39

M a v r a

Opéra bouffe en 1 acte d’après A. Pouchkine. Texte de Boris Kochno – Mawra. Opera buffa in einem Akt. Text von Boris Kochno nach Alexander Puschkin – Mavra. Opera in one act after Pushkin by Boris Kochno – Mavra. Opera buffa in una atto. Testo di Boris Kochno su una poesia di Alexander Pouchkine – Mavra.

 

Title: The opera should have the title of Pushkin’s original (‘The House in Colomna’ or ‘The little house in Colomna’). The reasons why the title was changed to ‘Mavra’ have never been discussed, but are clear from a dramaturgical perspective. The name Mavra appears only once in Pushkin’s versions. Responding to the question posed by the mother to the man disguised as a female cook asking his name, he calls himself ‘Mavra’, a name that is not used as a first name in Russia, but which, according to its formation, is suitable for a female first name. The assumption (also in Pushkin’s version) that this could be an enigmatic play on words derived from the Russian word for ‘Moor’ is rejected by researchers of the Russian language by reason of technical linguistic arguments. Whilst in Pushkin’s version, the plot is an unfolding of the poetological concept, which he as narrator fulfills with the story played out in the ‘little’ house, Kochno only works with the plot itself. This is driven solely by the disguised female cook, Mavra, and not by Parasha, who never changes throughout the course of the piece, and certainly not by the mother or the neighbour. The location itself is just an accessory. To explain to the title figure was not pointless from a dramaturgical perspective.

 

Scored for: a) First editions (Opera Rols): Ïàðàøà (Paracha, Parascha, Parasha), Soprano; Ñîñäêà (Voisine, Nachbarin, The Neighbour), Mezzo-Soprano; Màòü (Mère, Die Mutter, The Mother), Alto; Ãóñàðú (Hussar = Cuisinière, Der Husar = Köchin, The Hussar = Cook), Tenor; ~ (Opera Orchestra): Flauto piccolo, 2 Flauti grandi, 2 Oboi, Corno inglese, Clarinetto piccolo in Mib, 2 Clarinetti in Sib / in La, 2 Fagotti, Violino I, Violino II, Viola, 4 Corni in Fa, 2 Trombe in Do, 2 Trombe in La, 2 Tromboni tenori, Trombone basso, Tuba, Timpani, Violoncelli, Contrabassi [Piccolo Flute, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, English horn, Piccolo Clarinet in E flat, 2 Clarinets in B flat / A, 2 Bassoons, Violin I, Violin II, Viola, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in D, 2 Trumpets in A, 2 Tenor Trombones, Bass Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, Violoncellos, Double Basses]; ~ (Song of Paracha): Canto, 2 Oboi, 2 Clarinetti in B, 2 Fagotti, 4 Corni in F, Tuba, 2 Violini soli, 1 Viola sola, Violoncelli, Contrabassi – 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in Bb, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, Tuba, 2 Solo Violins, Solo Viola, Cellos*, Double Basses*, b) Performance requirements: Soprano, Mezzo-Soprano, Alto, Tenor; Piccolo Flute (= 3rd Flute), 3 Flutes (3rd Flute = Piccolo Flute), 2 Oboes, English horn, Piccolo Clarinet in E flat, Clarinet in B flat**, Clarinet in A**, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, 2 Trumpets in C, 2 Trumpets in A, 2 Tenor Trombones, Bass Trombone, Tuba, Timpani, 2 Solo Violins, Solo Viola, Strings*** (Violoncellos****, Double Basses****); Parasha-Arrangement: Soprano, 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in B flat, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, Tuba, 2 Solo Violins, Solo Viola, Strings (Violoncellos, Double Basses)

* Full complement.

** B flat and A clarinets played at the same time.

*** No tutti violins and tutti violas.

**** Also divided into two parts.

 

Voice types (Fach): Parasha: Coloratura soubrette or light lyric, smart soprano, range d1-b2; Neighbour: Lyric or Character Mezzo with great linguistic agility, range bb–g2; Mother: Spielalto with an especially good low register, range g-f2; Hussar: Spieltenor or extremely comic lyric tenor, range d-b1. For all four roles, comic voices with great flexibility and a mastery of parlando technique are required. The ranges for the roles are consistently comfortable.

 

Performance practice: Between figures 5 and 6 in the score, a figure 5a, lasting six bars, was inserted. In his model performance of 7th May 1965, Strawinsky omitted a section of figure 5a. The recording transitions in the first Parasha scene from figure 57 directly to the ending after figure 5a, which is followed by the Gipsy song of the Hussar (figure 61). There are also 10 bars missing containing the last 3 lines of the Parasha song, the text of which however is printed in the accompanying booklet to the official CD recording. Strawinsky was not happy with a vinyl recording under the baton of Robert Craft, presumably because he did not like the leading lady, Phyllis Curtin. He wrote about this on 29th March 1951 to his son, Soulima. There are substantial differences between the orchestral score and the piano edition, which was the one used until 1966.

 

Summary: The plot takes place in a small Russian city during the reign of Charles X. according to the literature, meaning the period of Pushkin in the first quarter of the 19th century. The only set is a living-room with a window facing the street. – Young Parasha is in love with her neighbour Basilius* (Bàñèëèé, Wassili), a young hussar. She sits at the window where she sings a lovesong of yore, full of longing.- The happy-go-lucky hussar warbles a gypsy song outside her living-room window. A duet follows. After they quarrel a bit, her mother enters the room complaining about the recent death of her cook, Thekla** (Ô¸êëà, Fjokla, Phiocla).She demands that Parasha ask the neighbours about a new cook, and Parasha leaves. – The mother remains alone and soliloquizes about her memories of the past ten years when Thekla had so beautifully taken care of all her needs. A neighbour woman comes by to chat about this and that. Parasha comes back bringing the new cook with her, Mavra, and her mother and neighbour check her over. After passing judgement on Mavra‘s value, at the mother‘s insistence it is decided that Mavra, agreeing, will get a relatively small wage. The neighbour and mother leave the living-room. – Parasha and Mavra the cook fall into each other‘s arms, for Mavra is really her beloved hussar Basil, dressed in women‘s clothing. – The mother calls after Parasha, re-enters the living-room, and sends the cook off to wash up. Then she leaves the house with Parasha, not without announcing that they would soon return. The hussar stays behind and sings a song in happy expectation of an hour of love that evening. Then he begins to shave. – During this occurrance the mother re-enters the room. She does not see a cook, rather a thief, and faints from fright. Parasha catches her swooning mother and wishes for some smelling salts. While Basil and Parasha do not know what to do, the neighbour suddenly comes into the room and lets out a fervent prayer. As if that were not enough, the mother comes to herself at that moment and screams for help. At that the hussar jumps out the window with an adieu (Ïðîøàé). Parasha, baffled and frightened, runs to and fro between the two women screaming for help and the window, calling after Basil. She finally leans out of the window and despairingly cries twice after the escaped one, Âàñèë³é! (Basilius).

* German original translation

**German original translation for Fjokla

 

Source: The poem in verse form Äîìèê â Êîëîìíå (“The Little House at Kolumna”) is by Alexander Pushkin, who wrote it at age 30 or 31 in 1830 at the peak of his career as a poet. It consists of forty stanzas in eight lines of pentametric iambic verse in the rhyme scheme ABABABCC. The simple narrative style, told from an all-knowing perspective, is sprinkled with tiny dialogue fragments taken from recounted stories not central to the main story and begins in the middle of the ninth stanza. There is a poetilogical explanation beforehand, at the time a technique which had been a well-known one in poetical literature since the 18th century; this is realized in the story, it not being told for its own sake, rather as a development of the pre-told story explanation technique. Stanzas ten to twenty show a vivid if masked irony, as well as an inscrutable picture of Parasha‘s charm. She is poor, humble, hard-working, pious, and apparently also well-brought up and full of erotic longings, living out her life in a hostile environment with a deaf, man-hating cook and a bigoted, superstitious mother who only thinks of herself. For her, the daughter is more of a servant than the child to whom she at one time had happened to give birth. Parasha has to see to it that she copes with her situation herself. She has many admirers, is aware of her charms, and is careful to be on the watch for young men whether they just walk by, pointing to humble origins, or ride by, signifying a higher rank. She lies awake nights, indulging herself in her secret fancies and happily listening to the mating calls of the cats on the roof. As a contrasting figure, Pushkin introduces a nameless young countess in stanzas 2124. She is rich, young, and majestically beautiful, but also cold, proud, and calculating, and therefore in reality without happiness. Stanza 25 and 26 compare Parasha and the countess in favor of Parasha. Then Parasha is accidentally helped in that a part of her strict environment breaks off: The cook dies. This gives the poet another opportunity to characterise without pity the strange symbiosis on the home front, for it is the tomcat, Wasska, that mourns the deceased the longest. In the 29th stanza the mother, who is bossy and controlling and has nearly become unfit for life, sends out her daughter Parasha to inquire about a new cook at the neighbours. She is actually totally dependent upon her daughter, whose life‘s happiness she blocks. The mother lies down to sleep, and shortly before midnight Parasha returns bringing the new cook with her. A financial agreement is reached upon, followed with admonitions from the mother as well as what is always discussed and talked over in such situations.At stanza 32 the story begins in earnest. The cook does not know what she is supposed to do, and so of course Parasha has to help her out, which she always had had to do with the old cook anyway. Now they go to church. The cook is also expected to accompany the daughter to Mass as part of her duties, but either she always has a toothache or suddenly has to bake a cake. While in church the mother gets suspicious of the cook‘s strange behavior, thinking in her typical base manner of the only possible explanation: The cook intends to rob her. Parasha has to stay in the church while the mother runs home as fast as she can, and catches the cook in the act of scraping soap off his chin. The widow faints and the cook, rather one should say the disguised cook, escapes out of the front door. When Parasha comes home from Mass the chicken has already flown the coop. The last two stanzas serve the purpose of proclaiming a moral full of irony. That is, one should never hire a cook without a wage, and a man should never hide in women‘s clothing, because if caught one would think of him only as a rogue. A number of compositions in verse, apart from Pushkin‘s rhyming tales in operatic models, derive from or are attributed to Pushkin and not to Strawinsky or Kochno. An example of this is the opening scene with Parasha‘s song, which goes back to Pushkin‘s transcription of a Russian folksong which he later changed into a poem published in the fourth volume of the Pushkin Edition by S.A. Wengerow in 1910. Furthermore, the hussar‘s song comes from an untitled poem by Pushkin from 1833.

 

Kochno: Boris Kochno was not a poet, but a dancer and choreographer (he would go on to direct the Monte Carlo Ballet) and an amateur man of letters with the gift of being able to write pleasant rhymes and verses. He was 18 at the time, seen as well brought-up and educated, and was part of Strawinsky’s circle through his relatively short relationship to the homosexual Diaghilev, working as the latter’s temporary secretary in Paris. After this, they lost touch with one another. Strawinsky was satisfied with Kochno’s work. He received a scenario that he could work with which offered him all manner of possibilities for interpretation, and which in this case represented an especially discreet form of parody.

 

Dramaturgy: Pushkin‘s poetic and autobiographical story, critical about the ironies of society, was transformed by Kochno together with Strawinsky into a type of farcical cabaret. Kochno rewrote the story in direct speech using dialogue, something Pushkin did not do, added the role of the neighbour, and made the disguised cook into a hussar with the names Mavra and Basil. Strawinsky and Kochno interpreted the underlying and unclear threads of the story definitively as a clear-cut piece of realism. Pushkin‘s verse structure was necessarily abandoned, and his entire poetic ways and social views, certainly not dramaturgically possible in this form, were repressed. The coarsening of Pushkin‘s story-line in Kochno‘s libretto does not begin with the central question about the role Parasha plays, which is whether she has brought the hussar to her home in order to follow her feelings, or if the disguised hussar has come to her in order to attain his goal at a convenient time. Rather, it begins with the way in which the poet and librettist portrays the situation. With Kochno, everything is already obvious in the first scene with the new cook. Scarcely has the mother left the room than the lovers fall into each other‘s arms. The reader is now only waiting for the inevitable appearance of the catastrophe because the relation to duration cannot be concealed. Pushkin, however, only works with hints which in the end contradict Parasha‘s sweetness. Parasha does not have one lover, rather, she is on the look-out for men. Parasha brings the cook home at midnight while her mother is already asleep. When the mother bolts home Parasha remains in the church, as if she did not know that her mother would discover the soldier in a compromising situation. When she realizes the state of affairs, she does not blush. The story is over. The narrator has internal knowlege; he knows where the samovar is, meaning he has visited the house. Then he awakens suspicion that he has already been her lover. Pushkin hints at this in the 38th stanza, where the narrator wishes the lover would go to the devil, and when after the disguised man‘s flight he does not want to have anything more to do with him “Who replaced him in the house from this time.” We see the runaway soldier has a replacement, that the game continues with the next lover, and that the narrator, certainly in love with Parasha at one time, on account of the events has turned away from the girl. The story begins with the narrator visiting the Little House. The house has been demolished. It apparently looks harmless and peaceful. Memories arise in the narrator that paralyze his reason. Pushkin gradually leads the seeming farce back to its tragic foundation. Parasha is not who she pretends to be. What has happenend here is not funny, because there is no happy end, which neither Parasha nor her disguised lover intended. Parasha and the man she brought into the house are not lovers like in the Kochno version where they want to find each other. Rather, the story is about only one of many continuously changing relationships. This is the result of the circumstances and atmosphere in which Parasha has lived: bigotry, superstition, isolation, misanthropy, helplessness, cunning, and everything which grows out of baseness and base thinking. In the end, Parasha is not much better than her mother; in any case she is indolent in our story, for she knows that the man must shave himself, and that he uses the time when she and her mother are at church to freshen up. When the mother rushes home the deception is over. Parasha remains in the church, neither trying to hold back her mother nor trying to warn the man before the mother makes her discovery. Is she tired of him? Or is the next one standing in line at her door? In the Bodenstedt paraphrase she was: “Crazy about her guardsman like the lieutenant.” There is no lack of suitors, making Parasha kindred to the beautiful Lila in “The Faun and the Shepherdess.” In the Kochno version, the story is presumably a love story with a happy ending being the most important part. The mother is confined to her commonplaceness, and the addition of the neighbour serves as a sounding-board for her prattling gossip which carries on about absolutely nothing for hours at a time.In the Kochno version Parasha really does love, but the object of her affections is as fleeting as a greyhound. That is why Kochno makes him into a hussar, a light rider, with the emphasis on light, a man who croons gypsy songs and flirts with women and perhaps more than that. A man, who neglects Parasha, but always is able to get her for a rendezvous. Parasha pays the price. But when she makes him into a cook she has got him; he is under her control. The dramaturgical mistake is that a soldier is not allowed to stay away from his unit. When the disguise is exposed before the couple can reveal their love, Parasha becomes a tragic figure.In Kochno‘s version, in spite of the comedy there is a moment of despair which takes control of the young couple and particularly of Parasha, during the discovery and while the two older women are shrieking. The hussar jumps out of the window, leaving his girl in the lurch at the worst possible moment. The mother and neighbour only see a rogue in the disguised man. Their crowning stupidity is that they do not conceive of a connection between the man and the woman. If the soldier had stayed he would have had to explain himself, either scolding or laughter would have broken out, and the story would have ended with a wedding. Since the hussar has fled, Parasha must fear she has lost the stakes. How the story will end remains unknown.

 

Translations: Strawinsky’s Mavra has its own labyrinthine translation history. The French translation of the first printed version was surprisingly not by Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz but after an absolute odyssey to find a translator, by the then 44-year-old French composer Jacques Larmanjat. Strawinsky was not satisfied with it, as it later emerged, and referred to it as mediocre. Especially bad in Strawinsky’s opinion was the English translation by Robert Burness, which he referred to point-blank as ‘bad’. It was first corrected by Robert Craft, and then finally replaced by Craft’s own version. The German translation was by Alexander Elukhen. A further English translation by Thomas Scherman also inspired confidence. Strawinsky put his foot down, so that in the end only Craft’s version remained in circulation, but with a printing error in the name, which Strawinsky found irritating, ‘Kraft’ instead of ‘Craft’.

 

Translation history: Larmanjat had already explained, after a real Odyssean journey for a translator, that he would translate the stage work into French. Strawinsky had been looking for a translation amongst several friends and acquaintances without success, but clearly ruled out Ramuz although the economic situation of the Swiss writer was, as always, desperate and he would have needed money urgently. This implies a deeper resentment against Ramuz or a conviction that Ramuz was not up to the task, or indeed the sober insight of his being too far away from Ramuz for a fruitful collaboration (Ramuz had not mastered Russian and thus was reliant upon instructions and comments from linguists, here: from Strawinsky. Strawinsky had moved to Anglet. There were approximately 1,000 kilometres between him and Ramuz, and Strawinsky was also readying himself to move to Biarritz. Astonishingly, he reported on the opera ‘Mavra’ to Ramuz in a very personal letter dated 18th August 1921 from Anglet, characterizing it as a sort of ‘Soldier’s Tale’ with arias, duets and trios and calling it very melodic; he wrote that he wished to see him because he missed him, but did not write a single word about the translation problems, which must at this time have been agreed very favourably with Ansermet. This can be seen from Ansermet’s letter dated 10th September 1921. In it, he shares with Strawinsky that he was no longer able to uphold his promise regarding the translation of “Mavra”.  He was originally hoping for Walter Nouvel, who would help him to set the translated text correctly under the corresponding Russian words, but they were both too overloaded at the time to take on the opera. Ansermet, who at the time still had his own worries because he wished to give up his activities in Switzerland, advised that Jean Cocteau should deal with the matter, for whom such translated texts flowed easily and with whom he would be able to discuss in situ the allocation of translated and original texts to the musical text. Strawinsky tried to change Ansermet’s mind without success, and the latter continued advising in a letter dated 13th October 1921 that he use Cocteau. Cocteau was an admirer of “Mavra”, but whether he was seriously involved with the matter of the translation, and whether a translation vocabulary that he sent to Strawinsky in Autumn 1922 referred to “Mavra” remains conjecture. Cocteau was a master of polite letters and generally wrote to Strawinsky in a tone of gentle subservience; many projects however were not carried out because Cocteau himself did not want to. Strawinsky fell behind schedule. Kochno, among others, was in discussions for the task – but never Ramuz — until Strawinsky agreed on Larmanjat, who was connected, along with his wife, with the company Pleyel and who was later involved in the negotiations surrounding the pianola arrangements. What the collaboration looked like seems to be unknown. It can be seen from letters written decades later that Strawinsky was not satisfied with the translation. The linguistic issues was less pronounced for “Mavra” than for “Renard” because there were no Pribautki sections, and the cryptic atmosphere of Pushkin’s version seems to have been lost in Kochno’s version. In spite of this, the Larmanjat translation turned out so badly that Strawinsky made reference to it forty years later whilst he was making preparations for the first printed edition of the score in 1966. In a letter to Leopold Spinner dated 31st March 1966, he confirmed that the score should only contain the original Russian text and the English translation by Robert Craft. The German text and the other text, now seen as mediocre, were not required and should only remain in the piano reduction for rehearsal purposes. The German translation was by A. Elukhen, whose first name was not written out in the piano reduction printed by the Russian music publishers in 1925, unlike the first names of the other translators.

These were not the considerations of an old man. David Adams had sent the English translation by Thomas Scherman in 1953. He would never have done this if the Burness translation for the new Boosey editions had been called into question. Strawinsky ‘very confidentially’ referred to the Scherman translation by name in a letter to Adams dated 29th October 1953, but found however, being better acquainted with the English language than he was in 1952, that the game, especially in the Finale, had been changed in essence. At the time, he put forward Robert Craft as a new translator, who would translate Kochno’s text under his, Strawinsky’s, oversight, and for whom Strawinsky asked for a fee of 75 dollars.

 

Construction: Mavra is an opera buffo for four singers and middle-sized orchestra.; there are no recitatives, no chorus, and it is unnumbered. However, it does have arias, duets, and a quartett, parodying the russo-italian 19th century operatic style. At the same time, due to its structure and form, the work‘s classification is a matter of interpretation. In the Strawinsky literature, aside from the overture there are six to thirteen sections of proven attempts at inner-connecting parts; the number of such sections is higher if one considers the placement of dialogues and their corresponding ensemble scenes. For example, the hussar‘s gypsy song sounds within Parasha‘s song, and after Basil and Parasha have finished speaking she continues with her song. Strictly speaking, one can see this as four parts, or it can be counted as one part, as two (Parasha aria; dialogue), as three (Parasha aria;hussar song; duet), or four parts as already said. The same thing can be said about the scene with the mother, neighbour, Parasha, and hussar; one can see it as a whole, in two parts (dialogue; quartett), or even in three parts (dialogue; quartett; dialogue). The greater parts one chooses however, the more they lose their sense of being a means of connection in analytical clarification.

 

Structure

The subsequent inner structure outlines according to the libretto, 9 sections including the overture, but cannot lay any claim to an overall sense of musical unity. These sections are: [No.1] the Overture, [No.2] the Chanson russe = Russian Maiden’s Song = Parasha’s Aria (Figure 1), [No.3] the Song of the Hussar and the subsequent duet between Parasha and the Hussar (Figure 7), [No.4] the Mother’s Aria (Figure 34), [No.5] the duet between the Mother and the Neighbour (figure 44), [No.6] the Quartet between the Mother, Neighbour, Parasha and the Cook (Figure 68), [No. 7] the duet between Parasha and the Hussar, called the Love Duet (figure 96), [No. 8] the Hussar’s Aria together with the Shaving Scene (figure 134) and [No.9] the Final Scene (figure 163).

 

[1]        Overture

                        Crotchet = 104 (figure 2A up to figure G3)

                        Semiquaver = semiquaver (figure G4 up to figure I8)

[2]                    Crotchet = 69 (figure 11 up to the end of figure 5a5)

                                    (Vorhang) (figure 11)

                                    Çàíàâñú

Curtain

[Vorhang]

(figure 11)

                                    Ïàðàøà çà ðàáîòîé ïî¸ò ó îêíà

                                    PARASHA sitting by a window sings as she embroiders

[Parascha sitzt, mit einer Stickerei beschäftigt, am Fenster und singt]

(figure 12)

                                    Ãóñàðú ïîäõîäèòú êú îêíó.

                                    Hussar appears at the windows singing a gipsy song.

                                                [Vor dem Fenster erscheint der Husar. Er singt ein Zigeunerlied]

(figure 5a5)

[3]                    Più mosso Crotchet = 120 (figure 61 up to the end of figure 134)

                        Più lento (figure 141 up to figure 214)

                                    rallentando (figure 213)

                        Largo (figure 215 up to 217)

                        Tempo I (figure 221 up to the end of figure 2712)

                                    Ãóñàðú óõîäèòú.

                                    Exit Hussar.

                                                [Der Husar geht ab]

(figure 265)

                                    Ïàðàøà ñíîâà áåð¸òñÿ çà ðàáîòó, íàïâàÿ ïñåíêó.

                                    Paracha resumes her work and continues her song.

                                                [Parascha nimmt ihre Handarbeit wieder vor und singt ihr Lied weiter]

(figure 271)

                                    Âõîäèòú ìàòü Ïàðàøè

                                    Enter Mother of Paracha.

                                                [Paraschas Mutter tritt ein]

(figure 2712)

                        Più mosso Quaver = 168170 environ (figure 281 up to the end of figure 334)

                                    Ïàðàøà óõîäèòú

                                    Exit Paracha

                                                [Parascha geht ab]

(figure 334)

[4]                    Andante Quaver = 88 (figure 341 up to the end of figure 364)

                                    Ìàòü (îäíà)

                                    Mother (alone)

                                                [Die Mutter bleibt allein zurück]

(figure 342)

                        Allegretto Quaver = 132 (figure 371 up to the end of figure 394)

                        Tempo I Quaver = 88 (figure 401 up to figure 423)

                        Più mosso dotted Crotchet = 94 (figure 424 up to the end of figure 438)

                                    Âõîäèòú ñîñäêà

                                    Enter Neighbour.

                                                [Die Nachbarin tritt ein]

(figure 425)

[5]                    Tempo giusto Quaver = quaver (figure 441 up to the end of figure 676)

                                    Âú äâåðÿõú ïîêàçûâàåòñÿ Ïàðàøà

                                    Paracha appears at the door.

                                                [Parascha erscheint in der Türe]

(figure 676)

[6]                    Alla breve Minim = 80 (figure 681 up to the end of figure 926)

                                    Âõîäèòú êóõàðêà — ïåðîäòûé ãóñàðú.

                                    Enter Hussar disguised as Cook.

                                                [Der als Köchin verkleidete Husar tritt ein]

(figure 691)

                        Larghetto dotted Crotchet = 44 (figure 931 up to the end of figure 964)

                                    Cîñäêà óõîäèòú

                                    Exit Neighbour

                                                [Nachbarin geht ab]

(figure 936)

                                    Ìàòü óõîäèòú

                                    Exit Mother

                                                [Die Mutter geht ab]

(Figure 961)

[7]                    Con moto Crotchet = 116 (figure 971 up to the end of figure 1045)

                        Meno mosso Crotchet = 846 (figure 1051 up to the end of figure 1245)

                        Tempo commodo (Alla breve) (figure 1251 up to the end of figure 1336)

[8]                    Crotchet = quaver = 168176 environ (figure 1341 up to the end of figure 1395)

                                    Âõîäèòú ìàòü

                                    Enter Mother

                                                [Die Mutter tritt ein]

(figure 1341)

                                    Ïàðàøà è ìàòü óõîäÿòú

                                    Exeunt Paracha and Mother

                                                [Parascha und die Mutter verlassen das Zimmer]

(figure 1381)

                        Lento Crotchet = 80 (poco rubato) (figure 1401 up to the end of figure 1465)

                        Più mosso Crotchet = 104 (tempo giusto) (figure 1471 up to the end of figure 1557)

                        L’istesso tempo (figure 1561 up to the end of figure 1625)

                                    Áðåòñÿ

                                    Begins to shave

                                                [Er (der Husar) rasiert sich]

(figure 1611)

[9]                    Coda (L’istesso tempo) (figure 1631 up to the end of figure 1728)

                                    Ìàòü (âõîäèòú; ñú íåäîóìíî³ìú)

                                    Enter Mother (astonished)

                                                [Die Mutter tritt ein und ist sehr erstaunt]

(figure 1652)

                                    (Âèäèòú åãî)

                                    (sees him)

                                                [sie sieht ihn]

(figure 1654)

                                    Ïàðàøà (âáãàÿ, ïîäõâàòûâàåòú ìàòü)

                                    PARASHA (running in, catches her Mother)

                                                [Parascha kommt hereingelaufen, fängt ihre Mutter auf]

(figure 1663)

                                    Cîñäêà (âõîäÿ)

                                    Enter Neighbour

                                                [Die Nachbarin kommt herein]

(figure 1681)

                                    (êàêú áû ïðèõîäÿ âú ñåáÿ)

                                    (áðîñàåòñÿ âú îêíî)

                                    (recovering her sens)

                                    (leaps out of the windows)

                                                [(Die Mutter) kommt wieder zu sich]

                                                [(Der Husar) springt zum Fenster hinaus]

(figure 1691)

                                    Ïàðàøà (áæèòú êú îêíó)

                                    PARASHA (runs towards the window)

                                                [Parascha läuft zum Fenster]

(figure 1701)

                                    (áæèòú êú ìàòåðè)

                                    (runs towards Mother)

                                                [Sie eilt wieder zur Mutter]

(figure 1711)

                                    (ïåðåâøèâàåòñÿ âú îêíî)

                                    (leaning out of window)

                                                [Sie lehnt sich zum Fenster hinaus]

(figure 1713)

                                    Çàíàâñü áûñòðî îïóñêàåòñÿ.

                                    The curtain falls quickly.

                                                [Der Vorhang fällt schnell]

(figure 1725)

 

Corrections / Errata

Full score 394

Figure 116: >And | I re– | pea-ted, | re-pea– | — ted the< instead of >Oft | I re– | peat-ed | fond-ly, | fond–

            ly thy<

Parasha-Aria Voice-Piano 395

(many slurs)

  1.) p. 3, bar 2 [bar 11]: Ðîâ instead of Ðîç.

  2.) p. 3, bar 7 [bar 16]: ÂÚÒÅÌ instead of ÂÚÃÅÌ.

  3.) p. 3, bar 10 [bar 20] Chant: quaver ligature c#2-a1 has to be connected to the following quaver a2

by beam [quaver ligature c#2-a1-a2]; the Russian text ê has to be moved from the last but

one to the last note.

  4.) p. 5, bar 2 [bar 37]: Ñòðàñòü instead of Ñòðàñòú.

  5.) p. 5, bar 5 [bar 40], Piano descant: first chord quaver g1-h1-dotted crotchet db1-db2 instead of

quaver g1-b1-dotted crotchet d1-d2.

  6.) p. 5, bar 6 [bar 41], Piano descant, 2. system: 2. three-note-chord quaver ab–bb–f1 instead of a–

            bb–f1.

  7.) p. 5, bar 8 [bar 43], Piano descant, 2. system: 1. three-note-chord quaver ab–bb–f1 instead of a–

            bb–f1.

  8.) p. 7, bar 3 [bar 60] Piano descant: 2. three-note-chord quaver a-eb1-f1 instead of bb–db1-f1

[pencil].

 

Style: Mavra can be traced back to many stylistic areas, to the melodic writing of Russian Opera and Romances by Glinka and Dargomichsky, to Classical Italian bel canto, to Gipsy melodies and their game of contrasting long and short notes including cadences ending on the dominant. Like “Renard”, Mavra has thus become an artistic work for connoisseurs, the atmosphere of which the non-connoisseur can experience, but not interpret. As a result, the opera has continued to have an effect, leaving traces for example in Shostakovich’s “The Nose”, but it also experienced rejection by the communist musical aesthetic because the satire in their opinion was aimed at itself, and made no contemporary societal reference. The Parasha aria is a melancholy Romance in the Glinka manner; the hussar‘s song in gypsy style is a Polonaise, and taken together with the Parasha aria forms a stylistic unit in the sense of slow tempo, fast tempo. The mother‘s aria belongs to the category of Italian cavatina. The gabbing scene between the mother and neighbour becomes a Polka and imitates Dargomyshky. The quartet parodies Tchaikovsky. The final love duet crosses over into a slow salon-waltz. The degree to which one can understand the compositional style of Mavra depends on how much detailed knowledge one has in Russian operatic music dating from Dargomyschsky and Tschaikovsky. – In addition, there have been (much debated) Jazz influences recognized that are caused by echoes of Ragtime, inasmuch as Ragtime can be described as Jazz. This does not correspond to Strawinsky’s understanding of Ragtime and Jazz, especially if one, more problematically, interprets every chromatic melody and syncopation as being related to Jazz. As the wit of Strawinsky’s music exists in the alienation of Russian operatic models of developed musical forms in favour of Italian ones, the original models must be known before one can comprehend their inherent satirization. Parasha’s Aria (Parasha’s Song), in which one can hear a Glinka Romance, confronts, through the dilemma of whether one defines it as an Aria or Song, the Russian compositional dilemma between the beloved blissful New-Neapolitan opera aria and the at first unloved compositional logic of Gluck and Wagner. The result was an attempt to hold melodic lines in abeyance in order to be able to maintain effective musical scenes without sounding radical or epigonal. More difficult to answer is the question regarding the original models, whether Strawinsky had in mind specific pieces or numbers, or only took as a basis the style in itself. That he exhibited Russian and Italian operatic music in a slightly exaggerated manner remains unchallenged if one does not want to engage with the whole issue of hunting down reminiscences. Just as far-reachingly typical forms, such as Italian or Neapolitan coloratura arias or simple native folksongs develop numerous motific figures that constantly return. They are an intrinsic part of the style and their presence does not imply, that one composer copies from another. While he was composing Mavra, Strawinsky did not own a single Glinka opera score. Strawinsky was constructing a historical opposition between Russian composers who wrote in a spontaneous manner, such as Glinka, Dargomichsky and Tchaikovsky, and those that subscribed to a doctrine of aestheticism with the intention of only creating art that, coming from the people, was long a part of the people’s culture. As a consequence, this means not copying by adopting Russian models but characterizing in the sense of alienating them. The chosen character of an opera buffa made concessions to this. Strawinsky handled the four stage figures as petty bourgeois character types from Russian suburbia; the young girl looking to escape her boring everyday existence, the frivolous soldier searching for adventure and amours, and the gossip. For every character and their partner, Strawinsky develops a specific identifier: Parasha and the Hussar are allocated the Romance, the urban origin of which connects Parasha with a Russian, traditionally sentimental soundworld, and the Hussar with the opera-like theatricality of empty impetuosity. Parasha’s soundworld remains melancholy with a gently coquettish and wounded effect, for the same reason. That of the Hussar links an affected and frivolous gaiety with impatience and aural signifiers of his profession, such as fanfare motives or the large melodic leaps to express something unpleasant, here the impatience to get to the goal of the entire adventure as soon as possible, that are characteristics of Strawinsky. For the gossiping women the intonation changes into the Russian elegaic style of a lament or takes on the character of an entertaining couplet. In this way the pretended seriousness of opera stands in grotesque opposition to the banality of the events themselves, which are always neutralised. When the lovers see each other before the impending fulfilment of their wishes, they sing at first a duet in the style of a grand heroic-opera love duet, but cannot maintain its high level of pathos, and so fall back into the mustiness of their unprepossessing daily lives and end their love scene with a very miserable Waltz, a technique that Strawinsky had already employed in the Moor-Ballerina scene in Petrushka. What Strawinsky expresses at the end of the opera what he meant for these events which were for him not serious, but for the characters involved were a part of their lives: when it becomes likely that the lovers will not reach their goal this time, the composer mocks with great excess, writing funeral music behind them that is to be taken ironically. What connections with the text Strawinsky does make is always satirical or revealing in the sense of Wagnerian motific language. In the great love duet wide-ranging sequences represent to the endless blessedness in the text, and they are written as emptily and masklike as the blessedness is dishonestly exaggerated. Even before the text describes that Parasha has helped her Hussar over the cook’s back door into the house the fanfare melody reveals his military origin, as Parasha introduces her squire to her mother as the female cook. Strawinsky demonstrates that the words ‘God of Love’[=words in the text] are also not fast, despite the fact that his two volunteer victims have long decided on fast action, by bringing in the Waltz from the love duet, and then suddenly drastically slowing down the note values to minims at these words in the text. When the Hussar expresses his hope, that the mother and daughter will be satisfied with him, his melody flits from d1 up to E flat 2, the top of the range. Mother and daughter answer at the same time with the same words. The mother however has lamenting notes in her answer, because she is thinking about loyalty, honesty and cheapness, while Parasha degenerates into her Romance aria, to which Strawinsky lends a demanding feeling by means of a sudden harmonic shift. Many of these techniques of the style, which are just as meaningful as they are comic, are already recognised and articulated by Boris Assafyev and Boris Yurustovski. By doing this, Strawinsky pushes several levels of interpretation into and onto one another, in that he not only describes the separate characters, but also develops superior fields of meaning at textually appropriate opportunities. He therefore gives to the dead Thekla a separate motif that reappears in the opera several times. Thekla was ‘faithful and honorable’ and, nota bene, cheap, and she served for a long time. Her motif plays a role as the motivation of the mother in the hiring scene, and it returns again when the Hussar later boasts as a military man of ten years that he has served faithfully and honestly for that long. The contrast of the melodic and the harmonic and the coincidence of the tonic and dominant are stylistic techniques that Strawinsky had used previously to achieve grotesque effects. In Parasha’s aria for example, the melodic and harmonic writing do not go together well. Strawinsky’s bringing them into conflict means that emotionalism of this song, with its Romance-like melody that is beautiful in itself, gains an harmonic backdrop that no longer suits it, the normal relationships of which are inverted when the tonic is superimposed on the dominant and the dominant on the tonic. This interpretative multi-faceted approach is also served by the use of polytonal elements, harmonic shifts of key area and polyphony. The relationship between the events uses Classical conceptions of function as a prerequisite, because otherwise the alterations that are made to them, which characterise the text and situations, cannot be comprehended. Strawinsky mastered all of this already in the composition of Petrushka and the easy four-hand piano pieces. That he also used the traditional handling of orchestration for the purpose of characterisation but also distorted it, for example that he transfers the typical string passages into the woodwinds and vice versa as well as assigning instruments to people and situations, is also marginally understood. The trumpets for example are allocated to the Hussar, and fast woodwind writing to the gabbling, gossiping women.

 

Dedication: A la mémoire de / Pouchkyne, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky [To the memory of / Pushkin, Glinka and Tschaikowsky / Igor Strawinsky].

 

Duration: 2746″. Strawinsky found it annoying that early catalogues from Boosey & Hawkes contained incorrect statements of duration. A difference of opinion between the publishers and the recording company regarding the duration of Mavra, in that the company believed it to be shorter and the publishers longer, caused Strawinsky to write an irritated letter on 22nd May 1950. He wrote that these mistakes could be traced back to his corrections not being taken into account. In the case of Mavra, he specified the performance duration as 23 minutes. This figure is just as incorrect as the marking in the score of 25 minutes. In Strawinsky’s later documentation, he specified 28 minutes less 14 seconds. In the dispute over the duration of the Mass as well, the figures given by the publishers turned out to be correct, and Strawinsky’s incorrect.

 

Date of origin: Opera (without overture): Anglet and Biarritz, summer 1921 up to 9th March 1922*; Overture: later added in Paris shortly before the première; Parasha Arrangement: Biarritz, begun around 9th September 1923, completed before 15th September 1923; Parasha-Arrangement (Violin Transcription): New York April 1937.

* In the autumn, he had to interrupt things as a result of the work on “Sleeping Beauty”, but during November and December 1921, he continued work on his opera without interruption in Biarritz and was certain that he was seeing himself create a good work, a masterpiece, as he wrote in quotation marks to Ernest Ansermet on 21st December 1921. Again, there were a few interruptions caused by trips in between.

 

First performances: The first performance took place at the théâtre national de l’ opéra (Paris) with Oda Slobodskaja (Parasha), Hélène Sadovène (Neighbour), Soja Rossowskaja (Mother), Bélina Skoupewski [Stefano Bielina] (Hussar). Scenery and the costumes: Léopold Survage; staging: Bronislawa Nijinska; direction: Serge Grigoriew; under the musical conduction of Gregor Fitelberg and the responsibility of Serge Diaghilew. Strawinsky presumably did not play the overture at this preliminary performance of Mavra. Which piano arrangement Strawinsky used was brought into question by Craft, because the piano version for two hands was completed in March 1924. The preliminary performance was, in contrast to the premiere, very successful. Sébastien Voirol was also among the invited guests. (In the Strawinsky literature, the opinion, which stems from the incorrect dating in the ‘Memoirs’, is stubbornly clung to that Mavra and Renard were premiered on the same day in Paris, 3rd June 1922. This date is correct for the premiere of Mavra, but not for Renard, the premiere of which had already taken place on 18th May 1922. In his memoirs (which were not written by Strawinsky), the combination of both stage works is dressed up so as to make it appear vivid and superficially credible. Then there is the fact that Mavra was conducted by Fitelberg and Renard by Ansermet. In reality, Renard was not performed on 3rd June. The programme contained Petrushka, Mavra and Sacre.A pre-performance was arranged on 29th May 1922 in the ballroom of the Hôtel Continental at Paris for the friends of Diaghilew who supported the project in a version for piano (played by Strawinsky) under the musical conduction of Gregor Fitelberg. The first performance of the Parasha aria was probably on the 7th November 1923 at Paris. The Hylton arrangement was performed for the first time on 17th February 1931 in the opera house of Paris with the Hylton Band.

 

Remarks:  Immediately after the premiere, it was described as persiflage, and it is not certain whether this was a recognition of the work’s specification as Russian-Italian opera, or whether it referred to the idea that the newcomer who had become so famous with “Sacre” had hamstrung himself and moved backwards stylistically, or even not taken himself so seriously. In addition, they felt obliged to deal with the constantly reappearing dominant-seventh chords and leading-note music, which in the opinion of many contemporaries, did not suit Strawinsky. Strawinsky’s friend Francis Poulenc wrote about this in the June/July issue of “Les Feuilles Libres” and decisively stood against the claim of parody. It was in a letter to Poulenc, his New Year’s letter dated 1st January 1923, that Strawinsky finally acknowledged the defeat of his opera. The persiflage problem had experienced the most different interpretations, with the level of persiflage varying from harmless and affectionate parody to caricature of the Russian attitude to life, bordering on maliciousness. – The Parasha aria has likewise been linked back to a specific Romance by Glinka as well as a folksong collection by Daniil Kaschin from 1833 that has been verified to have been known and highly regarded by Strawinsky, and of which Strawinsky had a reprinting from 1883 in his library. He did not however have in his possession during the composition of Mavra any scores by Glinka. It was only after the premiere of Mavra that he bought, in July 1922, Glinka’s “Russlan and Ludmilla”, and in August of the same year “A Life for the Tsar”. – Strawinsky wrote very bitterly on 10th April 1964 to Stuart Pope of Boosey & Hawkes in connection with the planned vinyl recording. The music of Mavra had never been engraved, the orchestral scores (meaning the hire material) were unusable and the set of parts was in a bad condition. Of course the music had not received any success and it would also not receive. When he complained that worse music than Mavra was being performed, they replied that better music than Mavra was also not being performed. But he would certainly like to see Mavra printed. – In a letter from Nice dated 1st November 1926 to Ernest Ansermet, Strawinsky waxed enthusiastic about a performance of Mavra as part of what was at the time the Frankfurt Strawinsky festival. He would have gladly seen a performance if Ansermet used the resident singers at Frankfurt for a Strawinsky concert. He praised the voice of the only German in the ensemble, Ruth Arndt, as good but not big enough. The event never came about however, because the intended performance was to be performed in Russian and the singers could only master French and not Russian.

 

Nijinska’s stage direction: Not much has been said about Nijinska‘s staging nor about the single stage-set of one room. Actually, the staging consisted of gesticulations and was mainly an attempt at reasonable teamwork only, all of which Strawinsky did not think much of. For on the stage there were singers with their typically heavy singer gestures, so that Nijinska‘s plan for stylized movements using dance related technique were totally missing.

 

Subsequent productions

1928 Berlin, Kroll-Oper (Conductor and stage director: Otto Klemperer; décor: Ewald Dülberg;

            Parasha: Ellen Burger)

1934 Philadelphia (stage direction and décor: Herbert Graf; conductor: Alexander Smallens)

1935, Wednesday 23rd October 1935; concert performance Association de l’Orchestre Romand

            with the soloists Natalie Wetchor (soprano), Pierre Bernac (tenor), Rimathé und Goudal (alto);

            conductor Ernest Ansermet

 

History of origin: There are diverse versions as to the genesis of “Mavra, and today it is hardly possible to determine which one is completely right. In 1921 Diaghilev fought with Bakst for various reasons which have been handed down to us; they probably were financial ones, as they ended up with no choreographer. Therefore Diaghilev arrived at the idea of bringing back Petipas‘ ballet, “Sleeping Beauty” with the original choreography and Tschaikovsky‘s music. Strawinsky had a hand in the instrumentation. It was at this time that Strawinsky proposed his Mavra idea corresponding to Pushkin, telling the public about their reverence for Pushkin, Glinka, and Tschaikovsy. It is not believable that Diaghilev commissioned him. He was a ballet and not an opera impresario, and whenever opera was performed he gave it a dance aspect, and if possible tried to turn the piece into a ballet. We can be certain that Diaghilev took up the opera into the programme but did not commission it; one can surmise that he did that mainly to please his young friend Boris Kochno, who wrote the libretto. Strawinsky began the summer of 1921 in Anglet and received Kochno‘s libretto scene by scene, supposedly making sketches of melodies and stacking them in different piles, later pulling out a melody which suited a newly arrived verse. He finished his work on April 9th, 1922, but the piano-vocal score was not ready until April, 1924; he composed the overture shortly before its first performance in Paris.

Diaghilev was due to rechoreograph Petipa’s ballet “Sleeping Beauty” with music by Tchaikovsky in 1920 or 1921. The plan was supported by Strawinsky, and furthermore he received a commission to orchestrate some of the musical numbers. Diaghilev was now looking, it is reported, for a short section of prefatory music capable of being staged, and asked Strawinsky for this. This version of the story, which was related by Kochno, cannot be correct in this form. First, Sleeping Beauty is, at a length of 2 ½ hours, a full-length and also formidable dance production, which tolerates no other piece alongside it and would not be capable of having another stage work preceding it, either in terms of time considerations or content. So Sleeping Beauty is a dance work and Mavra an opera. What sort of impresario would join two such pieces together in one programme with their enormous costs! If Diaghilev had intended to only perform a single act from Tchaikovsky’s ballet, then he would have required a 2nd and probably even a 3rd piece. But he used the ballet in its entirety, achieved an unheard-of success and was then bankrupt.

A further version of events comes from Strawinsky himself. Diaghilev and he were united in their common high regard for Pushkin and that part of Russian music which behaved artistically spontaneously. Strawinsky named Glinka, Dargomyzhsky and Tchaikovsky, and broke away from the Belayev circle with Rimsky-Korsakoff and Glazunov and his doctrinally national aestheticism. According to this version, they therefore developed a plan in London to honour these significant Russians and sourced the Pushkin material together. Even this version can only be correct in parts.

If Diaghilev had planned an evening to honour Glinka, Dargomyzhsky and Tchaikovsky, then he would have, see “Sleeping Beauty”, performed their music with the Russian Ballet, but never commissioned an opera that didn’t even last half an hour.

Yet another version of events is based on the difficulties that Diaghilev had with Léon Bakst. There are also a further two versions. The first says that Bakst engaged with a female dancer and Diaghilev fired him for it. But this is not believable given Diaghilev’s erotic nature. Bakst did not “engage himself” with the dancer in the usual sense, but fell in love with her and married her. The other version is believable. According to it, Bakst and Diaghilev had fallen out over financial matters, as Diaghilev was not willing to pay the amount demanded by Bakst. They therefore went their separate ways and Diaghilev found himself without a choreographer. This caused him to keep a lookout for works that had already been choreographed. So he came upon Sleeping Beauty. In this situation, Strawinsky offered Mavra, an opera which certainly did not require a choreographer. Diaghilev certainly did accept the opera, but did not commission it, and certainly only included it in the program for the sake of his young friend Kochno.

 

Parasha Aria. History of origin: It can be seen from letters written by Strawinsky in Biarritz on 9th and 15th September 1923 to Ernest Ansermet that he had completed the planning for the Parasha arrangement on 9th September and the version for voice and piano certainly before 15th September 1923. Strawinsky gave the date of the completion of the final orchestral version as 1929 in a letter dated 10th December 1947 to Betty Bean, and it was also published in the same year. Whether this is an error of memory on Strawinsky’s part cannot be easily found out. According to the documentation in the Library of the British Museum, the conducting score (disc number R.M.V. 458) was already published in 1925. The London copy, from which this date was taken, has only a copyright mark dated 1925, but the printing mark 1933, and to make matters worse, a composition date of 192223 is stated in the main title on the first page of music. The time of acquisition sheds no light on the matter because in this case it is a bought copy that the Library obtained on 11th February 1918. As a result, all the information can be correct and incorrect at the same time. The copyright mark 1925 could have been taken from the piano-reduction edition, the printing date 1933 from a later print run, the date of the work’s completion could refer to the completion of the piano version of the arrangement, as the complete piano version was presumably not completed before March 1924. Strawinsky also used the date 1929 for the piano version of the Parasha song. In a letter dated 28th July 1952 to Ernst Roth, he refers to a new edition by the publishers of the 1929 edition, and casually recalls the orchestral version it was made into. Strawinsky gave the piece the French title ‘Chanson de Parasha’, which was later anglicised into ‘Russian Maiden’s Song’. The reason for turning the orchestral arrangement of the first entry of Parasha into a separate aria-like scene seems not to have been ascertained. In December 1947, Strawinsky completed a revised version because the young singer Vera Bryner (Pavlovsky) had been given the task of recording his songs (J. & W. Chester Publications). The revision affected the piano version, and not the orchestral one. For the publication, Strawinsky emphasised not naming the opera of origin ‘Mavra’ because he did not trust the old copyright statement by the Russian music Publishers from 1925 and also did not trust being protected by the fake editor name, Albert Spalding.  This was why the new title ‘Russian Maiden’s Song’ came about, published in the revised version of 1948.

 

Situationsgeschichte: In the memoirs, the conception of the First Orchestral Suite (No.2) can be traced back to the light piano piece for four hands which he wrote for an unnamed parisian music-hall.Tarushkin has proven that this music-hall was called the Théâtre de la chauve-souris à Moscow, which opened December, 1920 at the Théâtre femina on the Champs-Elysée under Nikita Balyjew and very soon enjoyed great popularity, particularly among Russian emigrées. The name chauve-souris, bat, came from the Moscow cabaret (Ëåòó÷àÿ ìûøü) with the same name. The idea was later transplanted with similar success to London (1921) and America (1922). The Fledermaus Theatre was soon a gathering point for presumably homesick Russian emigrants who could transport themselves back to their home via a lighter muse. Balyjev himself was an emigrant. At his theatre worked the leading Russian painter, Serge Soudeikin with his recently married wife Vera, who had been active before the Russian Revolution as one of the most significant theatre painters as well as for Diaghilev since 1906. It was via Soudeikin that Kochno came into contact with Diaghilev, and when Soudeikin invited Diaghilev to the Fledermaus Theatre to a general rehearsal on 19th February 1921, the latter brought Strawinsky along with him, who reputedly fell in love with the young, expansive, but box office-filling dancer Zhenya Nikitina, and was from then on a regular guest in the theatre. La Chauve-Souris had a favourable output of vaudeville theatre works with a Russian atmosphere, and it cannot be ruled out that the idea for Mavra was conceived in this atmosphere. Finally, Mavra was sketched in spring of the same year, in which Strawinsky first came to the Fledermaus Theatre. These possible connections can also explain why Strawinsky wrote that he was disappointed with the “Music-Hall”, but did not name its name because he had too many beautiful memories connected with it, not least with his second wife Vera Bosset, divorced as Vera Soudeikina. The Chauve-souris lived from vaudeville-theater with a Russian hue and its atmosphere may have kindled his Mavra idea. Its origin was basically not cabaret itself, rather the penchant for the grotesque which, according to Pribautki, had always belonged to the Russian soul and enabled a “bat cabaret” to come into existence. “Mavra” was not written as the result of the Fledermaus Theatre, but rather opera and cabaret were nourished by a common root.

 

Significane: Ergographically speaking, Mavra formed the very first step toward neoclassicism which was arrived at in the “Octet,” his next work. The Parasha aria already contains a broad spectrum of neoclassical characteristics. Writing to Ernest Ansermet on December 21, 1921, Strawinsky termed his own opera a masterpiece (“chef-d‘oeuvre”). The preliminary performance was a success, but opening night a disaster to the joy of Bakst, who had been done away with. For Strawinsky Mavra meant trauma, and he never got over it. Even during the revision negotiations in 1966 he spoke of his “poor” Mavra. The French quipped, “Ce Mavra, c‘est vraiment mavrant,” (play on words, meaning ‘that‘s bad, that‘s really bad), and an American journalist explained to his readers that the opening night was really a sandwich inside out, with two slices of meat on the outside and a slice of bread on the inside. “Petrouchka” and “Sacre” were meant by the meat, and “Mavra” the slice of bread between them. Indeed, the opera was in a disadvantageous clinch. In addition came the inference of a new style which one found unsuitable for Strawinsky. Furthermore, the opera was sung in Russian which the majority of the audience could not understand, and so no one had even the slightest inkling of the humor to be found in the piece.

 

Violin transcription: The violin transcription came out of the collaboration with Dushkin and the aims that arose as a result. The violin transcription received the double name ‘Chanson russe. Russian Maiden’s Song’. Strawinsky did not reduce the orchestra in any way for his arrangement, but used the original instrumentation from the opera score that he had selected for the Parasha entry, thus omitting Flutes, Cor Anglais, E-flat Clarinet, Trumpets, Trombones and percussion. The trumpets, trombones and timpani only play during the Parasha scene in connection with the Hussar. Strawinsky however cut his entry, and moved the required vocal writing from the tenor part into the orchestra. In this way, the entire scene could be turned into a self-standing soprano aria and transferred into a violin version.

 

Violoncello transcription: The violoncello transcription by Markevitch was written with consent, but not in collaboration with Strawinsky, so unlike the cases of the transcriptions by Dushkin and Gautier. Strawinsky therefore placed emphasis on a precise name. For Dushkin and Gautier, this meant that the collaboration with him be stated clearly, and for Markevitch, having the cellist’s name printed as the sole author. The contracts pending in August must have been drawn up in this context, as Strawinsky expressly demanded of the publishers in a letter dated 30th August 1950. In fact, the piano part to the cello transcription is identical to that of the Strawinsky-Dushkin violin transcription.

 

Hylton arrangement: Hylton had asked Strawinsky for permission to rework parts of Mavra for his jazz band and thus rework the sung sections instrumentally.

In a letter dated 9th September 1930, Strawinsky announced his forthcoming arrival in Paris. Strawinsky and Hylton came to an arrangement there, as Hector Fraggi published a message in the 23rd December 1930 edition of the magazine ‘Le Petit Marsellais’ that Hylton was preparing an arrangement of Mavra. Fraggi saw in it a connection between serious and light music. Naturally, the Russian Music Publishers took no part in this because only the piano reduction, but not the score had been published.

In a letter dated 6th February 1931 to Arthur Brooks of Columbia Grammophone in London, Strawinsky denied having any knowledge of a vinyl recording, and in a letter dated 12th February 1931, he warned Hylton against naming his name differently than that of the composer of the original for the vinyl recording, which was shortly to be released.

 

Versions: A printed (pocket) version in Russian and English first appeared in 1969, but only after Strawinsky‘s insistant pleading, two years before his death. What the Russian music publishers published three years after the first performance in 1925, due to Strawinsky‘s stalling, was a piano score with a truly fine outer design with medaillon pictures of Tschaikovsky, Glinka, and Pushkin. The handed down conductor‘s score in Russian, French, German, and English remained rental material.The publishers produced it with its own serial number, R.M.V.418 and was received by Strawinsky in Paris in November of 1925.* The Overture contains rehearsal figures that are letters. Presumably the score was figured without the Overture and Strawinsky did not want to change this, and thus added the letters only in the Overture in the later edition, so that there would not have to be a correction every few bars of the main score. In the same year he had the overture in a solo piano version released, as well as the mother‘s aria in a version for voice and piano. In 1929 the Parasha aria appeared as “Chanson de Parasha,” and was later anglicized as “Russian Maiden‘s Song.” Only a few of Strawinsky‘s pieces have had so many published versions as this song has had. In 1933 it appeared for small orchestra in a conductor‘s score; in 1947 as a violin transcription by Samuel Dushkin and in the same year as a pocket version; in 1948 as a new edition of the piano-vocal version (contract completed with Boosey and Hawkes on May 10th, 1948); in 1951 in the Markewitsch edition for cello and piano (contract completed with Boosey and Hawkes on November 6th, 1950); and finally, as a Russian pirate of the piano-vocal version in 1968. In spite of many endeavors, the financial success of the piece was just as sobering as was its first performance. The Russian publisher had sold almost 400 piano-vocal scores until the end of 1938, about 200 overture editions, and approximately 100 Mother and Parasha arias each. The piano score of the opera with its old serial number had been newly distributed by Boosey and Hawkes starting in 1956, but in the very same year a new piano score with a different serial number appeared with none of the original Russian text, replacing the original of Burness with that of Craft. For a long time the old orchestra/rental material had become increasingly unuseable. Strawinsky had made so many changes in the printed version of the score that he believed the differences between the new orchestral score and the new piano score of 1956 could be removed only through the production of a third piano score, which he demanded of the publishers in 1966. – A problem one of a kind arose in 1930 or 1931 regarding an arrangement by Jack Hylton for jazzband using different parts from the opera, mainly from the love duet and the quartet. People at the time saw a connection between serious and light music. Strawinsky listened to the completed Hylton in a trial arrangement in London and delivered the writer the necessary instructions for synchronising the arrangement and work (Strawinsky‘s) for the final recorded version. Disagreements followed, so much so that Strawinsky actually denied having known anything about a record recording. Finally, he forbid the mentioning of his name as anything other than the composer of the original; he was the composer and no one else.Robert Craft, however, did not doubt that Strawinsky had worked over the arrangement and claimed that Strawinsky also had even conducted parts of the record. The Hylton arrangement was never pressed.

* The British Library acquired an edition published in 1933 on 11th February 1958 and put the date 1925 onto the first edition, of which no copy has been located so far. It cannot be ruled out that this supposition may be correct. The plate number, however, points towards a dating of 1929, especially as in this year the accompanying piano reduction was also published. It would not be reasonable to assume that both editions are reprintings of a 1925 edition. If the latter were the case, it would probably mean the existence of two unlocateable editions of the conducting score.

 

Historical Recordings: 1937 Parashas Song with Samuel Dushkin (Violin) and Igor Strawinsky (Piano); in New York on 9th May 1946 Parashas Song with Joseph Szigeti (Violin) and Igor Strawinsky (Piano); on 7th Mai 1964* in Toronto (Canada) with Susan Belinck (Parasha), Mary Simmons (Mother), Patricia Rideout (Neighbour) and Stanley Kolk (Tenor), with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: VIII-1/14 (Recording 1964*).

* Strawinsky left out a section of figure 5a (in the score, figure 5a is inserted between figures 5 and 6). The continuation runs from figure 57 in the first Parasha scene directly into the end after figure 5a6, which then continues into the Hussar’s Gypsy song (figure 61). There are consequently 10 bars with the last 3 lines of Parasha’s song omitted.

 

Autograph: The autograph score is understood as being missing. A copy of the manuscript of the Overture was given to Ernest Ansermet. The autograph score of the piano reduction is stored in the Washington Library of Congress. The neat copy of the Dushkin transcription is in the Paul Sacher Stiftung in Basel.

 

Copyright: 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 1947 assigned to Boosey & Hawkes Inc.; 1956 for the edition with English Text by Boosey & Hawkes Inc., 1969 Pocket score by Boosey & Hawkes.

 

Errors, legends, colportages, curiosities, stories

During the interval on the day of the premiere, the Parisians laughed about an untranslatable play on words: ‘Ca Mavra, c’est vraiment mavrant.’ (vraiment = ; mavrant = ).

An American journalist was to explain to his readers that the programme of the premiere was an inverted sandwich, namely two slices of meat with a slice of bread in between. What this meant was Petrushka and Sacre, between which Mavra was the slice of bread.

 

Editions

a) Overview

391 1925 Oper VoSc; R-F-G-E; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 89 pp.; R. M. V. 411.

                        391Straw1 ibd. [with annotations].

                        391Straw2 ibd. [with annotations].

            39156 1956 ibd.

392 1925 Ouvertüre VoSc; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 6 pp.; R. M. V. 411a.

393 1925 Aria of the mother; Voice-Piano; R-F-G-E; Russ. Musikv. Berlin; 6 pp.; R. M. V. 411.411b.

394 1925 Oper FuSc; R-F-G-E; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; R. M. V. 418.

                        394Straw ibd. [with annotations].

395 1929 Parasha Aria; Voice-Piano; R-F-G-E; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 7 pp.; R. M. V. 467.

                        395Straw ibd.

396 [1929] Parasha Aria; FuSc; R-F-G-E; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 18 pp.; R. M. V. 458.

                        39633 1933 ibd.

397 1947 Chanson russe; Violin-Piano (Dushkin); Gutheil-Kussewitzky; 4 pp.; A. 10. 482 G.

                        397Straw ibd. [with annotations].

            397[47] ibd. Gutheil / Boosey & Hawkes London; B. & H. 17860.

398

399 1948 Parasha Aria; Voice-Piano; Boosey & Hawkes London; 7 pp. 2°; B. & H. 16360.

            399[65] [1965] ibd.

3910 (1948) KlA; R-F-G-E; Boosey & Hawkes London; 89 pp. (4°); R. M. V. 411.

3911 1951 Parasha Aria; Violoncello-Piano (Markewitsch); Boosey & Hawkes; 4. pp.; B. & H. 17815.

            3911[65] [1965] ibd.

3912 1956 VoSc; R-F-G-E; Russischer Musikverlag / Boosey & Hawkes London; 89 pp.; R. M. V. 411.

b) Characteristic features

391 Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE / Igor Strawinsky / [Vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno* / English Version by* [#] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / [°] / Réduction pour Chant et Piano / par l’auteur / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.)** / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Vocal score with chant [library binding] 26.5 x 33.3 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French-German-English; 89 [87] pages + 4 cover pages thin cardboard black on beige [front cover title laid out with vignette 2.1 x 3 decorated ornament, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page laid out with vignette 1 x 1,2 sitting women playing cymbalom, empty page, page of dedication hand-written printed in line etching Russian-French with the author’s signature in the Russian text underneath three oval pictures in medallion form >Ïàìÿòè / Ïóøêèíà / [Puschkin 4,6 x 6,2] / Ãëèíêè [#] ×àéêîâñêàãî / [Glinka 4,5 x 6,1] [#] [Tschaikowsky 4,3 x 6] / Èãîðü Ñòðàâèíñê³é / A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, empty page, page with (world) première data French, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >MAVRA<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / 1922.<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score below movement title flush left >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musiques.) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin.< flush right >Tous droits d’exécution réservés. / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; plate number >R. M. V. 411<; end of score dated p. 89 >Biarritz, Mars 1922<; without end marks) // (1925)

° Dividing line (tilde) of 0.8 cm.

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

391Straw1

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate is on the front cover title below the vignette centre centred with >Piano – Chant / Igor Strawinsky / Avril I925<   signed and dated and contains corrections [p. 7, figure 11 should be repeated from 4th crotchet to p. 9, figure 55, bars 27+8 = 1st Volta; p. 21, figure 323, Piano Bass: 1st two-note chord should be E-G instead of E-B; p. 23 figure 353, Piano Bass: the two last notes of the six-part semiquaver-ligature should be bb–c instead of db–eb; p. 2425, figure 38139: voice shoul be written an octave higher; p. 38, figure 621, Piano descant: 1st chord should be a-c#1-e1 instead of a#-c#1-e12nd chord should be b-g1-b1 instead of b-f1-g1; p. 38, figure 622, Piano descant: b1 should be added to the 4 two-note chords (are now three-note chords); p. 38, figure 623, Piano descant: minim a1 should be added to quaver e1; p. 42, figure 693, voice: minim a1 should be dotted; p. 42, figure 706, Piano descant: the last two-not chord should be d1-b1 instead of d1-bb1; p. 52, figure 882, Piano descant: the 1st three-note chord should be d2-f2-d3 instead of d2-f#2-d3; p. 55 figure 931, tempo marking behind >Larghetto.<: should be dotted crotchet  = 44 instead of crotchet = 44].

 

391Straw2

Strawinsky’s copy from his estate contains next to and below the ornament flush right the handwritten annotation with pencil >With sketches for a new and cor– / rect English translation by Robert Craft<, on p. 7 at the top of the page left the annotation with pencil >Translation sketches / by Robert Craft / Oct I954 / IStr<. The copy contains no further annotations.

 

392 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MAVRA* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno / English Version by [#**] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#**] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / [***] / Ouverture / pour piano / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’editeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.****) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Vocal score with chant [library binding] 27 x 34.1 (2° [4°]); 6 [4] pages without cover + 2 pages front matter [title page laid out black on creme white with vignette 1 x 1,2 sitting women playing cymbalom, empty page] without back matter; title head >MAVRA. / Ouverture.<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / 1922.<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score below title head flush left >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright Russischer Musikverlag, G. m . b . H., Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musique.) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin.< flush right centred >Tous droits d’exécution réservés. / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; plate number >R. M. V. 411. 411a<; without end marks) // (1925)

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script.

** Dividing ornament 2 x 2, spanning two lines.

*** Dividing line (tilde) of 1.1 x 0.3 cm.

**** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

393 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MAVRA* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno / English Version by [#] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / Air de la Mère / pour chant et piano / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.**) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Vocal score with chant [library binding] 26.8 x 34 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French-German-English; 6 [5] pages without cover + 1 page front matter [title page laid out with vignette 1 x 1,3 sitting women playing cymbalom] + 2 pages back matter [empty pages]; figuring 34423; title head >MAVRA / Air de la Mère<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / 1922.< flush left >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H., Berlin. / (Édition Russe de Musique.) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H., Berlin.< flush right centred >Tous droits d’exécution réservés. / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; plate number [p. 2:] >R. M. V. 411b<, [pp. 36:] >R. M. V. 411.411b<; without end marks) // (1925)

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

394 Mavra* / Opera buffe / Igor Strawinsky / [Vignette] / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno* / English Version by* [#] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / Partition d’orchestre / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.)** / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Full score [library binding] 26.5 x 33.1 ([4°]); 152 [151] pages + 4 cover pages black on creme white [front cover title laid out with vignette 4.2 x 6.2 decorated ornament, 3 empty pages] + 6 pages front matter [title page laid out with vignette 1 x 1,2 sitting women playing cymbalom, empty page, page of dedication hand-written printed in line etching Russian-French with the author’s signature in the Russian text underneath three oval pictures in medallion form >Ïàìÿòè / Ïóøêèíà / [Puschkin 4.6 x 6.2] / Ãëèíêè [#] ×àéêîâñêàãî / [Glinka 4.5 x 6.1] [#] [Tschaikowsky 4,3 x 6] / Èãîðü Ñòðàâèíñê³é / A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, empty page, page with (world) première data French, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >MAVRA<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title >OUVERTURE< flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1922<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score below movement title flush left >Edited by Albert Spalding, New York<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin. / (EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin.< flush right >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays. / Tous droits d’exécution réservés.<; plate number (only 1st page of the score) >R. M. V. 418<; without end of score dated<; production indication [second last page] p. 151 flush right as end mark >Druck: Berliner Musikalien-Druckerei: G.m.b.H.<) // [1925]

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

394Straw

Strawinsky’s copy of his estate is on the front cover title at the top of the page centred signed and dated with >Igor Strawinsky / Nov. I925 / Paris<. 

 

395 IGOR* STRAWINSKY* / MAVRA* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / CHANSON* DE* PARACHA* / pour chant et piano / Prix / °RM.: 2.— / °Frs.: 2.50 / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.)** / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / [°°] / Imp. Delanchy-Dupré – Paris-Asnières / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne. // (Vocal score with chant unsewn 26.5 x 34.4 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French-German-English; 7 [6] pages without cover + 1 page front matter [front cover title] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >CHANSON DE PARACHE / de l’opéra “MAVRA“; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 below title head flush left partly in italics centred >Texte russe de B. KOCHNO, d’après A. Pouchkine / Version française par J. LARMANJAT / English version by R. BURNESS / Deutsch von A. ELUKHEN< flush right centred >Musique de / IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin< flush right >Tous droits d’exécution de reproduction et / d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays. / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, Berlin<; plate number >R. M. V. 467<; production indications as end marks p. 7 flush left >Imp. Delanchy-Duprè – Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXIX< flush right >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // 1929

° The prices in different currencies are set below one another.

°° Dividing horizontal line of 0.9 cm.

* Hatched hollow font.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

395Straw

Strawinsky’s copy is on the front cover page between >IGOR STRAWINSKY< and >MAVRA< flush right signed and dated >IStrawinsky / 1929<.

 

396 IGOR STRAWINSKY° / MAVRA°° / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE°°° / CHANSON DE PARACHA° / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Chanson de Paracha / tirée de l’opéra-bouffe / MAVRA / Musique arrangée et transcrite par l’Auteur / pour une voix de soprano / accompagnée de 2 Hautbois, 2 Clarinettes, / 2 Bassons, 4 Cors, 1 Tuba, 2 Violons solo, / 1 Alto solo et plusieurs Violoncelles / et Contrebasses. / PARTITION d’ORCHESTRE / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG (G.M.B.H.)* / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEVITZKY / BERLIN · LEIPZIG · PARIS · MOSCOU · LONDRES · NEW YORK · BUENOS AIRES / [°°°°] / S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXIII // (Full score [library binding] 27.7 x 37.2 (2° [gr. 4°]); sung text Russian-French-German-English; 18 [18] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper black on light greybeige [ornamental front cover title] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] without back matter; title head partly in italics >Chanson de Paracha / tirée de l’opéra bouffe / Mavra / d’Igor Strawinsky / Musique arrangée et transcrite par / l’auteur pour petit orchestre<; authors specified with translator specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below title head flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky / 1922/1923< flush left centred partly in italics >Texte russe de B. KOCHNO, d’après A. Pouchkine / Version française par J. LARMANJAT / English version by R. BURNESS / German von A. ELUKHEN<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left centred >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H. Berlin< flush right centred >Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction et / d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays. / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag Berlin<; plate number >R. M. V. 458<; production indications p. 18 below type area flush left >S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXIII< flush right as end marks >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // (1933)

° Hatched hollow font.

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script.

°°° Line of text in curly ornaments.

°°°° Dividing horizontal line of 0.8 cm.

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

397 IGOR STRAWINSKY / CHANSON RUSSE / Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’AUTEUR et S. DUSHKIN / A. GUTHEIL // IGOR STRAWINSKY / CHANSON RUSSE / RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG / Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’AUTEUR et S. DUSHKIN / Prix: RM.* 2 = / Frs* 2.50 / A. GUTHEIL / (S. et N. Koussevitzky) / S Ame des Grandes Éditions Musicales, PARIS / Boosey & Hawkes Ltd., London – Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig – Galaxy Music Corporation, New York. // (Edition for violin and piano unsewn 27.1 x 34.6 ([4°]); 4 [4] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper grey blue on light beige [front cover title, 3 empty pages] without front matter and without back matter + violin part enclosed in identical text; 3 [2] pages [empty page, 2 pages of the score paginated, empty page] with name of the instrument >VIOLON< above type area centre; title head >CHANSON RUSSE [**] RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below title head flush right centred partly in italics >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1937< flush left >La partie de violon de / cette partition est établie / en collaboration avec / Samuel Dushkin<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left centred >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays. / A. GUTHEIL (S. & N. Koussevitzky)< flush right partly in italics >Copyright 1938 by S. & N. Koussevitzky / Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction / et d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays.<; plate number >A. 10. 482 G.<; without end of score dated p. 4; production indications p. 4 below type area flush left >Imp. S. I. M. A. G. Asnières< flush right as end mark >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // (1938)

* The prices in different currencies are set below one another.

** A vertical, wavy separating line.

 

397Straw

The copy in Stravinsky’s estate is dated >Paris / Sept. 38<. It contains numerous legato slurs entered in pencil which are present in the small-format neat copy but not in the printed version. The copy also lists a Columbia recording with Szigeti under the date Hollywood, 9th May 1946. This entry could be misleading; on this day the recording took place, but not in Hollywood, rather in New York.

 

397[47] igor stravinsky / chanson russe / Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / edition a. gutheil · boosey & hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Chanson Russe / Russian Maiden’s Song / Transcription pour violon et piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / Edition A. Gutheil . Boosey & Hawkes / London . Paris . Bonn . Johannesburg . Sydney . Toronto . New York // (Edition for violin and piano stapled 23 x 31 (4° [4°]); 4 [4] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper light tomato-red on green beige [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 2 pages back matter [empty pages] + eingelegte Violinstimme 4 [2] pages + 1 page front matter [empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >CHANSON RUSSE [°] RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 [part: unpaginated [S. 2]] below title head flush right centred partly in italics >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1937<; collaborator specified 1st page of the score below title head flush left score >La partie de violon de / cette partition est établie / en collaboration avec / Samuel Dushkin< part >La partie de violon est / établie en collaboration / avec Samuel Dushkin<; name of instrument [exclusively part] 1st page of the score below collaborator specified and author specified centre >VIOLON<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1938 by S. & N. Koussevitzky / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 17860<; production indication 1.Notentextseite below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; without end mark) // (1947*)

° A vertical, dividing line spanning several lines of text in a zigzag-wave form.

* The dating is according to that in the British Library for the copy purchased on 30th September 1976 >g.1056.a.(1.)<. This dating is questionable because both the order of the branches in the advertising and the spelling with ‘v’ point towards the time after 1957.

 

399 igor strawinsky / russian maiden’s / song / voice and piano / boosey & hawkes // (Edition for voice and piano [library binding] 25.8 x 32.3 (4° [4°]); sung text Russian-English; 7 [5] pages + 2 pages front matter [front cover title, empty page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production data >No. 453<]; title head >RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG / äâè÷üè ïñíè<; author specified in connection with translator specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 flush left centred >Lyrics by B. Kochno / after A. S. POUSHKIN / English translation by R. Burness< flush right centred >Music by / IGOR STRAWINSKY<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left partly in italics >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; plate number >B. & H. 16360<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in England<; without end of score dated; without end mark) // (1948??)

* In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spellings original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires.

 

399[65] igor stravinsky / russian maiden’s song / voice and piano / boosey & hawkes // (Edition for voice and piano [library binding] 23.8 x 30.8 (4° [4°]); 7 [5] pages without cover + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production data >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; title head >RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG / äâè÷üè ïñíè<; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right centred >Music by / IGOR STRAVINSKY< flush left centred with translator specified >Lyrics by B. KOCHNO / after A. S. POUSHKIN / English translated by R. BURNESS<; legal reservations 1st page of the score next to and above title head flush right in the text box contained >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< below type area >© Copyright 1948 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 60360<; without end marks<) // [1965]

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price informations and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

 

3910 Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE / Igor Strawinsky / [vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / BOOSEY & HAWKES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno* / English Version by [#**] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#**] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / [ornamental tilde] / Réduction pour Chant et Piano / par l’auteur / [ornamental tilde] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON · NEW YORK · SYDNEY · TORONTO / CAPE TOWN · PARIS · BUENOS AIRES // (Vocal score with chant sewn 26.5 x 32.9 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French-German-English; 89 [87] pages + 4 cover pages flexible cardboard black on creme [ornamental front cover title with 2.1 x 3. 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<*** production data >No. 453<] + 6 pages front matter [title page, empty page, page of dedication hand-written printed in line etching Russian–French with the author’s signature in the Russian text underneath three oval pictures in medallion form [°] >Ïàìÿòè / Ïóøêèíà / [°] / Ãëèíêè [#] ×àéêîâñêàãî / [°] [#] [°] / Èãîðü Ñòðàâèíñê³é / A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, page with legal reservations centre centred >Copyright 1925 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag). / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / [#] / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in / any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete / opera or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<, page with (world) première data French, list of forces required without headline + legend >Orchestre< French] + 3 pages back matter [empty pages]; title head >MAVRA<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title flush right centred >Igor Strawinsky. / 1922.<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score below movement title flush left >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1925 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag), / for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in England.<; plate number >B. & H. 16304<; without end of score dated; end mark p. 89 flush right >H.P.B104.148.<) // (1948)

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script.

** A dividing ornament spanning two lines which is identical to the ornamental vignette on the outer titles.

*** In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires.

 

3911 igor strawinsky / russian maiden’s / song / violoncello and piano / boosey & hawkes* // (Edition violoncello and piano with enclosed-piano score [library binding] 23.3 x 30.2 (4° [4°]); 3 [2] pages violoncello part without cover [Title page as front matter, 2 pages of the score, page with publisher’s >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<** production data >No. 453<] + 4 [4] pages enclosed score without cover, without front matter, without back matter; title head >Russian Maiden’s Song / CHANSON RUSSE<; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 [part paginated p. 2] below title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush left centred >Arranged for / Violoncello and Piano by / DIMITHRY MARKEVITCH<; name of the instrument >Cello< centre between authors specified ; legal reservations score and part below type area flush right >All rights reserved< [/] flush left >Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. New York.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 17815<; end number [exclusively score] p. 4 flush left >5. 51. E<) // (1951)

* The title is located on the 1st page of the violoncello part, the 4th page of which contains the advertisements. The piano part does not have its own titles, and was therefore inserted into the violoncello part, because there was no space on the score for any titles.

** In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires.

 

3911[65] igor stravinsky / Russian Maiden’s / Song / Violoncello and Piano / boosey & hawkes* // (Violoncello-Piano-edition [library binding] 23.5 x 31 (4° [4°]); 4 [3] pages + 4 cover pages dark red on grey green [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Stravinsky<* production data >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] without front matter, without back matter, + 3 [2] pages violoncello part [empty page, 2 pages of the score, empty page]; title head >Russian Maiden’s Song / CHANSON RUSSE<; name of the instrument [exclusively] part above type area centre >Cello< 1st page of the score unpaginated [S.2]; authors specified 1st page of the score + part unpaginated [p. 2] below title head flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY< flush left centred >Arranged for / Violoncello and Piano by / DIMITHRY MARKEVITCH<; legal reservations 1st page of the score above title head flush right [part: flush left] in the text box contained >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< score + part below type area flush left >© Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication score + part 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 17815<; without end marks) // [1965]

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers, without price informations and without specification of places of printing >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° centre centred; °° original mistake in the title].

 

3912 Mavra° / OPERA BOUFFE°° / Igor Strawinsky / [vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / BOOSEY & HAWKES // Igor Strawinsky / MAVRA / Opera in one Act after Pushkin by Boris Kochno / Opera en un acte d’après Pouchkine par Boris Kochno / Oper in einem Akt nach Puschkin von Boris Kochno / English version by Robert Kraft°°° / Traduction française par Jacques Larmanjat / Deutsche Übersetzung von A. Elukhen / Vocal score by · Réduction pour piano par · Klavierauszug von / Igor Strawinsky / Edition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes / London · Paris · Bonn · Capetown · Sydney · Toronto · Buenos Aires ·New York // (Vocal score with chant [library binding] 23 x 31 (4° [4°]); sung text English-French-German; 89 [87] pages + 4 cover pages orange red on beige orange [front cover title with coloured in fancy letters, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production data >No. 692< [#] >12.53<] + 6 pages front matter [title page, page with legal reservations justified text >Copyright 1925 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag)< / >Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Edition with English words, Copyright © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Copyright for all countries.< / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical / reproduction in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of / the libretto, of the complete opera or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<, page with dedication [exclusively on French] hand-written printed in line etching >A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, empty page, page with (world) première data French, index of rols >Characters · Personen< English-French-German + legend >Orchestra< Italian + duration data [25′] English-French-German] + 3 pages back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >Symphonic Music / Selected Works for / Soli, Chorus and Orchestra<** production data >No. 741< [#] >11.55<, page with publisher’s advertisements >Symphonic Music / A Selected List of / Light Compositions<*** production data >No. 743< [#] >11.55<, page with publisher’s advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<**** production data >No. 693< [#] >12.53<]; title head >MAVRA<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title >Overture< flush right centred >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1922<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score below movement title flush left on the level of 1. line author specified >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1925 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) for all countries / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Edition with English words, Copyright 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area flush right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 16304<; end of score dated p. 89 >Biarritz, Mars 1922<; without end mark) // (1956)

* Quasi-handwritten decorated script, light red on light orange.

°° Line of text in a mirror-like frame light red on light orange.

°°° Original spelling.

* Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations, in part multi-lingual and assigned (unstimmig) to genres >Stage Works° / Oeuvres Théatrales · Bühnenwerke° / The Rake’s Progress [#] Le Rossignol / Le Libertin Der Wüstling [#] The Nightingale Die Nachtigall / Opera in three acts Opéra en trois actes [#] Musical tale in three acts after Anderson°° / Oper in drei Akten [#] Conte lyrique en trois actes d’apres Anderson°° / [#] Lyrisches Märchen in drei Akten nach Anderson°° / Mavra [#] Oedipus Rex / Opera buffa in one act after Pushkin [#] Opera — Oratorio in two acts after Sophocles / Opéra Buffe en un acte d’apres°° Pushkin [#] Opéra – Oratorio en deux actes d’apres°° Sophocle / Oper°° Buffa°° in einem Akt nach Puschkin [#] Opern — Oratorium in zwei Akten nach Sophokles / Persephone [#] Pétrouchka / Melodrama in three parts by André Gide [#] Burlesque in four scenes / Melodramé°° en trois parties d’Andre°° Gide [#] Burlesque en quatre tableaux / Melodrama in drei Teilen von André Gide [#] Burleska°° in vier Bildern / Le Sacre du Printemps [#] Le Chant du Rossignol / The Rite of Spring [#] The Song of the Nightingale / Pictures from pagan Russia in two parts [#] Symphonic poem in three acts / Tableaux de la Russie paienne en deux parties [#] Poème symphonique en trois parties / Bilder aus dem heidnischen Russland in zwei Teilen [#] Symphonische Dichtung in drei Teilen / Pulcinella [#] Apollon Musagète / Ballet with chorus in one act after Pergolesi [#] Ballet in two scenes / Ballet avec chant en un acte d’apres Pergolesi [#] Ballet en deux tableaux / Ballett mit Chor in einem Akt nach Pergolesi [#] Ballett in zwei Bildern / Le Baiser de la Fée [#] Orpheus / Ballet — Allegory in two scenes [#] Ballet in thre scenes / Ballet — Allégorie en deux tableaux [#] Ballet en trois tableaux / Ballet°° — Allegorie in zwei Bildern [#] Ballett in drei Bildern / Symphonic Works° / Oeuvres Symphoniques · Symphonische Werke° / Pétrouchka Suite [#] Apollon Musagète / Pulcinella Suite [#] Symphonies pour°° instruments a°° vents°° / Le Sacre du Printemps [#] Symphonies of Wind Instruments / The Rite of Spring [#] Symphonien für Bläsinsrumente°° / Le Chant du Rossignol [#] Piano Concerto / The Song of the Nightingale [#] Capriccio / Divertimento [#] Quatre Etudes°° pour Orchestra°°/ Orpheus [#] Four Studies for Orchestra / Symphonie de Psaumes [#] Vier Etüden für Orchester / Symphony of Psalms [#] Concerto in D (Basle Concerto) / Psalmensymphonie [#] Messe°° / Voice and Orchestra° / Chant et Orchestre · Gesang und Orchester° / Trois poésies de la Lyrique japonaise [#] Chant du Rossignol (tiré du “Rossignol”) / Three japanese Poems [#] The Nightingale’s Song (from “The Nightingale”) / Trois petites chansons [#] Mephistopheles Lied vom Floh / Three little Songs [#] The Song of the Flea / Two Songs (Paul Verlaine)° / Sagesse · Sleep · Ein dusterer°° Schlummer° / La bonne Chanson · A Moonlight Pallid · Glimmernder mondschein°°+°< [° centre; °° original spelling; In the opposite column slightly displaced between >Mavra< and the >Burlesque in four scenes<, likewise there is a dislocated line spacing after >Apollon Musagète< in the section for Symphonic Works ]. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

** Compositions are advertised from >J. S. Bach< to >Leslie Woodgate<, amongst these >Igor Strawinsky / Cantata for Soprano and Tenor Soli, Female Chorus, / Two Flutes, Oboe, English Horn (doubling Oboe 2) / and Violoncello / Mass for Chorus and Double Wind Quintet / Symphony of Psalms (Revised 1948) / for Soli, Chorus and Orchestra<. After London the following places of printing are listed: London with Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

*** Compositions are advertised  from >Arthur Benjamin< to >Haydn Wood<, Strawinsky not mentioned. The following places of printing are listed: with Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York.

**** Compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price informations, in part multi-lingual >Pocket Scores° / Partitions de Poche · Taschenpartituren° / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy’s Kiss) / Cantata / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Le Chant du Rossignol (The Song of the / Nightingale) / Concerto in D for String Orchestra / Divertimento / Messe°° / Octet for Wind Instruments / Oedipus Rex / Orpheus / Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Pulcinella Suite / Four Studies for Orchestra / Quatre Etudes pour Orchestre / Vier Etüden für Orchester / Le Sacre du Primtemps°° (The Rite of Spring) / Septet 1953 / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphony of Psalms / Psalmensymphonie / Symphonies pour instruments à vents°° / Symphonies of Wind Instruments / Symphonien für Blasinstrumente / Piano Solo° / Piano Seul · Klavier zweihändig° / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy’s Kiss) / Le Chant du Rossignol / (The Song of the Nightingale) / Marche Chinoise de ”°° Chant du Rossignol ” / Mavra Overture°° / Octet for Wind Instruments (arr. A. Lourié) / Orpheus (arr. L. Spinner) / Serenade en la / Sonate / Symphonies pour instruments à vents<°° / Trois Mouvements de “ Pétrouchka ” / Piano Duets° / Piano à Quatre Mains · Klavier vierhändig° / Pétrouchka / Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) / Two Pianos° / Deux Pianos · Zwei Klaviere° / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Concerto / Madrid / Septet 1953 / Trois Mouvements de “ Pétrouchka ” (Babin) // Violin and Piano° / Violon et Piano · Violine und Klavier° / Airs du Rossignol and Marche Chinoise (Le / Chant du Rossignol) / Ballad (Le Baiser de la Fée) / Divertimento (Le Baiser de la Fée) / Duo Concertant / Danse Russe (Pétrouchka) / Russian Maiden’s Song / Suite after Pergolesi / Violoncello and Piano° / Violoncelle et Piano · Violoncello und Klavier° / Suite italienne (Piatigorsky) / Russian Maiden’s Song (Markevitch) / Chamber Music° / Musique de Chambre · Kammermusik° / Octet for Wind Instruments / Septet 1953 / Three pieces for String Quartet / Vocal Scores° / Partitions Chant et Piano · Klavierauszüge° / Cantata / Le Rossignol / Mavra / Messe°° / Oedipus Rex / Perséphone / Symphonie de Psaumes / The Rake’s Progress / Voice and Piano° / Chant et Piano · Gesang und Klavier° / The Mother’s Song (Mavra) / Le Rossignol / Introduction . Chant du Pedieur°° . Air du Rossignol / Paracha’s Song (Mavra) / Russian Maiden’s Song / Two Poems of Balmont / Blue Forget-me-not . The Dove / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Akahito . Mazatzuum°° . Tsarajuki°° / Trois petites chansons / La petite . Le Corbeau . Tchitcher-tatcher / Choral Music° / Musique Chorale · Chormusik° / Ave Maria (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella / Pater noster (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella / Credo (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella< [° centre; °° original spelling]. After London the following places of printing are listed: Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-New York.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

39

M a v r a

Opéra bouffe en 1 acte d’après A. Pouchkine. Texte de Boris Kochno – Mawra. Opera buffa in einem Akt. Text von Boris Kochno nach Alexander Puschkin – Mavra. Opera in one act after Pushkin by Boris Kochno – Mavra. Opera buffa in una atto. Testo di Boris Kochno su una poesia di Alexander Pouchkine – Mavra.

 

Titelgebung: Die Oper sollte zunächst den Titel der Puschkin-Vorlage („Das Haus in Kolomna“ beziehungsweise „Das kleine Haus (Häuschen) in Kolomna“) tragen. Die Gründe, warum der Titel in „Mawra“ geändert wurde, sind nie thematisiert worden, liegen aber dramaturgisch offen. Der Name Mawra fällt bei Puschkin nur ein einzigesmal. Auf die Frage der Mutter an den als Köchin verkleideten Mann, wie er heiße, nennt er sich Mawra, ein Name, den man in Rußland nicht als Vornamen kennt, der sich aber seiner Wortbildung nach als weiblicher Vorname eignet. Die Vermutung, es könne sich (auch bei Puschkin) um eine hintergründige Wortspielableitung vom russischen Wort für Mohr ( ) handeln, wird von russischen Sprachforschern mit sprachwissenschaftlichen Argumenten zurückgewiesen. Während bei Puschkin die Handlung eine Ausfaltung der poetologischen Vorstellung ist, die er als Erzähler mit der im „kleinen“ Haus spielenden Geschichte füllt, arbeitete Kochno nur mit der Handlung selbst. Die aber wird allein von der verkleideten Köchin Mawra vorangetrieben, nicht von Parascha, die sich im Laufe des Stückes nicht verändert, und erst recht nicht von der Mutter oder der Nachbarin. Der Spielort selbst bleibt Staffage. zur Titelfigur zu erklären, war dramaturgisch jedenfalls nicht sinnlos. 

 

Besetzung: a) Erstausgaben (Oper Rollen): Ïàðàøà (Paracha, Parascha, Parasha), Sopran; Ñîñäêà (Voisine, Nachbarin, The Neighbour), Mezzo-Sopran; Màòü (Mère, Die Mutter, The Mother), Alt; Ãóñàðú (Hussar = Cuisinière, Der Husar = Köchin, The Hussar = Cook), Tenor; ~ (Oper Orchester): Flauto piccolo, 2 Flauti grandi, 2 Oboi, Corno inglese, Clarinetto piccolo in Mib, 2 Clarinetti in Sib / in La, 2 Fagotti, Violino I, Violino II, Viola, 4 Corni in Fa, 2 Trombe in Do, 2 Trombe in La, 2 Tromboni tenori, Trombone basso, Tuba, Timpani, Violoncelli, Contrabassi [kleine Flöte, 2 große Flöten, 2 Oboen, Englischhorn, kleine Klarinette in Es, 2 Klarinetten in B / A, 2 Fagotte, Violine I, Violine II, Bratsche, 4 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in C, 2 Trompeten in A, 2 Tenorposaunen, Baßposaune, Tuba, Pauken, Violoncelli, Kontrabässe]; ~ (Lied der Parascha): Canto, 2 Oboi, 2 Clarinetti in B, 2 Fagotti, 4 Corni in F, Tuba, 2 Violini soli, 1 Viola sola, Violoncelli, Contrabassi – 2 Oboes, 2 Clarinets in Bb, 2 Bassoons, 4 Horns in F, Tuba, 2 Solo Violins, Solo Viola, Cellos*, Double Basses* [Gesang, 2 Oboen, 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, Tuba, 2 Solo-Violinen, Solo-Bratsche; b) Aufführungsanforderungen: Sopran, Mezzosopran, Alt, Tenor; kleine Flöte (= 3. große Flöte), 3 große Flöten (3. große Flöte = kleine Flöte), 2 Oboen, Englischhorn, kleine Klarinette in Es, Klarinette in B**, Klarinette in A**, 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, 2 Trompeten in C, 2 Trompeten in A, 2 Tenorposaunen, Baßposaune, Tuba, Pauken, 2 Solo-Violinen, Solo-Bratsche, Streicher*** (Violoncelli****, Kontrabässe****); Parascha-Arrangement: Sopran, 2 Oboen, 2 Klarinetten in B, 2 Fagotte, 4 Hörner in F, Tuba, 2 Solo-Violinen, Solo-Bratsche, Streicher (Violoncelli, Kontrabässe)

* Tutti-Streicher [= full complement].

** B– und A-Klarinette gleichzeitig gespielt.

*** keine Tutti-Violinen und Tutti-Bratschen.

**** auch zweifach geteilt.

 

Fachpartien: Parascha: Koloratursoubrette oder leicht lyrischer, gewitzter Sopran, Umfang d1 bis h2; Nachbarin: Mezzo des lyrischen oder Charakterfachs mit großer sprachlicher Wendigkeit, Umfang b bis g2; Mutter: Spielaltistin mit besonders guter Tiefe, Umfang g bis f2; Husar: Spieltenor oder äußerst komödiantischer lyrischer Tenor, Umfang d bis h1. Für alle vier Rollen werden komödiantische Stimmen mit großer Flexibilität und beherrschter Parlandotechnik verlangt. Die Stimmumfänge liegen durchweg angenehm.

 

Aufführungspraxis: Zwischen Partiturziffer 5 und 6 wurde eine sechstaktige Ziffer 5a eingeschoben. In seiner Modellaufführung vom 7. Mai 1965 hat Strawinsky einen Teil der Ziffer 5a weggelassen. Die Aufnahme geht in der ersten Parascha-Szene von Ziffer 57 sofort in den Schluß nach Ziffer 5a6 über, an den sich das Zigeunerliedchen des Husaren anschließt (Ziffer 61). Es fehlen also 10 Takte mit den letzten 3 Zeilen des Parascha-Liedes, dessen Text allerdings im Begleitheft der offiziellen CD-Aufnahme abgedruckt ist. Mit einer Schallplatten-Aufnahme unter der Leitung von Craft war Strawinsky nicht glücklich, vermutlich weil er die Hauptdarstellerin Phyllis Curtin nicht mochte. Darüber schrieb er am 29. März 1951 an seinen Sohn Soulima. Zwischen der Orchesterpartitur und dem bis 1966 gültigen Klavierauszug bestehen erhebliche Unterschiede.

 

Inhalt: Die Handlung spielt in einer kleinen russischen Stadt zur Zeit Karls X., wie in der Literatur angegeben wird, also zur Zeit Puschkins im ersten Viertel des 19. Jahrhunderts. Einziges Bühnenbild ist ein Wohnzimmer mit einem straßenwärts angebrachten Fenster. – Die junge Parascha ist in ihren Nachbarn Basilius* (Bàñèëèé, Wassili), einen jungen Husaren, verliebt. Sie sitzt am Fenster und singt eine sehnsüchtige Liebesweise. – Jetzt erscheint der leichtlebige, ein Zigeunerliedchen vor sich hin trällernde Husar vor dem Wohnzimmerfenster. Es kommt zum Duett. Erst zanken sich die beiden ein wenig, dann verabreden sie sich für anderntags abends bei der Schenke nebenan. – Die Mutter betritt das Wohnzimmer und jammert über den Tod der erst kürzlich verstorbenen Köchin Thekla** (Ô¸êëà, Fjokla, Phiocla,). Sie fordert Parascha auf, bei den Nachbarn um eine neue Köchin nachzufragen. Parascha geht. – Die Mutter bleibt zurück und monologisiert mit Erinnerungen an die zehnjährige Vergangenheit, als die verstorbene Thekla noch so schön für ihrer aller Bequemlichkeit gesorgt hatte. Die Nachbarin kommt zu einem Schwatz über dieses und jenes vorbei. – Parascha ist wieder zurück und hat eine neue Köchin mitgebracht, die Mawra heißt und von Mutter und Nachbarin begutachtet wird. Da sie wenig beziehungsweise Lohn nur nach Ermessen der Mutter verlangt, wird man einig. Nachbarin und Mutter verlassen das Wohnzimmer. – Parascha und die Köchin Mawra fallen sich in die Arme; denn Mawra ist der als Frau verkleidete geliebte Husar Basil. – Die Mutter ruft nach Parascha, kehrt wieder in das Wohnzimmer zurück und weist der Köchin Abwascharbeiten zu. Dann verläßt sie mit Parascha Zimmer und Haus, nicht ohne anzukündigen, bald wiederzukommen. Der Husar bleibt allein zurück und singt in Vorstellung der abendlichen Liebesstunde ein erwartungsfrohes Lied. Dann beginnt er sich zu rasieren. – Über diesen Vorgang betritt die Mutter wieder das Zimmer. Sie sieht nicht die Köchin, sondern nur einen Dieb, und fällt vor Schrecken in Ohnmacht. Parascha fängt die stürzende Mutter auf und will sich um Riechsalz kümmern. Noch während Basil und Parascha nicht wissen, was sie nun tun sollen, steht plötzlich die Nachbarin im Zimmer und bringt ein Stoßgebet aus. Zu allem Überfluß kommt in diesem Augenblick auch noch die Mutter wieder zu sich und schreit um Hilfe. Daraufhin springt der Husar mit dem Abschiedswort Ïðîøàé (Adieu) zum Fenster hinaus. Parascha läuft unter dem Hilfegeschrei von Mutter und Nachbarin Basil-rufend ebenfalls zum Fenster, wieder zurück zur Mutter, wieder hin zum Fenster, lehnt sich hinaus und schreit dem Entflohenen enttäuscht, verzweifelt und verängstigt zweimal Âàñèë³é! (Basilius) nach (* deutsche Originalübersetzung; ** deutsche Originalübersetzung für Fjokla).

 

Vorlage: Das Versgedicht Äîìèê â Êîëîìíå (das kleine haus in kolomna) stammt von Alexander Puschkin, der es im Alter von 30 oder 31 Jahren 1830 auf der Höhe seiner dichterischen Laufbahn schrieb. Es besteht aus 40 achtzeiligen Strophen gereimter fünffüßiger Jamben in der Reimform A-B-A-B-A-B-C-C. Die in einfacher auktoritativer Erzählform mit winzigen eingesprengten Dialogfragmenten wiedergegebene Geschichte, die bei Puschkin nicht zentral gedacht ist, setzt in der Mitte der 9. Strophe ein. Voraus geht eine poetologische Erklärung, wie sie in der dichterischen Literatur schon des 18. Jahrhunderts bestens bekannt war, die dann in der erzählten Geschichte realisiert wird, so daß die Geschichte nicht um ihrer selbst willen, sondern als Beispiel für den Erzähltechnik-Vorspann entwickelt wird. Die Strophen 10 bis 20 geben ein anschauliches, unter dem Vorwand der Ironie aber auch abgründiges Bild vom Liebreiz Paraschas, die ärmlich und einfach und fleißig und fromm und offensichtlich auch gut erzogen und voller erotischer Sehnsüchte in einer primitiven Wohngemeinschaft ihr Leben mit einer tauben, männerfeindlichen Köchin und einer bigott-abergläubischen, faulen Mutter zubringt, die nur an sich selbst denkt und für die ihre Tochter eher ein Dienstmädchen als ein Kind ist, das sie einmal geboren hat. Parascha muß sehen, wie sie mit ihrer Situation zurechtkommt. Verehrer hat sie genug, sie selbst weiß um ihre Ausstrahlung und schaut fleißig nach den jungen Männern aus, gleich ob sie nun vorbeigehen (also einfacher Herkunft sind) oder vorbeireiten, was auf einen höheren Rang schließen läßt. Nachts liegt sie noch lange wach, um ihren geheimen Gedanken nachzuhängen und sich am Liebesgeschrei der Katzen auf dem Dach zu erfreuen. Als Kontrastfigur fügt Puschkin mit den Strophen 21 bis 24 die Gestalt einer namenlosen jungen Gräfin ein, die reich, jung und majestätisch schön, aber auch kalt, hoffärtig und berechnend und dadurch in Wahrheit glücklos ist. Die Strophen 25 und 26 vergleichen Parascha und die Gräfin zugunsten Paraschas. Jetzt kommt der Zufall Parascha zu Hilfe. Der eine Teil ihrer Zwangsumgebung bricht ab, die Köchin stirbt. Der Anlaß gibt dem Dichter noch einmal Gelegenheit, die Personen dieser seltsamen Lebenssymbiose gnadenlos zu charakterisieren; es ist der Kater Wasska, der die Tote am längsten betrauert. Schon in Strophe 29 schickt die fast schon lebensuntüchtig gewordene, aber befehlsgewohnt-herrschsüchtige Mutter, die in Wirklichkeit ganz von einer Tochter abhängig ist, deren Lebensglück sie behindert, Parascha aus, bei den Nachbarn um eine neue Köchin nachzufragen. Die Mutter legt sich schlafen, und kurz vor Mitternacht ist Parascha zurück und hat die neue Köchin gleich mitgebracht. Man wird sich einig. Es folgen Ermahnungen und was sonst noch in einer solchen Situation alles be– und geredet wird. Mit Strophe 32 setzt die engere Geschichte ein. Die Köchin versteht ihr Handwerk nicht, und selbstverständlich muß Parascha aushelfen, keineswegs ungewohnt, denn bei der alten Köchin mußte sie es auch. Nun geht es mit der Tochter zur Messe. Eigentlich hätte die Köchin mitgehen sollen; aber einmal hat sie Zahnweh, zum anderen will sie noch gerade jetzt einen Kuchen backen. Erst in der Kirche kommt der Mutter das Verhalten der Köchin seltsam vor. Sie hat in ihrer eigenen niederen Denkungsart nur eine Erklärung dafür: Die Köchin will sie ausrauben. So muß Parascha in der Kirche bleiben, die Mutter aber rennt so schnell sie kann nach Hause und trifft die Köchin just in dem Augenblick an, da sie sich die Seife vom Kinn schabt. Die Witwe fällt in Ohnmmacht, die Köchin, jetzt muß man sagen, die verkleidete Köchin, macht sich durch die Haustüre davon. Als Parascha nach beendeter Messe nach Hause kommt, ist der ganze Spuk vorbei. Die beiden letzten Strophen dienen Puschkin zur ironischen Moralverkündung, man solle ohne Lohn keine Köchin beschäftigen und ein Mann sich nicht in Weiberkleider stecken, weil, werde er ertappt, man in ihm nichts als nur einen Spitzbuben sähe. – Eine Reihe von Verskompositionen, die sich unabhängig von Puschkins Reimerzählung in der Opernvorlage finden, stammen ebenfalls von oder nach Puschkin und nicht von Strawinsky oder Kochno. Dazu gehört die Eingangsszene mit dem Parascha-Lied, das auf ein erst 1910 im 4. Band der Puschkin-Ausgabe von S. A. Wengerow (S. 79) veröffentlichtes Gedicht zurückgeht, das selbst wieder eine Transkription eines russischen Volksliedes durch Puschkin gewesen ist. Des weiteren handelt es sich beim Husaren-Lied um ein unbetiteltes Puschkin-Gedicht aus dem Jahre 1833.

 

Kochno: Boris Kochno war kein Dichter, sondern Tänzer und Choreograph (er wird später das Monte Carlo Ballett leiten) und ein Amateurliterat mit der Fähigkeit, gefällige Reime und Verse machen zu können. Er war damals 18 Jahre alt, galt als wohlerzogen und gebildet und trat durch seine verhältnismäßig kurze Beziehung zum homosexuellen Diaghilew, als dessen zeitweiliger Sekretär er in Paris lebte, in Strawinskys Gesichtskreis. Danach verloren sie sich aus den Augen. Mit der Arbeit Kochnos zeigte sich Strawinsky zufrieden. Er bekam ein auslegungsfähiges Szenarium, das ihm alle Möglichkeiten zur Interpretation bot, die in diesem Falle eine besonders verschwiegene Art von Persiflierung darstellte. 

 

Dramaturgie: Die poetisch-autobiographisch und gleichzeitig ironisch-gesellschaftskritische Geschichte Puschkins wurde durch Kochno gemeinsam mit Strawinsky auf den Schwankteil zurückgeführt und in eine Art kabarettverträgliche Posse verwandelt. Kochno schrieb die Erzählung in direkte Rede um, erfand Dialoge, die es bei Puschkin nicht gibt, führte die bei Puschkin fehlende Rolle der Nachbarin ein, machte aus der verkleideten Köchin einen Husaren mit einem Ansprechnamen Mawra und Basil zugleich und legte alle bei Puschkin hintergründig uneindeutig verlaufenden Erzählfäden als eindeutig zu interpretierende Handlungsrealitäten frei. Die Puschkinsche Versstruktur wurde zwangsläufig aufgegeben, das gesamte poetologische und gesellschaftliche Denken Puschkins unterdrückt, das in dieser Form auch sicherlich nicht theaterfähig war. Die Vergröberung der Puschkinschen Handlungsführung durch Kochnos Libretto beginnt nicht mit der zentralen Frage nach der Rolle, die Parascha spielt, ob sie sich den Husaren ins Haus bestellt hat, um ihren Neigungen nachgehen zu können, oder ob sich ihr der Husar nur in Verkleidung genähert hat, um bei passender Gelegenheit sein Ziel zu erreichen, sondern mit der Art, wie Dichter und Librettist die Situationen darstellen. Bei Kochno ist alles schon in der ersten Köchinnen-Spielszene klar. Kaum hat die Mutter das Zimmer verlassen, fallen sich die Liebesleute in die Arme. Der Leser wartet jetzt nur noch auf die zwangsläufig eintretende Katastrophe, weil die Beziehung auf Dauer nicht verheimlicht werden kann. Puschkin dagegen arbeitet nur mit Andeutungen, die seine Schilderung des Liebreizes von Parascha am Ende in Frage stellen. Parascha hat nicht einen Geliebten, sondern sie schaut nach Männern aus. Parascha bringt die Köchin um Mitternacht, wenn die Mutter bereits schläft. Wenn die Mutter nach Hause stürzt, bleibt Parascha in der Kirche, als ob sie nicht wüßte, daß die Mutter den Soldaten in einer verräterischen Situation entdeckt. Als man ihr die Sachlage eröffnet, wird sie nicht rot. Die Geschichte ist zu Ende. Der Erzähler hat Binnenkenntnisse, er weiß, wo der Samowar steht. Er hat also im Hause verkehrt. Er erweckt zunächst die Vermutung, dieser Liebhaber gewesen zu sein. Puschkin zerstreut das erst in der 38. Strophe, in der der Erzähler den Liebhaber zum Teufel wünscht und nach der Flucht des verkleideten Mannes nicht einmal mehr wissen will, „Wer ihn im Haus vertreten hat fortan“. Der davongelaufene Soldat hat also einen Nachfolger gehabt, das Spiel ging mit dem nächsten Liebhaber weiter, und der Erzähler, ganz gewiß selbst einmal in Parascha verliebt, hat sich ob der Geschehnisse von dem Mädchen abgewandt. Die Erzählung beginnt mit dem Aufsuchen des Kleinen Hauses durch den Erzähler. Das Haus ist abgerissen. Angeblich sah es harmlos und friedlich aus. Im Erzähler kommen Erinnerungen hoch, Erinnerungen, die die Vernunft lähmen. Ganz allmählich führt Puschkin das scheinbare Possenspiel auf seinen tragischen Untergrund zurück. Parascha ist nicht das, was sie vorgibt zu sein. Was sich da abgespielt hat, ist keineswegs lustig, weil es kein fröhliches Ende bekommt und ein solches zu bekommen weder von Parascha noch vom verkleideten Liebhaber beabsichtigt gewesen ist. Parascha und der ins Haus geholte Mann sind keine Liebesleute wie bei Kochno, die zusammenfinden wollen. Die Geschichte ist Teil einer stets wechselnden Beziehung. Die aber ist die Frucht der Umstände, unter denen Parascha leben muß: Bigotterie, Aberglauben, Selbstliebe, Vereinsamung, Menschenfeindlichkeit, Hilflosigkeit, Schlauheit und aus all dem erwachsend eine niedere Denkungsart. Am Ende ist Parascha nicht viel besser als ihre Mutter, auf jeden Fall in der Sache selbst indolent. Daß der Mann sich rasieren muß, weiß sie doch; daß der Mann den Kirchenbesuch ausnutzt, um sich frischzumachen, weiß sie auch. Wenn die Mutter jetzt nach Hause rennt, ist die Täuschung beendet. Trotzdem bleibt Parascha in der Kirche. Sie versucht weder, die Mutter zurückzuhalten, noch ihr zuvorzukommen, um den Mann zu warnen. Ist sie der Sache überdrüssig geworden? Oder steht gar schon der Nächste vor der Türe? „Verrückt nach ihr Gardist wie Leutnant war“, heißt es in der Bodenstedtschen Nachdichtung. An Nachfolgern fehlte es also nicht, und so ist Parascha eine Geistesverwandte von Schön-Lila in faun und schäferin. Bei Kochno wird die Geschichte zu einer Liebesgeschichte mit (vermutlich vorerst nur) komischem Ende. Die Mutter ist biedermeierlich beschränkt. Die Einführung der Figur der Nachbarin dient zur Charakterzeichnung der Mutter als Klatschbase, die sich stundenlang über nichts unterhalten kann. Bei Kochno liebt Parascha wirklich, aber der, den sie liebt, ist allem Anschein nach ein Windhund. Nicht ohne Grund macht Kochno aus ihm einen Husaren, also einen leichten Reiter, wobei das Schwergewicht auf “leicht” liegt, der Zigeunerliedchen trällert, mit anderen Mädchen schäkert und vielleicht mehr als nur das, der Parascha vernachlässigt und sie doch wieder zum Stelldichein herumbekommt. Den Preis bezahlt Parascha. Aber wenn sie ihn zur Köchin macht, hat sie ihn bei sich, das heißt, sie hat ihn unter Kontrolle. Daß ein Soldat nicht von seiner Einheit wegbleiben kann, ist der dramaturgische Denkfehler im Spiel. Wenn jetzt die Täuschung entdeckt wird, bevor sich die Liebesleute erklären können, ist Parascha die tragische Gestalt. Bei Kochno wird bei aller Komik für einen Augenblick die Verzweiflung sichtbar, die beide jungen Leute, vor allem aber Parascha im Augenblick der Entdeckung und des Gekreisches der beiden alten Weiber beherrscht. Der Husar springt zum Fenster hinaus, er läßt sein Mädchen also im Augenblick der höchsten Gefahr im Stich. Mutter und Nachbarin sehen in dem verkleideten Mann nur einen Spitzbuben. Sie setzen ihrer Dummheit die Krone auf, indem sie keine Beziehung zwischen Mann und Frau herstellen. Wäre der Soldat geblieben, hätte er sich erklären müssen. Es wäre ein Geschimpfe oder ein Gelächter losgebrochen und die Geschichte mit einer Heirat beendet worden. Indem der Husar davonläuft, muß Parascha befürchten, ihren Einsatz verloren zu haben. Wie es ausgeht, bleibt offen.

 

Übersetzungen: Strawinskys Mawra hat eine eigene, umständliche Übersetzungsgeschichte. Die französische Übersetzung der Erstdruckfasssung stammt überraschenderweise nicht von Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz, sondern nach einer wahren Übersetzerirrfahrt von dem damals 44jährigen französischen Komponisten Jacques Larmanjat. Strawinsky war mit ihr, wie sich später herausstellte, nicht zufrieden und bezeichnete sie als mittelmäßig. Besonders schlecht kam im Urteil Strawinskys die englische Übersetzung von Robert Burness weg, die er rundheraus als schlecht (bad) bezeichnete. Sie wurde von Robert Craft erst korrigiert und schließlich gegen die Craftsche ausgetauscht. Die deutsche Übersetzung stammte von Alexander Elukhen. Vertrauenerweckend war eine weitere englische Übersetzung von Thomas Scherman. Strawinsky setzte sich durch, indem schließlich nur die Craftsche im Spiel blieb, allerdings mit einem für Strawinsky ärgerlichen Druckfehler im Namen, nämlich Kraft statt Craft.

 

Übersetzungsgeschichte: Larmanjat hatte sich nach einer wahren Übersetzer-Irrfahrt bereit erklärt, das Bühnenstück in das Französische zu übertragen. Strawinsky hat damals bei mehreren Freunden und Bekannten erfolglos um eine Übersetzung nachgesucht, schloß aber offensichtlich Ramuz aus, obwohl die wirtschaftliche Lage des schweizer Schriftstellers wie immer verzweifelt war und er dringend Geld gebraucht hätte. Es läßt auf einen tieferen Groll gegen Ramuz schließen oder auf eine Überzeugung, Ramuz sei der Aufgabe nicht gewachsen, oder auf die nüchterne Einsicht, für eine ersprießlich Zusammenarbeit zu weit von Ramuz entfernt zu sein (Ramuz beherrschte das Russische nicht und war auf einweisende Kommentare Sprachkundiger, hier: Strawinskys, angewiesen. Strawinsky war nach Anglet umgezogen. Zwischen ihm und Ramuz lagen jetzt rund 1000 Kilometer und Strawinsky rüstete sich überdies zur Übersiedlung nach Biarritz. Erstaunlicherweise berichtete er in einem sehr persönlichen Schreiben vom 18. August 1921 aus Angles Ramuz ganz kurz über die Oper „Mawra“, die er als eine Art von „Geschichte vom Soldaten“ mit Arien, Duos und Trios und als sehr melodiös charakterisierte, wünschte ihn zu sehen, weil er ihn vermisse, verlor aber kein Wort über die Übersetzungsprobleme, die zu diesem Zeitpunkt schon recht günstig mit Ansermet abgesprochen gewesen sein müssen. Das läßt sich aus Ansermets Brief vom 10. September 1921 herauslesen. Er teilt darin Strawinsky mit, sein Versprechen der Übersetzung von „Mawra“ nicht länger aufrechterhalten zu können. Ursprünglich habe er auf Walter Nouvel gehofft, der ihm helfen sollte, den Übersetzungstext richtig unter die entsprechenden russischen Wörter zu setzen; aber sie seien beide derzeit zu überbeschäftigt, um die Oper vornehmen zu können. Ansermet, der damals noch seine eigenen Sorgen hatte, weil er seine Schweizer Tätigkeit aufgeben wollte, rät. Jean Cocteau mit der Sache zu befassen, dem solche Übersetzungen leicht von der Hand gingen und mit dem er am Ort die Zuordnung von Übersetzungstext und Originaltext zum Notentext besprechen könne. Strawinsky versuchte erfolglos, Ansermet umzustimmen, der mit Brief vom 13. Oktober 1921 beim Rat blieb, Cocteau zu bemühen. Cocteau war ein Bewunderer von „Mawra; aber ob er mit der Übersetzungssache ernsthaft befaßt worden ist, ob sich ein Übersetzungsvokabular, das er im Herbst 1922 an Strawinsky schickte, auch auf „Mawra“ beziehen sollte, bleibe dahingestellt. Cocteau war ein Meister der höflichen Briefe und schrieb Strawinsky gegenüber meist mit einem Ton leichter Unterwürfigkeit; aber viele Projekte blieben unausgeführt, weil Cocteau selbst nicht wollte. Strawinsky geriet in Zeitverzug. Kochno war für die Aufgabe im Gespräch und wohl auch andere – nur zu keinem Zeitpunkt Ramuz, bis Strawinsky endlich mit Larmanjat einig wurde, der zusammen mit seiner Frau mit der Firma Pleyel in Verbindung stand und mit dem später Strawinsky Verhandlungen über Pianola-Arrangements führte. Wie die Zusammenarbeit ausgesehen hat, scheint nicht bekannt zu sein. Aus Jahrzehnte später geschriebenen Briefen geht hervor, daß Strawinsky mit der Übersetzung nicht zufrieden war. Das Sprachproblem stellte sich zwar für „Mawra“ weniger heikel dar als für „Renard“, weil die Pribautki-Komplexe fehlen, und die abgründige Puschkin-Atmosphäre schon bei Kochno verloren gegangen war. Trotzdem war die Larmanjat-Übersetzung so mißraten, daß Strawinsky sie vierzig Jahre später thematisierte, als er 1966 die Vorbereitungen für die erste Partitur-Druckausgabe betrieb. In einem Brief an Leopold Spinner vom 31. März 1966 legte er fest, die Partitur solle nur den russischen Originaltext und die englische Übersetzung von Robert Craft enthalten. Der deutsche und der jetzt als mittelmäßig bezeichnete Text würden nicht benötigt und sollten nur im Klavierauszug zu Probezwecken verbleiben. Die deutsche Übersetzung stammte von A. Elukhen, dessen Vornamen schon im 1925 vom Russischen Musikverlag gedruckten Klavierauszug im Gegensatz zu den Vornamen der anderen Übersetzer nicht ausgeschrieben worden war.

Das waren nicht die Überlegungen eines alten Mannes. David Adams hatte 1953 die englische Übersetzung von Thomas Scherman geschickt. Er hätte das nie getan, wenn die Burness-Übersetzung für die neuen Boosey-Ausgaben in Frage gekommen wären. Strawinsky nannte die Scherman-Übersetzung in einem Brief an Adams vom 29. Oktober 1953 vertrauenerweckend (very confidentially), fand jedoch, mit der englischen Sprache besser als 1952 vertraut, das Spiel sei, vor allem im Finale, im Wesen verändert worden. Schon damals schlug er Robert Craft als neuen Übersetzer vor, der den Kochno-Text unter seiner, Strawinskys, Aufsicht übertragen sollte und für den Strawinsky um ein Verlagshonorar von 75 Dollar nachsuchte. 

 

Aufbau: Mawra ist eine Komische Oper für vier Sänger und mittleres Orchester, ohne Rezitative, ohne Chor und ohne Nummerneinteilung, jedoch mit Arien, Duetten und einem Quartett, in denen der russo-italienische Opernstil des 19. Jahrhunderts parodiert wird. – Aufgrund ihrer Struktur ist die formtypologische Gliederung gleichzeitig auch ein Stück Interpretation. In der Strawinsky-Literatur zählen begründete Binnengliederungsversuche ohne Ouvertüre zwischen 6 und 13 Einzelabschnitte, und diese Zahl ließe sich je nach Zuordnung von Dialogen und nachfolgenden Ensembleszenen sogar noch um einige Abschnitte erhöhen. So klingt das Zigeunerliedchen des Husaren in das Parascha-Lied hinein, und nachdem sich Basil und Parascha ausgesprochen haben, setzt sie ihr Lied fort. Man kann diese streng genommen 4 Bühnenvorgänge als einen einzigen zählen, man kann zwei daraus machen (Parascha-Arie + Dialog), man kann drei daraus machen (Parascha-Arie + Husarenlied + Duett) und eben auch vier. Ebenso verhält es sich mit der Szene Mutter + Nachbarin + Parascha + Husar, die sich als Ganzes, als zweiteilig (Dialog + Quartett) oder sogar als dreiteilig (Dialog + Quartett + Dialog) betrachten läßt. Je größer man aber die Abschnitte wählt, um so mehr verlieren sie ihren Sinn als Gliederungsmittel der analytischen Klärung.

 

Aufriß

Die nachfolgende Binnengliederung geht, dem Textbuch folgend, von 9 Abschnitten einschließlich Ouverture aus, darf sich aber ebenfalls keiner Allgemeinverbindlichkeit berühmen. Dabei umfaßt [Nr. 1] die Ouverture, [Nr. 2] die Chanson russe = Russian Maiden’s Song = Parascha-Arie (Ziffer 1), [Nr. 3] das Lied des Husaren und das nachfolgende Duett Parascha-Husar (Ziffer 7), [Nr. 4] die Arie der Mutter (Ziffer 34), [Nr. 5] das Duett Mutter-Nachbarin (Ziffer 44), [Nr. 6] das Quartett Mutter-Nachbarin-Parascha-Köchin (Ziffer 68), [Nr. 7] das Liebes-Duett genannte Duett Parascha-Husar (Ziffer 96), [Nr. 8] die Arie des Husaren nebst Rasier-Szene (Ziffer 134) und [Nr. 9] die Schluß-Szene (Ziffer 163).

 

[1]        Overture

                        Viertel = 104 (Ziffer 2A bis Ziffer G3)

                        Sechzehntel = Sechzehntel (Ziffer G4 bis Ziffer I8)

[2]                    Viertel = 69 (Ziffer 11 bis Ende Ziffer 5a5)

                                    (Vorhang) (Ziffer 11)

                                    Çàíàâñú

Curtain

[Vorhang]

(Ziffer 11)

                                    Ïàðàøà çà ðàáîòîé ïî¸ò ó îêíà

                                    PARASHA sitting by a window sings as she embroiders

[Parascha sitzt, mit einer Stickerei beschäftigt, am Fenster und singt]

(Ziffer 12)

                                    Ãóñàðú ïîäõîäèòú êú îêíó.

                                    Hussar appears at the windows singing a gipsy song.

                                                [Vor dem Fenster erscheint der Husar. Er singt ein Zigeunerlied]

(Ziffer 5a5)

[3]                    Più mosso Viertel = 120 (Ziffer 61 bis Ende Ziffer 134)

                        Più lento (Ziffer 141 bis Ziffer 214)

                                    rallentando (Ziffer 213)

                        Largo (Ziffer 215 bis 217)

                        Tempo I (Ziffer 221 bis Ende Ziffer 2712)

                                    Ãóñàðú óõîäèòú.

                                    Exit Hussar.

                                                [Der Husar geht ab]

(Ziffer 265)

                                    Ïàðàøà ñíîâà áåð¸òñÿ çà ðàáîòó, íàïâàÿ ïñåíêó.

                                    Paracha resumes her work and continues her song.

                                                [Parascha nimmt ihre Handarbeit wieder vor und singt ihr Lied weiter]

(Ziffer 271)

                                    Âõîäèòú ìàòü Ïàðàøè

                                    Enter Mother of Paracha.

                                                [Paraschas Mutter tritt ein]

(Ziffer 2712)

                        Più mosso Achtel = 168170 environ (Ziffer 281 bis Ende Ziffer 334)

                                    Ïàðàøà óõîäèòú

                                    Exit Paracha

                                                [Parascha geht ab]

(Ziffer 334)

[4]                    Andante Achtel = 88 (Ziffer 341 bis Ende Ziffer 364)

                                    Ìàòü (îäíà)

                                    Mother (alone)

                                                [Die Mutter bleibt allein zurück]

(Ziffer 342)

                        Allegretto Achtel = 132 (Ziffer 371 bis Ende Ziffer 394)

                        Tempo I Achtel = 88 (Ziffer 401 bis Ziffer 423)

                        Più mosso punktierte Viertel = 94 (Ziffer 424 bis Ende Ziffer 438)

                                    Âõîäèòú ñîñäêà

                                    Enter Neighbour.

                                                [Die Nachbarin tritt ein]

(Ziffer 425)

[5]                    Tempo giusto Achtel = Achtel (Ziffer 441 bis Ende Ziffer 676)

                                    Âú äâåðÿõú ïîêàçûâàåòñÿ Ïàðàøà

                                    Paracha appears at the door.

                                                [Parascha erscheint in der Türe]

(Ziffer 676)

[6]                    Alla breve Halbe = 80 (Ziffer 681 bis Ende Ziffer 926)

                                    Âõîäèòú êóõàðêà — ïåðîäòûé ãóñàðú.

                                    Enter Hussar disguised as Cook.

                                                [Der als Köchin verkleidete Husar tritt ein]

(Ziffer 691)

                        Larghetto punktierte Viertel = 44 (Ziffer 931 bis Ende Ziffer 964)

                                    Cîñäêà óõîäèòú

                                    Exit Neighbour

                                                [Nachbarin geht ab]

(Ziffer 936)

                                    Ìàòü óõîäèòú

                                    Exit Mother

                                                [Die Mutter geht ab]

(Ziffer 961)

[7]                    Con moto Viertel = 116 (Ziffer 971 bis Ende Ziffer 1045)

                        Meno mosso Viertel = 846 (Ziffer 1051 bis Ende Ziffer 1245)

                        Tempo commodo (Alla breve) (Ziffer 1251 bis Ende Ziffer 1336)

[8]                    Viertel = Achtel = 168176 environ (Ziffer 1341 bis Ende Ziffer 1395)

                                    Âõîäèòú ìàòü

                                    Enter Mother

                                                [Die Mutter tritt ein]

(Ziffer 1341)

                                    Ïàðàøà è ìàòü óõîäÿòú

                                    Exeunt Paracha and Mother

                                                [Paracha und die Mutter verlassen das Zimmer]

(Ziffer 1381)

                        Lento Viertel = 80 (poco rubato) (Ziffer 1401 bis Ende Ziffer 1465)

                        Più mosso Viertel = 104 (tempo giusto) (Ziffer 1471 bis Ende Ziffer 1557)

                        L’istesso tempo (Ziffer 1561 bis Ende Ziffer 1625)

                                    Áðåòñÿ

                                    Begins to shave

                                                [Er (der Husar) rasiert sich]

(Ziffer 1611)

[9]                    Coda (L’istesso tempo) (Ziffer 1631 bis Ende Ziffer 1728)

                                    Ìàòü (âõîäèòú; ñú íåäîóìíî³ìú)

                                    Enter Mother (astonished)

                                                [Die Mutter tritt ein und ist sehr erstaunt]

(Ziffer 1652)

                                    (Âèäèòú åãî)

                                    (sees him)

                                                [sie sieht ihn]

(Ziffer 1654)

                                    Ïàðàøà (âáãàÿ, ïîäõâàòûâàåòú ìàòü)

                                    PARASHA (running in, catches her Mother)

                                                [Parascha kommt hereingelaufen, fängt ihre Mutter auf]

(Ziffer 1663)

                                    Cîñäêà (âõîäÿ)

                                    Enter Neighbour

                                                [Die Nachbarin kommt herein]

(Ziffer 1681)

                                    (êàêú áû ïðèõîäÿ âú ñåáÿ)

                                    (áðîñàåòñÿ âú îêíî)

                                    (recovering her sens)

                                    (leaps out of the windows)

                                                [(Die Mutter) kommt wieder zu sich]

                                                [(Der Husar) springt zum Fenster hinaus]

(Ziffer 1691)

                                    Ïàðàøà (áæèòú êú îêíó)

                                    PARASHA (runs towards the window)

                                                [Parascha läuft zum Fenster]

(Ziffer 1701)

                                    (áæèòú êú ìàòåðè)

                                    (runs towards Mother)

                                                [Sie eilt wieder zur Mutter]

(Ziffer 1711)

                                    (ïåðåâøèâàåòñÿ âú îêíî)

                                    (leaning out of window)

                                                [Sie lehnt sich zum Fenster hinaus]

(Ziffer 1713)

                                    Çàíàâñü áûñòðî îïóñêàåòñÿ.

                                    The curtain falls quickly.

                                                [Der Vorhang fällt schnell]

(Ziffer 1725)

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Dirigierpartitur 394

Ziffer 116: Richtig ist >And | I re– | pea-ted, | re-pea– | — ted the< zu lesen statt falsch >Oft | I re– | peat–

            ed | fond-ly, | fond–       ly thy<

Parascha-Arie Gesang-Klavier 395

(viele Bindebögen)

  1.) S. 3, Takt 2 [Takt 11] Textkorrektur: statt falsch Ðîç muß es richtig Ðîâ heißen.

  2.) S. 3, Takt 7 [Takt 16] Textkorrektur: statt falsch ÂÚÃÅÌ muß es richtig ÂÚÒÅÌ heißen.

  3.) S. 3, Takt 10 [Takt] Singstimme: Die Achtelligatur cis2-a1 ist mit der folgenden Achtelnote a2

durch einen Balken zu einer AchtelDreierligatur zu verbinden; der russische Text ê ist von

der vorletzten auf die letzte Taktnote zu verschieben.

  4.) S. 5, Takt 2 [Takt 37] Textkorrektur (das Härtezeichen ist durch ein Weichheitszeichen zu

ersetzen): statt falsch Ñòðàñòú muß es richtig Ñòðàñòü heißen.

  5.) S. 5, Takt 5 [Takt 40] Klavier Diskant: statt Dreitonakkord falsch Achtel g1-h1 mit punktierter

Viertel d1-d2 muß es richtig Achtel g1-h1 mit punktierter Viertel des1-des2 heißen.

  6.) S. 5, Takt 6 [Takt 41] Klavier Diskant 2. System: statt 2. Dreitonakkord Achtel falsch a-b-f1 muß

es richtig as-b-f1 heißen.

  7.) S. 5, Takt 8 [Takt 43] Klavier Diskant 2. System: statt 1. Dreitonakkord Achtel falsch a-b-f1 muß

es richtig as-b-f1 heißen.

  8.) S. 7, Takt 3 [Takt 60] Klavier Diskant: statt 2. Dreitonakkord Achtel falsch b-des1-f1 muß es richtig

a-es1-f1 heißen

 

Stilistik: Mawra läßt sich auf mehrere Stilbereiche zurückführen, auf die russische Opern– und Romanzen-Melodik Glinkas und Dargomyschskys, auf den klassischen italienischen Opern-Belcanto, auf die Zigeunermelodik und ihr Kontrastspiel von langen und kurzen Noten einschließlich der auf der Dominante schließenden Kadenzen. Wie „Renard“ wird Mawra auf diese Weise zu einem Kunstwerk für Kenner, dessen Atmosphäre der Nichtkenner zwar erfahren, aber nicht deuten kann. Dementsprechend hat die Oper weitergewirkt und Spuren etwa in Schostakowitschs Oper „Die Nase“ hinterlassen, aber auch Ablehnung durch die kommunistische Musikästhetik erfahren, weil sich die Satire nach deren Meinung auf sich selbst richte und keinen zeitgenössisch gesellschaftlichen Bezug mehr habe.  – Bei der Parascha-Arie handelt es sich um eine melancholische Romanze im Glinka-Stil. Das Husaren-Lied im Zigeunerstil ist als Polonaise gearbeitet und bildet mit der Parascha-Arie eine stilistische Einheit im Sinne der Abfolge Langsam-Schnell. Die Arie der Mutter gehört in die Gattung der italienischen Kavatine. Die Geschwätz-Szene Mutter-Nachbarin wird zur Polka und imitiert Dargomyschsky. Das Quartett parodiert Tschaikowsky. Das letzte Liebes-Duett mündet in einen langsamen Salon-Walzer. Das Ausmaß der Einsicht in die kompositorische Gestaltung von Mawra ist abhängig vom Ausmaß der Detail-Kenntnisse, die man über die russische Opernmusik zwischen Dargomyschsky und Tschaikowsky mitbringt. – Zusätzlich dazu hat man, veranlaßt durch Anklänge an den Ragtime, (umstrittene) Jazz-Einflüsse erkennen wollen, sofern man den Ragtime als Jazz begreift, was dem Ragtime– und Jazz-Verständnis Strawinskys nicht entspricht, und sofern man, noch problematischer, jede chromatische Melodie und jede Synkope jazzbedingt interpretiert. Da der Witz der Strawinsky-Musik in der Verfremdung russischer, nach italienischen Opernmodellen entwickelter Musizierformen besteht, müssen die Vorlagen gewußt sein, ehe man ihre Persiflierung nachvollziehen kann. Schon die Parascha-Arie (Parascha-Lied), aus der man eine Glinka-Romanze heraushören soll, trifft mit dem Bezeichnungsdilemma Arie oder Lied das russische Kompositionsdilemma zwischen beliebter neuneapolitanischer Opernarienseligkeit und zunächst unbeliebter Gluckscher und Wagnerscher Kompositionslogik. Das Ergebnis war der Versuch, Melodieverläufe gleichsam in der Schwebe zu halten, um bei wirkungsvollen Musikszenen bleiben zu können, ohne gleich radikal oder epigonal zu wirken. Viel schwieriger ist die Frage nach den Originalvorlagen zu beantworten, ob Strawinsky bestimmte Stücke oder Nummern gemeint hat oder nur den Stil als solchen zugrunde legte. Daß er russo-italienische Opernmusik leicht übertreibend zur Schau stellte, bleibt auch dann unwiderrufen, wenn man sich nicht der Reminiszenzen-Jägerei anschließen will. Gerade so weitgehend typisierte Muster wie italienisch-neapolitanische Koloratur-Arien oder bodenständige schlichte Volkslieder entwickeln zahlreiche, immer wiederkehrende Motivfloskeln. Sie sind stilimmanent und kommen nicht dadurch zustande, daß der eine Komponist vom anderen abschreibt. Als er Mawra komponierte, besaß Strawinsky keine einzige Opernpartitur von Glinka. Strawinsky konstruierte einen historischen Gegensatz zwischen russischen Komponisten, die sich spontan verhalten hätten, wie Glinka, Dargomyschsky und Tschaikowsky, und solchen, die einen doktrinären Ästhetizismus mit der Absicht pflegten, nur Kunst zu schaffen, die, vom Volk ausgehend, im Volk schon längst vorhanden sei. In der Konsequenz für sich selbst bedeutete das, bei der Übernahme von russischen Modellen nicht zu kopieren, sondern im Sinne einer Verfremdung zu charakterisieren. Dem kam der gewählte Typ einer Opera buffa entgegen. Strawinsky behandelt die vier Bühnengestalten als kleinbürgerliche Charaktertypen aus dem russischen Vorstadt-Umfeld: dem langweiligen Alltag zu entfliehen suchendes junges Mädchen, leichtsinniger Soldat auf der Suche nach Abenteuer und Amouren, Klatschbase. Für jeden Typ und ihre gegenseitige Angehörigkeit entwickelt Strawinsky eine eigene Kennung: Parascha und der Husar erhalten die Romanze zugeordnet, deren städtische Herkunft sich bei Parascha mit einem russischen, traditionell sentimentalen Einschlag verbindet, beim Husaren mit der opernhaften Theatralik leeren Ungestüms. Das Klangfeld Paraschas bleibt melancholisch, mit bei gegebenem Anlaß leicht kokettem und verletzten Einschlag; das des Husaren verbindet aufgesetzt-leichtsinnige Lustigkeit mit Ungeduld und Klangzeichen seines Standes wie Fanfarenmotive oder die für Strawinsky charakteristischen Ambitussprünge als Ausdruck des Unguten, hier der Ungeduld, möglichst bald zum Ziel des ganzen Abenteuers zu gelangen. Bei den Klatschweibern schlägt die Intonation in den russischen Klageliedmodus eines Lamento um oder nimmt Unterhaltungs-Couplet-Charakter an. Dabei steht der vorgetäuschte Opern-Ernst der Musikalisierung in einem grotesken Gegensatz zur Banalität des Vorgangs selbst, der immer wieder musikalisch aufgehoben wird. Wenn sich die Liebenden vor der bevorstehenden Erfüllung ihrer Wünsche sehen, singen sie zunächst einen Zweigesang nach Art der großen Heldenoper-Liebesduett-Schablonen, können deren hohes Pathos aber nicht durchhalten, sondern stürzen sofort in die Muffigkeit ihres reizlosen Alltags zurück und beenden ihre Liebesszene mit einem ganz elenden Walzer, eine Deutung, die Strawinsky schon in der Mohr-Ballerina-Szene von petruschka anbrachte. Was Strawinsky zum für ihn unernsten, für die Beteiligten ein Stück Leben ausmachenden Geschehen meint, drückt er am Opernende aus: Wenn sich abzeichnet, daß die Liebenden ihr Ziel diesmal nicht erreichen, spottet der Komponist zu allem Überfluß mit einer ironisch zu verstehenden Trauermusik hinter ihnen her. Sofern Strawinsky Textdeutung vornimmt, ist sie immer satirisch oder enthüllend im Sinne Wagnerscher Motivsprache. Im großen Liebesduett entsprechen weiträumige Sequenzen dem Text von der unendlichen Seligkeit, und sie sind so leer maskenhaft gearbeitet wie die Seligkeit verlogen übertrieben ist. Noch bevor der Text zu erkennen gibt, daß Parascha ihren Husaren über die Köchinnen-Hintertür ins Haus gelotst hat, enthüllt die Fanfarenmelodik die militärische Herkunft, als Parascha ihren Galan der Mutter als Köchin vorstellt. Und daß es “Gott Amor” diesmal gar nicht eilig hat, obwohl sich seine beiden freiwilligen Opfer längst für schnelles Handeln entschieden haben, deutet Strawinsky im Walzer des Liebesduetts an, wenn er bei diesen Textworten die Notenwerte plötzlich auf halbe Noten drastisch verlangsamt. Wenn der Husar seiner Hoffnung Ausdruck verleiht, daß Mutter und Tochter mit ihm zufrieden sein werden, züngelt sich seine Melodie von d1 nach es2 zum Ambitus-Höhepunkt hoch. Mutter und Tochter antworten gleichzeitig mit denselben Worten. Die Mutter aber hat Lamento-Töne in ihrer Antwort, weil sie an treu, ehrlich und billig denkt, während Parascha in ihre Romanzen-Arie verfällt, der Strawinsky eine plötzliche Rückung ins Fordernde verleiht. Viele dieser ebenso deutlichen wie komischen Stilmittel sind bereits von Boris Assafjew und von Boris Jarustowski erkannt und ausgesprochen worden. Strawinsky schiebt dabei mehrere Interpretationsschichten in– und übereinander, indem er nicht nur die Charaktere einzeln deutet, sondern bei textlich passenden Gelegenheiten auch übergeordnete Deutungsfelder entwickelt. So gibt er der verstorbenen Thekla ein eigenes Motiv, das in der Oper mehrmals wiederkehrt. Thekla war ja “treu und ehrlich” und notabene billig, und sie hat lange Zeit gedient. Ihr Motiv spielt als Motivation der Mutter in die Anstellungsszene hinein und es kehrt noch einmal wieder, wenn sich später der Husar als Militär der zehn Jahre rühmt, die er bislang gedient habe, ebenfalls treu und ehrlich. Der Kontrast aus Melodik und Harmonik und die Koinzidenz von Tonika und Dominante sind Stilmittel, deren sich Strawinsky bereits früher zur Erzielung grotesker Effekte bediente. Schon in der Parascha-Arie passen Melodik und Harmonik nicht zusammen. Indem Strawinsky beides auseinanderschiebt, bekommt die Rührseligkeit dieses Liedes mit ihrer an sich schönen romanzenhaften Melodie einen dazu nicht mehr passenden harmonischen Untergrund, dessen normale Beziehungen umgedreht werden, wenn die Tonika auf die Dominante und die Dominante auf die Tonika gesetzt wird. Der interpretierenden Mehrgleisigkeit dient auch der Einsatz polytonaler Elemente, von Tonartenrückungen und Polyphonie. Das Verständnis der Vorgänge setzt klassische Funktionsvorstellungen voraus, weil sonst deren Text und Situationen charakterisierende Abänderungen nicht nachvollzogen werden können. Dies alles beherrschte Strawinsky bereits bei der Komposition von petruschka und der leichten vierhändigen Klavierstücke. Daß er auch die herkömmliche Instrumentalbehandlung zu Charakterisierungszwecken benutzt, aber auch verdreht, indem er streichertypische Passagen in die Bläser verlegt und umgekehrt und dabei bestimmte Instrumente Personen und Situationen zuordnet, versteht sich am Rande. Die Trompeten beispielsweise gehören dem Husaren, die schnellen Holzbläser den schnatternden Klatschweibern.

 

Widmung: A la mémoire de / Pouchkyne, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky [Zum Gedenken an / Puschkin, Glinka und Tschaikowsky / Igor Strawinsky].

 

Dauer: 2746″. Strawinsky fand es ärgerlich, daß frühe Kataloge von Boosey & Hawkes falsche Dauerangaben enthielten. Eine Meinungsverschiedenheit zwischen Verlag und Aufnahmefirma über die Dauer von „Mawra“, bei der die Firma die Oper kürzer, der Verlag sie länger vermutete, nahm Strawinsky zum Anlaß eines verärgerten Briefes vom 22. Mai 1950. Diese Fehler seien auf Nichtberücksichtigung seiner Korrekturen zurückzuführen. Im Falle von „Mawra“ bestimmte er die Aufführungsdauer mit 23 Minuten. Diese Angabe ist genauso unrichtig wie die Partiturangabe mit 25 Minuten. In Strawinskys späterer Dokumentation benötigte er bis auf 14 Sekunden 28 Minuten. Auch im Disput über die zeitliche Dauer der „Messe“ haben sich die Angaben des Verlages als richtig, diejenige Strawinskys als unrichtig herausgestellt. 

 

Entstanden: Oper (ohne Ouvertüre): Anglet und Biarritz Sommer 1921 bis 9. März 1922*; Ouverture: nachkomponiert Paris kurz vor der Uraufführung; Parascha-Arrangement: Biarritz, begonnen um den 9. September 1923, fertiggestellt vor dem 15. September 1923; Parascha-Arrangement (Violin-Transkription): New York April 1937

* Im Herbst mußte er wegen der Arbeiten für „Dornröschen“ aussetzen; aber in den Monaten November und Dezember 1921 komponierte er ohne Unterbrechung in Biarritz an seiner Oper weiter und war sich sicher, eine gute Arbeit entstehen zu sehen, ein Meisterstück, wie er in Anführungsstrichen am 21. Dezember 1921 an Ernest Ansermet schrieb. Wieder kamen einzelne Reiseunterbrechungen dazwischen.

 

Uraufführung: 3. Juni 1922 im Pariser théâtre national de l’ opéra mit Oda Slobodskaja (Parascha), Hélène Sadovène (Nachbarin), Soja Rossowskaja (Mutter), Bélina Skoupewski [Stefano Bielina] (Husar), mit dem Bühnenbild und den Kostümen von Léopold Survage, in der Inszenierung von Bronislawa Nijinska, der Regie von Serge Grigoriew, unter der Musikalischen Leitung von Gregor Fitelberg und der Gesamtleitung von Serge Diaghilew. Vermutlich hat Strawinsky bei der Vorführung von „Mawra“ die Ouverture nicht gespielt. Von Craft ist das Klavierarrangement in Frage gestellt worden, das Strawinsky benutzt hat; denn der zweihändige Klavierauszug wurde erst im März 1924 fertiggestellt. Die Voraufführung war im Gegensatz zur Uraufführung sehr erfolgreich. Unter den geladenen Gästen befand sich auch Sébastian Voirol. (In der Strawinsky-Literatur hält sich hartnäckig die auf die Fehldatierung in den „Lebenserinnerungen“ zurückgehende Meinung, Mawra und Renard seien am selben Tag in Paris uraufgeführt worden, nämlich am 3. Juni 1922. Für die Mawra-Uraufführung ist dieses Datum richtig, nicht aber für die Renard-Uraufführung, die bereits am 18. Mai 1922 stattfand. In den (nicht von Strawinsky geschriebenen) Lebenserinnerungen wird die Zusammenstellung beider Bühnenwerke lebendig und vordergründig glaubhaft ausgeschmückt. Dann heißt es noch, Mawra sei von Fitelberg, Renard von Ansermet dirigiert worden. In Wirklichkeit wurde Renard am 3. Juni nicht gespielt. Das Programm brachte Petruschka, Mawra und Sacre.Der öffentlichen Uraufführung ging am 29. Mai 1922 im Ballsaal des Pariser Hôtel Continental eine Voraufführung für die finanzierenden Freunde von Diaghilew voraus, bei der die Orchesterfassung durch eine von Igor Strawinsky gespielte Klavierfassung ersetzt wurde und Gregor Fitelberg dirigierte. Die Uraufführung der Parascha-Arie wird nicht mit Sicherheit für den 7. November 1923 in Paris angenommen. Das Hylton-Arrangement war zum erstenmal am 17. Februar 1931 in der Pariser Oper mit der Hylton Band zu hören.

 

Bemerkungen: Schon sofort nach der Uraufführung sprach man von Persiflage, wobei nicht ganz sicher ist, ob man die Zuordnung zur russisch-italienischen Oper erkannte oder nur meinte, der mit „Sacre“ berühmt gewordene Neuerer habe sich selbst gezähmt und stilistisch rückwärts bewegt oder aber sich selbst nicht so ganz ernst genommen. Zu dieser Ansicht sah man sich genötigt, um mit den wieder auftauchenden Dominantseptimakkorden und Leittonklängen fertigzuwerden, die nach Meinung vieler Zeitgenossen nicht zu Strawinsky paßten. Strawinskys Freund Francis Poulenc hat darüber im Juni-Juli-Heft von „Les Feuilles Libres“ geschrieben und sich entschieden gegen die Behauptung von der Parodie gewehrt. Es war auch in einem Brief an Poulenc, seinem Neujahrsbrief vom 1. Januar 1923, daß Strawinsky die Niederlage seiner Oper eingestand. Das Persiflgenproblem hat die unterschiedlichsten Deutungen erfahren, wobei der Grad der Persiflage von harmlos-liebevoller Parodie bis zur Karikatur russischen Lebensgefühls hart an der Grenze zum Bösartigen eingestuft wurde. – Man hat die Parascha-Arie ebenso auf eine bestimmte Glinka-Romanze zurückgeführt wie auf eine, nachweisbar von Strawinsky gekannte und geschätzte Volkslieder-Sammlung von Daniil Kaschin aus dem Jahre 1833, von der Strawinsky einen Nachdruck aus dem Jahre 1883 in seiner Bibliothek hatte. Er besaß aber, als er Mavra komponierte, keine Partitur von Glinka. Erst nach der Uraufführung von Mawra kaufte er sich im Juli 1922 Glinkas „Russlan und Ludmilla“ und im August desselben Jahres „Ein Leben für den Zaren“. – An Stuart Pope vom Verlag Boosey & Hawkes schrieb Strawinsky am 10. April 1964 im Zusammenhang mit der geplanten Schallplatten-Aufnahme sehr verbittert. Die Musik zu Mawra sei nie gestochen worden, die Orchesterpartituren (gemeint ist das Leihmaterial) seien unbrauchbar und der Stimmensatz in einem schlechten Zustand. Natürlich habe die Musik keinen Erfolg gehabt und sie werde ihn auch nicht haben. Wenn er sich beschwerte, schlechtere Musik als Mawra werde aufgeführt, dann halte man ihm entgegen, auch bessere Musik als Mawra werde ebenfalls nicht aufgeführt. Aber er möchte nun einmal gerne Mawra gedruckt sehen. – In einem Brief aus Nizza vom 1. November 1926 an Ernest Ansermet schwärmte Strawinsky von einer Mawra-Aufführung im Rahmen des damaligen Frankfurter Strawinsky-Festes. Er hätte es gerne gesehen, wenn Ansermet die in Frankfurt verpflichteten Sänger für ein Strawinsky-Konzert geholt hätte. Lediglich die Stimme der einzigen Deutschen im Ensemble, Ruth Arndt, bezeichnete er zwar als gut, aber als nicht groß genug. Die Sache kam nicht zustande, weil die beabsichtigte Aufführung russisch gesungen werden sollte und die Sänger zwar französisch, aber nicht russisch beherrschten.

 

Entstehungsgeschichte: Über die Entstehungsgeschichte von Mawra gibt es mehrere Versionen, von denen sich heute kaum noch feststellen läßt, welche denn nun zur Gänze richtig ist. Diaghilew hatte sich 1921 mit Bakst aus unterschiedlich überlieferten Gründen, vermutlich aber finanziellen, zerstritten und stand ohne Choreographen da. So kam er auf die Idee, Petipas Ballett dornröschen mit der Musik Tschaikowskys nach der Original-Choreographie wieder aufzuführen. Strawinsky war mit Instrumentationen daran beteiligt. In dieser Zeit bot Strawinsky das mawra-Sujet nach Puschkin an und erzählte der Öffentlichkeit von ihrer aller Verehrung für Puschkin, Glinka und Tschaikowsky. Es ist nicht glaubhaft, daß Diaghilew einen Auftrag erteilt hat. Er war Ballett-, nicht Opern-Impressario, und wenn er Opern aufführte, dann gab er ihnen eine tänzerische Note und suchte sie, wenn möglich, in Ballette umzuwandeln. Mit Sicherheit hat Diaghilew die Oper nur angenommen, nicht aber beauftragt, und vermutlich hat er sie in der Hauptsache seines jungen Freundes Boris Kochno wegen, der das Libretto verfertigt hatte, ins Programm genommen. Strawinsky begann im Sommer 1921 in Anglet. Er bekam das Libretto von Kochno nicht als fertiges Textbuch, sondern szenenweise. Er soll zunächst Melodien entworfen und sie auf verschiedene Stapel gelegt und sich dann aus den Stapeln diejenigen Melodien wieder herausgesucht haben, die zu den gelieferten Versen paßten. Er schloß die Arbeit am 9. März 1922 ab, während der Klavierauszug noch bis April 1924 brauchte. Die Ouvertüre komponierte er erst kurz vor der Uraufführung in Paris.

Diaghilew hatte 1920 oder 1921 vor, Petipas Ballett „Dornröschen“ mit der Musik Tschaikowskys neu zu choreographieren. Der Plan wurde von Strawinsky unterstützt, außerdem erhielt er den Auftrag, einige Nummern zu instrumentieren. Diaghilew habe nun, so heißt es, eine inszenierungsfähige kurze Vorspann-Musik gesucht und Strawinsky darum gebeten. Diese Version, die von Kochno stammt, kann in dieser Form nicht stimmen. Einmal ist Dornröschen eine mit zweieinhalb Stunden Spieldauer eine abendfüllende und gleichzeitig überragende Tanzproduktion, die kein weirteres Stück neben sich duldet und ein Vorspann-Bühnenstück weder zeitlich noch inhaltlich verträgt. Sodann ist Dornröschen ein Tanzwerk und Mawra eine Oper. Welcher Impressario würde zwei solcher Stücke mit ihrer enormen Kostenbelastung miteinander verbinden! Hätte Diaghilew beabsichtigt, vom Tschaikowsky-Ballett nur einen einzigen Akt zu spielen, dann hätte er ein zweites und möglicherweise sogar noch ein drittes Stück benötigt. Aber er brachte das Ballett als Ganzes, erzielte einen unerhörten Erfolg und war anschließend bankrott.

Eine weitere Version stammt von Strawinsky selbst. Diaghilew und er hätten sich in ihrer gemeinsamen Verehrung für Puschkin und jenen Teil der russischen Musik getroffen, der sich künstlerisch spontan verhalten habe. Strawinsky nannte Glinka, Dargomishky und Tschaikowsky, und er setzte sich selbst vom Belajeff-Kreis mit Rimsky-Korssakow und Glazunow und seinem doktrinären nationalen Ästhetizismus ab. So hätten sie in London einen Plan zur Ehrung dieser bedeutenden Russen entwickelt und gemeinsam den Puschkin-Stoff ausgesucht. Auch diese Version kann nur teilweise richtig sein.

Wenn Diaghilew einen Abend als Glinka-Dargomishky-Tschaikowsky-Ehrung geplant hätte, dann hätte er, siehe „Dornröschen“, mit seinem Russischen Ballett deren Musik aufgeführt, aber niemals eine nicht einmal halbstündige Oper in Auftrag gegeben.

Eine wieder andere Darstellung geht von den Schwierigkeiten aus, die Diaghilew damals mit Léon Bakst hatte. Auch dazu gibt es zwei Versionen. Die eine sagt, Bakst habe sich mit einer Tänzerin eingelassen und Diaghilew ihn darauf gekündigt. Auch das ist beim erotischen Naturell Diaghilews unglaubwürdig. Bakst hat sich nicht im herkömmlichen Sinn mit der Tänzerin „eingelassen“, sondern er hat sich in sie verliebt und sie geheiratet. Die andere Version ist glaubwürdig. Ihr zufolge haben sich Bakst und Diaghilew finanziell überworfen und Diaghilew nicht in der von Bakst geforderten Höhe zahlen wollen. So trennten sie sich und Diaghilew stand ohne Choreographen da. Dies bewog ihn, nach bereits choreographierten Werken Ausschau zu halten. So kam er auf Dornsröschen. In dieser Situation bot Strawinsky Mawra an, eine Oper, die ebenfalls keinen Choreographen benötigte. Mit Sicherheit hat Diaghilew die Oper nur angenommen, aber nicht beauftragt, und mit Sicherheit hat er sie in der Hauptsache seines jungen Freundes Kochno wegen ins Programm genommen.

 

Parascha-Arie. Entstehungsgeschichte: Aus Briefen, die Strawinsky am 9. und am 15. September 1923 aus Biarritz an Ernest Ansermet schrieb, läßt sich herauslesen, daß er das Parascha-Arrangement am 9. September noch in der Planung und vor dem 15. September 1923 jedenfalls in der Fassung für Gesang und Klavier fertiggestellt hatte. Die Fertigdstellung der endgültigen Orchesterfassung datierte Strawinsky in einem Brief vom 10. Dezember 1947 an Betty Bean in das Jahr 1929, in dem sie auch erschienen sei. Ob es sich dabei um einen Erinnerungsfehler Strawinskys handelt, ist nicht einfach zu klären. Nach den Unterlagen der Bibliothek des Britischen Museums ist die Dirigierpartitur (Platten-Nummer R.M.V. 458) bereits 1925 erschienen. Allerdings trägt das Londoner Exemplar, von dem man dieses Datum abgeleitet hat, nur einen Copyright-Vermerk 1925, aber einen Drucker-Vermerk 1933, und zu allem Überfluß eine Entstehungsangabe 19221923 im Kopftitel der 1. Notentextseite. Der Anschaffungszeitpunkt gibt keinen Hinweis, weil es sich in diesem Falle um ein Kaufexemplar handelt, das die Bibliothek am 11. Februar 1918 erwarb. Dementsprechend können alle Angaben gleichzeitig richtig und unrichtig sein. Der Copyright-Vermerk 1925 kann von der Ausgabe des Klavierauszugs abgeleitet worden sein, die Druckdatierung 1933 sich auf eine spätere Auflage, die Kompositionsende-Datierung auf den Fertigstellungstermin der Klavierfassung des Arrangements beziehen, denn der ganze Klavierauszug ist vermutlich nicht vor März 1924 abgeschlossen gewesen. Strawinsky hat das Datum 1929 auch für die Klavierauszugs-Fassung des Parascha-Liedes in Anspruch genommen. In einem Schreiben vom 28. Juli 1952 an Ernst Roth bezieht er sich auf den Neudruck des Verlages der Ausgabe von 1929 und erinnert beiläufig an die davon gemachte Orchesterfassung. Strawinsky gab dem Stück den französischen Titel „Chanson de Parasha“, der später in „Russian Maiden‘s Song“ anglisiert wurde, Der Anlaß für das Orchester-Arrangement der ersten Parascha-Auftritte zu einer eigenen arienartigen Sopran-Szene scheint bislang nicht ermittelt worden zu sein. Im Dezember 1947 beendete Strawinsky eine Revisionsfassung, weil die junge Sängerin Vera Bryner (Pawlowsky) den Auftrag erhalten hatte, seine Lieder (J. & W. Chester Publications) aufzunehmen. Die Revision bezog sich demnach auf die Klavier-, nicht auf die Orchesterfassung. Für die Veröffentlichung legte Strawinsky Wert darauf, die Herkunftsoper „Mawra“ nicht zu nennen, weil er der alten Copyright-Angabe des Russischen Musikverlags von 1925 nicht traute und auch nicht an einen Schutz durch den fingierten Herausgebernamen Albert Spalding glaubte. So kam der neue Titel „Russians Maiden‘s Song“ zustande, unter dem die Revision 1948 erschien. 

 

Nijinska-Regie: Über die Nijinska-Regie wurde wenig gesprochen, auch nicht über das einzige Bühnenbild mit Schilderung eines Zimmers. Es war wohl mehr eine Einstudierung von Gebärden, und es ging hauptsächlich um ein vernünftiges Zusammenspiel. Nach Strawinskys Meinung führte es zu nichts. Auf der Bühne standen Sänger mit ihren typischen klobigen Sängergesten, so daß für die von der Nijinska geplante tänzerische Technik alle Voraussetzungen einer Bewegungsdisziplin fehlten.

Nachfolge-Produktionen

1928 Berlin, Kroll-Oper (Dirigent und Regisseur: Otto Klemperer; Ausstattung Ewald Dülberg;

            Parascha: Ellen Burger)

1934 Philadelphia (Regie und Ausstattung: Herbert Graf; Dirigent: Alexander Smallens)

1935, Mittwoch 23. Oktober 1935; Konzertaufführung als Schweizerische Erstaufführung durch das

            Association de l’Orchestre Romand und den Solisten Natalie Wetchor (Sopran), Pierre

            Bernac (Tenor), Rimathé und Goudal (Altistinnen) unter Ernest Ansermet im Rahmen des 2.

            Abonnementkonzerts im Grand Théâtre de Genève (als 1. Stück nach der Pause;

            vorangegangen: C-Dur-Symphonie von Paul Dukas, Finale 1. Akt aus Pelléas und Melisande

            von Claude Debussy; nachfolgend: Alborada del Gracioso von Maurice Ravel

 

 

Situationsgeschichte: In den Lebenserinnerungen wird die Entstehung der Ersten Orchester-Suite (Nr. 2) nach den leichten vierhändigen Klavierstücken auf den Auftrag einer Pariser Music-Hall zurück geführt, deren Namen er nicht nennt. Tarushkin hat nachgewiesen, daß es sich bei dieser Music-Hall um das Théâtre de la Chauve-Souris à Moscou gehandelt hat, das im Dezember 1920 im Théâtre femina auf den Champs-Élysées durch Nikita Balyjew eröffnet wurde und sich bald vor allem bei den russischen Emigranten größter Beliebtheit erfreute. Den Namen “Chauve-Souris” (Fledermaus) hatte es von dem gleichnamigen Moskauer Kabarett (Ëåòó÷àÿ ìûøü) übernommen. Die Idee wurde später mit ähnlichem Erfolg nach London (1921) und Amerika (1922) verpflanzt. Das Fledermaus-Theater war bald eine Sammelstätte vermutlich heimwehkranker russischer Emigranten, die sich hier auf dem Umweg über die leichtere Muse in ihre Heimat zurückversetzen konnten. Balyjew war selbst Emigrant. An seinem Theater arbeitete der geflüchtete russische Maler Serge Soudeikin mit seiner jungverheirateten Frau Vera, der vor der russischen Revolution einer der bedeutendsten Theatermaler und schon seit 1906 für Diaghilew tätig geworden war. Über Sudeikin kam Kochno mit Diaghilew in Berührung, und als Sudeikin Diaghilew für den 19. Februar 1921 zu einer Generalprobe in das Fledermaus-Theater einlud, brachte dieser Strawinsky mit, der sich angeblich in die junge, etwas raumgreifende, aber kassenfüllende Tänzerin Zenja Nikitina verliebte und daher im Theater bald als Stammgast einfand. Das Chauve-Souris lebte von Vaudeville-Theaterstücken russischen Kolorits mit gutem Ausgang, und es ist nicht von der Hand zu weisen, daß die Idee zu Mawra in dieser Atmosphäre geboren wurde. Schließlich wurde Mawra im Frühjahr desselben Jahres entworfen, in dem Strawinsky zum ersten Mal ins Fledermaus-Theater kam. Diese möglichen Zusammenhänge könnten auch erklären, warum Strawinsky zwar schrieb, von der „Music-Hall“ enttäuscht zu sein, aber ihren Namen nicht nannte, weil zu viele schöne Erinnerungen damit verbunden waren, nicht zuletzt mit seiner zweiten Frau Vera Bosset, geschiedene Vera Soudeikina. Das Chauve-Souris lebte von Vaudeville-Theaterstücken russischen Kolorits, und möglicherweise hat seine Atmosphäre die Idee zu Mawra beflügelt. Der Ursprung von allem war aber nicht das Kabarett selbst, sondern der Hang zur Groteske, der, wie die Pribautki, schon immer zum russischen Lebensgefühl gehörte und ein Fledermaus-Kabarett erst ermöglichte. „Mawra“ entstand nicht als Frucht des Fledermaus-Theaters, sondern Oper und Kabarett speisten sich aus einer gemeinsamen Wurzel.

 

Bedeutung: Ergographisch bildet Mawra die unmittelbare Vorstufe zum Neoklassizismus, der mit dem nächsten Werk, dem Oktett, erreicht wird. Die Parascha-Arie enthält bereits weitgehend neoklassizistische Merkmale. Strawinsky selbst wertete seine Oper als Meisterstück (“chef-d’œuvre”), wie er in Anführungsstrichen am 21. Dezember 1921 an Ernest Ansermet schrieb. Die Voraufführung wurde ein Erfolg, die Uraufführung ein glatter Mißerfolg, worüber sich der ausgeschiedene Bakst freute, während für Strawinsky Mawra zum Trauma wurde, von dem er sich nie erholt hat. Wenn er später von mawra sprach, setzte er Adjektive des Bedauerns ein. Noch bei den Korrekturverhandlungen 1966 sprach er von seiner “armen” (poor) mawra. Die Franzosen rissen ihre Witze (Ce Mavra, c’est vraiment mavrant), und ein amerikanischer Journalist erklärte seinen Lesern, der Uraufführungsabend sei ein umgekehrtes Sandwich gewesen, nämlich zwei Scheiben Fleisch mit einer Scheibe Brot dazwischen. Gemeint waren Petruschka und Sacre, zwischen denen Mawra die Brotscheibe bilden sollte. In der Tat konnte diese Umklammerung für die Oper nur ungünstig sein. Hinzu kam die Andeutung einer Stilneuorientierung, die man für Strawinsky unpassend fand. Außerdem wurde die Oper auf Russisch gesungen, was die Zuhörer in der Mehrzahl ohnehin nicht verstanden, so daß sie gar nicht in der Lage waren, den Witz der Partitur auch nur andeutungsweise zu verfolgen.

 

Violin-Transkription: Der Anlaß für die Violintranskription ergab sich aus der Zusammenarbeit mit Dushkin und den Zielen, die sie damit verfolgten. Die Violintranskription erhielt den Doppel-Namen „Chanson russe. Russian Maiden‘s Song“. Strawinsky reduzierte das Orchester für sein Arrangement keineswegs, sondern übernahm das originale Instrumentarium der Opernpartitur, das er für den Parascha-Auftritt gewählt hatte, verzichtete also auf Flöten, Englischhorn, Es-Klarinette, Trompeten, Posaunen und Schlagzeug. Trompeten, Posaunen und Pauken treten innerhalb der Parascha-Szene ohnehin nur in Verbindung mit dem Husaren in Erscheinung. Dessen Auftritt schnitt Strawinsky aber heraus und verlagerte benötigte Stimmführungen der Tenorpartie in das Orchester. So konnte er die gesamte Szene als selbständige Sopran-Arie montieren und auf die Violin-Fassung übertragen.

 

Violoncello-Transkription: Die Violoncello-Transkription von Markewitsch entstand mit Einwilligung, aber nicht unter Mitarbeit Strawinskys, also anders als in den Fällen der Dushkin– und Gautier-Transkriptionen. Deshalb legte Strawinsky auf eine genaue Auszeichnung Wert. Für Dushkin und Gautier hieß das, eine Mitarbeit oder Zusammenarbeit mit ihm bekannt zu geben, für Markewitsch, den Violoncellisten als den alleinigen Autor auszudrucken. Die im August anstehenden Verträge mußten in diesem Sinne aufgesetzt werden, wie Strawinsky mit Schreiben an den Verlag vom 30. August 1950 ausdrücklich verlangte. Tatsächlich ist die Klavierpartie der Violoncello-Transkription mit der der Strawinsky-Dushkinschen Violintranskription identisch.

 

Hylton-Arrangement: Hylton hatte bei Strawinsky um die Erlaubnis nachgesucht, Teile von Mawra für seine Jazzband bearbeiten und dabei die Gesangsteile instrumental ersetzen zu dürfen.

Mit Schreiben vom 9. September 1930 kündigte Strawinsky seine bevorstehende Ankunft in Paris an. Dort wurden sich Strawinsky und Hylton wohl einig, denn Hector Fraggi veröffentlichte in der Nummer vom 23. Dezember 1930 der Zeitschrift „Les Petit Marseillais“ eine Nachricht, Hylton bereite ein Arrangement von Mawra vor. Fraggi sah darin eine Verbindung ernster mit leichter Musik. Natürlich ging das nicht ohne Beteiligung des Russischen Musikverlags, weil nur der Klavierauszug, nicht aber die Partitur veröffentlicht vorlag.

Mit Brief vom 6. Februar 1931 an Arthur Brooks von der Columbia Grammophon in London bestritt Strawinsky, etwas von einer Schallplatten-Aufnahme gewußt zu haben, und mit Schreiben vom 12. Februar 1931 warnte er Hylton, auf der vor dem Erscheinen stehenden Schallplatte seinen Namen anders als den des Komponisten des Originals zu nennen. 

 

Fassungen: Eine gedruckte (Taschen-)Partitur russisch-englisch erschien erst 1969 zwei Jahre vor Strawinskys Tod, und auch die erst auf drängendes Bitten Strawinskys. Was der Russische Musikverlag durch Zeitverzögerung Strawinskys erst drei Jahre nach der Uraufführung 1925 herausbrachte, war der Klavierauszug in einer allerdings sehr schönen äußeren Aufmachung mit Medaillonbildern von Tschaikowsky, Glinka und Puschkin. Die überlieferte Dirigierpartitur russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch, die der Verlag 1925 mit einer eigenen Platten-Nummer R. M. V. 418 herstellte und die Strawinsky im November 1925 in Paris erhielt, blieb Leihmaterial.* Die Ouverture enthält eine Buchstabenbezifferung. Vermutlich ist die Partitur ohne Ouverture beziffert worden und Strawinsky hat das nicht mehr ändern wollen und daher in der späteren Auflage die Buchstabenbezifferung ausschließlich für die Ouverture eingeführt, um nicht alle paar Takte eine Korrektur einsetzen zu müssen. Im selben Jahr ließ Strawinsky die Ouvertüre in einer Solo-Klavierfassung und die Arie der Mutter in einer Fassung für Gesang und Klavier erscheinen. Im Jahre 1929 folgte die Parascha-Arie unter dem Titel Chanson de Parasha (später anglisiert als Russian Maiden’s Song). Nur wenige Strawinsky-Stücke haben eine so vielfältige Ausgabe erfahren wie dieses Lied. Es erschien 1933 als selbständige Dirigierpartitur ausschließlich für ein kleineres Orchester bearbeitet, 1947 als Violin-Transkription von Samuel Dushkin und im selben Jahr als Taschenpartitur, 1948 als Neuausgabe der Gesang-Klavier-Fassung (Vertragsabschluß mit Boosey & Hawkes am 10. Mai 1948), 1951 dann in der Markewitsch-Fassung für Violoncello und Klavier (Vertragsabschluß mit Boosey & Hawkes am 6. November 1950), und schließlich 1968 als unerlaubter russischer Nachdruck in der Gesang-Klavier-Fassung. Bei allem Bemühen waren die geschäftlichen Erfolge ebenso ernüchternd wie die Uraufführung. Der russische Musikverlag setzte bis Ende 1938 knapp 400 Klavierauszüge, etwas über 200 Ouvertüren-Ausgaben und jeweils rund 100 Mutter– und Parascha-Arien ab. Der Klavierauszug der Oper wurde mit identischer Platten-Nummer seit 1956 von Boosey & Hawkes neu vertrieben, aber noch im selben Jahr ein neuer Klavierauszug mit anderer Platten-Nummer aufgelegt, der auf den russischen Originaltext verzichtete und die ursprüngliche Burness-Übertragung durch die Craftsche ersetzte. Zu diesem Zeitpunkt war das alte Orchester– und Leihmaterial längst unbrauchbar geworden. Nun hatte Strawinsky für die Druckausgabe der Partitur so viele Änderungen eingetragen, daß seiner Meinung nach die nunmehr vorliegenden Unterschiede zwischen der (neuen) Orchesterpartitur und dem (neuen) Klavierauszug von 1956 nur durch die Herstellung eines dritten Klavierauszuges beseitigt werden konnten, den er 1966 vom Verlag einforderte. – Ein Problem eigener Art bildet das Arrangement von Teilen der Oper für Jazzband durch Jack Hylton 1930 oder 1931. Es ging vor allem um die Abschnitte des Liebes-Duetts und des Quartetts. Zeitgenossen sahen darin eine Verbindung von ernster und leichter Musik. Strawinsky hörte sich das probeweise fertiggestellte Hylton-Arrangement in London an und lieferte dem Verfasser die notwendigen Hinweise zur Synchronisation von Bearbeitung und Werk für die endgültige Aufnahme-Fassung. Es gab dann Unstimmigkeiten, so daß Strawinsky sogar bestritt, etwas von einer Schallplatten-Aufnahme gewußt zu haben. Er verbot schließlich die Nennung seines Namens anders als den des Komponisten des Originals. Robert Craft dagegen hat keinen Zweifel an der Überarbeitung des Arrangements durch Strawinsky gelassen und behauptet, Strawinsky habe auch Teile der Schallplatte selbst dirigiert. Die Hylton-Bearbeitung erschien nie im Druck.

* Die British Library erwarb am 11. Februar 1958 eine mit 1933 edierte Ausgabe und setzte die Erstausgabe, von der sich bislang kein Exemplar hat auffinden lassen, mit 1925 an. Es ist nicht auszuschließen, daß diese Vermutung richtig ist. Doch spricht die Platten-Nummer eher für eine Datierung um 1929, zumal in diesem Jahr auch der zugehörige Klavierauszug erschienen ist. Nicht stichhaltig wäre eine Annahme, in beiden Fällen von einem Nachdruck einer 1925er-Ausgabe ausgehen zu müssen. Dann müsste es sich bei der Dirigierpartitur möglicherweise gleich um zwei unauffindbare Ausgaben handeln.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: 1937 Paraschas Lied mit Samuel Dushkin (Violine) und Igor Strawinsky (Klavier); in New York am 9. Mai 1946 Paraschas Lied mit Joseph Szigeti (Violine) und Igor Strawinsky (Klavier); am 7. Mai 1964* im kanadischen Toronto mit Susan Belinck als Parascha, Mary Simmons als Mutter, Patricia Rideout als Nachbarin und Stanley Kolk als Tenor, mit dem Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony Orchestra unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky.

 

CD-Edition: VIII-1/14 (Opernaufnahme 1964*)

* Strawinsky hat einen Teil der Ziffer 5a weggelassen (in der Partitur ist zwischen Ziffer 5 und Ziffer 6 eine Ziffer 5a eingeschoben). Die Aufnahme geht in der ersten Parascha-Szene von Ziffer 57 sofort in den Schluß nach Ziffer 5a6 über, an den sich das Zigeunerliedchen des Husaren anschließt (Ziffer 61). Es fehlen also 10 Takte mit den letzten 3 Zeilen des Parascha-Liedes.

 

Autograph: Das Autograph der Partitur gilt als verschollen. Eine Manuskript-Abschrift der Ouvertüre ging an Ernest Ansermet. Das Autograph des Klavierauszuges lagert in der Washingtoner library of congress. Die Reinschrift der Dushkin-Transkription befindet sich in der paul sacher stiftung Basel.

 

Copyright: 1925 durch Russischen Musikverlag Berlin; 1947 assigned durch Boosey & Hawkes Inc.; 1956 für Ausgabe mit englischem Text durch Boosey & Hawkes Inc., 1969 für Taschenpartitur durch Boosey & Hawkes

 

Irrtümer, Legenden, Kolportagen, Kuriosa, Geschichten

Während der Pause am Uraufführungstag lachten die Pariser über einen unübersetzbaren Wortspielwitz: „Ca Mavra, c‘est vraiment mavrant.“ (vraiment = ; mavrant =  ).

Ein amerikanischer Journalist soll seinen Lesern erklärt haben, der Uraufführungsabend sei ein umgekehrtes Sandwich gewesen, nämlich 2 Scheiben Fleisch mit einer Scheibe Brot dazwischen. Gemeint waren Petruschka und Sacre, zwischen denen Mawra die Brotscheibe bildete.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

391 1925 Oper KlA; r-f-d-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 89 S.; R. M. V. 411.

                        391Straw1 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

                        391Straw2 ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            39156 1956 ibd.

392 1925 Ouvertüre KlA; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 6 S.; R. M. V. 411a.

393 1925 Arie der Mutter Ges.-Kl.; r-f-d-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 6 S.; R. M. V. 411.411b.

394 1925 Oper Dp; r-f-d-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; R. M. V. 418.

                        394Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

395 1929 Parascha-Arie Ges.-Kl.; r-f-d-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 7 S.; R. M. V. 467.

                        395Straw ibd.

396 [1929] Parascha-Arie Dp; r-f-d-e; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 18 S.; R. M. V. 458.

            39633 1933 ibd.

397 1947 Chanson russe Vl.-Kl. (Dushkin); Gutheil-Kussewitzky; 4 S.; A. 10. 482 G.

                        397Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            397[47] ibd. Gutheil / Boosey & Hawkes London; B. & H. 17860.

398

399 1948 Parascha-Arie Ges.-Kl.; Boosey & Hawkes London; 7 S.; B. & H. 16360.

            399[65] [1965] ibd.

3910 (1948) KlA; r-f-d-e; Boosey & Hawkes London; 89 S.; R. M. V. 411.

3911 1951 Parascha-Arie Vc.-Kl. (Markewitsch); Boosey & Hawkes; 4. S.; B. & H. 17815.

            3911[65] [1965] ibd.

3912 1956 KlA; r-f-d-e; Russischer Musikverlag / Boosey & Hawkes London; 89 S.; R. M. V. 411.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

391 Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE / Igor Strawinsky / [Vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno* / English Version by* [#] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / [°] / Réduction pour Chant et Piano / par l’auteur / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.)** / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Klavierauszug vierhändig mit Gesang [nachgebunden] 26,5 x 33,3 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch; 89 [87] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dünner Karton schwarz auf beige [aufgemachte Außentitelei mit Vignette 2,1 x 3 Ornamentverzierung, 3 Leerseiten] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [aufgemachte Innentitelei mit Vignette 1 x 1,2 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung, Leerseite, unterschriebene Widmungsseite handschriftlich russisch-französisch in Strichätzung mit Autorensignaturen im russischen Text oberhalb dreier ovaler Bildmedaillons >Ïàìÿòè / Ïóøêèíà / [Puschkin-Medaillon 4,6 x 6,2] / Ãëèíêè [#] ×àéêîâñêàãî / [Glinka-Medaillon 4,5 x 6,1] [#] [Tschaikowsky-Medaillon 4,3 x 6] / Èãîðü Ñòðàâèíñê³é / A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, Leerseite, Uraufführungslegende französisch, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >MAVRA<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / 1922.<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Satzbezeichnung linksbündig >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musiques.) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin.< rechtsbündig >Tous droits d’exécution réservés. / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 411<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 89 >Biarritz, Mars 1922<; ohne Endevermerke) // (1925)

° Trennstrich 0,8 cm in Tildenform.

* in Zierhandschrift

** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt

 

391Straw1

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf der Außentitelei unterhalb der Vignette mittig zentriert mit >Piano – Chant / Igor Strawinsky / Avril I925< gezeichnet und datiert. Das Exemplar enthält Korrekturen [S. 7, Ziffer 11 ist ab 4. Viertel bis S. 9, Ziffer 55 zu wiederholen, Takte 27+8 bilden die 1. Volta, die 2. Volta ist dreitaktig untergeschrieben; S: 21, Ziffer 323, Klavier Baß: der 1. Zweitonakkord ist richtig E-G statt E-H zu lesen; S. 23 Ziffer 353, Klavier Baß: die beiden letzten Noten der sechsteiligen Sechzehntelligatur sind richtig b-c statt des-es zu lesen; S. 2425, Ziffer 38139: die Gesangsstimme ist eine Oktave höher zu notieren; S. 38, Ziffer 621, Klavier Diskant: der 1. Akkord ist richtig a-cis1-e1 statt ais-cis1-e1, der 2. Akkord richtig h-g1-h1 statt h-f1-g1 zu lesen; S. 38, Ziffer 622, Klavier Diskant: allen 4 Zweitonakkorden ist eine h1 zuzufügen (werden dadurch jetzt Dreitonakkorde); S. 38, Ziffer 623, Klavier Diskant: der nach oben gestielten Achtelnote e1 ist eine nach unten gestielte Halbenote a1 hinzuzufügen; S. 42, Ziffer 693, Singstimme: die Halbenote a1 ist zu punktieren; S. 42, Ziffer 706, Klavier Diskant: der letzte Zweitonakkord ist richtig d1-h1 statt d1-b1 zu lesen; S. 52, Ziffer 882, Klavier Diskant: der 1. Dreitonakkord ist richtig d2-f2-d3 statt d2-fis2-d3 zu lesen; S. 55 Ziffer 931, Tempoangabe hinter >Larghetto.<: es muß richtig punktierte Viertel = 44 statt Viertel = 44 heißen].

 

391Straw2

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar enthält neben und unterhalb der Ornamentverzierung rechtsbündig die handschriftliche Bleistift-Eintragung >With sketches for a new and cor– / rect English translation by Robert Craft<. Auf S. 7 ist blattoberhalb links mit Bleistift >Translation sketches / by Robert Craft / Oct I954 / IStr< notiert. Das Exemplar enthält keine weiteren Einträge.

 

392 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MAVRA* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno / English Version by [#**] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#**] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / [***] / Ouverture / pour piano / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’editeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.****) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang [nachgeheftet] 27 x 34,1 (2° [4°]); 6 [4] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 2 Seiten Vorspann [aufgemachte Titelei schwarz auf cremeweiß mit Vignette 1 x 1,2 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >MAVRA. / Ouverture.<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / 1922.<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Kopftitel linksbündig >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright Russischer Musikverlag, G. m . b . H., Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musique.) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin.< rechtsbündig zentriert >Tous droits d’exécution réservés. / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 411. 411a<; ohne Endevermerke) // (1925)

* in Zierhandschrift kursiv.

** zweizeilig 2 x 2 durchlaufendes Trennornament.

*** Ornament-Tilde 1,1 x 0,3.

**** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

 

393 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MAVRA* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno / English Version by [#] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / Air de la Mère / pour chant et piano / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.**) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang [nachgeheftet] 26,8 x 34 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch; 6 [5] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 1 Seite Vorspann [aufgemachte Titelei mit Vignette 1 x 1,3 sitzende Frau Zymbalon spielend] + 2 Seiten Nachspann [Leerseiten]; Bezifferung 34423; Kopftitel >MAVRA / Air de la Mère<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAWINSKY. / 1922.< linksbündig >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H., Berlin. / (Édition Russe de Musique.) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H., Berlin.< rechtsbündig zentriert >Tous droits d’exécution réservés. / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays.<; Platten-Nummer [S. 2:] >R. M. V. 411b<, [S. 36:] >R. M. V. 411.411b<; ohne Endevermerke) // (1925)

* in Zierhandschrift kursiv.

** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

 

394 Mavra* / Opera buffe / Igor Strawinsky / [Vignette] / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno* / English Version by* [#] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / Partition d’orchestre / [Vignette] / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G.M.B.H.)** / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / C. G. Röder G. M. B. H., Leipzig. // (Dirigierpartitur [nachgeheftet] 26,5 x 33,1 ([4°]°); 152 [151] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf cremeweiß [aufgemachte Außentitelei mit Vignette 4,2 x 6,2 Ornamentverzierung] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [aufgemachte Innentitelei mit Vignette 1 x 1,2 sitzende Frau Cymbalom spielend, Leerseite, unterschriebene Widmungsseite handschriftlich russisch-französisch in Strichätzung mit Autorensignaturen im russischen Text oberhalb dreier ovaler Bildmedaillons [°] >Ïàìÿòè / Ïóøêèíà / [ Puschkin 4,6 x 6,2] / Ãëèíêè [#] ×àéêîâñêàãî / [Glinka 4,5 x 6,1; Tschaikowsky 4,3 x 6] [#] / Èãîðü Ñòðàâèíñê³é / A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, Leerseite, Uraufführungslegende französisch, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >MAVRA<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Satzbezeichnung >OUVERTURE< rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / 1922<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Satzbezeichnung linksbündig (in Höhe von 2. Zeile Autorenangabe) >Edited by Albert Spalding, New York<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin. / (EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE) / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, G. m. b. H., Berlin.< rechtsbündig >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays. / Tous droits d’exécution réservés.<; Platten-Nummer [nur 1. Notentextseite] >R. M. V. 418<; ohne Kompositionsschlußdatierung<; Herstellungshinweis [vorletzte] S. 151 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Druck: Berliner Musikalien-Druckerei: G.m.b.H.<) // [1925]

* in Zierhandschrift.

** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

 

394Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist auf der Außentitelei blattoberseits zentriert mit >Igor Strawinsky / Nov. I925 / Paris< gezeichnet und datiert. Er schrieb oberhalb des russisch-französisch-deutsch-englischen Textes in rot die neue englische Übersetzung ein und in der Ouverture die Buchstabenziffern.

 

395 IGOR* STRAWINSKY* / MAVRA* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / CHANSON* DE* PARACHA* / pour chant et piano / Prix / °RM.: 2.— / °Frs.: 2.50 / Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays / Tous droits d’exécution réservés / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.)* / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES / Imp. Delanchy-Dupré – Paris-Asnières / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne. // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang ungeheftet 26,5 x 34,4 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch; 7 [6] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 1 Seite Vorspann [Außentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >CHANSON DE PARACHE / de l’opéra “MAVRA“; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel linksbündig teilkursiv zentriert >Texte russe de B. KOCHNO, d’après A. Pouchkine / Version française par J. LARMANJAT / English version by R. BURNESS / Deutsch von A. ELUKHEN< rechtsbündig zentriert >Musique de / IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin< rechtsbündig >Tous droits d’exécution de reproduction et / d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays. / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag, Berlin<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 467<; Herstellungshinweise als Endevermerke S. 7 linksbündig >Imp. Delanchy-Duprè – Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXIX< rechtsbündig >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // 1929

° Die Preisangaben stehen bündig untereinander.

°° Trennstrich 0,9 cm waagerecht.

* Zier-Schreibschrift.

 

395Straw

Strawinskys Exemplar ist auf der Außentitelseite zwischen >IGOR STRAWINSKY< und >MAVRA< rechtsbündig mit >IStrawinsky / 1929< signiert und datiert.

 

396 IGOR STRAWINSKY°/ MAVRA°° / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE°°° / CHANSON DE PARACHA° / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Chanson de Paracha / tirée de l’opéra-bouffe / MAVRA / Musique arrangée et transcrite par l’Auteur / pour une voix de soprano / accompagnée de 2 Hautbois, 2 Clarinettes, / 2 Bassons, 4 Cors, 1 Tuba, 2 Violons solo, / 1 Alto solo et plusieurs Violoncelles / et Contrebasses. / PARTITION d’ORCHESTRE / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG (G.M.B.H.)* / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEVITZKY / BERLIN · LEIPZIG · PARIS · MOSCOU · LONDRES · NEW YORK · BUENOS AIRES / [°°°°] / S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXIII // (Dirigierpartitur [nachgeheftet] 27,7 x 37,2 (2° [gr. 4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch; 18 [18] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier schwarz auf hellgraubeige [Zieraußentitelei] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >Chanson de Paracha / tirée de l’opéra bouffe / Mavra / d’Igor Strawinsky / Musique arrangée et transcrite par / l’auteur pour petit orchestre<; Autorenangaben mit Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky / 1922/1923< linksbündig zentriert teilkursiv >Texte russe de B. KOCHNO, d’après A. Pouchkine / Version française par J. LARMANJAT / English version by R. BURNESS / Deutsch von A. ELUKHEN<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig zentriert >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H. Berlin< rechtsbündig zentriert >Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction et / d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays. / Copyright 1925 by Russischer Musikverlag Berlin<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 458<; Herstellungshinweis S. 18 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris. / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXIII< rechtsbündig als Endevermerke >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // (1933)

° schraffierte Hohlschrift.

°° schreibschriftartig kursiv.

°°° Textzeile in Schweifornamenten.

°°°° Trennstrich 0,8 cm waagerecht.

* G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt

 

397 IGOR STRAWINSKY / CHANSON RUSSE / Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’AUTEUR et S. DUSHKIN / A. GUTHEIL // IGOR STRAWINSKY / CHANSON RUSSE / RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG / Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’AUTEUR et S. DUSHKIN / Prix: RM.* 2 = / Frs* 2.50 / A. GUTHEIL / (S. et N. Koussevitzky) / S Ame des Grandes Éditions Musicales, PARIS / Boosey & Hawkes Ltd., London – Breitkopf & Härtel, Leipzig – Galaxy Music Corporation, New York. // (Violin–Klavierausgabe ungeheftet 27,1 x 34,6 ([4°]); 4 [4] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier graublau auf hellbeige [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] ohne Vorspann und ohne Nachspann + inliegende beschriftungsidentische Violinstimme 3 [2] Seiten [Leerseite, 2 Notenseiten paginiert, Leerseite] mit Instrumentenangabe >VIOLON< oberhalb Notenspiegel mittig; Kopftitel >CHANSON RUSSE [**] RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert teilkursiv >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1937< linksbündig >La partie de violon de / cette partition est établie / en collaboration avec / Samuel Dushkin<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig zentriert >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays. / A. GUTHEIL (S. & N. Koussevitzky)< rechtsbündig teilkursiv >Copyright 1938 by S. & N. Koussevitzky / Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction / et d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays.<; Platten-Nummer >A. 10. 482 G.<; ohne Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 4; Herstellungshinweis S. 4 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Imp. S. I. M. A. G. Asnières< rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >GRANDJEAN GRAV.<) // (1938)

* Währungseinheiten untereinander gesetzt.

** senkrechter Schlangenlinien-Trennstrich.

 

397Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist mit >Paris / Sept. 38< datiert. Es enthält zahlreiche mit Bleistift eingetragene Legatobögen, die in der kleinformatigen Reinschrift vorhanden sind, aber im Druck fehlen. Das Exemplar verzeichnet außerdem unter dem Datum Hollywood, 9. Mai 1946, eine Columbia-Aufnahme mit Szigeti. Die Eintragung könnte irreführen; die Aufnahme fand an diesem Datum statt, aber nicht in Hollywood, sondern in New York.

 

397[47] igor stravinsky / chanson russe / Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / edition a. gutheil · boosey & hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Chanson Russe / Russian Maiden’s Song / Transcription pour violon et piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / Edition A. Gutheil. Boosey & Hawkes / London . Paris . Bonn . Johannesburg . Sydney . Toronto . New York // (Violin-Klavierausgabe klammergeheftet 23 x 31 (4°); 4 [4] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier helltomatengerot auf grünbeige [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite] + 2 Seiten Nachspann [Leerseiten] + eingelegte Violinstimme 4 [2] Seiten + 1 Seite Vorspann [Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >CHANSON RUSSE [°] RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 [Stimme: unpaginiert [S. 2]] unter Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert teilkursiv >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1937<; Mitarbeiternennung 1. Notentextseite unter Kopftitel linksbündig Partitur >La partie de violon de / cette partition est établie / en collaboration avec / Samuel Dushkin< Stimme >La partie de violon est / établie en collaboration / avec Samuel Dushkin<; Instrumentenbezeichnung [nur Stimme] 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Mitarbeiternennung und Autorenangabe mittig >VIOLON<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1938 by S. & N. Koussevitzky / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17860<; Herstellungshinweis 1.Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1947*)

° textzeilenüberschreitender senkrechter Trennstrich in Zackwellenform.

* Datierung nach Angabe der British Library für das von ihr am 30. September 1976 käuflich erworbene Exemplar >g.1056.a.(1.)<. Diese Datierung ist in Frage zu stellen weil sowohl die Niederlassungsreihenfolge wie die v-Schreibung auf die Zeit nach 1957 hindeuten.

 

399 igor strawinsky / russian maiden’s / song / voice and piano / boosey & hawkes // (Gesang-Klavierausgabe [nachgeheftet] 25,8 x 32,3 ([4°]); Singtext russisch-englisch; 7 [5] Seiten + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Titelei, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<* Stand >No. 453<]; Kopftitel >RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG / äâè÷üè ïñíè<; Autorenangabe in Verbindung mit Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 linksbündig zentriert >Lyrics by B. Kochno / after A. S. POUSHKIN / English translation by R. Burness< rechtsbündig zentriert >Music by / IGOR STRAWINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig teilkursiv >Copyright 1948 in U.S.A. by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16360<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; ohne Kompositionsschlußdatierung; ohne Endevermerk) // [1948]

* editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires angegeben.

 

399[65] igor stravinsky / russian maiden’s song / voice and piano / boosey & hawkes // (Gesang-Klavierausgabe 23,8 x 30,8 (4°); 7 [5] Seiten ohne Umschlag + 1 Seite Vorspann [Titelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky<* Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<]; Kopftitel >RUSSIAN MAIDEN’S SONG / äâè÷üè ïñíè<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Music by / IGOR STRAVINSKY< linksbündig zentriert mit Übersetzernennung >Lyrics by B. KOCHNO / after A. S. POUSHKIN / English translated by R. BURNESS<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite neben und oberhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig gekastet >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< unterhalb Notenspiegel >© Copyright 1948 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 60360<; ohne Endevermerke<) // [1965]

* Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticums Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

 

3910 Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE / Igor Strawinsky / [Vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / BOOSEY & HAWKES // IGOR STRAWINSKY / Mavra* / OPERA BOUFFE EN 1 ACTE / d’après / A. Pouchkine / Texte de Boris Kochno* / English Version by [#**] Traduction française par / ROBERT BURNESS [#**] JACQUES LARMANJAT / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN / [Ziertilde] / Réduction pour Chant et Piano / par l’auteur / [Ziertilde] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES / LONDON · NEW YORK · SYDNEY · TORONTO / CAPE TOWN · PARIS · BUENOS AIRES // (Klavierauszug zweihändig fadengeheftet 26,5 x 32,9 (2°); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch; 89 [87] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag biegsamer Karton schwarz auf creme [Zieraußentitelei mit 2,1 x 3 Ornamentvignette, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<*** Stand >No. 453<] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite, unterschriebene Widmungsseite handschriftlich russisch-französisch in Strichätzung mit Autorensignaturen im russischen Text oberhalb dreier ovaler Bildmedaillons [°] >Ïàìÿòè / Ïóøêèíà / [°] / Ãëèíêè [#] ×àéêîâñêàãî / [°] [#] [°] / Èãîðü Ñòðàâèíñê³é / A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalten mittig zentriert >Copyright 1925 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag). / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Copyright for all countries. / [#] / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in / any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete / opera or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<, Seite mit Uraufführungsangaben, Besetzungsliste unbetitelt + Orchesterlegende >Orchestre< französisch] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [Leerseiten]; Kopftitel >MAVRA<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unter Satztitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Igor Strawinsky. / 1922.<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite unter Satztitel linksbündig >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1925 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag), / for all countries. / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in England.<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16304<; ohne Kompositionsschlußdatierung; Endevermerk S. 89 rechtsbündig >H.P.B104.148.<) // (1948)

* Zierschrift kursiv.

** über zweizeilig durchgehendes, mit Ornamentvignette Außentitelei identisches Trennornament.

*** editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires angegeben.

 

3911 igor strawinsky / russian maiden’s / song / violoncello and piano / boosey & hawkes* // (Violoncello-Klavier-Ausgabe mit eingelegter Klavierpartitur 23,3 x 30,2 (4° [4°]); 3 [2] Seiten Violoncello-Stimme ohne Umschlag [Titelei als Vorspann, 2 Notenseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener >ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (S. et N. KOUSSEWITZKY) / BOOSEY & HAWKES< Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<** Stand >No. 453<] + 4 [4] Seiten eingelegte Partitur ohne Umschlag, ohne Vorspann, ohne Nachspann; Kopftitel >Russian Maiden’s Song / CHANSON RUSSE<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite Partitur paginiert S. 1 Violoncellostimme paginiert S. 2 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY< linksbündig zentriert >Arranged for / Violoncello and Piano by / DIMITRY MARKEVITCH<; Instrumentenbezeichnung >Cello< mittig zwischen Autorenangaben; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt Partitur und Stimme unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >All rights reserved< [/] linksbündig >Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc. New York.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17815<; Ende-Nummer [nur Partitur] S. 4 linksbündig >5. 51. E<) // (1951)

* Der Titel befindet sich auf der 1. Seite der Violoncello-Stimme, deren 4. Seite die Werbung enthält. Der Klavierpart ist ohne eigene Titelei, wurde also in die Violoncello-Stimme eingelegt, weil auf der Partitur für eine Titelei kein Platz war.

** editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du / rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires angegeben.

 

3911[65] igor stravinsky / Russian Maiden’s / Song / Violoncello and Piano / boosey & hawkes* // (Violoncello-Klavier-Ausgabe [nachgeheftet] 23,5 x 31 (4° [4°]); 4 [3] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag dunkelrot auf graugrün [Außentitelei, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Stravinsky<* Stand >No. 40< [#] >7.65<] ohne Vorspann, ohne Nachspann, + 3 [2] Seiten Violoncello-Stimme [Leerseite, 2 Notenseiten, Leerseite]; Kopftitel >Russian Maiden’s Song / CHANSON RUSSE<; Instrumentenmitteilung [nur] Stimme oberhalb Notenspiegel mittig >Cello< 1. Notentexteite unpaginiert [S.2]; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite Partitur + Stimme unpaginiert [S. 2] unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY< linksbündig zentriert >Arranged for / Violoncello and Piano by / DIMITRY MARKEVITCH<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite Partitur oberhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig [Stimme: linksbündig] gekastet >IMPORTANT NOTICE / The unauthorized copying / of the whole or any part of / this publication is illegal< Partitur + Stimme unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >© Copyright 1951 by Boosey & Hawkes Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis Partitur + Stimme 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 17815<; ohne Endevermerke) // [1965]

* Angezeigt werden ohne Niederlassungsangaben zweispaltig ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preisangaben >Operas and Ballets° / Agon [#] Apollon musagète / Le baiser de la fée [#] Le rossignol / Mavra [#] Oedipus rex / Orpheus [#] Perséphone / Pétrouchka [#] Pulcinella / The flood [#] The rake’s progress / The rite of spring° / Symphonic Works° / Abraham and Isaac [#] Capriccio pour piano et orchestre / Concerto en ré (Bâle) [#] Concerto pour piano et orchestre / [#] d’harmonie / Divertimento [#] Greetings°° prelude / Le chant du rossignol [#] Monumentum / Movements for piano and orchestra [#] Quatre études pour orchestre / Suite from Pulcinella [#] Symphonies of wind instruments / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine [#] Variations in memoriam Aldous Huxley / Instrumental Music° / Double canon [#] Duo concertant / string quartet [#] violin and piano / Epitaphium [#] In memoriam Dylan Thomas / flute, clarinet and harp [#] tenor, string quartet and 4 trombones / Elegy for J.F.K. [#] Octet for wind instruments / mezzo-soprano or baritone [#] flute, clarinet, 2 bassoons, 2 trumpets and / and 3 clarinets [#] 2 trombones / Septet [#] Sérénade en la / clarinet, horn, bassoon, piano, violin, viola [#] piano / and violoncello [#] / Sonate pour piano [#] Three pieces for string quartet / piano [#] string quartet / Three songs from William Shakespeare° / mezzo-soprano, flute, clarinet and viola° / Songs and Song Cycles° / Trois petites chansons [#] Two poems and three Japanese lyrics / Two poems of Verlaine° / Choral Works° / Anthem [#] A sermon, a narrative, and a prayer / Ave Maria [#] Cantata / Canticum Sacrum [#] Credo / J. S. Bach: Choral-Variationen [#] Introitus in memoriam T. S. Eliot / Mass [#] Pater noster / Symphony of psalms [#] Threni / Tres sacrae cantiones°< [° mittenzentriert; °° Titelfehler original].

 

3912 Mavra° / OPERA BOUFFE°° / Igor Strawinsky / [Vignette] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / BOOSEY & HAWKES // Igor Strawinsky / MAVRA / Opera in one Act after Pushkin by Boris Kochno / Opera en un acte d’après Pouchkine par Boris Kochno / Oper in einem Akt nach Puschkin von Boris Kochno / English version by Robert Kraft°°° / Traduction française par Jacques Larmanjat / Deutsche Übersetzung von A. Elukhen / Vocal score by · Réduction pour piano par · Klavierauszug von / Igor Strawinsky / Edition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes / London · Paris · Bonn · Capetown · Sydney · Toronto · Buenos Aires  ·New York // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang [nachgeheftet] 23 x 31 (4°); Singtext englisch-französisch-deutsch; 89 [87] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag orangerot auf beigeorange [Außentitelei mit farbiger Zierschrift, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<* Stand >No. 692< [#] >12.53<] + 6 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalten Blocksatz >Copyright 1925 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag)< / >Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U. S. A. / Edition with English words, Copyright © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Copyright for all countries.< / >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical / reproduction in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of / the libretto, of the complete opera or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<, Seite mit Widmung [nur auf französisch] handschriftlich in Strichätzung >A la mémoire de / Pouchkine, Glinka et Tschaïkovsky / Igor Strawinsky<, Leerseite, Uraufführungslegende französisch, Personenverzeichnis >Characters · Personen< englisch-französisch-deutsch + Orchesterlegende >Orchestra< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [25′] englisch-französisch-deutsch] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Symphonic Music / Selected Works for / Soli, Chorus and Orchestra<** Stand >No. 741< [#] >11.55<, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Symphonic Music / A Selected List of / Light Compositions<*** Stand >No. 743< [#] >11.55<, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<**** Stand >No. 693< [#] >12.53<]; Kopftitel >MAVRA<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Satztitel >Overture< rechtsbündig zentriert >IGOR STRAWINSKY / 1922<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Satztitel linksbündig in Höhe 1. Zeile Autorenangabe >Edited by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1925 by Edition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) for all countries / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / Edition with English words, Copyright 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of reproduction in any form reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 16304<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 89 >Biarritz, Mars 1922<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1956)

° kursiv liegende Schreibdruckschrift hellrot auf hellorange.

°° Zeile in spiegelartigem Zierrahmen hellrot auf hellorange.

°°° Namensschreibfehler original

* Angezeigt werden ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig und teilweise mehrsprachig (unstimmig) gattungszugeordnet >Stage Works° / Oeuvres Théatrales · Bühnenwerke° / The Rake’s Progress [#] Le Rossignol / Le Libertin  Der Wüstling [#] The Nightingale  Die Nachtigall / Opera in three acts  Opéra en trois actes [#] Musical tale in three acts after Anderson°° / Oper in drei Akten [#] Conte lyrique en trois actes d’apres Anderson°° / [#] Lyrisches Märchen in drei Akten nach Anderson°° / Mavra [#] Oedipus Rex / Opera buffa in one act after Pushkin [#] Opera — Oratorio in two acts after Sophocles / Opéra Buffe en un acte d’apres°° Pushkin [#] Opéra – Oratorio en deux actes d’apres°° Sophocle / Oper°° Buffa°° in einem Akt nach Puschkin [#] Opern — Oratorium in zwei Akten nach Sophokles / Persephone [#] Pétrouchka / Melodrama in three parts by André Gide [#] Burlesque in four scenes / Melodramé°° en trois parties d’Andre°° Gide [#] Burlesque en quatre tableaux / Melodrama in drei Teilen von André Gide [#] Burleska°° in vier Bildern / Le Sacre du Printemps [#] Le Chant du Rossignol / The Rite of Spring [#] The Song of the Nightingale / Pictures from pagan Russia in two parts [#] Symphonic poem in three acts / Tableaux de la Russie paienne en deux parties [#] Poème symphonique en trois parties / Bilder aus dem heidnischen Russland in zwei Teilen [#] Symphonische Dichtung in drei Teilen / Pulcinella [#] Apollon Musagète / Ballet with chorus in one act after Pergolesi [#] Ballet in two scenes / Ballet avec chant en un acte d’apres Pergolesi [#] Ballet en deux tableaux / Ballett mit Chor in einem Akt nach Pergolesi [#] Ballett in zwei Bildern / Le Baiser de la Fée [#] Orpheus / Ballet — Allegory in two scenes [#] Ballet in thre scenes / Ballet — Allégorie en deux tableaux [#] Ballet en trois tableaux / Ballet°° — Allegorie in zwei Bildern [#] Ballett in drei Bildern / Symphonic Works° / Oeuvres Symphoniques · Symphonische Werke° / Pétrouchka Suite [#] Apollon Musagète / Pulcinella Suite [#] Symphonies pour°° instruments a°° vents°° / Le Sacre du Printemps [#] Symphonies of Wind Instruments / The Rite of Spring [#] Symphonien für Bläsinsrumente°° / Le Chant du Rossignol [#] Piano Concerto / The Song of the Nightingale [#] Capriccio / Divertimento [#] Quatre Etudes°° pour Orchestra°°/ Orpheus [#] Four Studies for Orchestra / Symphonie de Psaumes [#] Vier Etüden für Orchester / Symphony of Psalms [#] Concerto in D (Basle Concerto) / Psalmensymphonie [#] Messe°° / Voice and Orchestra° / Chant et Orchestre · Gesang und Orchester° / Trois poésies de la Lyrique japonaise [#] Chant du Rossignol (tiré du “Rossignol”) / Three japanese Poems [#] The Nightingale’s Song (from “The Nightingale”) / Trois petites chansons [#] Mephistopheles Lied vom Floh / Three little Songs [#] The Song of the Flea / Two Songs (Paul Verlaine)° / Sagesse · Sleep · Ein dusterer°° Schlummer° / La bonne Chanson · A Moonlight Pallid · Glimmernder mondschein°°+°< [° mittig; °° Schreibung original; Spaltengegenüber zwischen >Mavra< und >Burleska in vier Bildern< leicht verschoben, desgleichen verschiebender Spaltendurchschuß nach >Apollon Musagète< im Komplex der Symphonischen Werke]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist nächst London mit Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York angegeben.

** Angezeigt werden Kompositionen von >J. S. Bach< bis >Leslie Woodgate<, an Strawinsky-Werken >Igor Strawinsky / Cantata for Soprano and Tenor Soli, Female Chorus, / Two Flutes, Oboe, English Horn (doubling Oboe 2) / and Violoncello / Mass for Chorus and Double Wind Quintet / Symphony of Psalms (Revised 1948) / for Soli, Chorus and Orchestra<. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist nächst London mit Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York angegeben.

*** Angezeigt werden Kompositionen von >Arthur Benjamin< bis >Haydn Wood<, keine Strawinsky-Nennung. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-Buenos Aires-New York angegeben.

**** editions– und alphabetisch geordnete Werkfolge ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise. Angezeigt werden zweispaltig und teilweise mehrsprachig >Pocket Scores° / Partitions de Poche · Taschenpartituren° / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy’s Kiss) / Cantata / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Le Chant du Rossignol (The Song of the / Nightingale) / Concerto in D for String Orchestra / Divertimento / Messe°° / Octet for Wind Instruments / Oedipus Rex / Orpheus /  Perséphone / Pétrouchka / Pulcinella Suite / Four Studies for Orchestra / Quatre Etudes pour Orchestre / Vier Etüden für Orchester / Le Sacre du Primtemps°° (The Rite of Spring) / Septet 1953 / Symphonie de Psaumes / Symphony of Psalms / Psalmensymphonie / Symphonies pour instruments à vents°° / Symphonies of Wind Instruments / Symphonien für Blasinstrumente / Piano Solo° / Piano Seul · Klavier zweihändig° / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée (The Fairy’s Kiss) / Le Chant du Rossignol / (The Song of the Nightingale) / Marche Chinoise de ”°° Chant du Rossignol ” / Mavra Overture°° / Octet for Wind Instruments (arr. A. Lourié) / Orpheus (arr. L. Spinner) / Serenade en la / Sonate / Symphonies pour instruments à vents<°° / Trois Mouvements de “ Pétrouchka ” / Piano Duets° / Piano à Quatre Mains · Klavier vierhändig° / Pétrouchka / Le Sacre du Printemps (The Rite of Spring) / Two Pianos° / Deux Pianos · Zwei Klaviere° / Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra / Concerto / Madrid / Septet 1953 / Trois Mouvements de “ Pétrouchka ” (Babin) // Violin and Piano° / Violon et Piano · Violine und Klavier° / Airs du Rossignol and Marche Chinoise (Le / Chant du Rossignol) / Ballad (Le Baiser de la Fée) / Divertimento (Le Baiser de la Fée) / Duo Concertant / Danse Russe (Pétrouchka) / Russian Maiden’s Song / Suite after Pergolesi / Violoncello and Piano° / Violoncelle et Piano · Violoncello und Klavier° / Suite italienne (Piatigorsky) / Russian Maiden’s Song (Markevitch) / Chamber Music° / Musique de Chambre · Kammermusik° / Octet for Wind Instruments / Septet 1953 / Three pieces for String Quartet / Vocal Scores° / Partitions Chant et Piano · Klavierauszüge° / Cantata / Le Rossignol / Mavra / Messe°° / Oedipus Rex / Perséphone / Symphonie de Psaumes / The Rake’s Progress / Voice and Piano° / Chant et Piano · Gesang und Klavier° / The Mother’s Song (Mavra) / Le Rossignol / Introduction . Chant du Pedieur°° . Air du Rossignol / Paracha’s Song (Mavra) / Russian Maiden’s Song / Two Poems of Balmont / Blue Forget-me-not . The Dove / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Akahito . Mazatzuum°° . Tsarajuki°° / Trois petites chansons / La petite . Le Corbeau . Tchitcher-tatcher / Choral Music° / Musique Chorale · Chormusik° / Ave Maria (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella / Pater noster (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella / Credo (Latin) S.A.T.B. a cappella< [° mittig; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist nächst London mit Paris-Bonn-Capetown-Sydney-Toronto-New York angegeben.

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM