmically displaced version of bars 2 and 3 of the original up to bar 15. The horn part then enters again with bar 3 of the original, omits bar 4 and continues with bars 5 and 6 of the original. The horn part ends at bar 17 of the version. The process repeats itself because from this bar up to bar 20, the violin part can be heard again twice with bars 1 and 2 of the original, and is even imitated again at the end in bars 19 to 21 by the oboes. In turn, their unison D finally declaimed by the strings, which is held for 5 bars from bar 22 up to the first crotchet of 26, completes the work and the composition as a sort of coda.

 

Construction table

Example ‚Cortège’*

A-section                                  B-section                                  A1-section

bars                                          bars                                          bars

Strawinsky        Source              Strawinsky        Source              Strawinsky        Source 

01                     00                     01                     01                     01                     01

02                     00                     02                     02                     02                     01

#                       03                     01                     03                     (X)

03                     01                     04                     02                                             #

04                     02                                             #                      04                     (X)

#                       05                     01                                 #

05                     00                     06                     (6)                    05                     01

#                       07                     (6)                    06                     02

06                     01                                             #                      07                     01

07                     02                     08                     01                     08                     02+01

08                     02                     09                     02                                 #         

#                       10                     01                     09                     02

09                     03                     11                     01                     10                     03

10                     04                     12                     02                     11                     04

11                     05                                             #                      12                     05

12                     06+01               13                     03+04               13                     06+01

#                       14                     04+(06)                         #

13                     01+02               15                     06                     14                     06+02

#                       16                     06+00               15                     03

14                     02+09               17                     02                     16                     05

15                     05                                             #                      17                     06+01

16                     06                     18                     01                                 #         

17                     06                     19                     01                     18                     02

                                                20                     02                     19                     01

                                                                                                20                     02+01

                                                                                                21                     02

                                                                                                            #         

                                                                                                22                     (Coda)

                                                                                                23                     (Coda)

                                                                                                24                     (Coda)

                                                                                                25                     (Coda)

                                                                                                26                     (Coda)

* According to Helmut Kirchmeyer: Verfahrenstechniken Strawinskyscher Bearbeitungen, in: Musikinformatik und Medientechnik, Musikwissenschaftliches Institut der Universität Mainz, Bericht Nr. 40, März 2000, 17 S.

 

Dedication: no dedication known.

 

Duration: 224″ (Intrada), 213″ (Song), 115″ (Wedding Dance), 213″ (Cortège).

 

Date of origin: Hollywood, spring up to 18th August 1942.

 

First performance: 13rd January 1944, Sanders Theatre, Cambridge, Massachusetts, Boston Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

 

Remarks: Without Strawinsky’s own statements, we would not know today the reason for the composition of the Four Norwegian Moods. As a result of these, the four pieces have a two-fold compositional root. The first begins with the commission by a Hollywood film company to write music to an anti-Nazi film which was to be about the invasion of Norway by German troops in the Second World War, and the other was his wife’s visit to an antique shop. As to which film company it was or which folksong collection Vera Strawinsky bought remains unspecified. Strawinsky even forgot the name of the film when he was asked about it in 1959. The compositional period can be logically defined as being from the early part of 1942 up to the autumn of that year using the confirmed fragmentary data available to us. The invasion of Norway was an event in the War that took place between April and June 1942. The order to land was given on 2nd April, and Narvik was invaded on 9th April by the mountain infantry. On 28th May however, it was captured back by the Allied forces who, after being beaten again by the German troops, withdrew from Norway on 8th June. There can therefore have been no commission given to Strawinsky before the 9th April, because the events in Norway had not yet taken place. Over the course of May, it looked like the English would win and this offered a good battle film scenario for the Allies. Strawinsky would probably not have selected a song without good reason for his second instrumental piece, the text of which portrays one party chasing away another from their own waters. While the surviving composition sketches, very unusually for Strawinsky, are neither signed nor dated, the surviving orchestral autograph score bears the date of completion 18th August 1942. According to this, his work on Four Norwegian Moods was completed, as we know today, between the middle of April at the earliest up to the 18th August 1942. Strawinsky, who was living humbly in Hollywood, must have wanted a speedy completion in order to avoid newly looming financial concerns. For this reason, Strawinsky worked very quickly. The music was also to turn out more favourably than usual. Both facilitated the idea of making a Folksong Suite. On 5th October 1943, Strawinsky informed Nicolas Nabokov from Hollywood of his composition, explained its idea of Mood as Modus and brought up the matter of the folk songs edition in an explanatory note. Vera is not mentioned in this, and neither is anything about the antique shop. According to this letter, he found the edition himself in a public library. Here, he also names the publishers as being Hansen, dates the edition to the beginning of the century and names the pieces authentic, irrespective of their aesthetic origins which are from Grieg, Sinding, Svendon etc. These two versions don’t necessarily contradict themselves. An antique shop can also be a library and vice versa, and Strawinsky certainly did not use the term ‘library’ to mean as a specialist library. There were numerous reasons, with regard to Nabokov, why it was not a technical question or a question of the history of a composition, but a short casual message to describe a situation that is very small and skeletal. According to Craft years later, the matter should be seen quite differently. He conveyed to Voigt in a letter dated 25th July 1942 of the completion of, as he wrote, a Little Suite on Norwegian Folk Tunes. He gave the duration as 7 minutes. Strawinsky evidently delayed sending it to the publishers a little after he had made a connection with a group of studio musicians that gave composers the opportunity to hear their pieces in a rehearsal, i.e. they gave what was known in France at the time of Wagner as auditions. This can be construed from a letter that Strawinsky sent to Voigt on 4th September 1942. There must have been a recording of the pieces shortly afterwards. This can be seen in a letter that Strawinsky sent to Hugo Winter of Associated Music Publishers on 11th February 1944. An idea of Koussevitsky’s efforts to repeat Strawinsky’s Boston programme the next day under his own direction and to record the Circus Polka can be seen in this letter. Strawinsky advised Winter to send his recording of the Symphony, Norwegian Moods and Circus Polka to Koussevitsky, in order that he might known what they were like and that there remain no room for conjecture. – In Strawinsky’s few comments about the compositional history of the Four Norwegian Moods, he rejected claims that he used originals found by Grieg; in spite of this, Grieg’s handwriting cannot be mistaken. With the use of unaltered melodies, and especially the harmonic original, Strawinsky also certainly did use Grieg’s melodic and harmonic thinking. If one asserts that Strawinsky could not have known that the anonymous editor was in fact Grieg, although according to a letter dated 5th October 1943 to Nabokov he had recognised Grieg’s (and Sinding’s) handwriting, and one does not know whether in his bought copy the publishers’ mark was eventually made in handwriting, then he was subjectively correct when he ruled out a direct influence from the Norwegian composer. His critics were also right however, although they would not know that during their lifetimes, but Grieg’s handwriting could be identified, especially in the 2nd and 3rd pieces.

 

Movie Data: In the middle of 1942, the filming of an anti-Nazi propaganda war film began in Hollywood after the invasion of Norway by German troops, to which Strawinsky was to write the music. The script, which was accepted after an American directorial call-to-arms for the creation of anti-German films by Columbia Pictures, was called Commandos strike at Dawn, and worked with the typical fill-up paragraph methods of the flawless heroism on the one hand and the evil stupidity of the other. John Farrow was the director. The main roles were played by Lilian Gish and Paul Muni. The black-and-white movie has a duration of 98 (according to French sources*: 99) minutes (8,973 ft.) and is based on the story by C. S. Forester which has been published in the “Cosmopolitan magazine”. Strawinsky neither watched the movie nor knew Forester’s script before the scoring. He exclusively went by the screenplay. Admiral Bowen, R.N., his daughter Judith and his son Robert were on holiday at a Norwegian fjord village in summer 1939. Judith left her heart there, with Eric Toresen (Paul Muni). The Germans came to the village. Toresen led the underground war against them. In the hills he found a new German aerodrome which within a fortnight was to become a major base with hundreds of ‘planes. Toresen, with half a dozen villagers, escaped to England in a small boat. A Commando raid was made on the new aerodrome with Admiral Bowen in command, his son Robert heading the landing force and Toresen as guide. It was entirely successful, but Robert and Toresen were killed in rescuing Toresen‘s little daughter (he was a widower) and other Norwegians from the village. The distinction of this C. S. Forester story is the / feeling of reality the director has given it by exploiting natural scenery and restrained acting. Most of the scenes are out-of-doors, and the gorges of Newfoundland (eftective film substitute for Norwegian fjords) make an impressive background. Paul Muni, playing a younger role than most he has had recently, presents the transition of Torensen – from the diffident serious young man of peace to the ruthless alert franc-tireur – with a sureness of touch which is rnasterly. By contrast with the deft underplaying in the rest of his performance, the convulsions of his dying (when he is shot) are so violently gruesome that one wonders what other player could have made them convincing. Sir Cedric Hardwicke as the admiral and Robert Coote as his son have a sound supporting cast. The enthusiasm and vigour of a force of Canadian troops in the Commando battle scenes contributes in no small measure to their verisimilitude”* – The film ran with a certain amount of success from Winter 1942/43, and was shown in France (LE COMMANDO FRAPPE A L’AUBE) but not in Germany. – The 7 songs sought out by Strawinsky resulted in 4 innocuous and idyllic pieces that were unsuited for the purposes of Hollywood as well as to the Hollywood style, so that the film people were not able to use it at all. The film was made however, but the music was written by Louis Gruenberg, an opera and concert composer born in Russia in 1883, and who grew up in New York, instead of by Strawinsky. He, like Strawinsky, did not come from the branch of film composers, but delivered a few contributions to Hollywood during the ‘40’s. That is one version. It could also be that Strawinsky, with his own ideas for film music, was not actually interested in the war film and accepted the commission only due to his financial need, as in many other cases at the time, and completed it ˜with the left hand’, writing it with the intention of having his music later performed in concert. What supports this is that he wrote the Four Norwegian Moods as a concert score and exclusively to the script and some of the scenes selected from it, which ruled out its use as unedited film music from the start.

* La Saison Cinematographique 194547, Paris, S. 53[b-c].

** Monthly Film Bulletin, London, 30. April 1943, p.39[a-b]

 

Film projects: Although Strawinsky lived for many years during his time in America in immediate proximity to the film metropolis Hollywood, and there was certainly not a lack of film offers, without exception all of Strawinsky’s (just like Schönberg’s) film projects fell through. Both composers could not get the measure of having to play a supporting role with their art in a cinema film. Strawinsky had already begun work on the filming of the cartoon of Renard for Walt Disney, and the Norwegian project was from his point of view mostly completed, but the cartoon project failed, although Disney was still interested in Strawinsky, as his excerpt from Sacre featured in Fantasia had shown. The fact that the harmless Grieg imitation in the Four Norwegian Moods was not suitable for an anti-German propaganda film for the American taste, is nothing against the film makers themselves, all the less if one believes Strawinsky’s later claim that he did not write the works genuinely for the film, but for concert performance. Strawinsky reported that he was offered one hundred thousand dollars for the film music and after his refusal in spite of this, he was offered the same sum if he would only lend his name to it and allow someone else to write the music. According to Strawinsky, it was only about money with people from the film world, and thus he always liked to deal with them because they never hid behind artistic arguments. Both Schönberg and Strawinsky however refused the artistic conditions of the film people. Strawinsky cited at this opportunity Schönberg’s >Ihr tötet mich, um mich vor dem Hungertod zu retten< [You kill me, so as to save me from starvation]. In order to make money from a film, it must able to be sold, and in order to sell a film profitably, it must satisfy the taste of the masses, because only from the masses can the costs be recouped. For cognoscenti, the music of Strawinsky, as well as Schönberg, was not appropriate for this, unless it was a pure art film that was being produced, such as in certain French productions by Cocteau, the focal point of which was Schönberg’s or Strawinsky’s music. This was never the case. Strawinsky did not miss to describe Schönberg’s Musik zu einer Lichtspielszene as the best film music ever in the context of the explanations about his experiences with film people, with the undercutting remark that this was probably because there was no film to it.

 

Significance: The appreciation of the historical significance of the pieces depends on the originals, whether they are seen as arrangements or as self-standing works. If one sees them as arrangements, then they are a well made orchestration of idiosyncratically extended folksong originals constructed in Strawinsky’s style; if one sees them as compositions, then they are worthwhile, but less exciting copies of a style of Norwegian folksongs after Grieg, the continuing awareness of which may be exclusively owing to its connection with Strawinsky’s name.

 

Versions: The Four Norwegian Moods were published in October 1944 as a pocket score in a print run of 1,023 copies by Associated Music Publishers in New York. The publishing contract was settled on 10th November 1942. Strawinsky received a flat fee of 500 dollars and the usual shares including his percentage share of the shop sale price of the pocket score. In the publishing year up to the middle of 1945, 152 scores were sold and 103 given away for free. Up to June 1947, 280 were sold, and 28 free copies given away. The conducting score and parts were only available to hire. Schott publishers, based in Mainz, would later take on the pocket score in their series Music of the 20th Century.

 

Historical recordings: New York 5th February 1945 with the new york philharmonic orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 29th March 1963 with the canadian broadcasting corporation symphony orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: VI/1316 (Recording 1963).

 

Autograph: A photocopy of the autograph score from Nadia Boulanger’s estate is located in the National Library in Paris, and the short score is in the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel.

 

Copyright: 1944 by Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York.

 

Editions

a) Overview

651 1944 PoSc; Associated Music Publishers New York; 48 pp.; A. p. 19449.

651Straw1 ibd. [with annotations]  

651Straw2 [with annotations]

 

652 [1973] PoSc; Schott Mainz; 32 pp.; 43400; 6333.

b) Characteristic features

651 Igor Stravinsky / FOUR / NORWEGIAN MOODS / for orchestra / (1942) / [Vignette] / Miniature Score .… $ 1.75 / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U. S. A. // Igor Stravinsky / FOUR / NORWEGIAN MOODS / (1942) / [#] Page / Intrada* 2 / Song* 18 / Wedding Dance* 23 / Cortège* 37 / Orchestra material available on rental / Time 8½ minutes / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U. S. A. // (Pocket score stapled 15.2 x 23 (8° [gr. 8°]); 48 [47] pages + 4 cover pages thin cardboard black on light green-grey [front cover title with centre centred picture vignette 5,1 x 5,6 female head facing the audience crowned with a lyra centre on stage with raised curtain, 2 empty pages, empty page with shaded centre centred vignette 2.1 x 2.6 >AMP-Music<**] + 1 page front matter [title page]; title head >Four Norwegian Moods<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 above and below movement title >Intrada< flush right centred >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1942<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area inside left >Copyright, 1944, by Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York<; production indication p. 2 below type area flush right >Printed in U.S.A.<; plate number >A. S. 19449<; without end mark) // (1944)

* Movement title flush left, fill character (dotted line), page number flush right.

** The word >Music< stands against/towards the letter >P< vertically underneath the bulge/stomach and has as a syllable the same font size as half of a single letter.

 

651Straw1

 

Strawinsky’s copy is signed and dated: on the outer title page on the right >IStr< above the name, and with >I Strawinsky / 27 Oct. I944< on the right of the inner title page next to >FOUR< and under >NORWEGIAN MOODS<. On the empty back page of the outer title page, he notes down a test translation >  — deutlich / — rhythmi / — klar / — <. The copy contains no further corrections, only instructions to the conductor.

 

651Straw2

 

The second copy in the estate is unsigned and contains the following markings: >crotchet = I24< at figure 411 above the Piccolo system, >Tempo 1°< underneath the bassoon system, and >crotchet = I24< above the Violin system for the 1st Violins.

 

652 Schott / Musik des 20. Jahrhunderts / [°] / Strawinsky / Four Norwegian Moods / for Orchestra / Vier norwegische Impressionen / für Orchester / Ed. 6333 / [vignette] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Four Norwegian Moods / for Orchestra / (1942) / Vier norwegische Impressionen / für Orchester / Studien-Partitur / Edition Schott 6333 / B. Schott’s Söhne · Mainz / Schott & Co. Ltd. · London / Schott Music Corp. · New York // (Score sewn 19.2 x 27.3 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 52 [47] pages + 4 cover pages black on bright yellow [front cover title with vignette 0.7 x 1.2 yellow on black wheel of Mainz in a frame without text, 2 empty pages creme white, page with publisher’s advertisements bright yellow >Schott / Music of the 20 th Century<* without production data] + 6 pages front matter [title page flush right, empty page, legend flush right >Orchestra< English + duration data [8½’] English<, empty page, index flush right >Intrada / Song / Wedding Dance / Cortège<, empty page] + without back matter; title head in connection with author specified and unnumbered movement title 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 6] flush right >Igor Strawinsky / Four Norwegian Moods / (1942) / Intrada<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush right >© Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York, 1944 / © assigned to B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz, 1968<; without end of score dated p. 52; production indication in connection with price English advertising page below advertising block flush left >Printed in Germany< flush right >70 s<; plate number [exclusively] in connection with production indication p.52 flush right as end mark >Verlag: B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz 43400<) // [1973]

° [nearly] page width dividing (horizontal) line.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns with edition numbers without fill character (dots) shown in the block of Schott scores from >Wolfgang Fortner< to >Bernd Alois Zimmermann<, amongst these >Igor Strawinsky / Ode. Triptychon für Orchester (1943) Ed. 5942 / Scherzo fantastique Ed. 3501 / Danses concertantes< Ed. 4275, in the block of the Eulenburg scores compositions from >Tadeusz Baird< to >Goffredo Petrassi< (Strawinsky not mentioned).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

65

F o u r  N o r w e g i a n  M o o d s

for orchestra – Vier Stücke nach norwegischer Art (Vier norwegische Impressionen = Vier norwegische Stimmungsbilder) für Orchester – Quatre Pièces à la norvégiennes (Quatre Impressions norvégiennes) pour orchestre – Impressioni Norvegesi. [Quattro episodi alla norvegese] per orchestra

 

Titel: Als Strawinsky 1939 nach Amerika kam, waren seine englischen Sprachkenntnisse mangelhaft. So unterlief ihm für seine norwegischen Stücke ein falscher Titel, weil er mit Mood den lateinischen Begriff modus meinte. Daher sind alle gebräuchlich gewordenen Übersetzungen, die moods mit Impressionen, Stimmungsbilder oder Impressions, gleich mit welchen Eigenschaftswörtern, wiedergeben, unrichtig. Der wirkliche, dem Sachverhalt entsprechende Titel ist französisch gedacht und lautet Quatre Pièces à la norvégiennes. Es ergibt sich also bei den Four Norwegian Moods erneut der Fall eines diesmal englischen Originaltitels, der den Sinn nicht wiedergibt, und einer streng genommen falschen, aber als eigentliches Original autorisierten französischen Übertragung, die dem Sachverhalt gerecht wird und der man demgemäß bei Übersetzungen in andere Sprachen folgen müßte.

 

Besetzung*: a) Erstausgabe: Piccolo Flute, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, English horn, 2 Clarinets in Bb (also in A), 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in Bb, 2 Trombones, Tuba, Timpani, Strings (Violins I, Violins II, Violas, Violoncellos, Double Basses [Piccolo-Flöte, 2 Flöten, 2 Oboen, Englischhorn, 2 Klarinetten in B und A, 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in B, 2 Posaunen, Tuba, Pauken, Streicher (ViolinenI, Violinen II, Bratschen, Violoncelli, Kontrabässe); b) Aufführungsanforderungen: kleine Flöte (= 2. große Flöte), 2 große Flöten (2. große Flöte = kleine Flöte), 2 Oboen (2. Oboe = Englischhorn), Englischhorn (= 2. Oboe), 2 Klarinetten (B und A), 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in B, 2 Posaunen, Tuba, 3 Pauken, 2 Solo-Violinen, 1 Solo-Bratsche, Streicher (1. Violine**, 2. Violine**, Bratsche**, Violoncello**, Kontrabaß)

* Die Besetzungsliste gibt die Gesamtheit aller zur Verwendung kommenden Instrumente an; die Stücke selbst sind individuell unterschiedlich besetzt.

** zweifach geteilt.

 

Aufbau: Es handelt sich um eine Abfolge von vier mit Überschriften versehenen, nicht numerierten, individuell apart instrumentierten kurzen Orchesterstücken in einfachster Dur-Moll-Tonalität im Stile schlichter norwegischer Volksmusik.

 

Aufriß

Intrada

            Viertel = 106 (77 Takte [ohne Auftakt] = Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 203 [formtypologisch A-B-A1-

                                    C-A2])

                        [B-Dur-Teil] (16 Takte [ohne Auftakt] = Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 3) {A}*

                        [F-Dur-Teil] (25 Takte = Ziffer 4 bis Ende Ziffer 9) {B}*

                        [B-Dur-Teil] (10 Takte = Ziffer 10 bis Ende Ziffer 12) {C = verkürzt A}*

                        Trio** [C-Dur-Teil] (17 Takte = Ziffer 13 bis Ende Ziffer 17) {D}

                        [B-Dur-Teil] (9 Takte = Ziffer 18 bis Ende Ziffer 20) {E = verkürzt A}*

Besetzung: Tutti ohne Englisch Horn***, ohne 3./4. Horn***, B-Klarinetten ohne Mutierung nach A***, ohne Solo-Streicher, 1./2. Violinen und Bratschen geteilt

                                                * { } Analyse-Kennbuchstabe

                                                ** Besetzung mit 1 B-Klarinette und 2 Fagotten

                                                *** Englisch Horn, 4 Hörner, B– und A-Klarinetten in der Instrumentenlegende der ersten Seite des

Stücks  mit vorgezeichnet

 

Song (Lied)

            Viertel = 66 ([C-Dur] 50 Takte = Ziffer 21 bis Ende Ziffer 305 [formtypologisch A-B-A1])

                        [a-moll-Teil] (24 Takte = Ziffer 21 bis Ende Ziffer 24) {A}*

                        [äolisch-a-moll-Teil] (17 Takte = Ziffer 25 bis Ziffer 291) {B}*

                        [a-moll-Teil] (9 Takte = Ziffer 292 bis Ende Ziffer 30) {C = verkürzt A}*

Besetzung: 2 große Flöten, 1 Oboe, Englischhorn, 1 Fagott, 1 Solo-Violine, 1 Solo-Bratsche, Streicher (1./2. Violinen geteilt)

                                                * { } Analyse-Kennbuchstabe

 

Wedding Dance (Hochzeitstanz)

            Viertel = 124 (70 Takte = Ziffer 31 bis Ende Ziffer 457 [formtypologisch A-B-A1–A2])

                        [d-moll-Teil] (20 Takte = Ziffer 31 bis Ende Ziffer 34) {A}*

                        Meno mosso Viertel = 108

                        [G-Dur-Teil] (23 Takte = Ziffer 35 bis Ende Ziffer 40**) {B}*

                        [d-moll-Teil] (13 Takte = Ziffer 41 bis Ende Ziffer 44) {C = leicht verändert A}*

                        [d-moll] (7 Takte = Ziffer 45) {C = verkürzt A mit Coda-Charakter}*

Besetzung: Tutti mit Piccolg-Flöte, 2 Oboen ohne Englisch Horn, B-Klarinetten ohne Mutierung nach A, ohne 2. Posaune, ohne Solo-Streicher, Violoncelli geteilt

                                                * { } Analyse-Kennbuchstabe

                                                ** Ziffer 40 = 4014 Anweisung zum accelerando

 

Cortège (Festzug)

            Viertel = 88 {A}* (53 Takte = Ziffer 46 bis Ende Ziffer 605 [formtypologisch A-B-A1])

                        [G-Dur-Teil] (17 Takte = Ziffer 46 bis Ende Ziffer 49)

                        Più mosso Viertel = 120 {B}*

                        [D-Dur-Teil] (20 Takte = Ziffer 50 bis Ende Ziffer 54)

                        Tempo Imo Viertel = 88 {C = erweitert und durchgeführt A}*

                        [G-Dur-Teil] (26 Takte = Ziffer 55 bis Ende Ziffer 60)

Besetzung: Tutti mit Piccolo-Flöte, 2 Oboen ohne Englisch Horn, A-Klarinetten ohne Mutierung nach B, ohne 4. Horn, ohne Trompeten, ohne Posaunen, ohne Tuba, 2 Solo-Violinen, ohne Solo-Bratsche, 1./2. Violine geteilt

                                                * { } Analyse-Kennbuchstabe

 

Vorlage: Die von Vera Strawinsky in Los Angeles aufgestöberte und von Strawinsky nur in seinem Brief an Nabokow vom 5. Oktober 1943 andeutungsweise charakterisierte, im übrigen unbenannt gelassene, für seine Stücke benutzte Volksliedersammlung findet sich 1972 von Uwe Kraemer* als Norges Melodier identifiziert. Obwohl es unter den zahlreichen Ausgaben norwegischer Volkslieder solche gibt, in denen das eine oder andere der sieben von Strawinsky verwendeten Volks– und Tanzlieder anzutreffen ist, fanden sich nur in den Norges Melodier alle nachgewiesenen Vorlagen, insgesamt sieben, gemeinsam vor. Die vier Bände erschienen in unterschiedlichen Zeitabständen zwischen 1875 und 1924. Der erste Band wurde anonym von Edvard Grieg herausgegeben, die drei weiteren von Eyvind Alnaes. Die verantwortlichen Verlage Wilhelm Hansen Musik-Forlag in Kopenhagen und Leipzig sowie Norsk Musikforlag in Stockholm und später Oslo waren Strawinsky als seine eigenen Verleger (Concertino) und Verleger Schönbergs (Serenade) bestens bekannt und Kraemers Mutmaßungen wurden durch die Nennung des Verlagsnamens Hansen Nabokow gegenüber zunächst zusätzlich bestätigt. Die vier Bände stellen insgesamt fünfhundert norwegische Volksliedweisen mit einer ganz schlichten Klavierbegleitung ohne Einzel– oder gar Durchnumerierung zusammen. Der erste Band enthält 123, der zweite 120, der dritte 125, der vierte 132 zum Teil mit unterlegten Texten versehene Stücke. Die Ausgabe erfüllte im Sinne des skandinavischen Nationalismus dokumentarische Zwecke, erhob aber keine Ansprüche auf Wissenschaftlichkeit. Es ist eine ausschließlich praktische Ausgabe für Volksliedfreunde mit geringen klavieristischen Fähigkeiten, ohne Vorwort, ohne Editionshinweise und auch ohne Erläuterung der Sammelprinzipien. Kraemer entdeckte darin alle von Strawinsky benutzten Volkslieder und listete sie auf. Angeblich soll es aber nicht die vierbändige Urausgabe gewesen sein, die Vera Strawinsky ihrem Mann brachte, sondern ein einbändiger amerikanischer Nachdruck aus dem Jahre 1930 (The Norway Music Album, Verlag O. Ditson, Boston), dem Strawinsky seine Vorlagen entnahm. Es schmälert nicht Kraemers Leistung, wenn es stimmen sollte. Ob Vera Strawinsky die norwegische Anthologie schon besaß und Strawinsky darauf zurückgriff, oder ob sie nach ersten Verhandlungen mit der Filmfirma mit ihrem Mann gezielt nach norwegischen Volksliedern suchte, weil die Orchestrierung einer noch dazu passenden Vorlage die Arbeit beschleunigte; ob sich Strawinskys Idee auf norwegische Volkslieder richtete oder das Vorhandensein solcher Lieder die Idee in eine bestimmte Bahn lenkte, sind Fragen, die unbeantwortet bleiben müssen. 

 

* Uwe Kraemer: „Four Norwegian Moods“ von Igor Strawinsky, Melos, Februar-Heft 1972, S. 80[b]-84[a].

 Tabelle der übernommenen Volksliedweisen

Intrada

     Brurelaat

          Norges Melodier Band III, S. 1617

               original Moderato mit Wiederholung 24 Vierviertel-Takte G-Dur

     Underjordisk musik

          Norges Melodier Band IV, S. 186

               original Andante mit Wiederholungen 32 Zweiviertel-Takte A-Dur

Song

     Eg rodde meg ut pas selagrunnen (Ich rudert‘ hinaus und hab‘gefunden)

          Norges Melodier Band I, S. 39

               original Andante 19 Dreiviertel-Takte a-moll

     En liten gutifra Tiste dal´n

          Norges Melodier Band I, S. 42

               original Con moto 14 Dreiviertel-Takte ohne Auftaktzählung a-moll

Wedding Dance

     Brudeslaaten

          Norges Melodier Band I, S. 20

               original Allegro moderato mit Wiederholung 20 Zweiviertel-Takte d-moll

Cortège

     Reise laat for brudefolget, near det kommer fra kirken

          Norges Melodier Band II, S. 124

               original Moderato mit Wiederholungen 20 Vierviertel-Takte G-Dur mit Modulation 2. Teil nach D-Dur

     Halling

          Norges Melodier Band II, S. 59

               original Moderato mit Wiederholungen 16 Zweiviertel-Takte G-Dur

Stilistik: I. Die 56 Takte der beiden Vorlagen-Lieder Brurelaat und Underjordisk musik werden bei Strawinsky um 21 auf 77 Takte erweitert, die Tonart des ersten Liedes von G-Dur nach B-Dur, die des zweiten Liedes von A-Dur nach C-Dur verschoben. Der Original-Takt 4/4 des ersten Liedes bleibt erhalten, der des zweiten Liedes 2/4 wird auf ebenfalls 4/4 erweitert und damit angepaßt. Von den (ohne Wiederholung gezählt) 16 Takten des ersten Liedes übernimmt er nur die ersten 6 Takte, aus den (ohne Wiederholung gezählt) 16 Takten des zweiten Liedes die ersten 4. Aus diesen zehn Originaltakten baut er das Stück als A-B-A1–C-A2–Form auf. Der erste Abschnitt {A} wird ausschließlich vom ersten Lied bestritten, wobei die Vorlagentakte 5 und 6 jedesmal erweitert werden. Der {B}-Teil lebt vom frei umgestalteten Rhythmus der Vorlagentakte A, die sequenziert werden. Der {C}-Teil besteht aus einem verkürzten {A}-Teil (A1). Den dreistimmigen Bläsersatz des Trio-{D}-Teils gestaltet Strawinsky mit den Vorlagetakten des zweiten Liedes. Der Schlußteil {E} besteht aus einem erneut verkürzten und leicht veränderten {A}-Teil (A2), der bis auf einen Takt in der großen Flöte (Ziffer 201) die charakteristischen Punktierungen abglättet, wohl aber die ebenso charakteristische Triolenbewegung beibehält. –

II. Die übernommenen textierten Lieder (deshalb vermutlich Strawinskys Stücktitel Song) Eg rodde meg und En liten bestehen original aus 19 beziehungsweise ohne Auftaktzählung 14, insgesamt also aus 33 Takten, mit denen Strawinsky die 50 Takte seines dreiteiligen Stückes bestreitet. Formtypologisch ist Song eine A-B-A1–Form, wobei A vom ersten und B vom zweiten Lied gespeist wird. Im ersten Abschnitt {A} bleibt die a-moll-Tonalität erhalten, ebenso der originale Dreiviertel-Takt. Nach einem Einleitungstakt der Violinen, der ihrer Begleitfunktion im nächsten Takt entspricht, setzt das Englisch Horn mit der Liedmelodie ein, die der Vorlage 9 Takte lang mit kaum nennenswerter Veränderung im 4. Takt folgt. Die Takte 11/12 unterbrechen mit einem Streicherzwischenspiel. Dann geht die Melodieführung unter Fagottbegleitung an die Oboe über, folgt der Vorlage aber nur noch fragmentarisch. Strawinsky verändert die rhythmischen Schwerpunkte des Liedes, ohne den Umfang anzutasten. Die Erweiterung dieses Teils um 5 Takte auf 24 unter Weglassung eines ganztaktigen mit 3 Triolen ausgedrückten dreimaligen Jubelrufes der Vorlage geht auf den Einleitungstakt, die beiden instrumentalen Zwischenspieltakte 11 und 12 und auf die 2 Takte Überleitung vom A– zum B-Abschnitt 23 und 24 zurück. Der Abschnitt {B}, der eigentlich schon am Ende von Takt 25 als Vortakt allerdings ohne den originalen Quartsprung einsetzt, macht aus den 14 (mit Auftakt 15) Takten der a-moll-Vorlage 17 Takte Mischung aus äolisch und a-moll unter Beibehaltung des originalen Dreiviertel-Taktes. Die gesamte Melodieführung ist der 1. Flöte zugeordnet. Sie spielt die Liedmelodie der Vorlage bis auf die Schwankungen zwischen gis und g notengetreu nach und verzichtet lediglich auf den (ohne Vortaktzählung) 4. Takt und verkürzt den Schlußtakt bei Ziffer 281 um einen Viertelwert, um unter Verzicht auf den Vortakt eine Wiederholung der (ohne Vortaktzählung) ersten 4 Takte des Liedes anzuschließen. Dabei kommt es wieder zu den charakteristischen Strawinskyschen Stauchungen, da er durch die Viertelwertverkürzung die rhythmischen Schwerpunkte des Originals um einen Viertelwert vorverlegen muß. Um trotzdem originalgetreu auskommen zu können, beginnt er Takt 16 (Ziffer 284) mit einer Viertelpause, und schließt dadurch einen Takt später (Ziffer 291) wieder im Rhythmus des Originals. Der Abschnitt {C} besteht nur noch aus 9 Takten, die dem ersten Lied entnommen sind und den ersten A-Teil verkürzen. Die Melodieführung der ersten 4 Takte ist unter geteilter Violin-Streicherbegleitung dem Englisch Horn zugeordnet, die der folgenden drei vorrangig den beiden großen Flöten unter Begleitung von Solo-Violine und Solo-Bratsche. Die beiden Schlußakkorde spielen zunächst die geteilten Violinen (Ziffer 304) dann die beiden Flöten, Oboe und Englisch Horn (Ziffer 305). Die 4 ersten Takte entsprechen der Vorlage, wobei Strawinsky, wie schon zuvor, den ersten Liedton, der im Original ganztaktig verstanden als Viertelwert mit Fermate erscheint, als Halbenote mit vorausgehender Viertelpause umschreibt. Die nächsten drei Takte greifen wechselnd zwischen Solo-Streichern und Bläsern (Flöten, Oboe) das charakteristische Triolenmotiv des Liedes auf, bevor die Pianissimo gespielten Schlußakkorde erklingen. –

III. Im Hochzeitstanzstück verwertet Strawinsky nur die ohne Wiederholung 15, mit Wiederholung 20 Takte der Volksweise Brudeslaaten, die zu einer 70 Takte umfassenden A-B-A-Form mit Coda aus A wird. In keinem anderen Stück der Four Norwegian Moods ist Strawinsky so notengetreu der Vorlage gefolgt. Die ersten 20 Takte des {A}-Teils behalten die d-moll-Tonart und den Zweiviertel-Takt des Originals bei. Die Wiederholung der ersten 5 Takte wird auskomponiert geschrieben. Für die anschließenden, aus dem Nachsatz der Volksweise genommenen 7 Takte, deren Melodie er in die Fagotte legt, gilt dasselbe. Lediglich die letzten 3 Takte wandelt er ab, weil er für seinen eigenen Mittelteil nach G-Dur modulieren muß. Dieser Mittelteil {B} aus 23 Takten ist offensichtlich frei nachkomponiert und benutzt keine Volksweise. Möglicherweise hat man sie aber bislang nur noch nicht gefunden. Strawinsky baut die Musik über ein rhythmisches Muster (Achtel-Pause, 2 Sechzehntel, 2 Sechzehntel + Achtel), das aus dem Brudeslaaten–Stück abgeleitet zu sein scheint. Der nachfolgende {C}-Abschnitt, der nach einem kurzen, nach d-moll zurückmodulierenden accelerando einsetzt und 20 Takte umfaßt, übernimmt zunächst die ersten 5, mit Wiederholung 10 Takte der Vorlage mit ganz leichten, die Melodie anfangs etwas stauenden, am Ende färbenden Abweichungen, und folgt dann wieder wörtlich den 7 Takten der Nachsatz-Vorlage, um nach weiteren 3 Takten aus abgewandeltem Takt 7 in eine Art Coda zu münden. Die Coda {D} besteht aus den notenidentisch wiederholten ersten 4 Takten von {A}, die der Vorlage entsprechen, und einem offen gelassenen Modulationsschritt nach A mit Finalakkorden. –

IV. Im Festzugs-Stück verwendet Strawinsky 2 norwegische Weisen. Die erste, Reise, umfaßt ohne Wiederholung 10, mit den beiden Wiederholungen von Vorder– und Nachsatz 20 Takte, die zweite, Halling, ohne Wiederholung 8, mit den drei Wiederholungen von Vorder-, Mittel– und Nachsatz 16 Takte. Aus diesen 18 beziehungsweise 36 Takten baut, besser konstruiert Strawinsky seine Bearbeitung von 53 Takten. Wie in seinen Originalkompositionen arbeitet er mit Bruchstücken, die er in unterschiedlicher Reihenfolge montiert. Formtypologisch ist Cortège wieder eine A-B-A1–Form. Doch scheint es so, als sei es Strawinsky leid geworden, immer nur der Vorlage im Volksliedstil zu folgen. In Cortège kommt es daher nicht nur zu leichten Imitationsgebilden, sondern innerhalb der Takte kombiniert er auch mehrfach das Ende einer Taktmelodie mit dem Anfang einer anderen, was bei der tonalen Schlichtheit der Vorlage nicht unbedingt schwierig zu bewerkstelligen war. Den ersten Abschnitt {A} bestreitet er nach einem zweitaktigen auftaktlosen Vorspiel aus Rhythmuselementen der Vorlage mit Fragmenten aus dem ersten Lied. Die Originaltonart G-Dur bleibt erhalten, der Originaltakt Vierviertel wechselt streckenweise taktweise zwischen Vierviertel, Dreiviertel und Zweiviertel. Notenidentisch übernimmt er zunächst nur die ersten beiden Takte der Vorlage als Takt 3 und 4 mit Melodiegebung in den Violinen, läßt für einen Takt die charakteristische Fagottbegleitung weiterlaufen, deren Rhythmus Achtel-Sechzehntel den ganzen Abschnitt bindet, kehrt zu den beiden Takten als Takt 6 und 7 zurück und imitiert die Melodie bei Takt 7 und 8 in Oboen und Fagotten. Die Takte 9 bis 12 übertragen die Vorlagentakte 3, 4, 5 und 6 mit Melodieführung im 1. Horn, wobei er noch in der zweiten Takthälfte von Takt 12 wieder zu den ersten beiden Takten der Vorlage mit identischer Instrumentierung zurückkehrt, die sich wegen der Taktänderung bis hin in den 14. Takt erstreckt (Ziffer 49), um für diesen Takt wieder Takt 7 der Vorlage mit Hornmelodie zu benutzen, führt ihn aber, immer noch im Horn, als Takt 15 und 16 mit Takt 5 und 6 der Vorlage weiter. Der letzte Takt 17 entspricht dem ersten Achtel der Wiederholungsklausel 6 der Vorlage und füllt die Restzeit mit Pausen auf. Strawinsky würfelt praktisch die Vorlage passend durcheinander. Das Verfahren läßt sich schematisch darstellen. Der Mittelteil {B} verschiebt die G-Dur-Vorlage nach D-Dur, behält den Zweivierteltakt bis auf eine Stelle (Takt 17 = Ziffer 541) bei und macht aus 8, mit Wiederholung 16 Takten der Vorlage 20 Takte. Das Verfahren ist dasselbe wie beim {A}-Teil. Strawinsky schneidet aus der Vorlage Einzeltakte, Fragmente und Rhythmuselemente aus und setzt sie auf andere Weise zusammen. Die ersten 4 Takte sind die beiden, schon im Original wiederholten, ersten beiden Takte von Halling. Der folgende Komplex der Takte 5 bis 7 besteht aus Takt 1 der Vorlage und aus einer dreimaligen, permutierten, getrennten Viersechzehntelfigur, die Takt 6 der Vorlage entnommen ist, aber durch Zwischenschaltung eines einzelnen Sechzehntelwertes eine Binnenrhythmusverschiebung bewirkt. Die Takte 8 bis 12 kombiniert er wieder aus den Vorlagetakten 1 und 2. Takt 13 (bis einschließlich Takt 16 ein Klarinetten-Zwiegespräch) ist eine Kombination aus dem 2. Halbtakt von Takt 3 mit dem 1. Halbtakt von Takt 4 der Vorlage. Der zweite Halbtakt von Takt 4 der Vorlage bildet den ersten Halbtakt von Takt 14. Für den Rest von Takt 14 bis zur ersten Hälfte von Takt 16 kehrt er zur Permutationsfigur von Takt 6 = Takt 6 der Vorlage zurück. Der Rest von Takt 16 ist eine Auslauffigur in den um einen Viertelwert erweiterten Takt 17, in dem Takt 2 der Vorlage mit Begleitfiguren kombiniert wird. Die restlichen Takte 18 bis 20 entsprechen wieder den ersten beiden Takten der Vorlage. Auch hier läßt sich ein Verknüpfungsschema herstellen, sofern man bedenkt, daß Strawinsky in diesem Mittelteil Einzeltakte der Vorlage auseinanderbricht oder ineinanderstaucht. Der Schlußteil {C} kehrt zur ersten Melodie zurück, erweitert aber mit 26 Takten die Vorlage beträchtlich. Der Reiz besteht in der Kombination von verschiedenen Vorlagetakten und gleichzeitig deren Sequenzierungen. Die Bearbeitung läßt sich nicht mehr so einfach in einem Schema darstellen, weil sich die Takte durchdringen. Die Tonalität bleibt unberührt, das originale Taktschema wird weniger häufig und nur durch Dreivierteleinheiten durchbrochen. Takt 1 entspricht der Vorlage. Takt 2 ist deren Wiederholung, allerdings wechselt die Melodiestimme vom Fagott in die 1. Oboe. Takt 3 entspricht in der 1. Oboe Takt 2, in der 2. Oboe Takt 3 und 9 der Vorlage. Takt 4 verbindet zahlreiche kleinste Melodie– und Rhythmus-Bröckchen aus allen, der Bearbeitung überhaupt zugrundeliegenden Takten. Die Takte 5 bis 8 sind wie schon bei {A} aus der Wiederholung der ersten beiden Takte der Vorlage konstruiert. Takt 9 bildet mit Takt 8 die Imitation der ersten beiden Takte in der 1. Oboe. Die Takte 10 bis 13 der Hornstimme entsprechen Vorlage Takte 3 bis 6. Dabei wird in Takt 13 Violinstimme der zweite Halbtakt von Vorlage Takt 1 mit hineingearbeitet und mit Vorlage Takt 2 und 3 rhythmusverschoben bis nach Takt 15 weitergeführt. Dort setzt erneut die Hornstimme mit Vorlage Takt 3 ein, überschlägt Takt 4 und fährt mit Takt 5 und 6 der Vorlage fort. Sie endet bei Takt 17 der Bearbeitung. Das Spiel wiederholt sich, weil in diesem Takt bis Takt 20 wieder die Violinstimme zweimal mit den Vorlage-Takten 1 und 2 zu hören ist, selbst aber wieder bei Ende 19 bis 21 von den Oboen imitiert wird. Deren über 5 Takte 22 bis zum ersten Viertelwert 26 ausgehaltenes und von den Streichern abschließend akklamiertes unisono-d beendet Stück und Komposition als eine Art Coda.

 

Konstruktionstabelle

Beispiel ‚Cortège’*

A-Teil                                        B-Teil                                        A1-Teil

Takte                                        Takte                                        Takte

Strawinsky        Vorlage             Strawinsky        Vorlage             Strawinsky        Vorlage

01                     00                     01                     01                     01                     01

02                     00                     02                     02                     02                     01

#                       03                     01                     03                     (X)

03                     01                     04                     02                                             #

04                     02                                             #                      04                     (X)

#                       05                     01                                 #

05                     00                     06                     (6)                    05                     01

#                       07                     (6)                    06                     02

06                     01                                             #                      07                     01

07                     02                     08                     01                     08                     02+01

08                     02                     09                     02                                 #         

#                       10                     01                     09                     02

09                     03                     11                     01                     10                     03

10                     04                     12                     02                     11                     04

11                     05                                             #                      12                     05

12                     06+01               13                     03+04               13                     06+01

#                       14                     04+(06)                         #

13                     01+02               15                     06                     14                     06+02

#                       16                     06+00               15                     03

14                     02+09               17                     02                     16                     05

15                     05                                             #                      17                     06+01

16                     06                     18                     01                                 #         

17                     06                     19                     01                     18                     02

                                                20                     02                     19                     01

                                                                                                20                     02+01

                                                                                                21                     02

                                                                                                            #         

                                                                                                22                     (Coda)

                                                                                                23                     (Coda)

                                                                                                24                     (Coda)

                                                                                                25                     (Coda)

                                                                                                26                     (Coda)

* According to Helmut Kirchmeyer: Verfahrenstechniken Strawinskyscher Bearbeitungen, in: Musikinformatik und Medientechnik, Musikwissenschaftliches Institut der Universität Mainz, Bericht Nr. 40, März 2000, 17 S.

 

Widmung: keine Widmung bekannt.

 

Dauer: 224″ (Intrada), 213″ (Song), 115″ (Wedding Dance), 213″ (Cortège).

 

Entstehungszeit: Hollywood Frühjahr bis 18. August 1942.

 

Uraufführung: 13. Januar 1944 im Sanders Theatre, Cambridge, Massachusetts, mit dem Boston Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky.

 

Bemerkungen: Ohne Strawinskys eigene Angaben würde man heute nicht einmal mehr den Grund der Entstehung der Four Norwegian Moods kennen. Ihnen zufolge haben die vier Stücke eine zweifache Entstehungswurzel. Die eine beginnt mit dem Auftrag einer Hollywooder Filmfirma, Musik zu einem antinationalsozialistischen Film zu schreiben, der die Besetzung Norwegens durch deutsche Truppen im Zweiten Weltkrieg behandeln sollte, die andere mit dem Antiquariatsbesuch seiner Frau. Um welche Filmfirma es sich gehandelt hat, wann der Auftrag erfolgte, welche Volksliedsammlung Vera Strawinsky erwarb, bleibt ungesagt. Auch den Namen des Films hatte Strawinsky vergessen, als man ihn um 1959 danach befragte. Die Entstehungszeit Frühjahr bis Herbst 1942 der Komposition ergibt sich schlüssig aus den gesicherten Rahmendaten. Die Besetzung Norwegens war eine Kriegssache der Monate April bis Juni 1942. Der Landungsbefehl erging am 2. April, Narvik wurde am 9. April durch deutsche Gebirgsjäger besetzt, am 28. Mai jedoch von aliierten Verbänden zurückerobert, die, erneut von deutschen Truppen geschlagen, am 8. Juni Norwegen verließen. Vor dem 9. April kann es also keinen Auftrag an Strawinsky gegeben haben, weil der norwegische Tatbestand noch nicht vorlag. Im Laufe des Mai sah es noch nach einem Sieg der Engländer aus und bot ein gutes Schlachten-Film-Szenarium für einen Verbündeten. Möglicherweise hat Strawinsky für das zweite Instrumentalstück nicht ohne Grund ein Lied ausgewählt, dessen Text die Verjagung eines anderen aus den eigenen Gewässern schildert. Während die erhaltenen Kompositions-Skizzen, für Strawinsky ganz ungewöhnlich, weder signiert, noch datiert sind, trägt das ebenfalls erhaltene Orchesterautograph das Abschlußdatum 18. August 1942. Demnach vollzog sich die Arbeit an den Four Norwegian Moods, so wie wir sie heute kennen, zwischen frühestens Mitte April bis 18. August 1942. Dem inzwischen bescheiden in Hollywood lebenden Strawinsky mußte an einer baldigen Fertigstellung gelegen sein, um den neuerlich auftretenden finanziellen Sorgen auszuweichen. Deshalb arbeitete Strawinsky sehr schnell. Die Musik hatte auch gefälliger als gewohnt auszufallen. Beides erleichterte den Gedanken an eine Volksliedersuite. Am 5. Oktober 1943 unterrichtete Strawinsky aus Hollywood Nicolas Nabokow über seine Komposition, erläuterte seine Vorstellung von Mood als Modus und brachte in einer Anmerkung die Volksliederausgabe zur Sprache. Von Vera ist da keine Rede und auch nicht von einem Antiquariat. Diesem Brief zufolge hat er die Ausgabe in einer öffentlichen Bibliothek selbst gefunden. Hier nennt er auch den Verlag Hansen, datiert die Ausgabe auf den Anfang des Jahrhunderts und nennt die Stücke authentisch, abgesehen von ihrer ästhetischen Darbietung, die von Grieg, Sinding, Svendson etc. sei. Nun müssen sich diese beiden Darstellungen nicht unbedingt widersprechen. Ein Antiquariat kann auch eine Bibliothek sein und umgekehrt, und Strawinsky hat den Begriff Bibliothek gewiß nicht fachbibliographisch definiert gebraucht. Es gab zahlreiche Gründe, Nabokow gegenüber, wo es nicht um eine Sachfrage oder um die Entstehungsgeschichte einer Komposition, sondern nur um eine kurze Nebenbeiunterrichtung ging, einen Sachverhalt ganz knapp und skelettiert darzustellen. Craft gegenüber Jahre später war das von der Fragestellung her schon anders zu sehen. Voigt unterrichtete er mit Schreiben vom 25. Juli 1942 über die Fertigstellung einer, wie er sich ausdrückte, kleinen Suite über norwegische Volksweisen (a little suite on Norwegian folk tunes). Die Dauer gab er mit 7 Minuten an. Die Versendung an den Verlag hat Strawinsky offensichtlich ein wenig hinausgezögert, nachdem er mit einer Studio-Musikergruppe Verbindung bekommen hatte, die Komponisten Gelegenheit gab, ihre Stücke probeweise anzuhören, also das machte, was man in Frankreich zur Wagnerzeit Auditionen nannte. Jedenfalls ist das einem Brief zu entnehmen, den Strawinsky am 4. September 1942 an Voigt schickte. Von den Stücken muß es bald eine Tonaufnahme gegeben haben. Das geht aus einem Brief hervor, den Strawinsky am 11. Februar 1944 an Hugo Winter ebenfalls von Associated Music Publishers gerichtet hat. Dem Brief entnimmt man Bemühungen Kussewitzkys, Strawinskys Bostoner Programm anderntags unter eigener Leitung zu wiederholen und die Circus-Polka aufzunehmen. Strawinsky rät Winter, seine Aufnahme von Symphonie, Norwegischen Stücken und Zirkus-Polka an Kussewitzky zu schicken, damit dieser wisse, worum es gehe und kein Raum für Mutmaßungen (Strawinsky gebraucht das englische Wort conjecture) bleibe. – In den wenigen Äußerungen Strawinskys über die Entstehungsgeschichte der Four Norwegian Moods wies er Vermutungen zurück, Griegvorlagen aufgegriffen zu haben; trotzdem ist die Griegsche Handschrift nicht zu überhören. Mit der Übernahme der nicht verfremdeten Melodien und vor allem auch der harmonischen Vorlage übernahm Strawinsky zwangsläufig auch das melodische und harmonische Denken Griegs. Unterstellt man, daß Strawinsky nicht wissen konnte, daß es sich bei dem anonymen Bearbeiter um Grieg handelte, obwohl er seinem Brief vom 5. Oktober 1943 an Nobokow entsprechend die Griegsche (aber auch die Sindingsche etc.) Handschrift erkannt hatte, und man außerdem nicht weiß, ob in seinem gekauften Exemplar ein Herausgebervermerk gegebenenfalls handschriftlich angebracht worden war, so hatte er allenfalls subjektiv recht, wenn er eine unmittelbare Beeinflussung durch den norwegischen Komponisten ausschloß. Recht hatten aber auch seine Kritiker, die das zu Lebzeiten auch nicht wußten, aber Griegs Handschrift vor allem im 2. und 3. Stück heraushörten.

 

Film-Daten: Mitte 1942 begannen in Hollywood nach der Besetzung Norwegens durch deutsche Truppen Dreharbeiten für einen antinationalsozialistischen amerikanischen Propagandakriegsfilm, zu dem Strawinsky die Musik schreiben sollte. Das nach einem amerikanischen Regierungsaufruf zur Herstellung antideutscher Filme von columbia pictures angenommene Drehbuch hieß Commandos strike at Dawn (Kommando im Morgengrauen) und arbeitete mit den typischen Versatzstück-Mitteln vom tadellosen Heldentum der eigenen Partei und der bösartigen Dummheit des Gegners. Regie führte John Farrow, Hauptdarsteller waren Lilian Gish und Paul Muni. Der Schwarz-Weiß-Film dauert 98 (nach französischen Quellen*: 99) Minuten (8,973 ft.) und basiert auf einer Geschichte von C. S. Forester, die im „Cosmopolitan magazine“ veröffentlicht wurde. Vor der Vertonung hat Strawinsky weder den Film gesehen noch Foresters Vorlage gekannt, sondern sich ausschließlich nach dem Drehbuch gerichtet. – „Admiral Bowen verbringt im Sommer 1939 mit seiner Tochter Judith und seinem Sohn Robert Ferien in einem norwegischen Fjorddorf. Judith verliebt sich in Eric Toresen, der seit dem Tod seiner Frau dort allein mit seiner Tochter lebt. Als die Deutschen kommen, geht er in den Untergrund und verwandelt sich aus einem schüchternen Menschen in einen unbarmherzigen „franc-tireur“. In den Bergen entdeckt er einen neuen deutschen Luftwaffenstützpunkt, der in den nächsten vierzehn Tagen ausgebaut werden soll. Torsten setzt mit einem halben Dutzend Dorfbewohnern in einem kleinen Boot nach England über. Admiral Bowen ordnet ein Kommandounternehmen an, sein Sohn befehligt die Landetruppen und Toresen dient als Führer. Das Unternehmen ist erfolgreich, aber die Deutschen haben Toresens Tochter als Geisel genommen. Daraufhin greift das Kommando das Dorf an. Das kleine Mädchen und andere norwegische Dorfbewohner können gerettet werden, aber Toresen und Robert finden dabei den Tod.“ [The distinction of this C. S. Forester story is the feeling of reality the director has given it by exploiting natural scenery and restrained acting. Most of the scenes are out-of-doors, and the gorges of Newfoundland (eftective film substitute for Norwegian fjords) make an impressive background. Paul Muni, playing a younger role than most he has had recently, presents the transition of Torensen – from the diffident serious young man of peace to the ruthless alert franc-tireur – with a sureness of touch which is rnasterly. By contrast with the deft underplaying in the rest of his performance, the convulsions of his dying (when he is shot) are so violently gruesome that one wonders what other player could have made them convincing. Sir Cedric Hardwicke as the admiral and Robert Coote as his son head a sound supporting cast. The enthusiasm and vigour of a force of Canadian troops in the Commando battle scenes contributes in no small measure to their verisimilitude.**] – Der Film lief seit Winter 1942/43 mit mäßigem Erfolg, wurde in Frankreich (LE COMMANDO FRAPPE A L’AUBE), aber nie in Deutschland gezeigt. – Die von Strawinsky herausgesuchten 7 Lieder ergaben 4 harmlos-idyllische Stücke, die für den Hollywood-Zweck wie den Hollywood-Stil denkbar ungeeignet waren, so daß die Filmleute nichts damit anfangen konnten. Der Film wurde zwar gedreht, aber die Musik schrieb statt Strawinsky Louis Gruenberg, ein 1883 in Rußland geborener, in New York aufgewachsener Opern– und Konzertkomponist, der wie Strawinsky nicht aus der Filmbranche kam, aber während der vierziger Jahre einige Beiträge für Hollywood lieferte. Das ist die eine Version. Es könnte aber auch sein, daß Strawinsky mit seinen eigenen Vorstellungen von Filmmusik an dem Kriegsfilm nicht interessiert war und den Auftrag nur aus Geldnöten annahm, wie in vielen anderen Fällen damals auch, ihn daher eher mit der linken Hand und schon in der voraussehenden Absicht erledigte, seine Musik konzertant zu lassen. Dafür würde sprechen, daß er die Four Norwegian Moods gleich als Konzertpartitur und ausschließlich nach dem Drehbuch und einigen daraus ausgesuchten Szenen schrieb, was ihre Benutzung als unbearbeitete Filmmusik von vorne herein ausschloß.

* La Saison Cinematographique 194547, Paris, S. 53[b-c].

** Monthly Film Bulletin, London, 30. April 1943, p.39[a-b]

 

Filmprojekte: Obwohl Strawinsky während seiner amerikanischen Zeit viele Jahre in unmittelbarer Nähe der Filmmetropole Hollywood lebte und es auch an Filmangeboten gewiß nicht mangelte, sind ausnahmslos alle Strawinskyschen (wie auch Schönbergschen) Filmprojekte fehlgeschlagen. Beide Komponisten kamen nicht damit zurecht, in einem Kinofilm mit ihrer Kunst dienende Funktionen ausüben zu müssen. An der Trickverfilmung von Renard für Walt Disney hatte Strawinsky schon zu arbeiten begonnen, auch das Norwegenprojekt war von seiner Seite aus weitgehend abgeschlossen, es scheiterte aber, obwohl Disney an Strawinsky interessiert war, wie sein in Fantasia verwerteter Auschnitt aus dem Sacre gezeigt hatte. Daß allerdings die harmlosen Grieg-Imitationen der Four Norwegian Moods nicht für einen deutschfeindlichen Propagandafilm amerikanischen Zuschnitts taugten, setzt die Filmemacher nicht ins Unrecht, um so weniger, wenn man Strawinskys späterer Behauptung Glauben schenkt, er habe die Stücke gar nicht genuin für den Film, sondern gleich für die Konzertpraxis geschrieben. Strawinsky berichtete, man habe ihm für eine Filmmusik hunderttausend Dollar geboten und nach seiner Trotzdem-Weigerung dieselbe Summe, wenn er nur seinen Namen hergäbe und die Musik einen anderen schreiben lasse. Es gehe, so Strawinsky, bei Filmleuten immer nur ums Geld, und daher habe er an sich immer gerne mit ihnen verhandelt, weil sie sich nicht hinter künstlerischen Argumenten versteckten. Aber sowohl Schönberg wie Strawinsky lehnten die künstlerischen Bedingungen der Filmleute ab. Strawinsky zitierte bei dieser Gelegenheit Schönbergs Ihr tötet mich, um mich vor dem Hungertod zu retten. Um mit einem Film Geld zu machen, muß er verkauft werden können, und um einen Film gewinnträchtig zu verkaufen, muß er einem Massengeschmack genügen, weil nur über Masse die Kosten zurückgespielt werden können. Die Musiken für Kenner Strawinskys wie Schönbergs taugten dafür nicht, es sei denn, man hätte wie in bestimmten französischen Produktionen Cocteaus einen reinen Kunstfilm gedreht, dessen Mittelpunkt die Schönbergsche oder Strawinskysche Musik bildete. Dazu ist es nie gekommen. Strawinsky ließ es sich nicht nehmen, im Zusammenhang mit den Erklärungen über seine Erfahrungen mit Filmleuten Schönbergs Musik zu einer Lichtspielszene als beste Filmmusik überhaupt zu bezeichnen, mit der bösen Pointe, sie sei es vermutlich deshalb, weil es dazu keinen Film gäbe.

 

Bedeutung: Die Einschätzung der historischen Bedeutung der Stücke ist von der Vorgabe abhängig, ob sie als Bearbeitung oder als selbständiges Werk gesehen werden. Wertet man sie als Bearbeitung, dann handelt es sich um eine nach Strawinsky-Art konstruierte und gut gemachte Instrumentierung einer eigenwillig erweiterten Volksliedvorlage – wertet man sie als Komposition, dann bilden sie eine gefällige, aber wenig aufregende Stilkopie norwegischer Volkslieder nach Grieg, deren heutige Noch-Kenntnis ausschließlich mit dem Namen Strawinsky zusammenhängen dürfte.

 

Fassungen: Die Four Norwegian Moods erschienen im Oktober 1944 als Taschenpartitur in einer Auflage von 1023 Stück bei Associated Music Publishers in New York. Der Verlagsvertrag wurde am 10. November 1942 geschlossen. Strawinsky erhielt ein festes Honorar von 500 Dollar und die üblichen Beteiligungen einschließlich seines Prozentanteils am Ladenverkaufspreis der Taschenpartitur. Im Erscheinungsjahr bis Mitte 1945 setzte man 152 Partituren ab und verschenkte 103. Bis Juni 1947 kamen 280 Verkäufe und 28 Freistücke hinzu. Dirigierpartitur und Stimmen waren nur als Leihmaterial erhältlich. Später (1973) nahm der Mainzer Schott-Verlag die Taschenpartitur in seine Reihe musik des 20. jahrhunderts auf.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: New York 5. Februar 1945 mit dem New York Philharmonic Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Toronto 29. März 1963 mit dem Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: VI/1316 (Aufnahme von 1963).

 

Autograph: Eine Photokopie des Autographs aus dem Nachlaß Nadia Boulangers befindet sich in der Pariser Nationalbibliothek, das Particell in der Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel.

 

Copyright: 1944 durch Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

651 1944 Tp; Associated Music Publishers New York; 48 S.; A. S. 19449.

651Straw1 ibd. [mit Eintragungen] 
651Straw2 [mit Eintragungen].

652 [1973] Tp; Schott Mainz; 32 S.; 43400; 6333.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

651 Igor Stravinsky / FOUR / NORWEGIAN MOODS / for orchestra / (1942) / [Vignette] / Miniature Score .… $ 1.75 / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U. S. A. // Igor Stravinsky / FOUR / NORWEGIAN MOODS / (1942) / [#] Page / Intrada* 2 / Song* 18 / Wedding Dance* 23 / Cortège* 37 / Orchestra material available on rental / Time 8½ minutes / ASSOCIATED MUSIC PUBLISHERS, INC. / New York / Printed in U. S. A. // (Taschenpartitur klammergeheftet 15,2 x 23 (8° [gr. 8°]); 48 [47] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dünner Karton schwarz auf hellgrüngrau [Außentitelei mit mittenzentrierter Bildvignette 5,1 x 5,6 lyragekrönter Frauenkopf mittig auf vorhanggeöffneter Bühne mit Blick zum Betrachter, 2 Leerseiten, Leerseite mit schraffierter mittenzentrierter Vignette 2,1 x 2,6 >AMP-Music<**] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei]; Kopftitel >Four Norwegian Moods<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 ober– und unterhalb Satztitel >Intrada< rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAVINSKY / 1942<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halblinks >Copyright, 1944, by Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York<; Herstellungshinweis S. 2 unter Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in U.S.A.<; Platten-Nummer >A. S. 19449<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1944)

* Satzbezeichnung linksbündig, Distanzpunkte bis Seitenangabe, Seitenangabe rechtsbündig.

** das Wort >Music< steht gegen den Buchstaben >P< unterhalb des Bauches senkrecht und hat als Silbe dieselbe Punktgröße wie der halbe Einzelbuchstabe.

 

651Straw1

 

Strawinskys Exemplar ist auf der Außentitelei oberhalb Namen rechts mit >IStr< und auf der Innentitelei rechts neben >FOUR< und unter >NORWEGIAN MOODS< mit >I Strawinsky / 27 Oct. I944< signiert und datiert. Auf der leeren Rückseite des Außentitels notierte er eine Übersetzungsprobe >    — deutlich / — rhythmi / — klar / — <. Darüber hinaus enthält das Exemplar keine Korrekturen, sondern ausschließlich Dirigieranweisungen.

651Straw2

 

Das zweite Nachlaßexemplar ist ungezeichnet und enthält bei Ziffer 411 oberhalb des Piccolo-Systems die Anmerkung >Viertel = I24<, unterhalb des Fagott-Systems die Anmerkung >Tempo 1°<, oberhalb des Violin-Systems der 1. Violoinen die Anmerkung >Viertel = I24<.

652 Schott / Musik des 20. Jahrhunderts / [°] / Strawinsky / Four Norwegian Moods / for Orchestra / Vier norwegische Impressionen / für Orchester / Ed. 6333 / [Vignette] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Four Norwegian Moods / for Orchestra / (1942) / Vier norwegische Impressionen / für Orchester / Studien-Partitur / Edition Schott 6333 / B. Schott’s Söhne · Mainz / Schott & Co. Ltd. · London / Schott Music Corp. · New York // (Partitur fadengeheftet 19,2 x 27,3 (4° [Lex. 8°]); 52 [47] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf leuchtend gelb [rechtsbündig gesetzte Außentitelei mit Vignette 0,7 x 1,2 gelb in schwarzem Block Rad im textlosen Spiegel, 2 Leerseiten cremeweiß, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung leuchtend gelb >Schott / Music of the 20 th Century<* ohne Stand] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [rechtsbündig gesetzte Innentitelei, Leerseite, rechtsbündig gesetzte Orchesterlegende >Orchestra< englisch + Spieldauerangabe [8½’] englisch<, Leerseite, rechtsbündig gesetztes Satzverzeichnis >Intrada / Song / Wedding Dance / Cortège<, Leerseite] + ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel in Verbindung mit Autorenangabe und unnumeriertem Satztitel 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 6] rechtsbündig >Igor Strawinsky / Four Norwegian Moods / (1942) / Intrada<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >© Associated Music Publishers, Inc., New York, 1944 / © assigned to B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz, 1968<; ohne Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 52; Herstellungshinweis in Verbindung mit englischer Preisangabe Umschlagwerbeseite unterhalb Werbeblock linksbündig >Printed in Germany< rechtsbündig >70 s<; Platten-Nummer [nur] in Verbindung mit Herstellungshinweis S.52 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Verlag: B. Schott’s Söhne, Mainz 43400<) // [1973]

° [fast] seitenbreiter Trennstrich waagerecht.

 

* Angezeigt werden zweispaltig mit Editionsnummern ohne Distanzpunkte in der Schott-Reihe Kompositionen von >Wolfgang Fortner< bis >Bernd Alois Zimmermann<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Igor Strawinsky / Ode. Triptychon für Orchester (1943) Ed. 5942 / Scherzo fantastique Ed. 3501 / Danses concertantes< Ed. 4275, sowie in der Eulenburg-Reihe ohne Strawinsky-Nennung Kompositionen von >Tadeusz Baird< bis >Goffredo Petrassi<. Die Werbeseite trägt unterhalb des Werbeblocks linksbündig den Herstellungshinweise >Printed in Germany< rechtsbündig die Angabe >70 s<.

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM