18

L e*  R o s s i g n o l**

Conte lyrique en trois actes de Igor Strawinsky et S. Mitousoff d’après Andersen*** – Ñîëîâåé.Die Nachtigall. Lyrische Erzählung in drei Akten nach einem Märchen von Hans Christian Andersen von Igor Strawinsky und Stepan Mitussow – The Nightingale. Musical fairy tale in three acts after the story by Hans Andersen – L’Usignuolo. Racconto lirica in tre atti di Strawinsky e S. Mitousoff, da una fiaba di Andersen

* The omission of the definite article rests on a translation error by Michel-Dimitri Calvocoressi.

** The use of a capitalized initial letter goes back to the original.

*** The autograph score uses Russian; the first printed edition gives the title only in French, not Russian, whereas the sung text

appears in Russian and, beneath it, French.

 

Scored for: a) Characters: The Nightingale (soprano), The Cook (soprano), The Fisherman (tenor), The Emperor of China (baritone), The Chamberlain (bass), The Bonze (bass), Death (alto)°, Three Japanese Envoys (two tenors, bass), Courtiers (chorus) – Chorusses: femal chorus, male chorus, mixed chorus – Orchestra (First edition): Piccolo Flauto, 2 Flauti grandi, 2 Oboi, Corno inglese, 3 clarinetti (3° anche cl. basso), 2 fagotti, Contrafagotto (anche fag. 3°), 4 corni, 4 trombe, 3 tromboni, Tuba, Timpani, Batteria (Piatti, Tamburo militare, Triangolo, Gran cassa, Piatti antichi, Campanelle I e II, Tamburino, Tam-tam), Pianoforte, Celesta, 2 Arpe, Chatarra ad. lib., Mandolino ad. lib., Archi [Piccolo flute, 2 Flutes, 2 Oboes, 3 Clarinets (3rd also Bass clarinet) 2 Bassoons, Contrabassoon (also 3rd Bass.), 4 Horns, 4 Trumpets, 3 Trombones, Tuba, Timpani, Percussion (Cymbals, Snare drum, Triangle, Big drum, Tambourine, Cymbales antiques, Glockenspiel I and II, Tam-tam), Pianoforte, Celesta, 2 Harps, Guitar ad libitum, Mandolin ad libitum, Strings]; b) Performance requirements: 2 Solo Sopranos, 1 Solo Alto, 3 Solo Tenors, 1 Solo Bariton, 3 Solo Basses, chorus: ad libitum chorus (8 sopranos, 8 contraltos), [four-part] men’s chorus (tenors and basses, each group subdivided into two), [twelve-part] mixed double chorus made up of two [six-part] choruses (sopranos, altos and tenors, each group subdivided into two) and four-part mixed chorus (soprano, alto, tenor, bass); orchestra: piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, english horn, sopranino clarinet in D (= 2nd clarinet), 3 clarinets in Bb and A (2nd clarinet = sopranino clarinet in D, 3rd clarinet = bass clarinet), bass clarinet in Bb (= 3rd clarinet), 3 bassoons (3rd bassoon = contrabassoon), contrabassoon (= 3rd bassoon), 4 horns in F, high trumpet in D and E b (= 3rd trumpet), 4 trumpets in A (1st/2nd trumpets = trumpets in A and B b, 3rd trumpet = trumpet in A and Bb and = high trumpet in D and Eb, 4th trumpet = trumpet in A and C), 3 trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion* (2 glockenspiels, cymbales antiques, tambourine, side drum, bass drum, triangle, cymbals, suspended cymbals, tam-tam), piano, celesta, 2 harps, guitar ad libitum, mandolin ad libitum, 4 solo violins, 3 solo violas, 4 solo cellos, strings (1st violins**, 2nd violins**, violas**, cellos***, double basses****).

° In Russian, death is a feminine noun.

* 5 players.

** Divided in four.

*** Divided in eight.

**** Divided in two.

 

Voice types (Fach): The Nightingale: lyric coloratura soprano with heart and brilliant technique, range e flat¢ – f¢¢¢; The Cook: soubrette adept at parlando, f¢ – a¢¢; The Fisherman: lyric tenor with flexible top register, e – a¢; The Emperor: lyric baritone with ability to play character parts, A – e flat¢; The Chamberlain: character bass or buffo bass depending on the production concept, F sharp – d sharp¢; The Bonze: buffo bass, F – c¢; Death: lyric alto*, a flat – d¢¢.

* In Russian understanding the death is feminine nature [in German: Der Tod, die ‘Tödin’].

 

Performance practice: According to the requirement, the voice of the Nightingale sounds from out of the orchestra pit.

 

Summary: Act One: The Fisherman in his boat sings his song and longs to hear a nightingale singing, as it does every night at this time. The voice of the Nightingale is heard. It addresses its song to the roses, bidding them wake up, but they still seem to be weighed down by the oppressive dew and to be weeping secret tears. The Chamberlain, Bonze, Courtiers and Cook enter in search of the Nightingale. They have been sent to invite it to sing to the Emperor. They do not know the Nightingale and have never seen it, so they initially mistake the lowing of the Fisherman’s calf and the croaking of frogs for the Nightingale’s singing, expressing their wonderment and delight at what they hear. On each occasion, the Cook enlightens them. Finally they hear the real Nightingale and invite it to sing for the Emperor. The Nightingale agrees and announces its willingness to go to the Emperor’s Palace, even though it can sing far more beautifully in the green forest. The messengers are well pleased as they would have been beaten if they had returned home empty-handed. The Fisherman ends his song. – Act Two: The second act begins with an entr’acte headed ‘Courants d’air’, or ‘Draughts’. The actual stage is hidden behind gauzes. To the accompaniment of gossip on the part of the fawning courtiers, preparations are being made for the Nightingale’s arrival. The Cook has become an important personage as it was she who recognized the Nightingale and who, to the others’ amazement, describes the little bird’s modest appearance. The gauzes now rise out of sight and reveal the magnificent Porcelain Palace whose owner, the Emperor of China, is solemnly borne in to the strains of the Chinese March. The Nightingale is already sitting on a long perch and at a sign from the Emperor begins its song (Song of the Nightingale). It moves the Emperor to tears and by way of thanks he confers on it the Gold Slipper. The Nightingale refuses: the Emperor’s tears are thanks enough. The ladies of the court begin to imitate the Nightingale’s trilling by filling their mouths with water, throwing back their heads and trying to trill. The courtiers find this delightful. Three Japanese Envoys enter with a mechanical nightingale as a gift for the Emperor. It is a modest replica of the real nightingale, which flies away unnoticed. The mechanical nightingale is wound up and starts to sing; but the Emperor finds its singing artificial and gestures to the Envoys to turn it off. He wants to hear the real nightingale and is dismayed to discover that it has gone. In his annoyance he banishes it from his kingdom while the mechanical bird is carried into his bedchamber and given a place of honour on his left-hand side. – Act Three: The third act takes place at night in the moonlit bedchamber of the dying Emperor, who lies in a large bed, at the head of which stands Death, wearing the Emperor’s crown and holding his sword and banner. At the end of the prelude, the Emperor hears ghostly voices heralding his impending death. He calls for his musicians to drown out the voices. They do not come. Instead of his musicians, the Nightingale returns however and starts to sing of the magic of the gardens, the radiance of the sky and the fragrance of the flowers. The bird sings so beautifully that Death itself begs it to continue. The Nightingale agrees on condition that Death returns the crown to the Emperor and in that way restores his life. Death consents. The Nightingale continues singing and Death leaves the Emperor’s bedchamber. Once again the Emperor wants to reward the Nightingale by conferring the highest honours on it, and once again it refuses. But it offers to return to the Emperor each night and sing for him from nightfall to morning. The courtiers return in a solemn procession, expecting to find the Emperor dead. But they find him alive, standing in the bright sunlight and wearing his ceremonial robes. He welcomes them. His courtiers fall to the ground. From outside we hear the voice of the Fisherman. With his greeting to the Nightingale both the act and the opera end.

 

Source: Strawinsky’s source was the fairy tale Nattergalen (The Nightingale) written in 1843 by Hans Christian Andersen. In it, Andersen depicts the confrontation between nature (the Nightingale) and artifice (the mechanical bird) against the wider background of a clash between living reality and the narrow-mindedness of the Biedermeier period. A number of the tale’s episodes may be interpreted autobiographically inasmuch as the Nightingale, like Andersen, is recognized in its own country only through reports from foreign parts. From a dramaturgical point of view, the subject matter was especially well suited to operatic treatment in that it is music, represented by the Nightingale, which is central to the plot and the starting point of the action. Strawinsky and Mitusov drew up the scenario with this particular aspect in mind, skilfully preparing the way for the Nightingale’s first scene by means of the scene with the Fisherman. Strawinsky undoubtedly chose Andersen’s fairy tale less for its cryptic conflict between nature and artifice than for the opportunities that it afforded not only for a wide range of exotic colours but also for his exploration of a theme that could be interpreted in terms of a substitute religion. Indeed, the clash between nature and artifice was played down by both authors and reinterpreted, even though it is clear from the composer’s correspondence with Alexander Sanin that he did indeed see the antithesis between the living and the mechanical nightingale as Andersen’s central theme. As its title indicates, the opera comprises lyrical, rather than dramatic, scenes, and the earliest scenario contains no hint of Andersen’s conflict. Here we read only about the Fisherman who, in the best classical tradition, introduces the Nightingale as something very special, followed by a reference to the bird’s singing, which is moving the Emperor to tears, and to a second scene in which the Emperor’s imminent death is prevented by the bird’s singing. Strawinsky created a parable of the power of music to triumph over death, while Andersen had written an allegory about the low level of culture on the part of the masses who react according to the dictates of fashion and who prefer inauthenticity and untruth to the genuine and the true, whereas it is only at the very end of a person’s life that the genuine and the true has any permanence. For Strawinsky, the Porcelain Palace was merely a descriptive motif, whereas for Andersen it was a symbol of an artificial and unnatural world manifested in the mechanical nightingale.

Strawinsky had certainly sought out Andersen’s fairytale due to the possibility for a variety of exotic colours and the ersatz-religiously interpreted thematic material, less for the cryptic conflict between naturalness and artificiality, which is not only overplayed by both authors, but reinterpreted; Strawinsky however, as the correspondence with Sanine indicates, did correctly see Andersen’s central theme as conflict between the living and the artificial Nightingale. Strawinsky’s opera is made up of, as the title says, lyrical, not dramatic scenes. The earliest scenario has survived and was published by Craft. It contains not even a suggestion of Andersen’s conflict. It is just about a fisherman who, in the classic way, makes the introduction, announcing the Nightingale with her song as something quite special, and then the little animal’s singing before the Emperor moves the latter to tears, and in a 2nd scene, there is the imminent death of the Emperor, which is prevented by the song of the Nightingale. Andersen’s conflict is sidelined entirely in favour of an example of the power of music, which can even conquer death. Andersen did not want to show the victory of music over death, but to give an example that in the last moments of human life, only the genuine and truthful matters. Andersen’s Emperor goes to pieces just as his court does before the magic of artificiality. There is much empty-headed prattle and babbling. Andersen dedicates almost a quarter of his story to this scene. More than this, the cult of artificiality leads to a complete loss of value. Until the Emperor, court and people grasp the un-beautiful as beauty and value in itself. Only the poor, unpresentable fisherman experiences the difference, without being able to put words to it. Andersen shifts appearance and reality in the direct meaning of these words. His Chinese people are natural to so little an extent that they themselves shower the Nightingale in a world of platitudes when they greet each other, in that they say “Naacht” and the other answers with “gal”, and untranslatable play on words, because in the Danish, “gal” also means “crazy”. In Andersen’s version, the scene also plays a part. Everything in this Imperial court is artificial. The Palace is made of porcelain, and one must move carefully inside it in order to avoid breaking anything; silver bells have been tied to the flowers. The Palace and the institution are as unnatural as its inhabitants, who carry on in a mannered and ornate language, swan about, always nodding their heads, but without being able to tell the difference between the mooing of the cow and the croaking of a frog, and they confuse both with the song of the Nightingale. The Emperor of Japan is much cleverer. It is he who sends the artificial Nightingale, but expressly with the warning that the artificial Nightingale of the Emperor of Japan is poor in comparison with the real Nightingale of the Emperor of China (which has been banished by the offended Emperor and replaced with a work of art). After many years, at the moment of death, the deception is revealed. The toadies have already chosen a new Emperor; the mechanical Nightingale no longer chimes because there is no one to wind it up; a personification of Death sits on the chest of the once-so-powerful man and has removed from him his insignias of his power, the crown, sabre and flag; in agony, his good and evil deeds appear before him – for the first time, nature and un-nature are separated. The banished real Nightingale comes back and sings so poignantly that Death asks her to keep singing and grants her request to give back to the Emperor his insignias in exchange for a small song. In Strawinsky and Mitussov’s version on the other hand, the Emperor interrupts the playing of the mechanical Nightingale because he notices the cerebral deception and grasps the difference between mechanistic reproduction and creative uniqueness. He brings the mechanical Nightingale into his bedchamber because the living Nightingale has flown away from him, and he believes himself betrayed and must make do with the artificial bird. The toadies, in Strawinsky’s version, lose their abysmal stupidity and thus create material for humorous stage effects. Even the naïveté of the poor, little kitchen maid, who every day brings food to her sick mother and must cover a large distance in doing so, but who is the only person in the court to have safeguarded her naturalness, to know the Nightingale, better: to be able to recognise the Nightingale, is downplayed. In Strawinsky’s version, it is no longer a child who is helped by her innocence, but a grown female cook who is boasting with her experience.

A Nightingale sings her song all night to the joy of a poor fisherman. The Nightingale is widely known throughout the land, but only the simple and poor people in the land know of her existence, a narrative sequence which overlaps with Andersen’s own biography (because Andersen only began to receive recognition in Denmark through foreign countries, especially Germany). The Emperor of China only learns of the Nightingale from foreign books and wishes to hear it in his court. The people of the court do not know about it. After they are threatened with a flogging, they find after a little searching and little kitchen maid, who knows where the Nightingale can be heard. They follow her into the forest, and she is so ignorant that she takes the mooing of a cow, and then the croaking of a frog for the song of the Nightingale. They then find the Nightingale thanks to the kitchen maid’s knowledge, and convey the Emperor’s invitation to come and sing for him to her. The Nightingale begins to sing immediately because it thinks the Emperor is amongst the listeners already present. The toadies from the court explain her mistake. She is prepared to come to the Palace although it is so much better to sing in the green. Her song moves the Emperor to tears while the ladies of the court, to the enchantment of the toadies, attempt to imitate the trills of the Nightingale by taking water into their mouths, bending their heads backwards and gargling out loud. The little Nightingale becomes the talk of the town and her name becomes a call of greeting. There then arrives a large package containing a mechanical Nightingale as a present from the Emperor of Japan. Her artificial song creates the same sensation as the song of the real Nightingale, with whom it is not possible to create a duet, and the latter flies away in a moment in which she is unwatched. When the Emperor becomes aware of this, he is furious and banishes the bird once and for all from his kingdom, thinking her ungrateful. In the meanwhile, the mechanical bird becomes a cultural focal point and is in the spotlight of palace life. Everyone seeks to imitate her series of notes, which are always the same. A separate science is created about it with learned, but incomprehensible books. The artificial bird, which can wave its jewel-adorned tail up and down so beautifully, always sings what is expected of it, and that is exactly what everyone loves about it, because with the real Nightingale, one never knew what was going to come out. Only the simple fishermen are unsatisfied. They sense that something is missing with the mechanical bird, even if they don’t expressly understand what it is. Then the mechanism breaks and proves to be irreparable. Only once in the year can the mechanical Nightingale be wound up, and even that seems too much. Five years pass. The Emperor is dying. Death sits on his chest and has taken from him his Imperial insignia to take it for himself: Crown, sword and flag. His good deeds and bad deeds appear to the Emperor in the form of small heads. He does not want to hear what they wish to say to him. He calls for musicians to sing over the song of the spirits, but they do not come. He calls for the mechanical Nightingale, which does not sing because there is no-one there to wind it up. And the court has already long chosen a new Emperor. In this moment of greatest need, the real Nightingale comes back and sings so wonderfully that even Death is moved and asks her to continue singing. The Nightingale consents provided that Death gives back to the Emperor his insignias, and with them his life. Death fulfils the conditions, but the song of the Nightingale fills Death with such longing for the green spaces of the cemetery, which are watered by the tears of the surviving relatives that he leaves the bedchamber of the Emperor like a fog. The next morning, the Emperor stands up rejuvenated and dresses himself. The Nightingale does not fulfil the Emperor’s wish to stay with him, but promises him to come back every night and to sing at his window, and to share with him the joyful and sad things that are happening in his kingdom. The only condition is that he should not say to anyone that he has a little bird that tells him everything.

 

Construction: Its individual sections each furnished with its own heading, Le Rossignol is a short Russian fairy-tale opera in three acts that could equally well be regarded as a one-act work in three scenes, with the first scene as a prelude to the two later ones and the second scene consisting of several distinct tableaux. The opening act begins with an orchestral introduction that looks forward to the combined image onstage of lightly moved water and a forest filled with the sound of birdsong that creates a Pan-like atmosphere. Soloistic woodwinds and horns rise up over an even movement of alternating intervals in the strings always gliding back down (violas, divided into 8 parts), while the soprano and alto parts intone tritone intervals, supporting the strings, with closed mouths. When the curtain rises, the fisherman in his boat begins his song. He sings about his work, interrupting his song with an anxious question about the Nightingale, and then transfigures her with a description of her wonderful song before ending with a shortened description of the moon. Hymnic in tone, the Fisherman’s song consists of a three-bar nucleus and a three-bar refrain which in terms of their literary and musical form may be analysed as two strophes and a coda in A–B–A1B1 form. It already contains a pre-echo of the voice of the Nightingale in the upper instruments. The bird’s actual song is launched with a preparatory flute solo and a four-bar vocalise of a kind that Strawinsky had already used in his Pastorale. From a textual perspective, the song of the Nightingale is shorter than that of the fishermen, but musically they are both the same length. This passage, too, is hymnic in tone. Formally speaking, it falls into three sections, the initial vocalise being identical to the final one, thus producing the form A–B–C–B1–A. The brief middle section (213 to 221) allows the singer time to recover and provides the Fisherman with an opportunity to express his sense of wonderment, which he does with an intonational formula similar to the Nightingale’s. A short orchestral introduction clatters hurriedly. The courtiers who have been sent out by the Emperor now arrive with the Chamberlain and the Bonze at their head under the leadership of the Cook, noisily beating their way through the forest to the strains of an agitated babble with individually characterized part-writing. The female cook enthuses about her Nightingale, who she amongst all the people of the court was the only one to hear. Whenever the Nightingale is mentioned, a Nightingale call appears in the orchestra. The lowing of the calf is merely hinted at by means of two glissandos in the unison cellos and double basses, while the croaking of the frogs is depicted by six chords on the oboe, english horn and the two clarinets in A. Both effects are subsumed within the general hubbub. The effect is subsequently strengthened by a combination of IV. and III. Horn. The members of the court are very enthusiastic, even imitating the glissando with rapturous wonder with Âîòú ñèëà (Language of platitudes, literally: “how wonderful” translated with a loss of characterisation as “how delightful”); the Chamberlain finds the singer Êàêà ñèëèùà (literally: “what power”, translated with a change of meaning as “what a beautiful singer”) and the Tsing-Pé-Bonze marvels at the power of the little bird. The Bonze keeps calling out the syllables ‘Tsing-Pé’, for which Strawinsky reserves a particular effect, the first syllable being declaimed on the upbeat to the accompaniment of the cymbals, while the second coincides with the main beat to the accompaniment of the bass drum. The Cook clears up the error, and then the game is repeated with the frogs. The croaking of the frogs is also characterised in a restrained manner, so that one does not understand at first why the courtiers are so enthusiastic. Strawinsky uses six instrumental sounds for this, composed chordally, the first oboe, cor anglais, and both A clarinets, with the oboe and cor anglais playing a small grace note before each chord. The Tsing-Pé-Bonze with his unavoidable cymbal and drum beat hears in it the bells of the pagoda, which Strawinsky underlines with harp and piano, which can only be heard here for two bars, and the Chamberlain compares the croaking even to a golden throat, which Strawinsky caricatures with three staccato notes in the tuba proceeding downwards. Once again, the Cook explains. The courtiers are becoming tearful because they know what is waiting for them if they return to the Emperor without having achieved anything. The Chamberlain, no less anxiously, promises the Cook the post of personal chef to the court and the right to see the Emperor eat, the highest of honours that can be bestowed upon a person in this situation and position. And then finally, the actual Nightingale can be heard, first anticipated in the solo flute, then with her voice out of the orchestra. In the meanwhile, the courtiers wonder at her simple appearance, but know what their task is and put themselves at the Nightingale’s service. Strawinsky mocks the mechanistic and spiritless flourishing chatter of stereotypical phrases of politeness with a correspondingly mechanistic voice part. The Nightingale is finally tracked down and settles on the Cook’s hand (its fluttering flight can be heard in the clarinets and bassoons), and everyone is clearly relieved: the one hundred strokes with a bamboo cane, mockingly articulated in the pizzicato violins and staccato solo winds, are no longer something they must fear. The act ends with the final part of the Fisherman’s Song. Dramaturgically, one can imagine this sequence of scenes as if the fisherman has worked throughout the entire act and continued singing, rowing on during the middle scenes and then returning. – The second act likewise opens with its own introduction, but this is played before the curtain as an independent entr’acte subtitled ‘Courants d’air’ (‘Draughts’ or ‘Breezes’). The music is of considerable expanse, lasting 14 figures (5165). It describes the agitation and babble produced in the courtiers by the arrival of the Nightingale and the evening’s recital for the Emperor, with all its attendant preparations. This entr’acte is developed as a self-contained number and could equally well come from the choreographed scenes of Les Noces. The vapidity of the events unfolding onstage is characterized by means of antiphonal choruses and by a rhythmically angular linguistic flow that moves quickly in the declamatory manner of the new Russian school, with brief interjections of Russian melody in the style of folksongs and an unexpected glissando ending that creates a curious impression: a current of air, much ado about nothing, produced by the wind or by hot air. The next scene is entitled ‘Chinese March’. It is however more than just a March. The participants form themselves into a procession into the Imperial Palace for the ceremonial taking of their places. In the Chinese March, Strawinsky offers a concentrate of all the stylistic features that his contemporaries regarded as quintessentially Chinese, without it actually having to be Chinese: short steps within a quick-march beat, the use of cymbals and gong, a pentatonic melody with no chromaticisms, sustained ostinatos and clearly distinguished colours produced by split sounds. Unlike those in The Firebird and Petrushka, the scenes are two-dimensional, with no individual incidents singled out within the overall picture. The music depicts none of the many events that take place on the stage and that are described in elaborate detail. It is left, therefore, to the director to interpret the images as he or she thinks best according to the music, which provides no more than a series of episodes of ‘Chinese’ colour. The third scene consists of the entry of the Nightingale in front of the Imperial court and the dialogue between the songbird and the shocked Emperor. The style changes again. The coloratura melody of the ensuing Song of the Nightingale is intensely chromatic and at times appears to hover in space. The song begins and ends with a coloratura cadence. When the Nightingale converses with the Emperor, the coloratura writing is transferred from the vocal line to the solo flute and solo clarinet. The ladies-in-waiting are also affected by the impression left on the Emperor and, hence, his court by the Nightingale, and so they try to imitate its coloratura flourishes by gargling with water. The orchestra underlines this oddly ordinary sound with wind tremolandos and notes on the harps. The overbred courtiers, who were previously incapable of telling the difference between the singing of a nightingale and the croaking of frogs, are beside themselves with pleasure at this sound. Strawinsky uses unchromatic, bright-toned broken chords to caricature this whole episode and, with it, the lack of culture on the part of the courtiers and ladies-in-waiting. The entrance of the Japanese Envoys is less affected, but here too Strawinsky avoids a painterly approach to the text. The action of the mechanical nightingale – which has to be wound up, of course (the noise can be heard very clearly) – consists of a brief motoric repetition of the same primitive formulas moving up and down in the two oboes. Nor is any attempt made to depict the flight of the departing Nightingale – in this respect, too, the score is untypical of the young Strawinsky. The act ends with a fragmentary repeat of the opening Song of the Fisherman. The third act, like the second, begins with a prelude, a brief, relatively sombre character-piece that derives its thematic material from the following Chorus of Spectres and the Song of the Nightingale, adumbrating the conflict between life and death but for the present leaving the outcome unresolved. The motivic writing of the Chorus of Spectres contains a faint but audible echo of the opening of the Dies irae, the well-known sequence from the Catholic Mass for the Dead that many composers have chosen for its potent symbolism. In the scene in which the Nightingale reappears, the various elements that make up the action are not individually characterized but are simply declaimed within the linguistic flow of the Song of the Nightingale. The most disparate meanings are ascribed to the various melodic formulas. The solemn procession adopts the earlier march rhythm, but the Chinese local colour is now much less pronounced. The formulas heard in the english horn are familiar from The Rite of Spring. At the end of the opera we hear a thirteen-bar fragment of the song in which the Fisherman had earlier admired the Nightingale. In the course of it, the first oboe plays the same simple two-note formula sixteen times. Even without a diminuendo marking in the score, this ending conveys the impression of events slowly disappearing into the distance.

 

Structure

Premier Acte

INTRODUCTION

Larghetto Quaver = 92

            (figure 21 up to the end of Figure 58]

L’istesso tempo

            (figure 6)

Più mosso Crotchet = 60

            (figure71)

a tempo Quaver = 92

            (figure 72)

ÇÀÍÀÂÑÚ

RIDEAU

 (figure 72)

Più mosso Crotchet = 60

            (figure734)

(Íî÷íîé ïåéçàæú. Áåðåãú ìîðÿ. Îïóøêà ëñà.

Áú ãëóáèí ñöñíû ðûáàêú âú ÷åëíîê.)

Paysage nocturne, au bord de la mer. La lisière d’une forêt.

Au fond de la scène, le pêcheur dans sa barque.

Larghetto Quaver = 80

            (figure 8 up to the end of Figure 99)

Più mosso Quaver = 88

            (figure 101 up to Figure 111)

Pochissimo meno mosso Crotchet = 40

            (figure 112 up to the end of Figure 126)

Larghetto Quaver = 80

            (figure 13 up to the end of Figure 159)

Più mosso Quaver = 88

            (figure16)

Andante Crotchet = 58

            (figure 17 up to the end of Figure 184)

CÎËÎÂÅÉ (Ãîëîñú âú îðêåñòð.)

LE ROSSIGNOL (Voix dans l’orchestre)

 (figure 181)

L’istesso tempo

            (figure 19 up to the end of Figure 246)

Più mosso Crotchet = 88

            (figure 247 up to Figure 264)

Âõîäÿòèü: Êàìåðãåðú, Áîíçà, Ïðèäâîðíûå è Êóõàðî÷êà.

Entrent: le Chambellan, le Bonze, les Courtisans et la Cuisinière.

 (figure 2612)

poco più accelerando sino all Crotchet = 116

            (figure 2659)

Molto moderato, quasi andante Crotchet = 58

            (figure 27 up to the end of Figure 2810)

Allegro Crotchet = 116

            (figure 29 up to the end of Figure 348)

Sostenuto Crotchet = 84

            (figure 35 up to the end of Figure 379)

Andante Crotchet = 58

            (figure 38)

Allegro Crotchet = 116

            (figure 39 up to Figure 401)

Maestoso (alla breve) Halbe = 76

            (figure 402 up to the end of Figure 417)

Andante Crotchet = 58

            (figure 42 up to the end of Figure 435)

Allegro Crotchet = 116

            (figure 44 up to the end of Figure 467)

(Áîíçà è Êàìåðãåðú óäàëÿþòñÿ)

(Le Bonze et le Chambellan s’éloignent)

 (figure 454)

(óäàëÿþòñÿ)

(ils s’eloignent)

 (figure 4510)

Molto meno mosso

            (figure 47)

Larghetto Quaver = 80

            (figure 48 up to the end of Figure 507)

Òþëåâûå çàíàñû.

Rideau de tulle.

 (figure 501)

 

Deuxième Acte [Lécnâît ânîhît]

ENTRACTE

(“COURANTS D’AIR”)

[Bíòåðëþäèè]

[Leíîâåíèå]

Ìóçûêà ýòîãî àíòðàêòà èãðàåòñÿ ïðè ñïóùåííûõú òþëåâûõú çàíàñàõú.

Pendant cet entr’acte, la scène est voliée par des rideaux de tulls.

Presto Crotchet = 144

            (figure 51 up to the end of Figure 627)

Lento Crotchet = 56

            (figure 63)

Crotchet = 144

            (figure 64)

Molto meno mosso Crotchet = 80

            (figure 65)

MARCHE CHINOISE

[Êèòàéñê³é ìàðøú]

Òþëåâûå çàíàâñû ìåäëåííî ïîäûìàþòñÿ

Les rideaux de tulle se levent lentement.

Crotchet = 76

            (figure 66 up to the end of Figure 729)

Âú çòîìú ìñò âñ òþëè äîëæíû áûòü ïîäíÿòû

Ici les rideaux de tulle doivent avoir disparu.

 (figure 678)

Ôàíòàñòè÷åñê³é ôàðôîðîâûé äâîðåöú Êèòàéñêãî Èìïåðàòîðà.

Le palais de porcelaine de l’Empereur de Chine.

 (figure 681)

Ïðàçäíè÷íîå óáðàíñòâî. Ìíîæåñòâî ôîíàðèêîâú. Òîðæåñòâåíèîå øåñòâ³å ïðèäâîðíîé çíàòè. Íà àâàíñöåí ñïèíîé êú çðèòåëþ ñòîèòú ïðèäâîðíûé ëàêåé ñú äëèííûìú øåñòîìú íà êîòîðîìú ñîëîâåé.

Architecture fantaisiste. Decoration de fête, luminaires en abondance. Entrée solenelle des dignitaires de la cour. A l’avant-scene, dos au public, se tient un laquais de cour, portant une longue hampe, où est perché le rossignol.

(figure 682)

Triplet = dotted Crotchet

            (figure 731)

Quaver = Quaver = Crotchet 116120)

            (figure 732 up to Figure 768)

poco accel. Quaver = Quaver

            (figure 769)

Quaver = Quaver a tempo

            (figure 77 up to the end of Figure 7812)

Quaver = Quaver del Tempo I (Marcia)

            (figure 79)

(͐ñêîëüêî ñëóãú òîðæåñòâåííî âíîñÿòú ñèäÿoàãî âúáàëäàõèí Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà.)

Des serviteurs portent triomphalement l’Empereur de Chine, assis dans sa chaise à baldaquin.

 (figure 791)

rubatissimo

            (figure 801)

a tempo

            (figure 802)

Semiquaver = Meno mosso

            (figure 8037)

Cëóãè ñòàâÿòú áàëäàõèíú ñú Êèò. Èìï. íà âîçâûøåí³å ïîñðåäè ñöåíû.

La chaise de l’Empereur est déposée sur une estrade au milieu de la scène.

 (figure 803)

Poco meno mosso Quaver = 120

            (figure 81)

Èìïåðàòîðú æåñòîìú ïðèêàçûâàåòú ñîëîâüþ íà÷èíàòú.

L’Empereur fait au Rossignol signe de commencer.

 (figure 814)

CHANSON DU ROSSIGNOL

[ϐñíÿ ñîëîâüÿ]

Crotchet = 66

            (figure 82)

Molto adagio Quaver = 46

            (figure 83 up to the end of Figure 859)

Cadenza (tempo come rima cadenza)*

            (figure 861)

a tempo Quaver = 46

            (figure 8625)

Sostenuto Quaver = 66

            (figure 8714)

Più mosso Quaver = 88

            (figure 8744 up to the end of Figure 8811)

Poco più mosso Crotchet = 76

            (figure 89)

Âñ äàìû âú ïîäðàæàí³å ñîëîâþ, íàáðàú èçú ôàðôîðîâûõú ÷àøå÷åêú âîäû âú ðîòú, èçäàþòú çòîòú çâóêú, îòêèíóâú ãîëîâû íàçàäú.

Toutes les dames, pour imiter le rossignol, se remplissent la bouche d’eau et rejetant la tête en arrière, s’efforcent de triller.

 (figure 892)

Êú Êèò. Èìï. ïîäõîäÿòú òðè ÿïîñêèõú ïîñëà; äâîå âïåðåäè, òðåò³é ñçàäè. Ïîñëäí³é äåðæèòú áîëüøóþ çîëîòóþ øêàòóëêó, íà êðûøê êîòîðîé ñèäèòú áîëüøàÿ èñêóññòâåííàÿ ïòèöà, èñêóññòâåííûé Cîëîâåé-äàðú Èìïåðàòîðà ßïîíñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðó Êèãàéñêîìó.

Vers l’Empereur s’avancent trois envoyés Japonais: deux en avant ensemble; celui qui les suit porte une grande cassette d’or, sur le couvercle de laquelle se dresse un grand oiseau artificiel, un rossignol mècanique, cadeau de l’Empereur du Japan à l’Empereur de Chine.

 (figure 901)

Larghetto Crotchet = 56

            (figure 9016)

Largo Crotchet = 40

            (figure 90715)

Vivace Halbe = 76

            (figure 91)

Ïåðâûå äâà ÿïîí. ïîñëà ðàçñòóïàþòñÿ. Êú Êèò. Èìï. ïîäõîäÿòú òðåò³é ÿïîí. ïîñîëú ñú Èñêóññòâ. Cîë. âú ðóêàõú.

Les deux premiers envoyés s’écartent, le troisième s’avance vers l’Empereur, et lui présente le rossignol artificiel.

(figure 911)

JEU DU ROSSIGNOL MÉCANIQUE

[Èãðà èñêóññòâåííàãî Cîëîâüÿ]

Âî âðåìÿ èãðû èñêóññòâåííàãî ñîëîâüÿ íàñòîÿù³é ñîëîâåé íåçàìòíî èñ÷åçàåòú.

Pendant cette scène, le vrai rossignol disparaît sans être remarqué.

 (figure 92)

Moderato Crotchet = 60

            (figure 92 up to the end of Figure 939)

Èìïåðàòîðú æåñòîìú ïðåêðàùàåòú èòðó èñêóñòâåííàãî ñîëîâüÿ.

L’Empereur, d’un geste, met fin au jeu du rossignol mécanique.

 (figure 938)

Meno mosso Crotchet = 52 circa

(figure 9413)

Èìïåðàòîú, æåëàÿ ïðîñëóøàòü ñíîâà íàñòîÿùàãî ñîëîâüÿ ïîâîðà÷èâàåòú ãîëîâó ñú ïîäíÿòîé ðóêîé âú åãî ñòîðîíó, îäíàêî çàìòèâú åãî îòñóòñòâî³ ñú íåäîóìí³ìú îáðàùàåòñÿ êú êàìåðãåðó.

L’Empereur, qui veut entendre de nouveau le rossignol véritable, tourne la tête de son côté et lève la main. Voyant que l’oiseau n’est plus là, il se tourne, perplexe, vers le chambellan.

Der Kaiser, der die echte Nachtigall hören will, wendet den Kopf zur Seite und hebt die Hand. Als er den Vogel nicht mehr sieht, wendet er sich bestürzt an den Kammerherrn,

The Emperor, who wants to hear the real nightingale again, turns his head and points in the direction of the nightingale’s perch. When he sees that the bird is no longer there, he turns perplexed to the Chamberlain.

(figure 941)

Più mosso Crotchet = 60

            (figure 944)

Quaver = 108

            (figure 9517)

Tempo di “Marcia Chinese” Crotchet = 76

            (figure 95813)

Largo maestoso Crotchet = 60

            (figure 96 up to the end of Figure 987)

Èìïåðàòîðú æåñòîìú ïðèêàçûâàåòú íà÷àòü øåñòâ³å. Èìïåðàòîðà íåñóòú. Âñ óäàëÿþòñÿ âú òîðæåñòâåííîìú ìàðø. Çàíàâñú ìåäëåííî îïóñêàåòñÿ.

L’Empereur fait signe de former le cortège. On l’emporte. Tous sortent en procession triomphale. Le rideau s’abaisse lentement.

 (figure 961)

Larghetto Quaver = 80

            (figure 99 up to the end of Figure 1009 [Enchaînez forward to figure 101 Third Act])

Ãîëîñú Ðûáàêà

Le voix du PÊCHEUR

 (figure 993)

 

Troisième Acte

Con moto Quaver = 120

            (figure 101 up to the end of Figure 105)

Maestoso Crotchet = 160

            (figure 106 up to the end of Figure 1077)

[Çàíàâñú]

Rideau

 (figure 1077)

Lento Quaver = 72

            (figure 108 up to the end of Figure 1128)

Ïîêîè âî äâîðö Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà. Íî÷ü. Ëóíà. Âú ãëóáèí ñöåíû îïî÷èâàëüíÿ Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà. Ãèãàíòñêîå ëîæå, íà êîòîðîìú [#] ëåæèòú áîëüíîé Èìïåðàòîðú, à íà íåìú ñèäèòú Cìåðòú ñú êîðîíîé Èìïåðàòîðà íà ãîëîâ, ñú åãî ñàáëåé è çíàìåíåìú âú ðóêàõú. Çàíàâñú, îòäëÿþøàÿ îïî÷èâàëüíþ îòú ïåðåäíèõú ïîêîåâú îòäåðíóòà.

Une salle du palais de l’Empereur de Chine. Nuit. Clarté lunaire. Au fond la chambre de repos de l’Empereur, lit gigantique [#] où gît l’Empereur malade. A son chevet est assise la Mort, elle porte la couronne impériale, et s’est imparée du glaive et de l’étendard; le rideau qui sépare la chambre de repos des autres, est ouvert.

 (figure 1081)

Poco più mosso Sechzehntel = 120

            (figure 113 up to the end of Figure 1145)

Semiquaver = 96

            (figure 115)

Lento Crotchet = 60

            (figure 116 up to Figure 1232**)

            poco rall. (figure 1120)

            a tempo (figure 1201)

Largo Quaver = 72

            (figure 1232 up to the end of Figure 128 [With the insertion of a replacement figure 124bis***])

            rit. (figure 1242)

            a tempo (figure 1243)

Cìåðòü èñ÷åçàçòú

La Mort disparaît

 (figure 1252)

Íà÷èíàåòú ñâòàòú

Il commence à s’éclaircir

 (figure 1261)

Un poco meno mosso

            (figure 128)

CORTÈGE SOLENNEL

Pianissimo Minim = 4042

            (figure 129 up to the end of Figure 1328)

Ïðèäâîðíûå, ñ÷èòàÿ Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà óæå óìåðøèìú, öåðåìîí³àëíûìú ìàðøåìú âõîäÿòú âú ïåðåäí³å ïîêîè äâîðöà. Çàíàâñü, îòäëÿþùàÿ ïîñëäí³å îòú, îïî÷èâàëüíè òîðæåñòâåííî çàäåðæèâàåòñÿ ïàæàìè ñú ïðîòèâóïîëîæíûõú ñòîðîíú.

Les courtisans pensant que l’Empereur est mort, entrent aux sons d’une marche solennelle et s’avancent vers la chambre de repos, dont des pages retiennent avec solomnité les rideaux fermées.

 (figure 1291)

Çàíàâñü ðàñêðûâàåòñÿ. Îïî÷èâàëüíÿ çàëèòà ñîëíöåìú. Êèòàéñê³é Èìïåðàòîðú âú ïîëíîìú öàðñêîìú óáðàíñò␠ñòîèòú ïîñðåäè îïî÷èâàëüíè. Ïðèäâîðíûå ïàäàþòú íèöú.

Les rideaux de la chambre de repos s’ouvrent. La chambre de repos est baignée de soleil. L’empereur en grande tenue se tiend debout au milieu. Les courtisans tombent à terre.

 (figure 1322)

Quaver = 54 (più largo che sopra)

(figure 133 up to the end of Figure 13412)

Çàíàâñú ìåäëåííî îïóñêàñòñÿ

Le rideau tombe lentement

 (figure 1331)

Ãîëîñú ÐÛÁÀÊÀ

La voix de PÊCHEUR

* Figure 822 is meant.

** In the new edition of the pocket score, the number of the figure 119 is missing.

*** Figure 124 is given twice: 124 = 8 bars; 124bis = 12 bars.

 Corrections / Errata

Transcription (Dushkin) 187

  1.) bar 61 (p. 6, 2nd system, bar 3) Violin: 1st demisemiquaver (2nd ligature) bb2 instead of b2.

  2.) bar 63 (p. 6, 3rd system, bar 1) Piano: the 4th note of the ligature has to read g1 (with bracket

            natural).

  3. Cadenza below system: the 6th (last) note) should be ab2 [Violin: g#1] instead of a2.

  5.) bar 82 (p. 7, last bar of the cadenza) Violin: last triplet note ab1 instead of a1.

  7.) Violin part, p. 3, last bar: 6th note before the end has to be read ab2 instead of a2, 2nd note

            flageolet a3 instead of flageolet ab3.

 

Style: The first act is the work of the pre-Firebird Strawinsky, while the second and third reflect the composer’s musical language after Le Sacre respectively during Les Noces. The result is two clearly disparate stylistic worlds inasmuch as Strawinsky’s style developed markedly between The Firebird and The Rite. This explains why he used only sections of the second and third acts for his independent symphonic poem The Song of the Nightingale. The first act reveals links with Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera The Golden Cockerel as well as with Debussy’s Impressionistic treatment of the orchestra. A number of important passages in this act, including the Song of the Fisherman and the solo writing associated with the bird’s voice, could be taken from Rimsky’s opera with only minor rhythmic and intervallic changes. The chromaticisms of the Song of the Nightingale itself recall the music of Skryabin, while the cantabile writing points in the direction of popular French opera and the choral writing is influenced by Debussy’s Nuages. Other turns of phrase that are reminiscent of Debussy may perhaps be traceable to Mussorgsky, who in turn left his mark on Debussy’s musical language. In spite of its alienatingly Impressionistic peculiarities, the opening act still takes its place within the Russian musical tradition that was practised in St Petersburg and Moscow. In the case of such relatively clearly outlined scenes as the lowing of the calf and the croaking of the frogs, the situations onstage are less fully characterized than in Petrushka. In keeping with the work’s essentially lyrical starting point, the humorous elements in this act are played down even in the later revisions of 1920. To western ears, this act’s folksonglike, specifically Russian colour plays a subordinate role, even if there is an evident echo of Petrushka at one point. In short, this opening act creates the impression of a prologue to the second and third acts. By now, Strawinsky was no longer a mere copyist. Here the writing for soloists and chorus derives from the world of Les Noces. The way in which the situations onstage are now characterized reflects the composer’s experience of working on his three intervening ballets. Strawinsky’s typical humour now makes its presence felt onstage. Having experimented with the use of contrast in Petrushka, he was now able to apply that experience to the action and interaction between the genuine and the mechanical nightingale. The Chinese local colour, which had played virtually no part in the opening act, now becomes a stylistic feature of the work, and the work’s stageability is significantly affected: by embracing the chinoiserie that was popular at this time, Strawinsky laid the foundations for a magnificent staging with extensive and colourful images of a kind familiar from The Firebird and Petrushka but not from The Rite of Spring. At the same time he took over the scenes with the Nightingale and Fisherman from the first act and introduced them into the second and third as complexes involving repetition and reminiscence, thereby welding together all three acts.

 

Dedication: There is no authentic dedication, although according to Paul Collaer, the dedicatee was Stepan Mitusov.

 

Duration: 44¢ 55¢¢. Act One: 16¢ 34¢¢; Act Two: 14¢ 48¢¢ [2¢ 12¢¢ (Courants d’air), 3¢ 38¢¢ (Chinese March), 3¢ 48¢¢ (Song of the Nightingale), 0¢ 40¢¢ (The Courtiers), 1¢ 03¢¢ (Three Japanese Envoys), 0¢ 59¢¢ (Action of the Mechanical Nightingale), 2¢ 28¢¢ (Conclusion)]; Act Three: 13¢ 33¢¢ [2¢ 49¢¢ (Prelude), 1¢ 18¢¢ (A Room in the Emperor’s Palace), 6¢ 59¢¢ (The Return of the Nightingale), 1¢ 09¢¢ (Solemn Procession), 1¢ 18¢¢ (The Recovery of the Emperor)].

 

Date of origin: The draft of the libretto is dated 3 April 1908. The earliest musical sketches were made in Ustilug between 29 November 1908 and 1 February 1909, and the rough version in sketch form was completed in Ustilug during the summer of 1909. The full score of Act I was completed in Ustilug in the autumn of 1909. A new scenario had been drafted by 27 March 1913 and was worked up into a new libretto between mid-May and December 1913. Act Two was completed after 4 November 1913, and Act Three probably not before early May 1914. (Strawinsky’s own date is 14/27 March 1914.) Acts Two and Three were written in Clarens and Leysin.

 

History of Origin: After it was established that the opera would be sung in Paris, London and Moscow (in Russian), Nicolas Struve organised a translation into French. A proposed translation into English fell through because the intended translator (Feiwel) worked too slowly in Struve’s opinion to complete the task by the deadline. A translation into German was not planned because, as he shared with Strawinsky in a letter dated 11th October, it would certainly not be beneficial to the later spread of the opera. Struve presumably gave up because the publisher had bad experiences with one-act operas that did not fill an entire evening. Le Rossignol was, strictly speaking, not an opera in 3 acts, but a one-act opera in 3 scenes that required an oversized, mammoth orchestra. This held the publishers enthusiasm within limits. The title pages of the original editions were printed in French-Russian (not Russian-French) so that the authorised original title, Le Rossignol, did not read Ñîëîâåé, whatever it may say on the autograph score. The French translation, as one would expect in the years before the First World War, was entrusted to the Marseille-born, polyglot journalist, music writer and translator of Greek origin, Michel-Dimitri Calvocoressi (his first names were always shortened to M. D., and to M. in his letters), who had developed himself into a notable and in-demand personality in Paris in the period before the War. With the outbreak of the War, he was forced to leave France due to his country of origin. He went to England, married an English woman and gained English citizenship, but did not gain in London (unlike he did in Paris) a significance befitting his achievements. Strawinsky corresponded with the Strawinsky enthusiast in a friendly manner, even warmly. Calvocoressi, who had mastered the Russian language, had already translated texts for Rimsky-Korsakov and Strawinsky, and was looking forward to working on Strawinsky’s opera with impatience, as a letter dated 16th October 1913 to Strawinsky demonstrates. Calvocoressi received the first act shortly afterwards, as he had stopped pressing further in the next letter, dated 5th November 1913. The publishers confirmed with Strawinsky in a letter from Struve dated 14th November, that they had delivered the copies of the first act to Calvocoressi. It can also be seen from the correspondence that he had in his possession the 2nd act by 16th January 1914 at the latest, and by this time had already translated the 1st scene (meaning the 1st act). He confirmed this in an undated letter that must have been written before 16th January because he is excited and impatient in a postscript for the 2nd act to be sent to him. He confirmed receipt of the latter on 16th January 1914. There is nothing in the correspondence about the delivery of the translation of the 2nd and 3rd acts, but it would not have taken the linguistic genius Calvocoressi much time; Struve however was not entirely satisfied with the translation. Calvocoressi had produced the translation quickly, but in Struve’s opinion, not well. There were errors remaining in it. Struve was especially annoyed about the incorrect title (Rossignol instead of Le Rossignol), which, for a Frenchman, should not have crept in, as Struve wrote to Strawinsky on 6th June 1914 after the premiere. Even in Germany, one would know the considerable difference between Rossignol and Le Rossignol. All the translations taken on later also brought about comments. For the English premiere in 1914 in the Drury Lane Theatre, a separate translation was produced and published, so not connected with the piano edition. It was written by Basil T. Timotheyev and Charles C. Hayne. For the London performance in 1919, a translation by Edward Agate was used. Both translations were not used later in the revised editions, but were swapped out for Robert Craft’s translation, which was protected by copyright. A German translation was produced by Elizabeth Weinhold; this was also not used for the revised editions, but was replaced by a translation by A. Elukhen and B. Feiwel.

 

First performances: The opera received its first performance in Russian on 26 May 1914 in Paris at the Salle Garnier (Opéra), with Pavel Andreyev (Emperor) and Yelena Nikoleva* (Cook) from St Petersburg’s Maryinsky Theatre, Aureliya Dobrovolskaya (Nightingale) from Moscow’s Bolshoi Theatre, and with Yelisaveta Petrenko (Death), Alexander Varfolomeyev (Fisherman), Alexandre Belyanin (Chamberlain), Nicolas Gulayev (Bonze), Elisabeth Mamsina, Basile Charonov and Fedor Ernst (Japanese Envoys), the Moscow Opera Chorus and Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. The sets and costumes were designed by Alexandre Benois,** the choreographer was Boris Romanov, the director Serge Grigoriev and the conductor Pierre Monteux. The work was performed as an opera-ballet, each role being allotted to both a singer and a dancer. The dancers performed on the stage, while the singers were placed in the pit. This arrangement was retained in both London in 1914 and in St Petersburg in 1918. Strawinsky’s transcription of the work for violin and piano was performed in the Salle Pleyel in Paris on 8 December 1932 with Samuel Dushkin (violin) and the composer himself on the piano.

* According to other sources it was Marie Brian.

** According to other sources it was Alexandre Benois and Alexander Sanin.

 

Staging: The practice of doubling the roles and dividing them between singers and dancers that was adopted for the first performances of Rimsky-Korsakov’s The Golden Cockerel in 1909 was retained for The Nightingale. While the singers were placed in the pit, members of the ballet danced and mimed onstage. Within the circles in which he moved, Boris Romanov was well known for his masterly handling of crowd scenes and shifted the focus of attention to the processions, which were bathed in a magical blue light. Benois’ principal design was praised for its avoidance of spurious chinoiserie, which was then fashionable throughout the whole of Europe: instead, it was said to have captured genuine aspects of Chinese culture in terms of their contours and colours and to have breathed theatrical life into them.

 

Remarks: In Strawinsky’s opinion, the opera is one of his contentious compositions that can only be played by a good orchestra. He therefore replaced the planned performance in 1969 in Zürich with a performance of “Histoire du soldat” because he did not trust the orchestra of the Zurich Opera to accomplish the task.Strawinsky completed what was to become the first act in the summer of 1909 as an independent, essentially lyrical work. At that date he still had no clear idea of how to develop the piece. The death scene in which, according to the original scenario, music would have triumphed over the transience of life, was not taken any further because in the meantime Strawinsky had been commissioned to write The Firebird, Petrushka and finally The Rite of Spring and was already working on Les Noces when he returned to the opera in response to a new commission. It seems likely that the work would never have been taken up again if the Moscow stage director Alexander Sanin had not approached Strawinsky on 17 February 1913 with what was virtually a cry for help for a three-act stage work for the Free Theatre, which Sanin’s well-known boss, Konstantin Mardzhanov, had recently founded. After brooding on the matter for a time, Strawinsky agreed to help and drafted a new scenario that essentially includes all the details found in the finished work. But the new company went bankrupt even before Strawinsky had completed the third act. Diaghilev was left as the only impresario who might produce the work, but even he found himself in difficulties over Strawinsky’s uncharacteristic slowness in completing the opera (a slowness that attests to the effort required to see the project through to completion) and threatened to abandon the production. The third act suffered a particularly painful birth and was not completed until shortly before the first night: the conductor, Pierre Monteux, is said not to have seen the score until thirteen days before the first performance on 26 May 1914. The version that was published in 1923 differs considerably from the original, differences that affect the instrumentation and that left deep traces on the instrumental textures. Strawinsky presumably undertook these changes in 1917 and 1919. The Song of the Nightingale that is based on material from the second and third acts of the opera is an independent symphonic poem that stands on its own both structurally and orchestrally and for which Strawinsky made a number of changes to the scenario.

 

Situationsgeschichte: The claim that Rimsky-Korsakov used fairy-tale subjects as a way of escaping from the socio-political reality of his own day is historically untenable. Quite the opposite, in fact: he used fairy-tale subjects as the best way of depicting the political situation that had arisen following the uprisings of 1905. His late fairy-tale operas, from The Tale of Tsar Sultan to The Golden Cockerel, pack a powerful political punch, deriving their negative models from tsarist (mis)rule. Even though Rimsky-Korsakov was merely one of many Russian intellectuals who were working towards a more liberal and humane political reappraisal of the tsarist claims to power, rather than the outright overthrow of the Romanovs, he exerted a powerful influence on students with fairy-tale operas that the censors found it hard to attack. There were good reasons for the temporary suspension of his professorship. At the same time, his exploration of the language of musical exoticism, which so impressed Strawinsky, was not the result of an exclusively Russian development in the history of music. Rather, it stretches far back into the history of nineteenth-century European music, especially that of Germany and France, when composers were beginning to break free from the prevailing understanding of major and minor scales and to develop new melodic models. Gregorian modes, historical and artificial scales and, finally, the attempt to supplant the academicism associated with traditional tonality by non-European, exotic modes resulted in the emergence of Impressionistic devices that go back for the most part to Liszt. By the beginning of the twentieth century, exoticism had become an all-embracing, European movement that no composer was willing to ignore. Rimsky-Korsakov was part of this tradition and so, even more, was Strawinsky, who was additionally receptive to Impressionism and hence to forms of expression of which Rimsky-Korsakov would never have dared to think.

 

Significance: Strawinsky’s original idea for The Nightingale was grounded in that of a substitute religion, as were his settings of Konstantin Balmont’s meaningless symbolic, ecstatic lines in Zvezdoliki and the notion of a mysterious sacrifice in The Rite, a sacrifice that Strawinsky preferred to depict as an action transported to some nebulous faraway country. His temporary decision to leave the church created a vacuum that had to be filled. Wagner and his successors had popularized the idea of overcoming life and with music as substitue for religion and when Strawinsky decided after a certain amount of hesitation to return to Andersen’s fairy tale, in which the theme of conflict had already been watered down, he used music to weaken this idea yet further. In making a clear break between life and art a new Strawinsky is announced.

 

Effect: The performance of the opera was, astonishingly enough, inconsequential, which cannot only be ascribed to the fact that the War broke out shortly afterwards. After the premiere in Paris, there was a further performance two days later on 28th May 1914. It was performed 4 times in total in London in the Drury Lane Theatre, this time under the baton of Emile Cooper, on 18th & 19th June and 14th & 23rd July 1914. Struve’s hope of finding a more sensitive and serious interest in the work in England than in France, entertained in a letter dated 16th June 1914, was shattered because in the latter place, it only provoked nice-sounding but empty words in reaction to it. In Russia, it was read differently. This was probably due to Diaghilev himself. He sent a telegram to Strawinsky in Salvan on 16th July 1914 after the last London performance, proclaiming the third and fourth performances a great success. He also expressed the hope that “Les Noces” would go the same way. The St. Petersburg newspaper wrote on 19th June (2nd July) 1914 that, on the back of the huge success in Paris and London, Strawinsky was planning an opera about ancient Rome, which could have been meant ironically or as the result of enthusiastic misunderstanding. Two years later, Diaghilev would demand from Strawinsky manifold changes in the opera, and especially ask him to remove boring parts. The perception of his contemporaries was similarly strangely divided. Long accustomed to thinking in groups and in schools, the music was too normal for those sympathetic to the uproar around Sacre, and they were annoyed by the comments made by opponents of the music of Sacre. The latter found the music of Le Rossignol heavenly in comparison to what Strawinsky had produced in his younger days, and this sort of understanding of Strawinsky suited each group as little as the other. A testimony for the confusion that Le Rossignol caused amongst the intellectual, modernist artistic programmers can be seen for example in the Rossignol manifest by a friend of Strawinsky, Futurist and former captain of the Italian Zouave regiment, Ricciotto Canudo. Canudo oversaw one of the many short-lived program sheets of the time, in which artistic theories were proposed and knocked down without proof, and wild, silver-tongued plays on words were made far from philosophical reality. His in places ironic and polemic article “Notre Esthétique . A propos du “Rossignol” d’Igor Strawinsky” was published on the 5th page of the last edition of the magazine “Montjoie” (No. 46, April-June 1914) and claimed that the opera bore witness to the entire flow of contemporary art which consisted of Cubism, Synchronism and Simultanism on the one side, and a nervous, prosodic arrhythmia on the other. The evident break in style on the part of Strawinsky was re– and misinterpreted as participation in the most various artistic trends of the time.

 

Versions: The vocal score went on sale on 16 June 1914 and was intended to be followed by a second edition within the course of that same summer. Both the cover and the title-page give the title only in French, not in Russian, this appears in capitals (ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ) only on the first page of the score. The French title was in fact garbled by the omission of the article, an omission that remained uncorrected for years, in spite of complaints from the composer. The score included a note of ownership but no copyright notice and above all no copyright date. The printing costs amounted to 4886.35 marks. By the end of 1920 the Russian publisher had sold a total of 113 copies. By the end of 1938 the total was around 450 copies. In May 1952 Boosey & Hawkes reprinted this edition, but with the inclusion of the definite article and the copyright. The conducting score was published in 1923, together with a set of parts for hire. The pocket score, which did not appear until 1962, was published in an attractive imitation leather binding of a kind that Boosey & Hawkes used for several of Strawinsky’s works at this time. The Russischer Musikverlag had earlier sought to popularize the piece by publishing two transcriptions, bringing out an edition of the Chinese March by Théodore Szánto in 1922 and following this up in 1923 with the Introduction, the Song of the Fisherman and the Song of the Nightingale. By 1938 Szánto’s transcription had sold almost 800 copies, the later transcription almost 400. Neither edition was reissued by Boosey & Hawkes, although the Song of the Nightingale was later taken over into the Russian reprint of Strawinsky’s songs that appeared in 1968. In 1934, Strawinsky collaborated with Samuel Dushkin on an alternative arrangement of the Chinese March and the Songs of the Nightingale. One of a series of violin transcriptions that he and Dushkin prepared, appeared in 1934: Strawinsky received his file copy in November. By 1938 barely 100 copies had been sold, hardly a signal success. Not until after 1960 was the work as a whole reprinted. A reprint of the full score and vocal score was planned for the middle of 1961, by which date the older editions and performing material must have been barely usable any longer. Although the almost eighty-year-old composer was pleased at the work’s reappearance, he expressed his bitterness in a letter written from Santa Fe to Ernest Roth on 28 July 1961 at the fact that no progress had been made on publishing a corrected pocket score of The Rake’s Progress. For a decade, he went on, musicians interested in the score had been waiting for such an edition, whereas the operas of younger composers – he refers specifically to Henze at this point – were immediately made available in pocket scores by their publishers – in this case Schott. Boosey reprinted the old vocal score in 1961, removing the Russian text and replacing it with a German translation. The pocket score, as revised by Strawinsky, appeared in 1962 in both an ordinary and an imitation leather binding. The parts were available for hire. The vocal score was republished in Russia in 1968. The symphonic poem Chant du Rossignol (Song of the Nightingale) is something of a special case among the various concert works drawn from existing stage works: it is not really an adaptation of the opera but a newly composed piece made up of elements drawn from the opera.

 

Historical recordings: 2931 December 1960, Washington, DC, sung in English, with Loren Driscoll (Fisherman), Reri Grist (Nightingale), Marina Picassi (Cook), Kenneth Smith (Chamberlain), Herbert Beattie (Bonze), Donald Gramm (Emperor), Elaine Bonazzi (Death), Stanley Kolk, William Murphy, Carl Kaiser (Japanese Envoys), Chorus (chorusmaster John Moriarty) and Orchestra of the Opera Society of Washington under the direction of Igor Strawinsky; 8 June 1933, Studio Albert, Paris, 1932 violin transcription of the Songs of the Nightingale and Chinese March with Samuel Dushkin (violin) and Igor Strawinsky (piano).

 

CD edition: VIII1/113 (Washington recording).

 

Autograph score: The autograph full score was originally with Boosey & Hawkes in New York, the autograph vocal score with Boosey & Hawkes in London. Both are now in the British Library in London.

 

Copyright: 1922 for the Szánto transcription; 1923 for the conducting score; 1924 for vocal excerpts; 1934 for the violin transcription; 1947 copyright transferred to Boosey & Hawkes in London; 1956 for Hawkes & Son’s English translation, 1961 for the German translation; 1962 for Hawkes & Son’s revised version.

 

Editions

a) Overview

181 1914 VoSc; R-F; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 93 pp.; R. M. V. 241.

                        181Straw ibd. [with annotations].

            181[14] [1914] VoSc; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 93 pp.; R.M.V. 241.

 

182 (1922) Piano; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 11 pp.; R.M.V. 346.

            182[26] [1926] ibd.

 

183Td (1923) Libretto German; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 20 pp.; R.M.V. 405.

184 [1923] VoSc; R-F; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 93 pp.; R.M.V. 241.

185 (1923) FuSc; R-F; Russischer Musikverlag Moskau-Berlin; 119 pp.; R.M.V. 158.

                        185Straw ibd. [with annotations].

186 (1924) Introduction, etc. Voice-Piano; R-F-G; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 17 pp.; R.M.V. 241a.

187 1934 Violin-Piano [Dushkin]; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 15 pp.; R. M. V. 583/584.

                        187Straw iIbd. [with annotations].

188 1941 Chant du Rossignol; Piano [Block]; Marks New York; 7 pp.; 115185; 11518.

189Alb 1941 Chant du Rossignol; Piano [Block]; Marks New York; 5 pp.; 115185.

1810 1952 VoSc; R-F; Russ. Musikverlag Berlin / Boos. & Hawk. London; 93 pp.; B. & H. 17187.

1811 1961 VoSc; F-E-G; Russischer Musikverlag / Boosey & Hawkes London; 97 pp.; 17187.

1812 1962 PoSc rev.; R-F-E-G; Edition Russe / Boos. & Hawk. London; 159 pp.; 18936; HPS 738.

1813 1962 FuSc; R-F-E-G; Edition Russe / Boosey & Hawkes London; 159 pp.; B. & H. 18936.

1814 1962 PoSc rev.; R-F-E-G; Edition Russe / Boos. & Hawkes London; 159 S.; 18936; HPS 738.

1814L 1962 Libretto; G.; Boosey & Hawkes London; HPS 738.

1815Alb 1968 Ïåñíÿ ñîëîâüÿ èç îïåðû „Ñîëîâåé“; Musyka Moskau; 4 pp.; 5823.

b) Characteristic features

181 IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CHANT ET PIANO / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUEBERLINMOSCOUST.PETERSBOURG // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI. / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / ÏÐÀÂÀ ÈÑÏÎËÍÅÍ²ß ÑÎÕÐÀÍßÞÒÑß. / ÑÎÁÑÒÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ / 1914 / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#*] ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#*] (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.**) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#*] BERLINMOSCOUST. PETERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /*** MAX ESCHIG PARIS / R. M. V. 241 // (Vocal score with chant [library binding] 27 x 34.2 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French; 93 [91] pages + 4 cover pages black on light grey [front cover title in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below movement title >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION< flush right centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservation without Copyright 1st page of the score between movement title and author specified flush left >Tous droits d’exécution réservés.< below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin. Moskau. St. Petersburg.< flush right >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; plate number >R. M. V. 241<; end of score dated p. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; production indication pp. 93 as end mark flush right >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H. Leipzig.<) // 1914

* Publisher’s emblem spanning three lines 0.9 x 1 sitting woman playing cymbalom.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

*** Slash original.

 

181Straw

Strawinsky’s copy contains annotations with pencil.

 

181[14] IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / [°] / CHANT ET PIANO / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUEBERLINMOSCOUST.PETERSBOURG // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI. / [°°] / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / [°°°] / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / ÏÐÀÂÀ ÈÑÏÎËÍÅÍ²ß ÑÎÕÐÀÍßÞÒÑß. / ÑÎÁÑÒÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#*] ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#*] (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.**) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#*] BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /*** MAX ESCHIG PARIS / R. M. V. 241 // (Vocal score with chant [sewn] 26.7 x 33.5 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French; 93 [91] pages + 4 cover pages black on light grey [front cover title in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below legal reservation flush right centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservations without Copyright 1st page of the score between movement title >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION.< and author specified flush left >Tous droits d’exécution réservés.< below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin. Moskau. St. Petersburg.< flush right >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; plate number >R. M. V. 241<; end of score dated p. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; production indication pp. 93 as end mark flush right >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H. Leipzig.<) // [1914]

° Dividing horizontal line of 2.4 cm.

°° Dividing horizontal line of 1.8 cm.

°°° The copy in what was formerly the Prussian State library in Berlin >DMS 188124< contains at this point flush right inside the decorative feather frame a round ø 2cm publisher’s stamp >Geschenk des Verlages< [>Gift of the publishers<].

* Publisher’s separating emblem spanning three lines 0.9 x 1 sitting woman playing cymbalom.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

*** Slash original.

 

182 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MARCHE CHINOISE / TIRÉE DU CONTE LYRIQUE / „ROSSIGNOL” / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO / PAR / THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / [°] / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW-YORK / POUR LA FRANCE ET SES COLONIES: MUSIQUE RUSSE, PARIS, 3 RUE DE MOSCOU / POUR L’ANGLETERRE ET SES COLONIES: THE RUSSIAN MUSIC AGENCY, LONDRES W. I, 34 PERCY STREET / [°°] // (Edition not sewn 26.5 x 33.6 (2° [4°]); 11 [10] pages creme without cover + 1 page front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame with publisher’s emblem 1 x 1.2 sitting woman playing cymbalom] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >LES ŒUVRES / D’IGOR STRAWINSKY<** production date >1<]; title head >Marche chinoise / tirée du conte lyrique / „Rossignol“<; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 above title head centre >Igor Strawinsky< [°°°] below title head flush right >Transcription par Théodore Szántó<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1922 by Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin.< flush right >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; plate number >R.M.V. 346<; production indication p. 11 flush right as end mark >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H., Leipzig.<) // (1922)

° Dividing horizontal line of 8.8 cm.

°° The (re-bound) copy in the then Prussian Library >DMS 193696< to Berlin contains underneath the titles on the inside right a round, red stamp ø 2cm >Geschenk des Verlages< [>Gift of the publishers<].

°°° Between the author’s/authors’/composer’s name and the title heading, there is a decorative, horizontal dividing line.

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

** Compositions are advertised laid out >PÉTROUCHKA (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / „TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA“. / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO-SOLO PAR L’AUTEUR / ROSSIGNOL (CONTE LYRIQUE) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / „MARCHE CHINOISE“. TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO-SOLO / [#] PAR THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / „CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL“. (POÈME SYMPHONIQUE) / PARTITION DE POCHE / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / [°] / TROIS PIÈCES POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / PARTITION DE POCHE / [°] / POUR CHANT ET PIANO:°° / DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE, FRANÇAIS, ANGLAIS ET ALLEMAND / TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE, FRANÇAIS ET ANGLAIS / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (SOUVENIR DE MON ENFANCE) / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE ET FRANÇAIS, RUSSE ET ANGLAIS / [°°°] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE< [° dividing (horizontal) 4 cm line; °° line centre; °°° dividing (horizontal) 5,7 cm line].

 

182[26] IGOR STRAWINSKY / MARCHE CHINOISE / TIRÉE DU CONTE LYRIQUE / „ROSSIGNOL” / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO / PAR THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / [vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.* / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES // (Edition [library binding] 26.6 x 33.2 (2° [4°]); 11 [10] pages + 1 page front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements in ornamental feather frame >LES ŒUVRES / D’IGOR STRAWINSKY<** production date >No. 3.<; title head >Marche chinoise / tirée du conte lyrique / „Rossignol“; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 above title head centre >Igor Strawinsky< below title head flush right >Transcription par Théodore Szántó<; legal reservation 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1922 by Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H. Berlin.< flush right >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; plate number >R. M. V. 346<; production indication p. 11 flush right as end mark >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G. m. b. H., Leipzig.< advertisements below frame centre >C. G. Röder G. m. b. H., Leipzig. 130126.<) // [1926]

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

** Compositions are advertised >MAVRA. Opéra en 1 acte — Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur / (avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand) / Ouverture pour piano solo — Air de la mère pour chant et piano / PÉTROUCHKA (Ballet) / Partition de poche — Réduction pour piano à quatre mains par l’auteur / TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA; Transcription pour piano solo par l’auteur / Suite de Pétrouchka, Transcription pour piano solo par TH. SZÁNTÓ / PULCINELLA (Ballet) / SUITE DE PULCINELLA pour petit orchestre — Partition de poche / rossignol (Conte lyrique) / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur / (textes russes et français) / Introduction, chant du pêcheur et Air du Rossignol pour chant et piano /tiré du I-er acte) / MARCHE CHINOISE, Transcription pour piano solo par TH. SZÁNTÓ / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL (Poème symphonique) — Partition de poche / Réduction pour piano à deux mains par J. LARMANJAT / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS, (Ballet) / Partition de poche — Réduction pour piano à quatre mains par l’auteur / SYMPHONIES D’INSTRUMENTS À VENT / Réduction pour piano solo par A. LOURIÉ / TROIS PIÈCES pour Quatuor à cordes / Partition de poche — Parties / OCTUOR pour instruments à vent / Partition de poche — Parties / Réduction pour piano à deux mains par A. LOURIÉ / SUITE pour Violon et piano d’après les thèmes, fragments et morceaux de / G. B. PERGOLESI / CONCERTO pour piano et orchestre d’harmonie / Réduction pour deux pianos à quatre mains par l’auteur / SÉRÉNADE en La pour piano solo / SONATE pour piano solo / SUR DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / Édition nouvelle avec textes russes, français, anglais et allemand / SUR TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / Édition nouvelle avec textes russe, français et anglais / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (Souvenir de mon enfance) / Édition nouvelle avac textes russe-francais° et russe-anglais [° = original spelling].

 

183Td Igor Strawinsky / Die Nachtigall / (ROSSIGNOL)* / [vignette] / Text-Buch / [°] / Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / DIE NACHTIGALL / (ROSSIGNOL)* / Lyrisches Märchen in drei Acten / von / I. STRAWINSKY und S. MITUSOFF / nach / ANDERSEN / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN und B. FEIWEL / Alle Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Eigentum des Verlages für alle Länder / RUSSISCHER [°°] MUSIKVERLAG / G. m. [°°] b. H. / Gegründet von S. und N. Kussewitzky / BERLINLEIPZIG / LONDON, MOSKAU, NEW-YORK, PARIS, BRÜSSEL, BARCELONA, MADRID / R. M. V. 405 // (Libretto German octavo format; 20 pages + 4 cover pages [front cover title in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 4 pages front matter [title page, empty page, index of roles >Personen< German, empty page] without back matter; plate number [only title page] >R. M. V. 405<; production indication as ende mark p. 20 centre >„Der Reichsbote“ G. m. b. H., Berlin SW 11.<) // (1923)

° Dividing horizontal line centrally thickening

°° Publisher’s emblem spanning more than two lines sitting women playing cimbalom.

* Original mistake in the title.

 

184 IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / [°] / CHANT ET PIANO / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / MOSCOU, BERLIN, LEIPZIG, PARIS, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, / MADRID, BARCELONA, NEW-YORK. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI / [°°] / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE [vignette] RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.* / (FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY.) / MOSCOU. BERLIN. LEIPZIG. PARIS. LONDRES. / BRUXELLES. MADRID. BARCELONA. NEW-YORK. // (Vocal score with chant 26.3 x 32.8 (2° [4°]); 93 [91] pages + 4 cover pages black on light brown-grey [front cover title in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame with vignette 0,9 x 1 publisher’s emblem sitting woman playing cymbalom, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; sung text Russian-French; title head >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below legal reservation flush right centred >Èãîü Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservations without Copyright 1st page of the score between movement title >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION.< and author specified flush left >Tous droits d’exécution réservés.< below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin. Moskau. St. Petersburg.< flush right >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; plate number >R.M.V. 241<; end of score dated p. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; production indication p. 93 flush right as end mark >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H. Leipzig; // [1923***]

° Dividing horizontal line of 2.4 cm.

°° Dividing horizontal line of 1.8 cm.

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the underlined G. and M.

** 1914 according to Catalogue >Preußische Staatsbibliothek Berlin<; from the title pages, it can be seen that it is a subsequent edition and not the first edition of the piano reduction, and it can be placed considerably later chronologically

 

185 IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / [°] / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / MOSCOU, BERLIN, LEIPZIG, PARIS, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, / MADRID, BARCELONA, NEW-YORK. [*] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / [°°] / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÈSERVÈS. / Edition russe de musique [vignette] Russischer MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.** / (FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY.) / MOSCOU. BERLIN. LEIPZIG. PARIS. LONDRES. / BRUXELLES. MADRID. BARCELONA. NEW-YORK. [*] // (Full score [library binding] 26.5 x 33 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French-German; 119 [117] pages + 4 cover pages black on light grey [front cover title black on light grey in ornamental feather frame, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page in ornamental feather frame with publisher’s emblem 1 x 1.2 sitting woman playing cymbalom, legend >NOMENCLATURE DES INSTRUMENTS< Italian + index of rols >Ï€ÍRÅ | PERSONNAGES: | PERSONEN:< Russian-French-German] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. / Ä€ÉÑÒÂIÅ ÏÅÐÂÎÅ. / ÂÑÒÓÏËÅÍIÅ. / LE ROSSIGNOL. | DIE NACHTIGALL. / PREMIÈRE ACTE. | ERSTER AKT. / INTRODUCTION. | EINLEITUNG.; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to 2nd line title head flush left >Edited by F. M. Schneider<; legal reservations 1st page of the score above type area below fictitious editor specified between 2nd and 3rd line title head flush left >Tous droits d’exécution reserves.< below type area flush left >Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H., Berlin, Leipzig. / Edition Russe de Musique / Copyright 1923 by Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin.< flush right >Propriété de l’Éditeur pour tous pays.<; plate number >R. M. V. 158<; without end mark) (1923)

Exemplar<.

° Dividing horizontal line of 2.4 cm.

°° Dividing horizontal line of 1.8 cm.

* There is a blue stamp >Unverkäufliches / Exemplar< [>Unsaleable copy<] above the decorative feather frame of the outer and inner title in the Berlin copy >DMS 207741< centrally formatted and in the centre, and on p. 3 between the title heading and the page number centred.

** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the underlined G. and M.

 

185Straw

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate is dated Biarritz 12th September 1923. He used it as a copy for making his corrections and contains the annotation >Revised score by / composer / from which new score is / engraved / April 1962 / aso in 1th + 2nd proofe)<.

 

186 IGOR STRAWINSKY / LE / ROSSIGNOL / INTRODUCTION, / CHANT DU PÊCHEUR ET AIR DU ROSSIGNOL / DU Ier ACTE / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE [vignette] Russischer MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.* / (FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY.) / MOSCOU. BERLIN. LEIPZIG. LONDRES. / BRUXELLES. MADRID. BARCELONA. NEW-YORK. / PARIS / 22. rue ‘d** Anjou 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES EDITION MUSICALES // (Edition [library binding] 26.5 x 33.5 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French-German 17 [15] pages + 2 pages front matter [title page without feather frame black on creme-white*** with publisher’s emblem 1 x 1,2 sitting woman playing cymbalom, empty page] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >LES ŒUVRES d’IGOR STRAWINSKY<**** production date >No 2.<]; title head >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅÍ, [#] Introduction, / Ï€ÑÍß ÐÛÁÀÊÀ È ÀÐIß [#] Chant du Pêcheur et Air du / ÑÎËÎÂÜß. [#] Rossignol.<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right centred >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; fictitious editor specified 1st page of the score next to and above author specified flush left >Edited and revised by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; translator specified 1st page of the score above type area flush left >Traduction française de M. P. Calvocoressi.< legal reservations 1st page of the score next to 3. line title head flush left centred italic >Tous droits d’exécution / réservés.< below type area flush left >Copyright 1924 by Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H., Berlin (Edition Russe de Musique). / Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H., Berlin.< flush right >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; plate number >R. M. V. 241 241a [S. 17: R. M. V. 241a]; without end mark) // (1924)

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the underlined G. and M.

** Misprint original

*** Cream beige; only the 1st and last pages of the edition.

**** Compositions are advertised laid out >PÉTROUCHKA (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO SOLO PAR L’AUTEUR / ROSSIGNOL (CONTE LYRIQUE) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / [#] (textes russe et français) / INTRODUCTION, CHANT DU PÊCHEUR et AIR DU ROSSIGNOL / [#] tirés du Ier acte). / MARCHE CHINOISE, TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO SOLO / [#] PAR THÉODORE SZANTO° / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL (POÈME SYMPHONIQUE) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A DEUX MAINS PAR J. LARMANJAT / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPTS (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / TROIS PIÈCES POUR QUATUOR A CORDES / PARTIES / PARTITION DE POCHE / OCTUOR POUR INSTRUMENTSVENT / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A DEUX MAINS PAR A. LOURIÉ / CONCERTO pour Piano et Orchestre d’Harmonie°° / RÉDUCTION POUR DEUX PIANOS A 4 MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / MAVRA OPÉRA EN 1 ACTE / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / (avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand) / sur DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand. / sur TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe, français et anglais. / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (Souvenir de mon enfance) / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe et français, russe et anglais.< [° original spelling; °° ].

 

187 IGOR STRAWINSKY / AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL / et / MARCHE CHINOISE / Transcription* / pour violon et piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL / et / MARCHE CHINOISE / pour violon et piano / Prix RM. 4.= / Frs. 4.= [**] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL / et / MARCHE CHINOISE / pour violon et piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / Russischer MUSIKVERLAG (G.M.B.H.***) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEVITZKY / BERLIN · LEIPZIG · PARIS · MOSCOU · LONDRES · NEW YORK ·BUENOS AIRES / [°] / S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXIV // (Edition violin and piano [library binding] 26.6 x 33.8 (2° [4°]); 15 [14] pages + 4 cover pages thicker paper red on light orange [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 1 page front matter [title page] + 1 page back matter [empty page] + 6 [5] pages violin part sewn [empty page, 1st page of the score paginated p. 2 with score in identical text and layout + name of the instrument above type area centre >Violon< p. 3 without end mark, p. 4 with score in identical text and layout + name of the instrument >Violon<, p. 6 without end mark, 2 pages back matter = empty pages]; title head [p. 2:] >AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL< [p. 8:] >MARCHE CHINOISE<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 2, p. 8 below title head flush right >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush left centred >Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / 1932<; legal reservation pp. 2 + 8 below type area flush left centred >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays. / Edition Russe de Musique / Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin< flush right centred >Copyright 1934 by Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H. Berlin. / Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction et / d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays.<; plate numbers >R. M. V. 583< [Airs: score pp. 27, part pp. 23], >R. M. V. 584< [Marche: schore pp. 815, part pp. 46]; production indications p. 15 below type area flush left >S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris.< pp. 7 + 15 flush right as end mark >GRANDJEAN GRAV<) // (1934)

° Dividing horizontal line of 1.8 cm.

* Only front cover title, missing title page front matter.

** The London copy, which was bought on 15st July 1978, has a blue stamp >INCREASED PRICE / 5/- / BOOSEY & HAWKES LTD.<. at this place.

*** G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

 

187Straw

Strawinsky’s copy of his estate is rebound (score) and sewn (violin part) and on the front cover page below >IGOR STRAWINSKY< flush right with >IStr nov/°34< [° slash original] signed and dated.The copy contains corrections.

 

188 No. 11518 / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL / From “ROSSIGNOL” / [#*] For / [#*] PIANO SOLO / [#*] by / [#*] IGOR STRAVINSKY / Price 50c net / EDWARD B. MARKS MUSIC COPRPORATION / RCA Building · Radio City / NEW YORK / PRINTED IN U. S. A. // (Edition [library binding] 23.3 x 30.4 (4° [4°]); 7 [5] pages + 4 cover pages [ornamental front cover page in wine-red with two ornamental text frames decorated with bows on the left of the page 18 x 9,5 (16) + 10 (11) x 3 (3,9), gold on a wine-red background 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >FAMOUS COMPOSITIONS FOR PIANO SOLO / By / IGOR STRAVINSKY<**] without front matter + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >KALEIDOSCOPE [vignette***] EDITION / A NEW SERIES OF MUSIC FOR PIANO BY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSERS / PART ONE<**** without production date]; title head >CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL / From “ROSSIGNOL”; authors specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 below title head flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY< flush left italic >Arranged by / FREDERICK BLOCK<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area centre >Copyright MCMXLI by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation. / [inside left] All Rights Reserved.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below 1. line legal reservation inside right >Printed in U. S. A.<; plate number >115185<; without end mark) // (1941)

* On the left side of the page, the publisher’s emblem spanning four to five lines 1.9 x 3.1 (in a semicircular arch in a four-line system running in left and out flush right:] >KALEIDOSCOPE< / [vignette 1.4 x 2.1 Pianist at a grand piano with a raised lid] / [a standard sentence in a five-line system running in left and out flush right:] >EDITION<.

** Advertised are 17 pieces with edition numbers, and prices behind fill character (dotted line) >11507 CHEZ PETROUSHKA from “Petrouska” $ .60 / 11508 DANSE DE LA FOIRE from “Petroushka” .60 / 10619 DANSE RUSSE from “Petroushka” .60 / 11510 DANSE DES ADOLESCENTS from “Sacre du Printemps” .50 / 11509 Ronde Pritaniere “Sacre du Printemps” .50 / 11506 Tourneys of the rival TRIBES“Sacre du Printemps” .50 / 11504 DEVILS DANCE from “Tale of the Soldier” (Histoire du Soldat) .50 / 11516 BERCEUSE AND FINALE from “Firebird” (Oiseau de Feu) .50 / 11517 DANSE INFERNALE from “Firebird” .75 / 11534 RONDE DES PRINCESSES from “Firebird” .60 / 11503 SCHERZO from “Firebird” .50 / 11514 SUPPLICATION from “Firebird” .60 / 11502 MARCHE CHINOISE from “Chant du Rossignol” .75 / 11518 CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL from “Rossignol” .50 / 11515 PASTORALE .50 / 11505 NAPOLITANA from “Suite of 5 Pieces” .50 / 10342 ETUDE Op. 7, No. 4 (F# Major) .60<.

*** A pianist at a grand piano with the lid raised.

**** Compositions are advertised from >I. Albeniz< to >E. Lecuona<, Strawinsky not mentioned.

 

189Alb >CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL / From “ROSSIGNOL“< // ([in:] CONTEMPORARY MASTERPIECES · ALBUM No. 9 / ALBUM OF / IGOR STRAVINSKY / MASTERPIECES / [Porträt] / SELECTED COMPOSITIONS for PIANO SOLO / PRICE $1.00 NET / MADE / IN U.S.A. / EDWARD B. MARKS MUSIC CORPORATION · RCA BLDG. · RADIO CITY · NEW YORK; 87 [85] pages + 4 cover pages black light–orange on creme [front cover title with portrait photo Strawinsky facing left, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s advertisements >ALBUMS OF CONTEMPORARY MASTERPIECES<* without production date] + 1 page back matter [page with publisher’s advertisements >KALEIDOSCOPE EDITION / A NEW SERIES FOR PIANO BY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSERS<** without production date) // Album (5 pp. [pp. 3640], arranger specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 36 below title head flush left centred italic >Arranged by / Frederick Block<; author specified below arranger specified flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; legal reservation with production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre >Copyright MCMXLI by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation. / All Rights reserved. [#] Printed in U. S. A.<; plate number >115185<; without end marks) // 1941

* 6 Albums are advertised (Albeniz, Debussy, Dohnányi, Rachmaninoff, Ravel, Scriabine).

** Compositions are advertised under the heading >PART ONE< by Albeniz, Borodin, Bortkiewitz, Chabrier, Chavarri, Debussy, Dohnanyi, Dukas, Enescu, de Falla, Faure, Granados. Gliere, Holmes, Ippolitow-Iwanow, Juon, Lareglia, Lecuosa.

 

1810 igor strawinsky / le rossignol / chant et piano / édition russe de musique · boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Le Rossignol / Conte lyrique en Trois Actes / de / I. Strawinsky et S. Mitousoff / d’aprés° Andersen / Traduction francais° de / M. D. Calvocoressi / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur / Edition Russe de Musique (S. & N. Koussewitzky) · Boosey & Hawkes / London · New York · Toronto · Sydney · Capetown · Buenos Aires · Paris · Bonn // (Vocal score with chant sewn 23.4 x 30.9 (2° [4°]); sung text Russian-French; 93 [91] pages + 4 cover pages tomato red auf grüngrey [front cover title, 2 empty pages, page with publisher’s >Édition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< advertisements >Igor Strawinsky<* production date >No. 453] + 2 pages front matter [title page, page with legal reservations centre centred >Copyright by Édition Russe de Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) / for all countries / Copyright by arrangement, Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. < / [#] / justified text italic >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical repro– / duction in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, / of the complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved<] + 3 pages back matter [page with publisher’s >Édition A. Gutheil / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< advertisements** >Serge Rachmaninoff< production date >No. 461<, page with publisher’s >Édition A. Gutheil / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< advertisements** >Serge Rachmaninoff< production date >No. 527< [#] >3.49<, page with publisher’s >Édition A. Gutheil / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< advertisements** >Serge Prokofieff< production date >454<]; title head >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated page 3 below movement title >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅÍ. [#] INTRODUCTION. < flush right centred >Èãîü Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright by Édition Russe de Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) for all countries. / Printed by arrangement, Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A.< flush right >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area below legal reservation flush right >Printed in England.<; plate number: B. & H. 17187; end of score dated p. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; end number pp. 93 flush left >5. 52. E<) // (1952)

° Original spelling.

* In French, compositions are advertised in two columns without edition numbers and without price information editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge with Frenchen Titeln without Editionsnummern und without Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* different spelling original; ° centre centred; °° original spelling]. The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires<.

** The following places of printing are listed: London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Capetown-Buenos Aires-Paris.

 

1812 [intricate Strawinsky’s monogram] I S [gold tooling 2.0 x 4.0] // Igor Stravinsky / Le Rossignol / The Nightingale [#] Die Nachtigall / Conte lyrique en trois actes / de / I. Stravinsky et S. Mitousoff / d’après Andersen / Traduction française de M. D. Calvocoressi / English translation by Robert Craft / Deutsche Abovetragung von A. Elukhen und B. Feiwel / HPS 738 / Édition Russe de Musique (S. & N. Koussewitzky) · Boosey & Hawkes // (Pocket score bound 1.7 x 18.3 x 26.7 1.7 x 19 x 27.3 ([Lex. 8°]); texts Russian-French-German-English; 159 [159] pages + 4 pages imitation leather dark blue with text on spine gold tooling >STRAVINSKY LE ROSSIGNOL< [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 4 pages front matter with binding sides [title page, page with legal reservations centre centred >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< centre centred italic >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form whatsoever / (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<; index of rols French-English-German, legend >Orchestra< Italian + duration data [45’] French] + 1 page back matter with binding sides [empty page]; title head >LE ROSSIGNOL / THE NIGHTINGALE [#] DIE NACHTIGALL / ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ<; author specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 below movement title >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION< flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; legal reservations >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 18936<; without end mark) // (1962)

 

1814 Igor Stravinsky / Le Rossignol* / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Le Rossignol / The Nightingale [#] Die Nachtigall / Conte lyrique en trois actes / de / I. Stravinsky et S. Mitousoff / d’après Andersen / Traduction française de M. D. Calvocoressi / English translation by Robert Craft / Deutsche Abovetragung von A. Elukhen und B. Feiwel / HPS 738 / Édition Russe de Musique (S. & N. Koussewitzky) ·Boosey & Hawkes // (Pocket score [library binding] 17.7 x 26 ([Lex. 8°]); text Russian-French-English-German; 159 [159] pages + 4 cover pages black-white on beige + 4 pages front matter [title page, page with legal reservations partly in italics >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form whatsoever / (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<; index of rols French-English-German, legend Italian + duration data [45’] French] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; title head >[#] Le Rossignol [#] / The Nightingale [#] Die Nachtigall / [#] ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ [#]; author specified 1st page of the score unpaginated [p. 1] next to movement title >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION< flush right >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; legal reservations 1st page of the score below type area flush left >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (RUSSISCHER Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< flush right >All rights reserved<; production indication 1st page of the score below type area centre inside right >Printed in England<; plate number >B. & H. 18936<; without end mark) // (1962)

* Printed in white.

 

1814L 1962 Libretto; German; Boosey & Hawkes London; HPS 738.

 

1815Alb 1968 Ïåñíÿ ñîëîâüÿ èç îïåðû „Ñîëîâåé“; Verlag Musyka Moskau; in: ÈÇÁÐÀÍÍÛÅ ÂÎÊÀËÜÍÛÅ ÑÎ×ÈÍÅÍÈß äëÿ ãîëîñà ñ ôîðòåïèàíî; 54 pp. 27,7 x 28,8 (4° [Lex. 8°]); Pl.-Nr. 5823; pp. 3134

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

L e*  R o s s i g n o l**

Conte lyrique en trois actes de Igor Strawinsky et S. Mitousoff d’après Andersen*** – Ñîëîâåé.Die Nachtigall. Lyrische Erzählung in drei Akten nach einem Märchen von Hans Christian Andersen von Igor Strawinsky und Stepan Mitussow – The Nightingale. Musical fairy tale in three acts after the story by Hans Andersen – L’Usignuolo. Racconto lirica in tre atti di Strawinsky e S. Mitousoff, da una fiaba di Andersen

* Schreibweise ohne Artikel beruht auf einem Übersetzungsfehler Calvocoressis.

** Majuskelschreibung des Anfangsbuchstabens ist original.

*** das Autograph schreibt russisch; der Erstdruck enthält nur eine französische, keine russische Titelangabe, schreibt aber den Singtext erstrangig russisch, zweitrangig französisch.

 

 

Besetzung: a) Rollen: Nachtigall (Sopran), Köchin (Sopran), Fischer (Tenor), Kaiser von China (Bariton), Kammerherr (Baß), Bonze (Baß), Tod (Alt°), drei japanische Gesandte (2 Tenöre, Baß), Hofleute – Chöre: Frauenchor, Männerchor, gemischter Chor – Orchester (Erstausgabe): Piccolo Flauto, 2 Flauti grandi, 2 Oboi, Corno inglese, 3 clarinetti (3° anche cl. basso), 2 fagotti, Contrafagotto (anche fag. 3°), 4 corni, 4 trombe, 3 tromboni, Tuba, Timpani, Batteria (Piatti, Tamburo militare, Triangolo, Gran cassa, Piatti antichi, Campanelle I e II, Tamburino, Tam-tam), Pianoforte, Celesta, 2 Arpe, Chatarra ad. lib., Mandolino ad. lib., Archi [Piccolo Flöte, 2 Flöten, 2 Oboen, 3 Klarinetten (3. auch Baßklarinette), 2 Fagotte, Kontrafagott (auch Fag. 3), 4 Hörner, 4 Trompeten, 3 Posaunen, Tuba, Pauken, Schlagzeug (Becken, Militärtrommel, Triangel, Große Trommel, Tamburin, Cymbales antiques, Glockenspiel I und II, Tam-tam), Klavier, Celesta, 2 Harfen, Gitarre ad libitum, Mandoline ad libitum, Streicher]; b) Aufführungsanforderungen: 2 Solo-Soprane, 1 Solo-Alt, 3 Solo-Tenöre, 1 Solo-Bariton, 3 Solo-Bässe, Chor ad libitum (8 Soprane, 8 Alte), [vierstimmiger] Männerchor (Tenor– und Baßstimmen zweifach geteilt), [zwölfstimmiger] gemischter Doppel-Chor aus zwei [sechstimmigen] Chören (Sopran-, Alt-, Tenorstimmen zweifach geteilt), vierstimmig gemischter Chor (Sopran, Alt, Tenor, Baß); kleine Flöte, 2 große Flöten, 2 Oboen, Englischhorn, kleine Klarinette in D (= 2. Klarinette), 3 Klarinetten in B und A (2. Klarinette = kleine Klarinette in D, 3. Klarinette = Baßklarinette), Baßklarinette in B (= 3. Klarinette), 3 Fagotte (3. Fagott = Kontrafagott), Kontrafagott (= 3. Fagott), 4 Hörner in F, kleine Trompete in D und Es (= 3. Trompete), 4 Trompeten in A (1./2. Trompete = Trompeten in A und B, 3. Trompete = Trompete in A und B und = kleine Trompete in D und Es, 4. Trompete = Trompete in A und C), 3 Posaunen, Tuba, Pauken, Schlagzeug* (2 Glockenspiele, Cymbals antiques, Tamburine, kleine Trommel, große Trommel, Triangel, Becken, aufgehängtes Becken, Tamtam), Klavier, Celesta, 2 Harfen, Gitarre ad libitum, Mandoline ad libitum, 4 Solo-Violinen, 3 Solo-Bratschen, 4 Solo-Violoncelli, Streicher (Erste Violinen**, Zweite Violinen**, Bratschen**, Violoncelli***, Kontrabässe****)

° Nach russischem Sprachverständnis ist der Tod weiblicher Natur [Tödin].

* 5 Spieler.

** vierfach geteilt.

*** achtfach geteilt.

**** zweifach geteilt.

 

Fachpartien: Nachtigall: lyrischer Koloratursopran mit Herz und brillanter Technik, Umfang es1 bis f3; Köchin: parlandogewandte Soubrette, Umfang f1 bis a2; Fischer: lyrischer Tenor mit geschmeidiger Höhe, Umfang e bis a1; Kaiser: lyrischer bis Charakterbariton, Umfang A bis es1; Kammerherr: je nach Regiekonzept Charakterbaß oder Baßbuffo, Umfang Fis bis dis1; Bonze: Baßbuffo, Umfang F bis c1; Tod: lyrischer Alt, Umfang as bis d2.

 

Aufführungspraxis: Nach Vorschrift erklingt die Stimme der Nachtigall vom Orchestergraben aus.

 

Inhalt: Erster Akt: Ein Fischer in seinem Boot singt sein Lied und sehnt sich nach dem Gesang einer Nachtigall, der jede Nacht um dieselbe Zeit zu hören ist. Die Stimme der Nachtigall erklingt. Sie richtet ihr Lied an die Rosen, die erwachen sollen, aber noch vom drückenden Tau betrübt zu sein und heimliche Tränen zu weinen scheinen. Auf der Suche nach der Nachtigall sieht man den Kammerherrn, den Bonzen, Höflinge und die Köchin. Sie sollen der Nachtigall eine Einladung überbringen, vor dem Kaiser zu singen. Zuerst halten sie bewundernd und entzückt das Brüllen von des Fischers Kalb, dann das Quaken der Frösche für den Gesang der Nachtigall, die sie nicht kennen und noch nie gesehen haben. Jedesmal klärt sie die Köchin über ihren Irrtum auf. Dann hören sie endlich die wirkliche Nachtigall und laden sie ein, vor dem Kaiser zu singen. Die Nachtigall ist einverstanden und will in den Palast kommen, obwohl es sich im grünen Wald viel schöner singen lasse. Die Boten sind sehr zufrieden, weil sie Prügel erhalten hätten, wenn sie erfolglos heimgekommen wären. Der Fischer beendet sein Lied. — Zweiter Akt: Der zweite Akt beginnt mit einem Luftzug genannten Zwischenspiel. Die eigentliche Bühne ist durch Tüllvorhänge verdeckt. Unter Hofschranzengeschwätz wird alles für den Nachtigallenauftritt hergerichtet. Die Köchin ist eine wichtige Person geworden, weil sie die Nachtigall gekannt hat und den anderen zu deren Erstaunen von der bescheidenen Erscheinungsweise des Vögelchens berichten kann. Jetzt heben sich die Tüllvorhänge und geben den Blick auf den prächtigen Porzellan-Palast frei, dessen Besitzer, der Kaiser von China, feierlich unter den Klängen des Chinesischen Marsches hereingetragen wird. Die Nachtigall sitzt bereits auf einer langen Stange und beginnt auf ein Zeichen des Kaisers mit ihrem Gesang (Lied der Nachtigall). Sie rührt den Kaiser zu Tränen, der ihr als Dank den Pantoffel in Gold verleihen will. Die Nachtigall lehnt ab; die Tränen des Kaisers sind ihr Dank genug. Die Hofdamen beginnen, die Triller der Nachtigall nachzuahmen, indem sie den Mund mit Wasser füllen und mit zurückgeworfenem Kopf zu trillern versuchen. Die Höflinge finden das entzückend. Drei japanische Gesandte kommen und überbringen als Geschenk eine mechanische Nachtigall als bescheidenes Abbild der lebenden. Die echte Nachtigall fliegt daraufhin unbemerkt davon. Die mechanische Nachtigall wird aufgezogen und beginnt zu spielen; doch der Kaiser beendet nach einer Weile mit einer Handbewegung das künstliche Spiel. Er will die echte Nachtigall hören. Als er sie nicht mehr sieht, ist er bestürzt und verbannt sie empört aus seinem Reich, während die künstliche Nachtigall in sein Schlafgemach getragen und einen Platz an seiner (linken) Ehrenseite erhalten soll. — Dritter Akt: Der dritte Akt spielt nächtens im vom Mondschein beschienenen Schlafgemach des sterbenden Kaisers, der in einem großen Bett liegt, an dessen Kopfende der Tod zu sehen ist. Er trägt des Kaisers Krone, Säbel und Fahne. Nach einem Vorspiel hört der Kaiser Geisterstimmen, die ihm seinen bevorstehenden Tod verkünden. Der Kaiser ruft nach seinen Musikern, die die Stimmen übertönen sollen. Sie kommen nicht, wohl aber kehrt die Nachtigall zurück und beginnt vom Zauber der Gärten, von Himmelsglanz und Blumenduft zu singen. Sie singt so schön, daß sie der Tod selbst bittet, weiterzusingen. Sie ist einverstanden, wenn der Tod dem Kaiser die Krone und damit das Leben zurückgibt. Der Tod willfahrt ihr. Die Nachtigall singt weiter und der Tod verläßt des Kaisers Schlafgemach. Wieder will sie der Kaiser zur Belohnung mit den höchsten Würden ausstatten, und wieder lehnt sie ab. Aber sie wird jede Nacht zum Kaiser zurückkommen und von der Nacht an bis in den Morgen hinein für ihn singen. Mit einem zeremoniellen Marsch suchen die Höflinge das Schlafgemach des Kaisers auf, den sie für tot halten. Doch der steht im Galakleid im hellen Sonnenschein lebend vor ihnen und begrüßt sie. Die Höflinge fallen zur Erde nieder. Von draußen hört man die Stimme des Fischers. Mit seinem Gruß an die Nachtigall schließen Akt und Oper.

 

Vorlage: Strawinskys Opernvorlage war das Märchen Nattergalen (Die Nachtigall) von Hans Christian Andersen, das 1843 entstand. Andersen schildert darin die Auseinandersetzung zwischen Natur (Nachtigall) und Künstlichkeit (Mechanische Nachtigall) im Umfeld einer Auseinandersetzung zwischen lebensverbundener Realität und biedermeierlicher Beschränktheit. Etliche Erzählsequenzen sind autobiographisch zu deuten, weil die Nachtigall, wie Andersen, im eigenen Land erst durch Berichte in fremden Ländern anerkannt wird. Unter dramaturgischen Gesichtspunkten war der Stoff in besonderem Maße opernfähig, weil es die durch die Nachtigall dargestellte Musik selbst ist, die im Mittelpunkt steht und von der die Handlungsbewegung ausgeht. Strawinsky und Mitussow haben das Szenarium entsprechend zugerüstet und bereiten den ersten Nachtigallenauftritt handwerksgerecht mit dem Fischerauftritt vor. Strawinsky hat sich das Andersensche Märchen mit Sicherheit wegen der Möglichkeiten exotischer Farbenvielfalt und der ersatzreligiös auszulegenden Thematik, weniger wegen der abgründigen Auseinandersetzung zwischen Natürlichkeit und Künstlichkeit ausgesucht, die von den beiden Autoren nicht nur überspielt, sondern umgedeutet wurde, obwohl Strawinsky, wie der Briefwechsel mit Sanin beweist, das Zentralthema Andersens als Auseinandersetzung zwischen der lebenden und der artifiziellen Nachtigall richtig gesehen hat. Strawinskys Oper besteht, wie es auch der Titel sagt, aus lyrischen, nicht aus dramatischen Szenen. Das früheste Szenarium enthält nicht einmal eine Andeutung des Andersenschen Konfliktes. Da ist nur vom Fischer die Rede, der nach klassischer Art als Introduktion die Nachtigall mit seinem Lied als etwas ganz Besonderes ankündigt, vom Gesang des Tierchens vor dem Kaiser, dem Tränen entlockt werden, und in einer zweiten Szene vom bevorstehenden Tod des Kaisers, den der Gesang der Nachtigall verhindert. Strawinsky vertonte ein Beispiel für die Macht der Musik, die noch den Tod besiegt; Andersen dichtete ein Beispiel für die niedrige Kulturstufe der modisch reagierenden Menge, die das Unechte und Unwahre mehr als das Echte und Wahre liebt, während erst an der letzten menschlichen Lebensgrenze nur noch das Echte als das Wahre von Bestand ist. Während der Porzellanpalast für Strawinsky Schilderungsmotiv ist, ist er für Andersen das Symbol einer künstlich-unnatürlichen Welt, die sich in der artifiziellen Nachtigall offenbart.

Strawinsky hat sich das Andersensche Märchen mit Sicherheit wegen der Möglichkeiten exotischer Farbenvielfalt und der ersatzreligiös auszulegenden Thematik, weniger wegen der abgründigen Auseinandersetzung zwischen Natürlichkeit und Künstlichkeit ausgesucht, die von den beiden Autoren nicht nur überspielt, sondern umgedeutet wurde; obwohl Strawinsky, wie der Briefwechsel mit Sanine bezeugt, das Zentralthema Andersens als Auseinandersetzung zwischen der lebenden und der künstlichen Nachtigall richtig gesehen hat. Strawinskys Oper besteht, wie auch der Titel sagt, aus lyrischen, nicht aus dramatischen Szenen. Das früheste Szenarium hat sich erhalten und wurde von Craft veröffentlicht. Es enthält nicht einmal eine Andeutung des Andersenschen Konfliktes. Es ist nur von einem Fischer die Rede, der nach klassischer Art als Introduktion die Nachtigall mit ihrem Lied als etwas ganz besonderes ankündigt, vom Gesang des Tierchens vor dem Kaiser, dem Tränen entlockt werden, und in einer zweiten Szene vom bevorstehenden Tod des Kaisers, den der Gesang der Nachtigall verhindert. Der Andersen-Konflikt ist ausschließlich zugunsten eines Beispiels für die Macht der Musik, die noch den Tod besiegt, ausgemerzt worden. Andersen wollte aber nicht den Sieg der Musik über den Tod zeigen, sondern ein Beispiel dafür geben, daß in den letzten menschlichen Lebensgrenzen nur noch das Echte als das Wahre von Belang ist. Der Andersensche Kaiser verfällt ebenso wie sein Hof zunächst der Magie der Künstlichkeit. Man plappert und schwätzt dümmlich vor sich hin. Andersen widmet diesem Bild fast ein Viertel seiner Erzählung. Mehr noch, der Kultus der Künstlichkeit führt zu völligem Wertverlust. Bis Kaiser, Hof und Volk das Unschöne als Schönheit und Wert an sich begreifen. Nur die armen, nicht hoffähigen Fischer erfühlen den Unterschied, ohne ihm Sprache geben zu können. Andersen verrückt in des Wortes unmittelbarem Sinne Schein und Wirklichkeit. Seine Chinesen sind so wenig natürlich, daß sie selbst die Nachtigall in eine Welt von Plattitüden versetzen, wenn sie sich inzwischen begrüßen, indem der eine „Naacht“ sagt und der andere mit „gal“ antwortet, ein unübersetzbares Wortspiel, weil im Dänischen „gal“ so viel wie „verrückt“ heißt. Bei Andersen spielt auch die Szene mit. Alles an diesem Kaiserhof ist künstlich. Der Palast ist aus Porzellan, und man muß sich ganz vorsichtig darin bewegen, um nichts zu zerbrechen; an die Blumen hat man Silberglöckchen gebunden. Palast und Einrichtung sind so unnatürlich wie ihre Bewohner, die sich in einer maniriert-gezierten Sprache unterhalten, herum scharwenzeln, ständig mit dem Kopf nicken, aber das Muhen einer Kuh nicht vom Quaken eines Frosches unterscheiden können und beides mit Nachtigallengesang verwechseln. Viel klüger ist der Kaiser von Japan. Er ist es zwar, der die künstliche Nachtigall schickt, aber ausdrücklich mit der Warnung, die künstliche Nachtigall des Kaisers von Japan sei arm gegenüber der (vom beleidigten Kaiser verbannten und durch ein Kunstgebilde ersetzten) echten Nachtigall des Kaisers von China. Erst nach vielen Jahren, im Augenblick des Todes, offenbart sich der Betrug. Die Schranzen haben schon einen neuen Kaiser gewählt; die mechanische Nachtigall ertönt nicht mehr, weil niemand da ist, der sie aufzieht; der personifizierte Tod sitzt auf der Brust des einstmals so mächtigen Mannes und hat ihm die Insignien seiner Macht, Krone, Säbel und Fahne, abgenommen; in der Agonie erscheinen ihm die guten und bösen Taten – erst in diesem Augenblick trennen sich Natur und Unnatur. Sie, die verbannte echte Nachtigall kommt zurück und singt so ergreifend, daß der Tod sie bittet, weiter zu singen und ihre Forderung erfüllt, für ein kleines Lied dem Kaiser seine Insignien zurückzugeben. Bei Strawinsky-Mitussow dagegen bricht der Kaiser das Spiel der mechanischen Nachtigall ab, weil er den geistigen Betrug bemerkt und den Unterschied zwischen mechanistischer Wiederholbarkeit und schöpferischer Einmaligkeit begreift. Er holt die mechanische Nachtigall in sein Schlafgemach, weil ihm die lebendige Nachtigall davongeflogen ist, er sich verraten glaubt und sich mit dem Kunstvogel begnügen muß. Die Schranzen verlieren bei Strawinsky ihre abgründige Dümmlichkeit und geben damit Stoff für lustige Bühneneffekte. Sogar die Einfalt des armen kleinen Küchenmädchens, das jeden Tag seiner kranken Mutter etwas Essen bringt und dabei einen weiten Weg zurücklegen muß, sich aber als einzige am Hof seine Natürlichkeit bewahrt hat, um die Nachtigall kennen, besser: erkennen zu können, ist unterspielt. Bei Strawinsky ist es kein Kind mehr, dem seine Unschuld hilft, sondern eine erwachsene Köchin, die lediglich Erfahrung besitzt und sich anschließend bei denen, die keine besitzen, wichtig tut. 

Eine Nachtigall singt allnächtlich zur Freude eines armen Fischermannes ihr Lied. Die Nachtigall ist weit über das Land hinaus berühmt, nur im Land selbst wissen nur die einfachen und armen Menschen von ihrer Existenz, eine Erzählsequenz, in die Andersensche Biographie einfließt (weil Andersen erst durch das Ausland, vor allem durch Deutschland, im eigenen Land, Dänemark, zur Anerkennung gelangte). Der Kaiser von China erfährt nur aus fremden Büchern von der Nachtigall und will sie bei Hofe hören. Seine Hofleute wissen nicht Bescheid. Nachdem ihnen Prügelstrafe angedroht worden ist, finden sie nach einigem Suchen ein kleines Küchenmädchen, das weiß, wo die Nachtigall zu hören ist. Sie folgen ihr in den Wald, und sie sind so unwissend, daß sie das Brüllen eines Kalbes, dann das Quaken eines Frosches entzückt für den Gesang der Nachtigall halten. Dann finden sie dank des Wissens des Küchenmädchens die Nachtigall und überbringen ihr die Einladung des Kaisers, vor ihm zu singen. Die Nachtigall beginnt sofort mit ihrem Gesang, weil sie den Kaiser unter den Zuhörern wähnt. Die Hofschranzen klären sie über ihren Irrtum auf. Sie ist bereit, in den Palast zu kommen, obwohl es sich im Grünen so viel besser singen lasse. Mit ihrem Gesang rührt sie den Kaiser zu Tränen, während die Hofdamen zum Entzücken der Hofschranzen die Triller der Nachtigall nachzuahmen versuchen, indem sie Wasser in den Mund nehmen, den Kopf nach hinten beugen und laut gurgeln. Die kleine Nachtigall wird zum Tagesgespräch und ihr Name zum Begrüßungsruf. Dann kommt in einem großen Paket als ein Geschenk des Kaisers von Japan eine mechanische Nachtigall an. Ihr künstliches Spiel erregt dasselbe Aufsehen wie der Gesang der echten Nachtigall, mit der es nicht möglich ist, ein Duett zustandezubringen, und die in einem unbewachten Augenblick davonfliegt. Als der Kaiser dessen gewahr wird, ist er sehr erzürnt und verbannt den Vogel ein für allemal als undankbar aus seinem Reich. Inzwischen ist der mechanische Vogel zum kulturellen Mittelpunkt und Glanzlicht des Palastlebens geworden. Jeder sucht seine immer gleichen Tonfolgen nachzuahmen. Es entsteht eine eigene Wissenschaft darüber mit gelehrten, wenn auch unverständlichen Büchern. Der künstliche Vogel, der so schön mit seinem edelsteingeschmüchten Schwanz auf und ab wippen kann, singt immer das, was man von ihm erwartet, und das ist es ja gerade, was man so an ihm schätzt; denn bei der echten Nachtigall wußte man nie, was kommen werde. Nur die einfachen Fischer sind unzufrieden. Sie spüren, daß dem mechanischen Vogel etwas fehlt, auch wenn sie nicht auszudrücken verstehen, was es ist. Dann geht die Mechanik kaputt und erweist sich als irreparabel. Nur noch einmal im Jahr darf die mechanische Nachtigall aufgezogen werden, und selbst das scheint noch zu viel. Fünf Jahre gehen dahin. Der Kaiser liegt im Sterben. Der Tod hockt auf seiner Brust und hat ihm seine kaiserlichen Insignien abgenommen und sich selbst angelegt: Krone, Schwert und Fahne. In Gestalt von kleinen Köpfen erscheinen dem Kaiser seine guten und seine schlechten Taten. Er will nicht hören, was sie ihm sagen wollen. Er ruft nach seinen Musikern, den Geistergesang zu übertönen; aber sie kommen nicht. Er ruft nach der mechanischen Nachtigall, die nicht singt, weil niemand da ist, sie aufzuziehen. Und der Hof hat schon längst einen neuen Kaiser gewählt. In diesem Augenblick der höchsten Not kommt die echte Nachtigall zurück. Und sie singt so wunderbar, daß selbst der Tod ergriffen wird und sie bittet, weiterzusingen. Die Nachtigall willigt ein, sofern der Tod dem Kaiser seine Insignien und damit das Leben zurückgibt. Der Tod erfüllt die Bedingungen; aber der Gesang der Nachtigall erfüllt den Tod mit solcher Sehnsucht nach den grünen Plätzen des Friedhofs, die von den Tränen der Hinterbliebenen bewässert werden, daß er wie ein Nebelschweif das Schlafgemach des Kaiser verläßt. Am Morgen steht der Kaiser erquickt auf und kleidet sich selbst an. Den Wunsch des Kaisers, bei ihm zu bleiben, erfüllt die Nachtigall zwar nicht; aber sie verspricht ihm, jede Nacht zurückzukommen und vor seinem Fenster zu singen und ihm mitzuteilen, was sich in seinem Reich an Freudigem und Traurigem abspielt. Nur solle er niemandem sagen, daß er einen kleinen Vogel habe, der ihm alles erzähle. 

 

Aufbau: le rossignol ist eine mit einzelnen Ausschnittsüberschriften versehene phantastische russische Märchen-Kurzoper in drei Akten, die ebensogut als Einakter in drei Bildern verstanden werden kann, wobei das erste Bild zum Vorspiel für die beiden anderen wird und das zweite Bild aus mehreren bildlich getrennten Szenen besteht. – Der erste Akt beginnt mit einer Orchester-Introduktion, die das kombinierte Szenenbild leicht bewegtes Wasser und vogelstimmenbelebter Wald in einer eigenartigen Pan-Atmosphäre vorwegnimmt. Über eine gleichmäßige immer wieder abwärts gleitende Wechselintervallbewegung der Streicher (Bratschen: achtfach geteilt) erheben sich solistisch geführte Holzbläser und Hörner, während zuletzt jeweils 8 Sopran– und Altstimmen mit geschlossenem Mund Tritoni-Intervalle als Streicher-Stütztöne intonieren. Wenn sich der Vorhang hebt, beginnt der Fischer in seinem Boot mit seinem Lied. Er singt von seiner Arbeit, unterbricht sein Lied mit der bangen Frage nach dem Verbleib der Nachtigall, verklärt sie dann mit der Schilderung ihres wundervollen Gesanges und schließt mit der verkürzten Beschreibung des Mondes. Das hymnenartig entäußerte Fischer-Lied besteht aus einem dreitaktigen Kern und einem dreitaktigen Refrain und ist formtypologisch literarisch und musikalisch zweistrophig mit Koda in A-B-A1-B1-Form gebaut und läßt die Stimme der Nachtigall schon in den hohen Orchesterstimmen voraushören. Der Nachtigallengesang beginnt mit einem vorbereitenden Flöten-Solo und einer viertaktigen Vokalise, wie Strawinsky sie schon im Pastorale kultivierte. Vom Text her ist das Lied der Nachtigall kürzer als das des Fischers, musikalisch sind beide Stellen gleich lang.  Der Stil ist ebenfalls hymnisch. Der Form nach ist das Stück dreiteilig mit einer identischen Initial– und Final-Vokalise A-B-C-B1-A und einem ganz kurzen Mittelteil (213 bis 221), der für die Sängerin als Erholungspause dient, um dem bewundernden Zwischenruf des Fischers Raum zu geben, der sich dabei einer angenäherten Intonationsformel der Nachtigall bedient. Ein kurzes Orchestervorspiel läßt es eilig und trappelnd werden. Wenn die vom Kaiser ausgesandten Höflinge mit Kammerherr und Bonze an der Spitze unter Leitung der Köchin lärmend durch den Wald brechen, kommt es zu aufgeregtem Plappern mit einzeln charakterisierter Stimmführung. Die Köchin schwärmt von ihrer Nachtigall, die sie als einzige unter den Hofmenschen gehört hat. Immer, wenn von der Nachtigall die Rede ist, erklingt im Orchester ein Nachtigallenruf.  Mit zwei Glissandi in den unisono geführten Kontrabässen und Violoncelli charakterisiert Strawinsky sehr versteckt das Brüllen des Kälbchens, mit 6 akkordisch komponierten Instrumentalklängen aus Oboe, Englischhorn und beiden A-Klarinetten das Froschgequake. Beide Effekte gehen im allgemeinen unter. Die Wirkung wird nachfolgend durch eine Kombination von IV. und III. Horn verstärkt. Die Höflinge sind hell begeistert, äffen sogar auf Âîòú ñèëà (Plattitüdensprache, wörtlich: „wie toll“, unter Charakterisierungsverlust mit „Wie wonnig“ übersetzt) hingerissen vor Bewunderung das Glissando nach; der Kammerherr findet die Sängerin Êàêà ñèëèùà (wörtlich: „Welche Kraft“, unter Sinnveränderung mit „Welch holde Sängerin“ übersetzt) und der Tsing-Pé-Bonze wundert sich über die Mächtigkeit des Vögelchens. Für den ständig ‚Tsing-Pé’ ausrufenden Bonzen hält Strawinsky einen besonderen Effekt bereit, indem er ‚Tsing’ auftaktig mit Beckenbegleitung deklamiert und das ‚Pé’ mit einem Schlag der Großen Trommel auf den schweren Taktteil fallen läßt. Die Köchin klärt den Irrtum auf, und dann wiederholt sich das Spiel mit den Fröschen. Auch das Frosch-Gequake ist verhalten charakterisiert, so daß man zunächst nicht mitbekommt, warum die Höflinge wiederum so begeistert sind. Strawinsky gestaltet es aus 6 akkordisch komponierten Instrumentalklängen mit 1. Oboe, Englischhorn und beiden A-Klarinetten, wobei Oboe und Englischhorn noch zu jedem Akkord einen kurzen Vorschlag intonieren. Der Tsing-Pé-Bonze mit seinem unvermeidlichen Becken-Trommel-Schlag hört daraus die Glöckchen der Pagode klingeln, was Strawinsky mit Harfe und Klavier unterstreicht, die hier nur für 2 Takte zu hören sind, und der Kammerherr vergleicht das Gequake sogar mit goldener Kehle, was Strawinsky mit 3 abwärts geführten Staccato-Tönen der Tuba karikiert. Wieder klärt die Köchin auf. Die Höflinge werden weinerlich, denn sie wissen, was ihnen blüht, wenn sie unverrichteter Dinge zum Kaiser zurückkehren. Der Kammerherr, nicht weniger ängstlich, verspricht der Köchin das Amt der Hofleibköchin und das Recht, den Kaiser essen zu sehen, wohl das Höchste an Ehren, was man in dieser Situation und Stellung verleihen kann. Und dann endlich ist die echte Nachtigall zu hören, erst in der Soloflöte antizipiert, dann mit ihrer Stimme aus dem Orchester. Inzwischen wundern sich die Höflinge über ihr schlichtes Aussehen; aber sie wissen um ihren Auftrag und versuchen, sich die Nachtigall geneigt zu machen. Strawinsky verspottet das mechanisch-geistlose Floskelgerede stereotyper Höflichkeitsphrasen mit einer entsprechend mechanisch geführten Singstimme. Die endlich aufgespürte Nachtigall läßt sich auf der Hand der Köchin nieder (die Flatterbewegungen sind in Klarinetten und Fagotten zu hören), und alle sind sehr erleichtert; denn die 100 Hiebe mit dem Bambusrohr, die von den Violinen und Solobläsern spöttisch pizzicato und staccato artikuliert werden, sind nicht mehr zu befürchten. Der Akt schließt mit der Beendigung des Fischerliedes. Dramaturgisch kann man sich diese Szenenfolge so vorstellen, als ob der Fischer während des ganzen Aktes weitergearbeitet und weiter gesungen hat und nur während der Mittelszenen fortgerudert ist und jetzt zurückkehrt.  – Der zweite Akt wird ebenfalls mit einer eigenen Introduktion eröffnet, die aber als szenisch selbständiger Zwischenakt vor dem Vorhang gespielt wird und den Untertitel Luftzug (Courants d’air = Draughts oder Breezes) führt. Die Musik ist mit 14 Ziffern Umfang (5165) von beträchtlicher Ausdehnung.  Sie schildert die Aufregung und das Geplapper, das die Ankunft der Nachtigall und das abendliche Solokonzert vor dem Kaiser mit den dazugehörigen Vorbereitungen beim Hofpersonal ausgelöst hat. Der Zwischenakt ist als in sich geschlossene Nummer gearbeitet und könnte ohne weiteres aus den choreographischen Szenen von les noces herausgenommen sein. Antiphonale Chöre, im Deklamationsstil der jungrussischen Schule schnell flutender rhythmisch gehärteter Sprachfluß mit kurzen russischen Melodieimplantationen im Volksliedstil und einem unvermuteten, kurios wirkenden kurztaktigen Glissandoschluß charakterisieren die Nichtigkeit dessen, was sich da abspielt: ein Luftzug, ein Lärm um Nichts, bei dem Wind oder heiße Luft produziert wird. Die nächste Szene ist mit Chinesischer Marsch überschrieben. Sie ist aber mehr als nur ein Marsch. Man formiert sich zum Einzug in den Kaiserpalast und zur zeremoniellen Einnahme der Plätze.  Im Chinesischen Marsch ballt Strawinsky alles an Stilmerkmalen zusammen, was seine Zeitgenossen als chinesisch empfanden, ohne daß es auch wirklich chinesisch sein mußte: Trippeltempo im Geschwindmarschtakt, Becken– und Gongschläge, pentatonische Melodik ohne Chromatismen, scharfe Spaltklangfarben, lang ausgehaltene Ostinati. Anders als in feuervogel oder petruschka, charakterisiert Strawinsky flächige Szenen und greift keine Einzelvorgänge im Totalbild heraus. Die Musik schildert keinen der vielen reich beschriebenen Vorgänge, die sich auf der Bühne abspielen. Es bleibt dem Regisseur überlassen, die Bilder nach seinem Gutdünken nach der Musik zu konstruieren, ohne daß die Musik ihm mehr angibt als “chinesisch” kolorierte Abschnitte. Die 3. Szene besteht aus dem Auftritt der Nachtigall vor dem kaiserlichen Hof und dem Zwiegespräch des Singvogels mit dem erschütterten Kaiser. Wieder ändert sich der Stil. Die Koloratur-Melodie des sich anschließenden Nachtigallen-Liedes wird durchchromatisiert und schwingt streckenweise frei im Raum. Der Gesang beginnt und endet mit einer Koloratur-Kadenz. Singt die Nachtigall beim Gespräch mit dem Kaiser unkoloriert, übernehmen Solo-Flöte oder Solo-Klarinette die Koloraturfunktion. Die Hofdamen, die den Eindruck mitbekommen haben, den die Nachtigall auf den Kaiser und damit auf den Hof gemacht hat, versuchen ihre Koloraturen zu imitieren, indem sie mit Wasser gurgeln. Das Orchester unterstreicht das in diesem Zusammenhang ordinär-kuriose Geräusch mit Bläsertremoli und Harfentönen. Die überzüchteten Höflinge, die vorher schon Froschgequake nicht von Nachtigallengesang unterscheiden konnten, sind von dem Geräusch hell entzückt. Strawinsky karikiert den Vorgang und damit die Kulturlosigkeit der Höflinge samt Hofdamen mit unchromatischen hellen Akkordbrechungen. Der Auftritt der japanischen Gesandten ist weniger geziert. Aber Strawinsky zeichnet auch diese Situation nicht malerisch. Das nachfolgende Spiel der mechanischen Nachtigall, die natürlich erst aufgezogen werden muß – das Geräusch ist deutlich zu hören –, besteht aus einer kurzen motorischen Abspulmusik immer derselben primitiven Formeln von aufwärts und abwärts durch die beiden Oboen. Auch der Vorgang der davonfliegenden Nachtigall wird, untypisch für den frühen russischen Strawinsky, nicht abgebildet. Der Akt schließt mit einer fragmentarischen Wiederholung des Fischerliedes. – Der dritte Akt beginnt wie der zweite mit einem Vorspiel, einem kurzen, eher düsteren Charakterbild, das sich thematisch aus der Motivik des nachfolgenden Geisterchors und des Nachtigallengesangs speist und den Widerstreit zwischen Tod und Leben mit vorerst offenem Ausgang andeutet. Aus der Geisterchor-Motivik läßt sich die dumpf instrumentierte Deklamation des Anfangs der Totensequenz Dies irae der katholischen Totenmesse heraushören, ein von vielen Komponisten gern gewähltes symbolgesättigtes Fragment. Auch in der Szene des Wiedererscheinens der Nachtigall sind die Handlungseinheiten nicht eigens charakterisiert und werden nur im Sprachfluß des Nachtigallengesanges deklamiert. Den Melodieformeln werden unterschiedlichste Sinnzusammenhänge zugeordnet. Der feierliche Festzug übernimmt den Marschrhythmus, aber nur noch abgeschwächt das chinesische Kolorit. Es sind sacre–Formeln, die im Englischhorn hörbar werden. Zum Opernschluß erklingt ein Bruchstück von 13 Takten aus dem bewundernden Lied des Fischers. Die erste Oboe spielt dazu sechzehnmal eine schlichte Zweitonformel, deren Verklingen auch ohne Einzeichnung eines diminuendo in der Partitur den Eindruck eines sich langsam entfernenden Geschehens vermittelt.

 

 Korrekturen / Errata

Transkription (Dushkin) 187

  1.) Takt 61 (S. 6, 2. System, Takt 3) Violine: In der 2. Ligature ist die 1. Sechzehntelnote b2 anstatt

            h2 zu lesen.

  2.) Takt 63 (S.p. 6, 3. System, Takt 1) Klavier: Die 4. Ligaturnote ist g1 (mit geklammertem

            Auflösungszeichen) zu lesen.

  3. Cadenza unterhalb Partitursystem: Die 6. (letzte) Note ist richtig as2 [Violine: g#1] statt a2 zu

            lesen.

  5.) Takt 82 (S. 7, letzter Takt der Cadenza) Violine: Die letzte Triolennote ist  ab1 statt a1 zu lesen.

  7.) Violinstimme, S. 3, letzter Takt: Die 6. Note vor Taktende ist ab2 statt a2 zu lesen, die 2. Note

            Flageolett a3 statt Flageolett ab3.

 

Stilistik: Der erste Akt zeigt Strawinsky in der Zeit vor dem Feuervogel, die beiden folgenden Akte zeigen ihn nach Sacre zur Zeit von Les Noces. Daraus ergeben sich zwei erheblich unterschiedliche Stilwelten, weil Strawinskys Entwicklungsprozeß zwischen Feuervogel und Sacre mit erheblichen stilistischen Weiterungen verlaufen ist. Aus diesem Grunde entnahm er für die selbständige Symphonische Dichtung chant du rossignol nur Teile des zweiten und dritten Aktes. Der erste Akt verbindet Strawinsky mit Rimsky-Korssakows Oper Der goldene Hahn ebenso wie mit der hochimpressionistischen Orchesterkultur Debussys. Wesentliche Partien wie Fischerlied und die Vogelstimmensoli können mit leichter rhythmischer und intervallischer Änderung aus Rimskys Oper herausmontiert werden. Die Chromatismen des Nachtigallengesangs nähern sich Skrjabin, die Kantabilität geht in Richtung populärer französischer Opernmusik, der Chor ist Debussys Nuages abgelauscht. Weitere Debussy nahestehende Formulierungen sind möglicherweise auf Mussorgsky rückzuführen, der seinerseits Debussys Tonsprache beeinflußte. In dieser Form paßt der musikalische Geist des Aktes trotz impressionistischer Befremdlichkeiten noch in die russische Musikkultur St. Petersburgs und Moskaus hinein. Die Situations-Charakterisierung ist bei vergleichsweise klar umrissenen Szenen (Kuhgebrüll, Froschquaken) weniger als in Petruschka ausgebildet. Entsprechend der lyrischen Ausgangslage werden die humoristischen Partien selbst noch in der später erfolgten Bearbeitung von 1920 unterspielt; aber auch das volksliednahe russische Kolorit spielt für westeuropäische Ohren eine untergeordnete Rolle, auch wenn ein entsprechender Anklang an Petruschka an einer Stelle unüberhörbar ist. Dem II. und III. Akt gegenüber verhält sich der I. Akt wie ein Prolog. Strawinsky kopiert nicht mehr. Die Solisten– und Chorführung entstammt der Welt von Les Noces. In der Situationencharakterisierung wirkt die Erfahrung aus der Arbeit an den vorangegangenen drei Balletten nach. Der typisch Strawinskysche Humor macht sich bemerkbar und schlägt auf die Szene durch. petruschka–Kontrastierungen werden für das Spiel und Widerspiel von echter und artifizieller Nachtigall folgenreich. Das chinesische Kolorit, das im ersten Akt so gut wie keine Rolle spielt, wird zum Stilmerkmal. Die Theaterfähigkeit ist bedeutend verändert Der Ausgriff auf die beliebte Chinoiserie begründete eine prächtige Bühnenausstattung mit umfangreichen farbenfrohen Einzelbildern, wie man sie aus feuervogel und petruschka, nicht aber mehr aus sacre kannte. Gleichzeitig nahm er die Nachtigall– und Fischer-Szenen des ersten Aktes in den zweiten und dritten als Wiederholungs– und Erinnerungskomplexe hinein und schloß auf diese Weise die drei Akte zusammen.

 

Aufriß

Premier Acte

INTRODUCTION

Larghetto Achtel = 92

            (Ziffer 21 bis Ende Ziffer 58)

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 6)

Più mosso Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer71]

a tempo Achtel = 92

            (Ziffer 72)

ÇÀÍÀÂÑÚ

RIDEAU

 (Ziffer 72)

Più mosso Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer734)

(Íî÷íîé ïåéçàæú. Áåðåãú ìîðÿ. Îïóøêà ëñà.

Áú ãëóáèí ñöñíû ðûáàêú âú ÷åëíîê.)

Paysage nocturne, au bord de la mer. La lisière d’une forêt.

Au fond de la scène, le pêcheur dans sa barque.

Larghetto Achtel = 80

            (Ziffer 8 bis Ende Ziffer 99)

Più mosso Achtel = 88

            (Ziffer 101 bis Ziffer 111)

Pochissimo meno mosso Viertel = 40

            (Ziffer 112 bis Ende Ziffer 126)

Larghetto Achtel = 80

            (Ziffer 13 bis Ende Ziffer 159)

Più mosso Achtel = 88

            (Ziffer16)

Andante Viertel = 58

            (Ziffer 17 bis Ende Ziffer 184)

CÎËÎÂÅÉ (Ãîëîñú âú îðêåñòð.)

LE ROSSIGNOL (Voix dans l’orchestre)

 (Ziffer 181)

L’istesso tempo

            (Ziffer 19 bis Ende Ziffer 246)

Più mosso Viertel = 88

            (Ziffer 247 bis Ziffer 264)

Âõîäÿòèü: Êàìåðãåðú, Áîíçà, Ïðèäâîðíûå è Êóõàðî÷êà.

Entrent: le Chambellan, le Bonze, les Courtisans et la Cuisinière.

 (Ziffer 2612)

poco più accelerando sino all Viertel = 116

            (Ziffer 2659)

Molto moderato, quasi andante Viertel = 58

            (Ziffer 27 bis Ende Ziffer 2810)

Allegro Viertel = 116

            (Ziffer 29 bis Ende Ziffer 348)

Sostenuto Viertel = 84

            (Ziffer 35 bis Ende Ziffer 379)

Andante Viertel = 58

            (Ziffer 38)

Allegro Viertel = 116

            (Ziffer 39 bis Ziffer 401)

Maestoso (alla breve) Halbe = 76

            (Ziffer 402 bis Ende Ziffer 417)

Andante Viertel = 58

            (Ziffer 42 bis Ende Ziffer 435)

Allegro Viertel = 116

            (Ziffer 44 bis Ende Ziffer 467)

(Áîíçà è Êàìåðãåðú óäàëÿþòñÿ)

(Le Bonze et le Chambellan s’éloignent)

 (Ziffer 454)

(óäàëÿþòñÿ)

(ils s’loignent)

 (Ziffer 4510)

Molto meno mosso

            (Ziffer 47)

Larghetto Achtel = 80

            (Ziffer 48 bis Ende Ziffer 507)

Òþëåâûå çàíàñû.

Rideau de tulle.

(Ziffer 501)

 

Deuxième Acte

ENTRACTE

(“COURANTS D’AIR”)

[Bíòåðëþäèè]

[Leíîâåíèå]

 

Ìóçûêà ýòîãî àíòðàêòà èãðàåòñÿ ïðè ñïóùåííûõú òþëåâûõú çàíàñàõú.

Pendant cet entr’acte, la scène est voliée par des rideaux de tulls.

Presto Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 51 bis Ende Ziffer 627)

Lento Viertel = 56

            (Ziffer 63)

Viertel = 144

            (Ziffer 64)

Molto meno mosso Viertel = 80

            (Ziffer 65)

MARCHE CHINOISE

[Êèòàéñê³é ìàðøú]

Òþëåâûå çàíàâñû ìåäëåííî ïîäûìàþòñÿ

Les rideaux de tulle se levent lentement.

Viertel = 76

            (Ziffer 66 bis Ende Ziffer 729)

Âú çòîìú ìñò âñ òþëè äîëæíû áûòü ïîäíÿòû

Ici les rideaux de tulle doivent avoir disparu.

 (Ziffer 678)

Ôàíòàñòè÷åñê³é ôàðôîðîâûé äâîðåöú Êèòàéñêãî Èìïåðàòîðà.

Le palais de porcelaine de l’Empereur de Chine.

 (Ziffer 681)

Ïðàçäíè÷íîå óáðàíñòâî. Ìíîæåñòâî ôîíàðèêîâú. Òîðæåñòâåíèîå øåñòâ³å ïðèäâîðíîé çíàòè. Íà àâàíñöåí ñïèíîé êú çðèòåëþ ñòîèòú ïðèäâîðíûé ëàêåé ñú äëèííûìú øåñòîìú íà êîòîðîìú ñîëîâåé.

Architecture fantaisiste. Decoration de fête, luminaires en abondance. Entrée solenelle des dignitaires de la cour. A l’avant-scene, dos au public, se tient un laquais de cour, portant une longue hampe, où est perché le rossignol.

(Ziffer 682)

Triole = punktierte Viertel

            (Ziffer 731)

Achtel = Achtel = Viertel 116120)

            (Ziffer 732 bis Ziffer 768)

poco accel. Achtel = Achtel

            (Ziffer 769)

Achtel = Achtel a tempo

            (Ziffer 77 bis Ende Ziffer 7812)

Achtel = Achtel del Tempo I (Marcia)

            (Ziffer 79)

(͐ñêîëüêî ñëóãú òîðæåñòâåííî âíîñÿòú ñèäÿoàãî âúáàëäàõèí Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà.)

Des serviteurs portent triomphalement l’Empereur de Chine, assis dans sa chaise à baldaquin.

 (Ziffer 791)

rubatissimo

            (Ziffer 801)

a tempo

            (Ziffer 802)

Sechzehntel = Meno mosso

            (Ziffer 8037)

Cëóãè ñòàâÿòú áàëäàõèíú ñú Êèò. Èìï. íà âîçâûøåí³å ïîñðåäè ñöåíû.

La chaise de l’Empereur est déposée sur une estrade au milieu de la scène.

 (Ziffer 803)

Poco meno mosso Achtel = 120

            (Ziffer 81)

Èìïåðàòîðú æåñòîìú ïðèêàçûâàåòú ñîëîâüþ íà÷èíàòú.

L’Empereur fait au Rossignol signe de commencer.

 (Ziffer 814)

CHANSON DU ROSSIGNOL

[ϐñíÿ ñîëîâüÿ]

Viertel = 66

            (Ziffer 82)

Molto adagio Achtel = 46

            (Ziffer 83 bis Ende Ziffer 859)

Cadenza (tempo come rima cadenza)*

            (Ziffer 861)

a tempo Achtel = 46

            (Ziffer 8625)

Sostenuto Achtel = 66

            (Ziffer 8714)

Più mosso Achtel = 88

            (Ziffer 8744 bis Ende Ziffer 8811)

Poco più mosso Viertel = 76

            (Ziffer 89)

Âñ äàìû âú ïîäðàæàí³å ñîëîâþ, íàáðàú èçú ôàðôîðîâûõú ÷àøå÷åêú âîäû âú ðîòú, èçäàþòú çòîòú çâóêú, îòêèíóâú ãîëîâû íàçàäú.

Toutes les dames, pour imiter le rossignol, se remplissent la bouche d’eau et rejetant la tête en arrière, s’efforcent de triller.

 (Ziffer 892)

Êú Êèò. Èìï. ïîäõîäÿòú òðè ÿïîñêèõú ïîñëà; äâîå âïåðåäè, òðåò³é ñçàäè. Ïîñëäí³é äåðæèòú áîëüøóþ çîëîòóþ øêàòóëêó, íà êðûøê êîòîðîé ñèäèòú áîëüøàÿ èñêóññòâåííàÿ ïòèöà, èñêóññòâåííûé Cîëîâåé-äàðú Èìïåðàòîðà ßïîíñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðó Êèãàéñêîìó.

Vers l’Empereur s’avancent trois envoyés Japonais: deux en avant ensemble; celui qui les suit porte une grande cassette d’or, sur le couvercle de laquelle se dresse un grand oiseau artificiel, un rossignol mècanique, cadeau de l’Empereur du Japan à l’Empereur de Chine.

 (Ziffer 901)

Larghetto Viertel = 56

            (Ziffer 9016)

Largo Viertel = 40

            (Ziffer 90715)

Vivace Halbe = 76

            (Ziffer 91)

Ïåðâûå äâà ÿïîí. ïîñëà ðàçñòóïàþòñÿ. Êú Êèò. Èìï. ïîäõîäÿòú òðåò³é ÿïîí. ïîñîëú ñú Èñêóññòâ. Cîë. âú ðóêàõú.

Les deux premiers envoyés s’écartent, le troisième s’avance vers l’Empereur, et lui présente le rossignol artificiel.

 (Ziffer 911)

JEU DU ROSSIGNOL MÉCANIQUE

[Èãðà èñêóññòâåííàãî Cîëîâüÿ]

Âî âðåìÿ èãðû èñêóññòâåííàãî ñîëîâüÿ íàñòîÿù³é ñîëîâåé íåçàìòíî èñ÷åçàåòú.

Pendant cette scène, le vrai rossignol disparaît sans être remarqué.

 (Ziffer 92)

Moderato Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 92 bis Ende Ziffer 939)

Èìïåðàòîðú æåñòîìú ïðåêðàùàåòú èòðó èñêóñòâåííàãî ñîëîâüÿ.

L’Empereur, d’un geste, met fin au jeu du rossignol mécanique.

 (Ziffer 938)

Meno mosso Viertel = 52 circa

(Ziffer 9413)

Èìïåðàòîú, æåëàÿ ïðîñëóøàòü ñíîâà íàñòîÿùàãî ñîëîâüÿ ïîâîðà÷èâàåòú ãîëîâó ñú ïîäíÿòîé ðóêîé âú åãî ñòîðîíó, îäíàêî çàìòèâú åãî îòñóòñòâî³ ñú íåäîóìí³ìú îáðàùàåòñÿ êú êàìåðãåðó.

L’Empereur, qui veut entendre de nouveau le rossignol véritable, tourne la tête de son côté et lève la main. Voyant que l’oiseau n’est plus là, il se tourne, perplexe, vers le chambellan.

Chamberlain.

(Ziffer 941)

Più mosso Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 944)

Achtel = 108

            (Ziffer 9517)

Tempo di “Marcia Chinese” Viertel = 76

            (Ziffer 95813)

Largo maestoso Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 96 bis Ende Ziffer 987)

Èìïåðàòîðú æåñòîìú ïðèêàçûâàåòú íà÷àòü øåñòâ³å. Èìïåðàòîðà íåñóòú. Âñ óäàëÿþòñÿ âú òîðæåñòâåííîìú ìàðø. Çàíàâñú ìåäëåííî îïóñêàåòñÿ.

L’Empereur fait signe de former le cortège. On l’emporte. Tous sortent en procession triomphale. Le rideau s’abaisse lentement.

(Ziffer 961)

Larghetto Achtel = 80

            (Ziffer 99 bis Ende Ziffer 1009 [Enchaînez weiter nach Ziffer 101 Dritter Akt])

Ãîëîñú Ðûáàêà

Le voix du PÊCHEUR

 (Ziffer 993)

 

Troisième Acte

Con moto Achtel = 120

            (Ziffer 101 bis Ende Ziffer 105)

Maestoso Viertel = 160

            (Ziffer 106 bis Ende Ziffer 1077)

[Çàíàâñú]

Rideau

 (Ziffer 1077)

Lento Achtel = 72

            (Ziffer 108 bis Ende Ziffer 1128)

Ïîêîè âî äâîðö Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà. Íî÷ü. Ëóíà. Âú ãëóáèí ñöåíû îïî÷èâàëüíÿ Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà. Ãèãàíòñêîå ëîæå, íà êîòîðîìú [#] ëåæèòú áîëüíîé Èìïåðàòîðú, à íà íåìú ñèäèòú Cìåðòú ñú êîðîíîé Èìïåðàòîðà íà ãîëîâ, ñú åãî ñàáëåé è çíàìåíåìú âú ðóêàõú. Çàíàâñú, îòäëÿþøàÿ îïî÷èâàëüíþ îòú ïåðåäíèõú ïîêîåâú îòäåðíóòà.

Une salle du palais de l’Empereur de Chine. Nuit. Clarté lunaire. Au fond la chambre de repos de l’Empereur, lit gigantique [#] où gît l’Empereur malade. A son chevet est assise la Mort, elle porte la couronne impériale, et s’est imparée du glaive et de l’étendard; le rideau qui sépare la chambre de repos des autres, est ouvert.

(Ziffer 1081)

[Nachtigall Ziffer 1097]

Poco più mosso Sechzehntel = 120

            (Ziffer 113 bis Ende Ziffer 1145)

Sechzehntel = 96

            (Ziffer 115)

Lento Viertel = 60

            (Ziffer 116 bis Ziffer 1232**)

            poco rall. (Ziffer 1120)

            a tempo (Ziffer 1201)

Largo Achtel = 72

            (Ziffer 1232 bis Ende Ziffer 128 [unter Einschaltung einer Ersatzziffer 124bis***])

            rit. (Ziffer 1242)

            a tempo (Ziffer 1243)

Cìåðòü èñ÷åçàçòú

La Mort disparaît

 (Ziffer 1252)

Íà÷èíàåòú ñâòàòú

Il commence à s’éclaircir

 (Ziffer 1261)

Un poco meno mosso

            (Ziffer 128)

CORTÈGE SOLENNEL

Pianissimo Halbe = 4042

            (Ziffer 129 bis Ende Ziffer 1328)

Ïðèäâîðíûå, ñ÷èòàÿ Êèòàéñêàãî Èìïåðàòîðà óæå óìåðøèìú, öåðåìîí³àëíûìú ìàðøåìú âõîäÿòú âú ïåðåäí³å ïîêîè äâîðöà. Çàíàâñü, îòäëÿþùàÿ ïîñëäí³å îòú, îïî÷èâàëüíè òîðæåñòâåííî çàäåðæèâàåòñÿ ïàæàìè ñú ïðîòèâóïîëîæíûõú ñòîðîíú.

Les courtisans pensant que l’Empereur est mort, entrent aux sons d’une marche solennelle et s’avancent vers la chambre de repos, dont des pages retiennent avec solomnité les rideaux fermées.

 (Ziffer 1291)

Çàíàâñü ðàñêðûâàåòñÿ. Îïî÷èâàëüíÿ çàëèòà ñîëíöåìú. Êèòàéñê³é Èìïåðàòîðú âú ïîëíîìú öàðñêîìú óáðàíñò␠ñòîèòú ïîñðåäè îïî÷èâàëüíè. Ïðèäâîðíûå ïàäàþòú íèöú.

Les rideaux de la chambre de repos s’ouvrent. La chambre de repos est baignée de soleil. L’empereur en grande tenue se tiend debout au milieu. Les courtisans tombent à terre.

 (Ziffer 1322)

Achtel = 54 (più largo che sopra)

(Ziffer 133 bis Ende Ziffer 13412)

Çàíàâñú ìåäëåííî îïóñêàñòñÿ

Le rideau tombe lentement

 (Ziffer 1331)

Ãîëîñú ÐÛÁÀÊÀ

La voix de PÊCHEUR

 (Ziffer 1341)

* gemeint ist Ziffer 822.

** in der Neuausgabe der Taschenpartitur fehlt die Eintragung von Ziffer 119.

*** die Ziffer 124 ist zweimal vergeben: 124 = 8 Takte; 124bis = 12 Takte.

° Der erste Halbsatz fehlt.

 

Widmung: keine authentische Widmung bekannt; nach Paul Collaer Stepan Mitussow

 

Dauer: 4455″ = I. Akt: 1634″; II. Akt: 1448″ [212″ (Luftzug), 338″ (Chinesischer Marsch), 348″ (Lied der Nachtigall), 040″ (Die Höflinge), 103″ (Drei japanische Gesandte), 059″ (Spiel der mechanischen Nachtigall), 228″ (Schluß)]; III. Akt: 1333″ [249″ (Vorspiel), 118″ (Ein Saal im Palast des Kaisers), 659″ (Rückkehr der Nachtigall), 109″ (Feierliche Prozession), 118″ (Die Genesung des Kaisers)]

 

Entstehungszeit: Librettoentwurf: 3. April 1908; erste Skizzen: Ustilug zwischen 29. November 1908 und 1. Februar 1909; Rohfassung in Skizzenform: Fertigstellung Ustilug Sommer 1909; Partitur I. Akt: Fertigstellung Ustilug Herbst 1909. Neuer Bühnenentwurf: 27. März 1913; Ausarbeitung des neuen Librettos: Mitte Mai bis Dezember 1913; Fertigstellung II. Akt: nach 4. November 1913; Fertigstellung III. Akt: vermutlich nicht vor Anfang Mai 1914 (Strawinsky-Datierung 14.-27. März 1914). Die Arbeiten am II. und III. Akt erfolgten in Clarens und Leysin.

 

Entstehungsgeschichte: Nachdem feststand, daß die Oper in Paris, London und Moskau (russisch) gesungen wurde, veranlaßte Nicolas Struve eine Übersetzung in das Französische. Eine vorgeschlagene Übersetzung in das Englische unterblieb, weil der dafür vorgesehene Übersetzer (Feiwel) nach Struves Meinung zu langsam arbeitete, um termingerecht fertigwerden zu können. Eine Übersetzung in das Deutsche war nicht vorgesehen, wie er Strawinsky mit Brief vom 11. Oktober mitteilte, und der späteren Verbreitung der Oper gewiß nicht förderlich. Vermutlich resignierte Struve, weil die Verleger mit nicht abendfüllenden Einaktern schlechte Erfahrungen gemacht hatten. Rossignol war, streng genommen, keine Oper in 3 Akten, sondern ein Einakter in 3 Bildern, der ein Mammutorchester erforderlich machte. Das hielt die verlegerische Begeisterung in Grenzen. Die Titelblätter der Urausgaben wurden französisch-russisch (nicht russisch-französisch) gedruckt, so daß der freigegebene Originaltitel Le Rossignol, nicht Ñîëîâåé lautete, was immer auch das Autograph sagen mag. Die französische Übersetzung wurde, wie in den Jahren vor dem Ersten Weltkrieg nicht anders zu erwarten, dem in Marseille geborenen polyglotten Journalisten, Musikschriftsteller und Übersetzer griechischer Herkunft Dimitri-Michail Calvocoressi (die Vornamen wurden immer mit M. D. abgekürzt, in seinen Briefen mit M.) anvertraut, der sich im Paris der Vorkriegszeit zu einer namhaften und gesuchten Persönlichkeit entwickelt hatte. Mit Ausbruch des Krieges mußte er seiner Abstammung wegen Frankreich verlassen. Er ging nach England, heiratete eine Engländerin und erhielt die englische Staatsbürgerschaft, gelangte aber in London (anders als in Paris) nicht mehr zu einer seinen Leistungen entsprechenden Bedeutung. Strawinsky korrespondierte mit dem Strawinsky-Enthusiasten freundschaftlich, ja herzlich. Calvocoressi, der die russische Sprache beherrschte, hatte bereits Texte Rimsky-Korssakows und Strawinskys übersetzt und erwartete, wie ein Brief vom 16. Oktober 1913 an Strawinsky bezeugt, Strawinskys Oper mit Ungeduld. Calvocoressi hat bald danach den 1. Akt erhalten; denn im nächsten Brief vom 5. November 1913 drängte er nicht mehr. Der Verlag bestätigte Strawinsky mit Schreiben Struves vom 14. November, Calvocoressi die Kopien des 1. Aktes zugestellt zu haben. Aus dem Briefwechsel geht weiter hervor, daß er bis spätestens 16. Januar 1914 den 2. Akt in Händen hielt und zu dieser Zeit die 1. Szene (gemeint ist der 1. Akt) schon übersetzt hatte. Dies bestätigte er in einem undatierten Brief, der vor dem 16. Januar geschrieben worden sein muß, weil er in einem Postskript ungeduldig auf die Übersendung des 2. Aktes gespannt ist. Dessen Eingang bestätigte er am 16. Januar 1914. Für die Übersetzung des 2. und des 3. Aktes, über deren Zulieferung der Briefwechsel schweigt, wird das Sprachgenie Calvocoressi nicht viel Zeit benötigt haben, doch war Struve mit der Übersetzung nicht ganz zufrieden. Calvocoressi hatte schnell, aber nach Meinung Struves nicht unbedingt gut übersetzt. Es waren Fehler stehengeblieben. Struve ärgerte sich besonders über den falschen Titel (Rossignol statt Le Rossignol), der einem Franzosen doch nicht hätte unterlaufen dürfen, wie Struve am 6. Juni 1914 nach der Uraufführung an Strawinsky schrieb. Selbst in Deutschland kenne man den beträchtlichen Unterschied zwischen Rossignol und Le Rossignol. Alle auch später vorgenommenen Übersetzungen lassen Kommentare zu. Für die englische Erstaufführung von 1914 im Drury Lane Theater wurde eine selbständige, also nicht mir dem Klavierauszug verbundene Übersetzung hergestellt und veröffentlicht. Sie stammte von Basil T Timothejew und Charles C. Hayne. Für die Londoner Aufführung von 1919 bediente man sich einer Übersetzung von Edward Agate. Beide Übersetzungen wurden später für die revidierten Ausgaben nicht mehr benutzt, sondern mit der copyright-geschützten Übersetzung Robert Crafts ausgetauscht. Eine deutsche Übersetzung stammt von Elisabeth Weinhold. Auch diese wurde mit den revidierten Ausgaben aufgegeben und durch eine Übertragung von A. Elukhen und B. Feiwel ersetzt. 

 

Uraufführungen: Oper: am 26. Mai 1914 in russischer Sprache in der Pariser Salle Garnier (Opéra) mit Pawel Andrejew (Kaiser) und Jelena Nikolewa* (Köchin) vom St. Petersburger Marien-Theater, Awreliaja Dobrowolskaja (Nachtigall) vom Moskauer Bolschoi-Theater, Jelisaweta Petrenko (Tod), Alexander Varfolomejew (Fischer), Alexandre Belianin (Kammerherr), Nicolas Gulajew (Bonze), Elisabeth Mamsina, Basile Charonow, Fedor Ernst (japanische Gesandte), den Chören der Moskauer Oper, dem Ensemble Ballets Russes de Serge de Diaghilew, mit dem Bühnenbild und den Kostümen von Alexandre Benois**, in der Choreographie von Boris Romanow, unter der Regie von Serge Grigoriew und unter der Musikalischen Leitung von Pierre Monteux. Le Rossignol wurde als Ballett-Oper uraufgeführt und dabei jede Rolle doppelt sowohl mit einem Tänzer wie mit einem Sänger besetzt. Die Tänzer agierten auf der Bühne, die Sänger waren im Orchestergraben untergebracht. Diese Aufführungstechnik wurde auch für London (1914) und für St. Petersburg (1918) beibehalten. Violin-Transkription: am 8. Dezember 1932 in der Pariser Salle Pleyel durch Samuel Dushkin und Igor Strawinsky

* nach anderen Quellen Marie Brian.

** nach anderen Quellen Alexandre Benois und Alexandre Sanin.

 

Inszenierung: Die bei der Inszenierung von Rimsky-Korssakows goldenem hahn kurz zuvor praktizierte Technik der Rollen-Doppelbesetzung in Form einer Trennung von Sängern und Schauspielern wurde für le rossignol beibehalten. Während man die Sänger im Orchestergraben untergebracht hatte, tanzten und mimten die Ballettmitglieder das Geschehen auf der Bühne. Romanow war in seinen Kreisen als Meister der Bewegungsführung anerkannt und verlagerte den Höhepunkt des Spiels auf die Aufzugsszenen, die in ein magisch blaues Licht eingetaucht wurden. Dem Hauptbühnenbildentwurf von Benois rühmte man nach, nicht der chinesischen Scheinmode verfallen zu sein, wie sie damals in Europa gehandelt wurde, sondern echte Merkmale der chinesischen Kultur nach Konturierung und Kolorierung erfaßt und auf die Bühne gebracht zu haben.

 

Bemerkungen: Nach Meinung Strawinskys zählt die Oper zu den heiklen Kompositionen, die nur von einem guten Orchester gespielt werden können. Deshalb ersetzte er die geplante Aufführung 1961 in Zürich durch eine Aufführung von „Histoire du soldat“, weil er dem Zürcher Opernorchester die Bewältigung der Aufgabe nicht zutraute. Strawinsky schloß den derzeitigen ersten Akt im Sommer 1909 als selbständige, lyrisch entwickelte Komposition ohne ausgereifte, weiterführende Pläne ab. Die nach dem ursprünglichen Szenarium gegebenenfalls noch angedachte Todesszene mit dem Sieg der Musik über die Vergänglichkeit des Lebens blieb unausgeführt, weil Strawinsky die Ballettaufträge erst zu Feuervogel, dann zu Petruschka, schließlich zu Sacre erhielt und bereits an Les noces arbeitete, als er auftragsbedingt zur Oper zurückkehrte. Vermutlich wäre der Operneinakter überhaupt nicht mehr aufgenommen worden, wenn nicht der Moskauer Bühnendirektor Alexander Sanin für das von dem in Rußland sehr berühmten Konstantin Mardchanow neugegründete Freie Theater in Moskau Strawinsky am 17. Februar 1913 um ein dreiaktiges Bühnenstück beinahe in Form eines Hilferufes ersucht hätte. Nach einiger Zeit des Nachdenkens sagte Strawinsky zu und entwickelte ein neues Szenarium, das schon im wesentlichen alle Einzelheiten des endgültigen Bühnengeschehens auflistet. Noch bevor Strawinsky den dritten Akt der Oper fertiggestellt hatte, machte das junge Unternehmen Bankrott. Diaghilew, der jetzt als einziger Produzent übrigblieb, geriet wegen der ganz ungewöhnlichen Langsamkeit, mit der Strawinsky die Oper fertigstellte und die ein Zeugnis für die Mühen war, unter denen Strawinsky das Stück zu Ende arbeitete, selbst in Schwierigkeiten und drohte mit dem Abbruch der Produktion. Der schmerzvoll geborene dritte Akt wurde tatsächlich erst kurz vor der Uraufführung fertig ‚und der Uraufführungsdirigent Pierre Monteux sollte die Partitur erst 13 Tage vor der Uraufführung, also am 13. Mai 1914, zu sehen bekommen. Die 1923 erschienene Druckfassung der Oper stimmt nicht mit der Originalfassung überein. Die Abweichungen von der originalen Instrumentation sind erheblich gewesen und haben tief in die instrumentale Struktur eingegriffen. Strawinsky hat diese Änderungen vermutlich 1917 und 1919 vorgenommen. Bei dem aus dem zweiten und dritten Akt der Oper abgeleiteten Orchesterwerk chant du rossignol handelt es sich um eine sowohl strukturell wie orchestral eigenständige Symphonische Dichtung selbständigen Charakters, für die Strawinsky auch das Szenarium etwas geändert hat.

 

Situationsgeschichte: Der Standpunkt, Rimsky-Korssakow habe sich auf Märchenstoffe verlegt, um vor der gesellschaftspolitischen Realität seiner Zeit fliehen zu können, ist historisch nicht haltbar. Rimsky-Korssakow benutzte Märchenstoffe, weil er die mit den Aufständen von 1905 entstandene politische Situation auf diese Weise am besten vorführen konnte. Rimsky-Korssakows späte Märchenopern vom zaren saltan bis zum goldenen hahn entwickeln eine beträchtliche politische Treibkraft und fanden ihre negativen Vorbilder in der Zaren(miß)wirtschaft. Auch wenn Rimsky-Korssakow nur einer der vielen russischen Intellektuellen gewesen ist, die möglicherweise nicht auf einen Sturz des Zaren, wohl aber auf eine liberalere und menschlichere politische Neuorientierung der zaristischen Machtansprüche hinarbeiteten, hat er mit seinen von der Zensur schwer angreifbaren Märchenopern stark in die Studentenschaft hineingewirkt. Es hatte seine Gründe, daß er zeitweise als Professor entlassen wurde. Ebenso ist Rimsky-Korssakows Strawinsky beeindruckender exotischer Grenzgang kein Ergebnis ausschließlich russischer Musikgeschichtsentwicklung gewesen. Vielmehr reicht er weit in die europäische, vor allem französische und deutsche Musikgeschichte des 19. Jahrhunderts hinein, als man sich vom vorherrschenden Dur-Moll-Verständnis zu lösen begann und anfing, neue Melodiemodelle zu entwickeln. Gregorianische Modi, historische und Kunstskalen und schließlich der Versuch, über außereuropäische Tonordnungen (Exotismus) den Dur-Moll-Akademismus aufzubrechen, ließen impressionistische Stilmittel entstehen, die weitgehend noch auf Liszt zurückgehen. Anfang des 20. Jahrhunderts wurde der Exotismus zu einer umfassenden europäischen musikalischen Bewegung, der kein Komponist mehr ausweichen wollte. In dieser Tradition bewegten sich auch Rimsky-Korssakow und noch mehr Strawinsky, der sich zusätzlich für den Impressionismus und damit für Darstellungsformen öffnete, an die Rimsky-Korssakow zu denken nie gewagt hätte.

 

Bedeutung: Der ursprüngliche Strawinskysche rossignol–Gedanke ist ersatzreligiöser Natur, wie es schon die Vertonung der nichtssagend-symbolistischen, rauschartigen Balmontverse von swjesdoliki oder die mysteriöse Opfervorstellung von sacre waren, die als eine in nebelhafte Ferne gerückte Handlung bevorzugt wurde. Die vorübergehende Trennung von seiner Kirche erzeugte ein Vakuum, das gefüllt werden mußte. Als sich Strawinsky nach etlichem Zögern entschloß, den Andersenschen Konfliktgedanken, wenn auch in abgeschwächter Form, nun doch aufzunehmen, schwächte Strawinsky die mit und nach Wagner populär gewordene säkularisierte Vorstellung einer Lebensüberwindung durch und mit Musik. Mit dem jetzt vollzogenen Bruch zwischen zwei verschiedenen Sichtweisen von Stoff und Leben kündigte sich ein neuer Strawinsky an.

 

Wirkung: Die Aufführung der Oper blieb erstaunlich folgenlos, was nicht nur am kurz danach ausbrechenden Krieg gelegen haben dürfte. Nach der Uraufführung in Paris kam es nur noch 2 Tage später, am 28. Mai 1914, zu einer weiteren Aufführung. In London wurde sie, diesmal unter der Orchesterleitung von Emile Cooper, insgesamt viermal im Drury Lane Theater gegeben, am 18. und 19. Juni sowie am 14. und 23. Juli 1914. Struves mit Brief vom 16. Juni 1914 noch gehegte Hoffnung war damit zerstoben, in England ein feinfühlenderes und ernsthafteres Interesse am Werk zu finden als in Frankreich, wo es bei schönen, aber nichtssagenden Worten blieb. In Rußland las man es anders. Dafür sorgte möglicherweise Diaghilew selbst. Er schickte am 16. Juli 1914 nach der letzten Londoner Aufführung Strawinsky ein Telegramm nach Salvan und verkündete darin den großen Erfolg der 3. und 4. Aufführung. Er knüpfte daran die Hoffnung, „Les Noces“ möge denselben Weg gehen. Die St. Petersburger Zeitung meldete schon am 19. Juni (2. Juli) 1914, Strawinsky plane auf Grund des sowohl in Paris wie in London gewaltigen Erfolges eine Oper über das alte Rom, mag es ironisch gemeint oder Ergebnis der enthusiastischen Fehleinschätzung gewesen sein. Zwei Jahre später wird Diaghilew von Strawinsky mannigfache Änderungen in der Oper und vor allem Entfernung langweiliger Stellen verlangen. Die Empfindungen der Zeitgenossen waren ebenso seltsam geteilt. Längst gewohnt, in Parteiungen und Schulen zu denken, war den Freunden des Sacre-Aufruhrs die Musik zu herkömmlich, und sie ärgerten sich über die Kommentare, die von Gegnern der Sacre-Musik abgegeben wurden. Dort fand man die Musik zu „Le Rossignol“ himmlisch gegenüber dem, was Strawinsky jüngst vorgelegt hatte, und diese Art von Strawinsky-Verständnis paßte den einen so wenig wie den anderen. Ein Zeugnis für das Durcheinander, das „Le Rossignol“ bei den intellektuell auftretenden modernistischen Kunstprogrammatikern anrichtete, bot etwa das Rossignol-Manifest des Strawinsky-Freundes, Futuristen und ehemaligen Kapitäns des italienischen Zuavenregiments Ricciotto Canudo. Canudo betreute eines der vielen kurzlebigen Programmblätter jener Zeit, in denen Kunstthesen beweislos auf– und wieder abgestellt wurden und feinzüngig verwilderte Spiele mit Worten fern der philosophischen Realität betrieben wurden. Sein streckenweise ironisch-polemischer Artikel “Notre Esthétique. A propos du „Rossignol“ d´Igor Strawinsky“ erschien auf der 5. Seite der letzten Nummer seiner Zeitschrift „Montjoie“ (Nr. 46, April-Juni 1914) und behauptete, die Oper lege Zeugnis für die Gesamtströmung der zeitgenössischen Kunst ab, die aus Kubismus, Synchronismus, Simultanismus auf der einen, und einer nervös prosodierenden Arhythmie auf der anderen Seite bestehe. Der offensichtliche Stilbruch Strawinskys wird als Teilhabe an den verschiedensten Kunstströmungen der Zeit um– und mißgedeutet. 

 

Fassungen: Der Klavierauszug war seit dem 16. Juni 1914 auf dem Markt und sollte vorgesehenermaßen im Laufe des Sommers eine zweite Ausgabe erfahren. Außen– und Innentitelei geben das Werk nur auf Französisch, nicht auf Russisch an. Lediglich auf der ersten Notentextseite findet sich der russische Titel in Majuskelschreibung (ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ). Der französische Haupttitel war durch das Fehlen des Artikels auch noch verdruckt, was für viele Jahre trotz aller Komponisten– und Verlegerkritik stehenblieb. Die Ausgabe führte einen Eigentums-, aber keinen Copyrightvermerk und vor allem kein Copyrightdatum. Die Druckkosten betrugen 4.886,35 Mark. Der Russische Musikverlag verkaufte bis zum Jahresende 1920 insgesamt 113, bis Ende 1938 etwas mehr oder weniger als 450 Exemplare. Boosey & Hawkes lieferte im Mai 1952 die unveränderte Neuauflage aus, allerdings mit inzwischen korrigiertem Artikel und mit Copyright. Die Dirigierpartitur kam 1923 mit leihbarem Stimmenmaterial heraus, die Taschenpartitur jedoch erst 1962, allerdings in einer schönen Kunstlederausgabe, wie sie Boosey & Hawkes damals für mehrere Strawinsky-Werke veranstaltete. Allerdings kümmerte sich der Russische Musikverlag zur Popularisierung der Musik um zwei Transkriptionen und ließ 1922 eine Ausgabe des Chinesischen Marsches von Théodore Szánto und ein Jahr später Introduktion, Fischerlied und Nachtigallen-Arie erscheinen. Von der Szántó-Transkription setzte der Verlag bis 1938 knapp 800, von der nachfolgenden knapp 400 Stück ab. Beide Ausgaben wurden später von Boosey & Hawkes nicht mehr neu aufgelegt. Die Nachtigallenarie wurde allerdings 1968 in die russische Nachdruck-Ausgabe der Lieder Strawinskys eingestellt. Strawinsky, der schon den Gesangsausschnitt bearbeitet hatte, arrangierte 1934 zusammen mit Samuel Dushkin im Rahmen ihrer Violin-Transkriptions-Sequenz auch den Chinesischen Marsch und die Nachtigallen-Arien, wobei die Stücke anders zusammengeschoben wurden. Die Ausgabe erschien 1934, sein Belegexemplar erhielt Strawinsky im November. Der Verkaufserfolg war bis 1938 mit knapp 100 abgesetzten Exemplaren nicht nennenswert. Erst nach 1960 kam es zu Neuauflagen und Neudrucken. Ein Neudruck von Partitur und Klavierauszug wurde in der Mitte des Jahres 1961 in Aussicht genommen. Die vorhandenen Materialien müssen sich zu dieser Zeit in einem erbärmlich unbrauchbaren Zustand befunden haben. Obwohl sich Strawinsky freute, äußerte sich der fast achtzigjährige Komponist in einem Schreiben aus Santa Fé an Ernest Roth vom 28. Juli 1961 bitter, weil sich offensichtlich auch mit der Drucklegung der Rake-Oper nichts tat. Seit einem Jahrzehnt warteten die interessierten Musiker auf den Druck, während die Opern-Partituren jüngerer Komponisten (gemeint ist Henze) von ihren Verlegern (gemeint ist wohl der Schott-Verlag) sofort als Taschenpartituren herausgebracht würden. Boosey veröffentlichte 1961 den alten Klavierauszug neu und gab ihm unter Verzicht auf den russischen Text eine deutsche Übersetzung bei, und 1962 erschien die von Strawinsky revidierte Taschenpartitur, die wohl in einer Doppelfassung als normale und als in Kunstleder gebundene Ausgabe herauskam. Die Stimmen waren leihweise erhältlich. Der Klavierauszug erfuhr 1968 einen russischen Nachdruck. – Eine Sonderstellung gegenüber allen anderen aus Bühnenwerken abgenommenen Konzertstücken besitzt die Symphonische Dichtung Gesang der Nachtigall (Chant du rossignol), weil es sich bei ihr nicht eigentlich um eine Bearbeitung der Oper, sondern um ein nach Bestandteilen der Oper neu komponiertes Stück handelt.

 

Historische Aufnahmen: Washington 29.-31. Dezember 1960 in englischer Singsprache mit Loren Driscoll (Fischer), Reri Grist (Nachtigall), Marina Picassi (Köchin), Kenneth Smith (Kammerdiener), Herbert Beatti (Bonze), Donald Gramm (Kaiser), Elaine Bonazzi (Tod), Stanley Kolk, William Murphy, Carl Kaiser (Japanische Gesandte), Chorus (Chorleiter: John Moriarty) and Orchestra of the Opera Society of Washington unter der Leitung von Igor Strawinsky; Paris Studio Albert 8. Juni 1933, Violintranskription 1932 (Lieder der Nachtigall, Chinesischer Marsch) mit dem Geiger Samuel Dushkin und Igor Strawinsky am Klavier.

 

CD-Edition: VIII-1/113 (Aufnahme Washington).

 

Autograph: Das Autograph der Orchesterpartitur lagerte ursprünglich bei Boosey & Hawkes in New York, das Autograph des Klavierauszugs bei Boosey & Hawkes in London. Beide befinden sich heute in der Londoner British Library.

 

Copyright: 1922 für Szánto-Transkription; 1923 für Dirigierpartitur; 1924 für Gesangs-Auszüge; 1934 für Violintranskription; 1947 Copyright-Übertragung an Boosey & Hawkes in London; 1956 durch Hawkes & Son für die englische, 1961 für die deutsche Übersetzung; 1962 durch Hawkes & Son für die revidierte Fassung

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

181 1914 KlA; r-f; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 93 S.; R. M. V. 241.

                        181Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

            181[14] [1914] KlA; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 93 S.; R.M.V. 241.

182 (1922) Kl.; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 11 S.; R.M.V. 346.

            182[26] [1926] ibd.

 

183Td (1923) Textbuch deutsch; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 20 S.; R.M.V. 405.

184 [1923] KlA; r-f; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 93 S.; R.M.V. 241.

185 (1923) Dp; r-f; Russischer Musikverlag Moskau-Berlin; 119 S.; R.M.V. 158.

                        185Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

186 (1924) Introduction, etc. Ges.-Kl.; r-f-d; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 17 S.; R.M.V. 241a.

187 1934 Arien/Marsch Vl.-Kl. [Dushkin]; Russischer Musikverlag Berlin; 15 S.; R. M. V. 583/584.

                        187Straw ibd. [signiert und datiert].

188 1941 Chant du Rossignol Kl. [Block]; Marks New York; 7 S.; 115185; 11518.

189Alb 1941 Chant du Rossignol Kl.aviertranskription [Block]; Marks New York; 5 S.; 115185.

1810 1952 KlA; r-f; Russ. Musikverlag Berlin / Boosey & Hawkes London; 93 S.; B. & H. 17187.

1811 1961 KlA; f-e-d; Russischer Musikverlag / Boosey & Hawkes London; 97 S.; 17187.

1812 1962 Tp rev.; r-f-e-d; Edition Russe / Boosey & Hawkes London; 159 S.; 18936; HPS 738.

1813 1962 Dp; r-f-e-d; Edition Russe / Boosey & Hawkes London; 159 S.; B. & H. 18936.

1814 1962 Tp rev.; r-f-e-d; Edition Russe / Boosey & Hawkes London; 159 S.; 18936; HPS 738.

1814L 1962 Textbuch; deutsch; Boosey & Hawkes London; HPS 738.

1815Alb 1968 Ïåñíÿ ñîëîâüÿ èç îïåðû „Ñîëîâåé“;Musyka Moskau; 4 S.; 5823.

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

181 IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CHANT ET PIANO / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUEBERLINMOSCOUST.PETERSBOURG // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI. / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / ÏÐÀÂÀ ÈÑÏÎËÍÅÍ²ß ÑÎÕÐÀÍßÞÒÑß. / ÑÎÁÑÒÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ / 1914 / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#*] ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#*] (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.**) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#*] BERLINMOSCOUST. PETERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /*** MAX ESCHIG PARIS / R. M. V. 241 // (Klavierauszug [nachgebunden] 27 x 34,2 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch; 93 [91] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf hellgrau [Außentitelei im Federzierrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalb Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite zwischen Satzbezeichnung und Autorenangabe linksbündig >Tous droits d’exécution réservés.< unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin. Moskau. St. Petersburg.< rechtsbündig >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 241<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; Herstellungshinweis S. 93 als Endevermerk rechtsbündig >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H. Leipzig.<) // 1914

* Verlagstrennvignette im Dreizeilenumfang 0,9 x 1 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung.

** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt

*** Schrägstrich original

 

181Straw

Exemplar STRAWINSKY mit Bleistifteintragungen

 

181[14] IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / [°] / CHANT ET PIANO / „ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUEBERLINMOSCOUST.PETERSBOURG // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI. / [°°] / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / [°°°] / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / ÏÐÀÂÀ ÈÑÏÎËÍÅÍ²ß ÑÎÕÐÀÍßÞÒÑß. / ÑÎÁÑÒÂÅÍÍÎÑÒÜ ÄËß ÂÑÕÚ ÑÒÐÀÍÚ [#] PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÐÎÑѲÉÑÊÀÃÎ ÌÓÇÛÊÀËÜÍÀÃÎ [#*] ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / ÈÇÄÀÒÅËÜÑÒÂÀ [#*] (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.**) / ÁÅÐËÈÍÚÌÎÑÊÂÀ – Ñ. ÏÅÒÅÐÁÓÐÃÚ [#*] BERLINMOSCOUST. PÉTERSBOURG / LEIPZIGLONDRESNEW-YORKBRUXELLES BREITKOPF & HÄRTEL /*** MAX ESCHIG PARIS / R. M. V. 241 // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang [fadengeheftet] 26,7 x 33,5 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch; 93 [91] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf hellgrau [Außentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite pahiniert S. 3 unterhalb Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechztsbündig zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite zwischen Satztitel >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION.< und Autorenangabe linksbündig >Tous droits d’exécution réservés.< unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin. Moskau. St. Petersburg.< rechtsbündig >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 241<; Kompositionsendedatierung S. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; Herstellungshinweis S. 93 als Endevermerk rechtsbündig >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H. Leipzig.<) // [1914]

° Trennlinie 2,4 cm waagerecht.

°° Trennlinie 1,8 cm waagerecht.

°°° Das Exemplar der ehemas Preußischen Staatsbibliothek >DMS 188124< enthält an dieser Stelle innerhalb des Federzierrahmens flush right ein runder ø 2 cm Verlagsstempel >Geschenk des Verlages<.

 * Verlagstrennvignette über Dreizeilenumfang 0,9 x 1 sitting woman playing cymbalom.

** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

*** Schrägstrich original

 

182 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MARCHE CHINOISE / TIRÉE DU CONTE LYRIQUE / „ROSSIGNOL” / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO / PAR / THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / [°] / [Vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.*) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN MOSCOU LEIPZIG NEW-YORK / POUR LA FRANCE ET SES COLONIES: MUSIQUE RUSSE, PARIS, 3 RUE DE MOSCOU / POUR L’ANGLETERRE ET SES COLONIES: THE RUSSIAN MUSIC AGENCY, LONDRES W. I, 34 PERCY STREET / [°°] // (Klavierausgabe ungeheftet 26,5 x 33,6 (2° [4°]); 11 [10] Seiten cremefarben ohne Umschlag + 1 Seite Vorspann [Titelei im Federzierrahmen mit Verlagsvignette 1 x 1,2 Person auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >LES ŒUVRES / D’IGOR STRAWINSKY<** Stand >1<]; Kopftitel >Marche chinoise / tirée du conte lyrique / „Rossignol“<; Autorenangaben 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 oberhalb Kopftitel mittig >Igor Strawinsky<°°° unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >Transcription par Théodore Szántó<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1922 by Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin.< rechtsbündig >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; Platten-Nummer >R.M.V. 346<; Herstellungshinweis S. 11 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H., Leipzig.<) // (1922)

° Trennstrich 8,8 cm waagerecht.

°° Das (nachgeheftete) Exemplar der ehemals Preußischen Staatsbibliothek >DMS 193696< zu Berlin enthält unterseits der Titelei halbrechts einen roten Rundstempel ø 2 cm >Geschenk des Verlages<.

°°° zwischen Autorenangabe und Kopftitel befindet sich ein Ziertrennstrich waagerecht.

* G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

** Aufgemacht angezeigt werden >PÉTROUCHKA (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / „TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA“. / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO-SOLO PAR L’AUTEUR / ROSSIGNOL (CONTE LYRIQUE) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / „MARCHE CHINOISE“. TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO-SOLO / [#] PAR THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / „CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL“. (POÈME SYMPHONIQUE) / PARTITION DE POCHE / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / [°] / TROIS PIÈCES POUR QUATUOR À CORDES / PARTITION DE POCHE / [°] / POUR CHANT ET PIANO:°° / DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE, FRANÇAIS, ANGLAIS ET ALLEMAND / TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE, FRANÇAIS ET ANGLAIS / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (SOUVENIR DE MON ENFANCE) / ÉDITION NOUVELLE AVEC TEXTE RUSSE ET FRANÇAIS, RUSSE ET ANGLAIS / [°°°] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE< [° Trennstrich 4 cm waagerecht; °° Textzeile mittig; °°° Trennstrich 5,7 cm waagerecht].

 

183 IGOR STRAWINSKY / MARCHE CHINOISE / TIRÉE DU CONTE LYRIQUE / „ROSSIGNOL” / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO / PAR THÉODORE SZÁNTÓ / [°] / [Vignette] / PROPRIÉTÉ DE L’ÉDITEUR POUR TOUS PAYS / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / (RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.* / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY / BERLIN, MOSCOU, LEIPZIG, NEW YORK, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, BARCELONA, MADRID, / PARIS / 22, RUE D’ANJOU, 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES ÉDITIONS MUSICALES // (Klavierausgabe [nachgeheftet] 26,6 x 33,2 (2° [4°]); 11 [10] Seiten + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei im Federzierrahmen] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung im Federzierrahmen >LES ŒUVRES / D’IGOR STRAWINSKY<** Stand >No. 3.<; Kopftitel >Marche chinoise / tirée du conte lyrique / „Rossignol“<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 oberhalb Kopftitel mittig >Igor Strawinsky< unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >Transcription par Théodore Szántó<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin. / (Edition Russe de Musique) / Copyright 1922 by Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H. Berlin.< rechtsbündig >Propriété de l’éditeur pour tous pays<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 346<; Herstellungshinweis S. 11 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G. m. b. H., Leipzig.< Werbeseite unterhalb Rahmen mittig >C. G. Röder G. m. b. H., Leipzig. 130126.<) // [1926]

° Trennlinie of 8.8 cm waagerecht.

* G.M.B.H. is printed in smaller letters whereas B. and H. are printed below the G. and M.

** Angezeigt werden ohne Spalteneinteilung >MAVRA. Opéra en 1 acte — Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur / (avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand) / Ouverture pour piano solo — Air de la mère pour chant et piano / PÉTROUCHKA (Ballet) / Partition de poche — Réduction pour piano à quatre mains par l’auteur / TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA; Transcription pour piano solo par l’auteur / Suite de Pétrouchka, Transcription pour piano solo par TH. SZÁNTÓ / PULCINELLA (Ballet) / SUITE DE PULCINELLA pour petit orchestre — Partition de poche / rossignol (Conte lyrique) / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur / (textes russes et français) / Introduction, chant du pêcheur et Air du Rossignol pour chant et piano /tiré du I-er acte) / MARCHE CHINOISE, Transcription pour piano solo par TH. SZÁNTÓ / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL (Poème symphonique) — Partition de poche / Réduction pour piano à deux mains par J. LARMANJAT / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPS, (Ballet) / Partition de poche — Réduction pour piano à quatre mains par l’auteur / SYMPHONIES D’INSTRUMENTS À VENT / Réduction pour piano solo par A. LOURIÉ / TROIS PIÈCES pour Quatuor à cordes / Partition de poche — Parties / OCTUOR pour instruments à vent / Partition de poche — Parties / Réduction pour piano à deux mains par A. LOURIÉ / SUITE pour Violon et piano d’après les thèmes, fragments et morceaux de / G. B. PERGOLESI / CONCERTO pour piano et orchestre d’harmonie / Réduction pour deux pianos à quatre mains par l’auteur / SÉRÉNADE en La pour piano solo / SONATE pour piano solo / SUR DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / Édition nouvelle avec textes russes, français, anglais et allemand / SUR TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / Édition nouvelle avec textes russe, français et anglais / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (Souvenir de mon enfance) / Édition nouvelle avac textes russe-francais° et russe-anglais [° = original spelling].

 

183Td Igor Strawinsky / Die Nachtigall / (ROSSIGNOL)* / [Vignette] / Text-Buch / [°] / Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / DIE NACHTIGALL / (ROSSIGNOL)* / Lyrisches Märchen in drei Acten / von / I. STRAWINSKY und S. MITUSOFF / nach / ANDERSEN / Deutsche Übersetzung / von / A. ELUKHEN und B. FEIWEL / Alle Aufführungsrechte vorbehalten / Eigentum des Verlages für alle Länder / RUSSISCHER [°°] MUSIKVERLAG / G. m. [°°] b. H. / Gegründet von S. und N. Kussewitzky / BERLINLEIPZIG / LONDON, MOSKAU, NEW-YORK, PARIS, BRÜSSEL, BARCELONA, MADRID / R. M. V. 405 // (Textbuch deutsch Oktav-Format; 20 Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag [Außentitelei im Ferderzierrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 4 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite, Rollenverzeichnis >Personen< deutsch, Leerseite] ohne Nachspann; Platten-Nummer [nur auf der Innentitelseite] >R. M. V. 405<; Herstellungshinweis als Endevermerk S. 20 mittig >„Der Reichsbote“ G. m. b. H., Berlin SW 11.<) // (1923)

° sich mittig verdickender Trennstrich waagerecht.

°° mehr als 2 Zeilen umfassende Verlagsvignette sitzende Frau Hackbrett spielend.

* Titelfehler original.

 

184 IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / [°] / CHANT ET PIANO / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / MOSCOU, BERLIN, LEIPZIG, PARIS, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, / MADRID, BARCELONA, NEW-YORK. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI / [°°] / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE [vignette] RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.* / (FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY.) / MOSCOU. BERLIN. LEIPZIG. PARIS. LONDRES. / BRUXELLES. MADRID. BARCELONA. NEW-YORK. // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang 26,3 x 32,8 (2° [4°]); 93 [91] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf hellbraun-beige [Außentitelei im Zierfederrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann Innentitelseite im Zierfederrahmen mit Vignette 0,9 x 1 sitzende Frau Zymbalon spielend, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Singtext russisch-französisch; Kopftitel >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 below and legal reservation flush right centred >Èãîü Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalte ohne Copyright 1. Notentextseite zwischen Satztitelseite >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅͲÅ. [#] INTRODUCTION.< und Autorenangabe linksbündig >Tous droits d’exécution réservés.< unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin. Moskau. St. Petersburg.< rechtsbündig >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; Platten-Nummer >R.M.V. 241<; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; Herstellungshinweis S. 93 rechtsbündig als Endevermerk >Stich und Druck von C. G. Röder G.m.b.H. Leipzig; // [1923***]

° Trennlinie 2,4 cm waagerecht.

°° Trennlinie 1,8 cm waagerecht.

* G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

** nach Katalog-Notiz der Preußischen Staatsbibliothek mit 1914 angegeben; den Titeleien nach zu urteilen muß es sich um eine Nachfolge-, nicht um die Erstausgabe des Klavierauszuges handeln und ist zeitlich erheblich später anzusetzen.

 

185 IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / [°] / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / MOSCOU, BERLIN, LEIPZIG, PARIS, LONDRES, BRUXELLES, / MADRID, BARCELONA, NEW-YORK. [*] // IGOR STRAWINSKY / ROSSIGNOL / CONTE LYRIQUE / EN / TROIS ACTES / DE / I. STRAWINSKY ET S. MITOUSOFF / D’APRÈS / ANDERSEN / TRADUCTION FRANÇAISE DE / M. D. CALVOCORESSI / PARTITION D’ORCHESTRE / [°°] / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÈSERVÈS. / Edition russe de musique [vignette] Russischer MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.** / (FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY.) / MOSCOU. BERLIN. LEIPZIG. PARIS. LONDRES. / BRUXELLES. MADRID. BARCELONA. NEW-YORK. [*] // (Dirigierpartitur [nachgebunden] 26,5 x 33 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch; 119 [117] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf hellgrau [Außentitelei schwarz auf hellgrau im Zierfederrahmen, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei im Zierfederrahmen mit Verlagsemblem 1 x 1,2 sitzende Frau Zymbalon spielend, Orchesterlegende >NOMENCLATURE DES INSTRUMENTS< italienisch + Personenverzeichnis >Ï€ÍRÅ | PERSONNAGES: | PERSONEN:< russisch-französisch-deutsch] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. / Ä€ÉÑÒÂIÅ ÏÅÐÂÎÅ. / ÂÑÒÓÏËÅÍIÅ. / LE ROSSIGNOL. | DIE NACHTIGALL. / PREMIÈRE ACTE. | ERSTER AKT. / INTRODUCTION. | EINLEITUNG.; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 unterhalkb Kopftitel rechtsbündig zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite neben 2. Zeile Kopftitel linksbündig >Edited by F. M. Schneider<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalte 1. Notentextseite oberhalb Notenspiegel unter Herausgeberbenennung zwischen 2. und 3. Zeile Kopftitel rechtsbündig >Tous droits d’exécution reserves.< unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H., Berlin, Leipzig. / Edition Russe de Musique / Copyright 1923 by Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H., Berlin.< rechtsbündig >Propriété de l’Éditeur pour tous pays.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 158<; ohne Endevermerk) (1923)

° Trennlinie 2,4 cm waagerecht.

°° Trennlinie 1,8 cm waagerecht.

* unterhalb des Zierfederrahmens von Außen– und von Innentitelei befindet sich im Berliner Exemplar >DMS 207741< mittig zentriert und auf S. 3 neben Kopftitel zwischen Kopftitel und Seitenzahl ein Stempelaufdruck >Unverkäufliches / Exemplar<.

*** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

 

185Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist mit Biarritz 12th Sept. 1923 datiert und enthält die Anmerkung >Revised score by / composer / from which new score is / engraved / April 1962 / also in 1th + 2nd proofe)<. Strawinsky benutzte die Ausgabe zur Einzeichnung zahlreicher Korrekturen.

 

186 IGOR STRAWINSKY / LE / ROSSIGNOL / INTRODUCTION, / CHANT DU PÊCHEUR ET AIR DU ROSSIGNOL / DU Ier ACTE / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO / PAR L’AUTEUR / TOUS DROITS D’EXÉCUTION RÉSERVÉS. / EDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE [Vignette] RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG G. M. B. H.* / (FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEWITZKY.) / MOSCOU. BERLIN. LEIPZIG. LONDRES. / BRUXELLES. MADRID. BARCELONA. NEW-YORK. / PARIS / 22. rue ‘d** Anjou 22 / S. A. DES GRANDES EDITION MUSICALES // (Gesang-Klavier-Ausgabe nachgeheftet 26,5 x 33,5 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch-deutsch 17 [15] Seiten + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Titelei ohne Zierfederrahmen schwarz auf cremeweiß*** mit Vignette 1 x 1,2 Mann auf Thron in kronenartiger Umrandung, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >LES ŒUVRES d’IGOR STRAWINSKY<**** Stand >No 2.<]; Kopftitel >ÂÑÒÓÏËÅIÅ, [#] Introduction, / Ï€ÑÍß ÐÛÁÀÊÀ È ÀÐIß [#] Chant du Pêcheur et Air du / ÑÎËÎÂÜß. [#] Rossignol.<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 oberhalb Notenspiegel rechtsbündig zentriert >Èãîú Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Herausgeberbenennung 1. Notentextseite neben und oberhalb Autorenangabe linksbündig >Edited and revised by Albert Spalding, New-York.<; Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite oberhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Traduction française de M. P. Calvocoressi.< Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite neben 3. Zeile Kopftitel linksbündig zentriert kursiv >Tous droits d’exécution / réservés.< unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1924 by Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H., Berlin (Edition Russe de Musique). / Russischer Musikverlag G. m. b. H., Berlin.< rechtsbündig >Eigentum des Verlags für alle Länder.<; Platten-Nummer >R. M. V. 241 241a [S. 17: R. M. V. 241a]; ohne Endevermerk) // (1924)

* G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter unterstrichen G. M. gedruckt

** Schreibfehler original

*** cremebeige; nur 1. und letzte Seite der Ausgabe

**** Aufgemacht angezeigt werden >PÉTROUCHKA (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO À QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / TROIS MOUVEMENTS DE PÉTROUCHKA / TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO SOLO PAR L’AUTEUR / ROSSIGNOL (CONTE LYRIQUE) / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / [#] (textes russe et français) / INTRODUCTION, CHANT DU PÊCHEUR et AIR DU ROSSIGNOL / [#] tirés du Ier acte). / MARCHE CHINOISE, TRANSCRIPTION POUR PIANO SOLO / [#] PAR THÉODORE SZANTO° / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL (POÈME SYMPHONIQUE) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A DEUX MAINS PAR J. LARMANJAT / LE SACRE DU PRINTEMPTS (BALLET) / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A QUATRE MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / TROIS PIÈCES POUR QUATUOR A CORDES / PARTIES / PARTITION DE POCHE / OCTUOR POUR INSTRUMENTSVENT / PARTITION DE POCHE / RÉDUCTION POUR PIANO A DEUX MAINS PAR A. LOURIÉ / CONCERTO pour Piano et Orchestre d’Harmonie°° / RÉDUCTION POUR DEUX PIANOS A 4 MAINS PAR L’AUTEUR / MAVRA OPÉRA EN 1 ACTE / RÉDUCTION POUR CHANT ET PIANO PAR L’AUTEUR / (avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand) / sur DEUX POÉSIES DE BALMONT / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe, français, anglais et allemand. / sur TROIS POÉSIES DE LA LYRIQUE JAPONAISE / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe, français et anglais. / TROIS PETITES CHANSONS (Souvenir de mon enfance) / ÉDITION NOUVELLE avec textes russe et français, russe et anglais.< [° Schreibweise original; °°].

 

187 IGOR STRAWINSKY / AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL / et / MARCHE CHINOISE / Transcription* / pour violon et piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL / et / MARCHE CHINOISE / pour violon et piano / Prix RM. 4.= / Frs. 4.= [**] / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE // IGOR STRAWINSKY / AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL / et / MARCHE CHINOISE / pour violon et piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / ÉDITION RUSSE DE MUSIQUE / RUSSISCHER MUSIKVERLAG (G.M.B.H.***) / FONDÉE PAR S. ET N. KOUSSEVITZKY / BERLIN · LEIPZIG · PARIS · MOSCOU · LONDRES · NEW YORK  ·BUENOS AIRES / [°] / S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris / 2 et 4, Avenue de la Marne – XXXIV // (Klavierauszug mit Violinstimme [nachgeheftet] 26,6 x 33,8 (2° [4°]); 15 [14] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag stärkeres Papier rot auf hellorange [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 1 Seite Vorspann [Innentitelei] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite] + 6 [5] Seiten Violinstimme fadengeheftet [Leerseite, 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2 mit Partitur text– und aufmachungsidentisch + Stimmangabe oberhalb Notenspiegel mittig >Violon< S. 3 ohne Endevermerk, S. 4 mit Partitur text– und aufmachungsidentisch + Stimmangabe >Violon<, S. 6 ohne Endevermerk, 2 Seiten Nachspann = Leerseiten]; Kopftitel [S. 2:] >AIRS DU ROSSIGNOL< [S. 8:] >MARCHE CHINOISE<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 2, S. 8 unterhalb Kopftitel rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAWINSKY< linksbündig zentriert >Transcription pour Violon et Piano / par l’Auteur et S. Dushkin / 1932<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt S. 2 + 8 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig zentriert >Propriété de l’Editeur pour tous pays. / Edition Russe de Musique / Russischer Musikverlag G.m.b.H. Berlin< rechtsbündig zentriert >Copyright 1934 by Russischer Musikverlag, G.m.b.H. Berlin. / Tous droits d’exécution, de reproduction et / d’arrangements réservés pour tous pays.<; Platten-Nummern >R. M. V. 583< [Airs: Partitur S. 27, Stimme S. 23], >R. M. V. 584< [Marche: Partitur S. 815, Stimme S. 46]; Herstellungshinweis S. 15 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >S. I. M. A. G. — Asnières-Paris.< S. 7 + 15 rechtsbündig jeweils als Endevermerk >GRANDJEAN GRAV<) // (1934)

° Trennstrich 0,8 cm waagerecht.

* fehlt im Innentitel.

** im Londoner Exemplar >h.3992.s.7<, das am 15. Juli 1978 angekauft wurde, befindet sich an dieser Stelle ein blauer Stempelaufdruck >INCREASED PRICE / 5/- / BOOSEY & HAWKES LTD.<.

*** G. M. B. H. ist mit kleineren Lettern und dabei B. H. unter G. M. gedruckt.

 

187Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar ist nachgebunden (Partitur) und fadengeheftet (Violinstimme) und auf der Außentitelseite neben dem Namen >IGOR STRAWINSKY< rechtsbündig mit >IStr nov/°34< [° Schrägstrich original] signiert und datiert. Es enthält Korrekturen.

 

188 No. 11518 / CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL / From “ROSSIGNOL” / [#*] For / [#*] PIANO SOLO / [#*] by / [#*] IGOR STRAVINSKY / Price 50c net / EDWARD B. MARKS MUSIC COPRPORATION / RCA Building · Radio City / NEW YORK / PRINTED IN U. S. A. // (Klavierausgabe [nachgeheftet] 23,3 x 30,4 (4° [4°]); 7 [5] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag [Außen-Ziertitel weinrot mit zwei linksseitig schleifenversehenen Text-Zierspiegeln 18 x 9,5 (16) + 10 (11) x 3 (3,9) goldfarben auf Weinrotgrund, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >FAMOUS COMPOSITIONS FOR PIANO SOLO / By / IGOR STRAVINSKY<**] ohne Vorspann + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >KALEIDOSCOPE [Vignette***] EDITION / A NEW SERIES OF MUSIC FOR PIANO BY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSERS / PART ONE<**** ohne Stand]; Kopftitel >CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL / From “ROSSIGNOL”; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert unter Kopftitel rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY< linksbündig kursiv >Arranged by / FREDERICK BLOCK<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig >Copyright MCMXLI by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation. / [halblinks] All Rights Reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter 1. Zeile Rechtsschutzvorbehalt halbrechts >Printed in U. S. A.<; Platten-Nummer >115185<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1941)

* linksseitig vier bis fünzeilige Verlagsvignette 1,9 x 3,1 [Halbrundbogensatz in links– und rechtsbündig auslaufendem Vierliniensystem:] >KALEIDOSCOPE< / [Vignette 1,4 x 2,1 Pianist an Flügel mit hochgestelltem Deckel] / [Normalsatz in links– und rechtsbündig auslaufendem Fünfliniensystem:] >EDITION<.

** angezeigt werden 17 Titel mit vorangestellten Editionsnummern und Preisen hinter Diastanzpunkten >11507 CHEZ PETROUSHKA from “Petrouska” $ .60 / 11508 DANSE DE LA FOIRE from “Petroushka” .60 / 10619 DANSE RUSSE from “Petroushka” .60 / 11510 DANSE DES ADOLESCENTS from “Sacre du Printemps” .50 / 11509 Ronde Pritaniere “Sacre du Printemps” .50 / 11506 Tourneys of the rival TRIBES“Sacre du Printemps” .50 / 11504 DEVILS DANCE from “Tale of the Soldier” (Histoire du Soldat) .50 / 11516 BERCEUSE AND FINALE from “Firebird” (Oiseau de Feu) .50 / 11517 DANSE INFERNALE from “Firebird” .75 / 11534 RONDE DES PRINCESSES from “Firebird” .60 / 11503 SCHERZO from “Firebird” .50 / 11514 SUPPLICATION from “Firebird” .60 / 11502 MARCHE CHINOISE from “Chant du Rossignol” .75 / 11518 CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL from “Rossignol” .50 / 11515 PASTORALE .50 / 11505 NAPOLITANA from “Suite of 5 Pieces” .50 / 10342 ETUDE Op. 7, No. 4 (F# Major) .60<

*** Pianist an Flügel mit hochgestelltem Deckel.

**** keine Strawinsky-Nennung; angezeigt werden Kompositionen von Komponisten in alphabetischer Anordnung zwischen I. Albeniz und E. Lecuona.

 

189Alb >CHANT DU ROSSIGNOL / From “ROSSIGNOL“< // ([in:] CONTEMPORARY MASTERPIECES · ALBUM No. 9 / ALBUM OF / IGOR STRAVINSKY / MASTERPIECES / [Porträt] / SELECTED COMPOSITIONS for PIANO SOLO / PRICE $1.00 NET / MADE / IN U.S.A. / EDWARD B. MARKS MUSIC CORPORATION · RCA BLDG. · RADIO CITY · NEW YORK; 87 [85] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz-hellorangerot auf creme [aufgemachte Außentitelei mit nach links gerichtetem Strawinsky-Porträt, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >ALBUMS OF CONTEMPORARY MASTERPIECES<* ohne Stand] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >KALEIDOSCOPE EDITION / A NEW SERIES FOR PIANO BY CONTEMPORARY COMPOSERS<** ohne Stand) // (5 S. [S. 3640], Bearbeiternennung 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 36 unterhalb Kopfitel linksbündig zentriert kursiv >Arranged by / Frederick Block<; Autorenangabe unter Bearbeiternennung rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt mit Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel mittig >Copyright MCMXLI by Edward B. Marks Music Corporation. / All Rights reserved. [#] Printed in U. S. A.<; Platten-Nummer >115185<; ohne Endevermerke) // 1941

* angezeigt werden 6 Alben (Albeniz, Debussy, Dohnányi, Rachmaninoff, Ravel, Scriabine)

** angezeigt werden unter >PART ONE< Kompositionen von Albeniz, Borodin, Bortkiewitz, Chabrier, Chavarri, Debussy, Dohnanyi, Dukas, Enescu, de Falla, Faure, Granados. Gliere, Holmes, Ippolitow-Iwanow, Juon, Lareglia, Lecuosa.

 

1810 igor strawinsky / le rossignol / chant et piano / édition russe de musique · boosey & hawkes // Igor Strawinsky / Le Rossignol / Conte lyrique en Trois Actes / de / I. Strawinsky et S. Mitousoff / d’aprés° Andersen / Traduction francais° de / M. D. Calvocoressi / Réduction pour chant et piano par l’auteur / Edition Russe de Musique (S. & N. Koussewitzky) · Boosey & Hawkes / London · New York · Toronto · Sydney · Capetown · Buenos Aires · Paris · Bonn // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang fadengeheftet 23,4 x 30,9 (2° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch; 93 [91] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag tomatenrot auf grüngrau [Außentitelei, 2 Leerseiten, Seite mit verlagseigener >Édition Russe de Musique / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< Werbung >Igor Strawinsky<* Stand >No. 453] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalten mittig zentriert >Copyright by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / for all countries / Copyright by arrangement, Boosey & Hawkes Inc., New York, U.S.A. / [#] / geblockt kursiv >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical repro– / duction in any form whatsoever (including film), translation of the libretto, / of the complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved<] + 3 Seiten Nachspann [Seite mit verlagseigener >Édition A. Gutheil / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< Werbung** >Serge Rachmaninoff< Stand >No. 461<, Seite mit verlagseigener >Édition A. Gutheil / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< Werbung >Serge Rachmaninoff< Stand >No. 527< [#] >3.49<, Seite mit verlagseigener >Édition A. Gutheil / (S. et N. Koussewitzky) / Boosey & Hawkes< Werbung >Serge Prokofieff< Stand >454<]; Kopftitel >ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ. [#] LE ROSSIGNOL.<; Autorenangabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert Seite 3 unterhalb Titel rechtsbündig zentriert >Èãîü Ñòðàâèíñêié. / Igor Strawinsky.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) for all countries. / Printed by arrangement, Boosey & Hawkes, Inc., New York, U.S.A.< rechtsbündig >All rights of reproduction in any form reserved.<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt rechtsbündig >Printed in England.<; Platten-Nummer: B. & H. 17187; Kompositionsschlußdatierung S. 93 >Clarens 1914.<; Ende-Nummer S. 93 linksbündig >5. 52. E<) // (1952)

° Schreibweise original.

* editionsgeordnete aufführungspraktische Reihenfolge mit französischen Titeln ohne Editionsnummern und ohne Preise zweispaltig. Angezeigt werden >Piano seul° / Trois Mouvements de Pétrouchka / Suite de Pétrouchka (Th. Szántó) / Marche chinoise de “ Rossignol ” / Sonate pour piano* / Ouverture de “ Mavra ” / Serenade en la / Symphonie*°° pour°° instruments à vent / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions pour piano°* / Le Chant du Rossignol / Apollon Musagète / Le Baiser de la Fée / Orpheus / Piano à quatre mains° / Le* Sacre du Printemps / Pétrouchka / Deux Pianos à quatre mains° / Concerto pour piano* / Capriccio pour piano* et orchestre / Chant et piano°* / Deux Poésies de Balmont / Trois Poésies de la lyrique japonaise / Trois petites chansons / Chanson de Paracha de “ Mavra ” / Introduction, chant du pêcheur, air du rossignol / Choeur°* / Ave Maria (a cappella) / Credo (a cappella) / Pater noster (a cappella) // Partitions pour chant et piano* / Rossignol. Conte lyrique en 3 actes / Mavra. Opéra bouffe en 1 acte / Œdipus Rex. Opéra-oratorio en 1 acte* / Symphonie de Psaumes / Perséphone / Violon et Piano°* / Suite d’après Pergolesi / Duo Concertant / Airs du Rossignol / Danse Russe / Divertimento / Suite Italienne / Chanson Russe / Violoncelle et Piano°* / Suite Italienne (Piatigorsky) / Musique de Chambre° / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Partitions de poche° / Suite de Pulcinella / Symphonies pour°° instruments à vent / Concerto pour piano* / Chant du Rossignol / Pétrouchka. Ballet / Sacre* du Printemps / Le Baiser de la Fée / Apollon Musagète / Œdipus Rex* / Perséphone / Capriccio* / Divertimento / Quatre Études pour orchestre / Symphonie de Psaumes / Trois pièces pour quatuor à cordes / Octuor pour instruments à vent / Concerto en ré pour orchestre à cordes< [* unterschiedliche Schreibweisen original; ° mittenzentriert; °° Schreibweise original]. Die Niederlassungsfolge ist mit London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Cape Town-Paris-Buenos Aires< angegeben.

** Niederlassungsfolge London-New York-Sydney-Toronto-Capetown-Buenos Aires-Paris.

 

1812 [verschlungenes Strawinsky-Monogramm] I S [Goldprägung 2,0 x 4,0] // Igor Stravinsky / Le Rossignol / The Nightingale [#] Die Nachtigall / Conte lyrique en trois actes / de / I. Stravinsky et S. Mitousoff / d’après Andersen / Traduction française de M. D. Calvocoressi / English translation by Robert Craft / Deutsche Übertragung von A. Elukhen und B. Feiwel / HPS 738 / Édition Russe de Musique (S. & N. Koussewitzky) · Boosey & Hawkes // (Taschenpartitur 1,7 x 18,3 x 26,7 mit Einband 1,7 x 19 x 27,3 ([Lex. 8°]); Texte russisch-französisch-deutsch-englisch; 159 [159] Seiten + 4 Seiten Kunstledereinband dunkelblau mit Rückendeckelbeschriftung Goldprägung längs >STRAVINSKY LE ROSSIGNOL< [Außentitelei, 3 Leerseiten] + 4 Seiten Vorspann mit Vorblatt [Innentitelei, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalten mittig zentriert >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< mittig zentriert kursiv >All rights of theatrical, radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form whatsoever / (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<; Besetzungsliste französisch-englisch-deutsch, Orchesterlegende >Orchestra< italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [45’] französisch] + 1 Seite Nachspann mit Nachblatt [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >LE ROSSIGNOL / THE NIGHTINGALE [#] DIE NACHTIGALL / ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ<; Autoren-Angabe 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 unter Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halbrechts >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 18936<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1962)

 

1814 Igor Stravinsky / Le Rossignol* / Boosey & Hawkes // Igor Stravinsky / Le Rossignol / The Nightingale [#] Die Nachtigall / Conte lyrique en trois actes / de / I. Stravinsky et S. Mitousoff / d’après Andersen / Traduction française de M. D. Calvocoressi / English translation by Robert Craft / Deutsche Übertragung von A. Elukhen und B. Feiwel / HPS 738 / Édition Russe de Musique (S. & N. Koussewitzky) ·Boosey & Hawkes // (Taschenpartitur [nachgeheftet] 17,7 x 26 ([Lex. 8°); Text russisch-französisch-englisch-deutsch; 159 [159] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz-weiß auf beige + 4 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Seite mit Rechtsschutzvorbehalten >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / All rights of theatrical,  radio, television performance, mechanical reproduction in any form whatsoever / (including film), translation of the libretto, of the complete work or parts thereof are strictly reserved.<; Besetzungsliste französisch-englisch-deutsch, Orchesterlegende italienisch + Spieldauerangabe [45’] französisch] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Kopftitel >[#] Le Rossignol [#] / The Nightingale [#] Die Nachtigall / [#] ÑÎËÎÂÅÉ [#]; Autoren-Angabe 1. Notentextseite unpaginiert [S. 1] neben Satzbezeichnung rechtsbündig >IGOR STRAVINSKY<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalte 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1923 by Édition Russe de Musique (Russischer Musikverlag) / Copyright assigned 1947 to Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. for all countries / English translation © 1956 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / German translation © 1961 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc. / Revised version © 1962 by Boosey & Hawkes, Inc.< rechtsbündig >All rights reserved<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite unterhalb Notenspiegel halbmittig >Printed in England<; Platten-Nummer >B. & H. 18936<; ohne Endevermerk) // (1962)

* Weißdruck.

 

1815Alb 1968 Ïåñíÿ ñîëîâüÿ èç îïåðû „Ñîëîâåé“; Verlag Musyka Moskau; in: ÈÇÁÐÀÍÍÛÅ ÂÎÊÀËÜÍÛÅ ÑÎ×ÈÍÅÍÈß äëÿ ãîëîñà ñ ôîðòåïèàíî; 54 S. 27,7 x 28,8 (4° [Lex. 8°]); Pl.-Nr. 5823; S. 3134

 

 

 

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM