31

Q u a t r e  C h a n t s  R u s s e s

pour voix et piano – Vier russische Lieder für Singstimme und Klavier – Four Russian Songs for voice and piano – ×åòûðå ðóññêèå ïåñíè äëÿ ãîëîñà ñ ôîðòåïèàíîQuattro canti russi per voce e pianoforte

 

 

Range of singing voice: f1 – a#2 (1st song ab1 – a#2; 2nd b1 – f#; 3rd a1 — g2 ; 4th f1 – f#2).

 

Performance practice: It is true that the songs are written for soprano voice and piano, but their origin lies in the sound world of the cimbalom. This is supported not only by the fact that Strawinsky orchestrated two of these songs for a miniature orchestra aiming at imitating the cimbalom sound in the widest sense, but especially by analysis of the sketches Strawinsky left. In Strawinsky’s estate there was a version for voice, cimbalom and flute from which we may infer that possibly an original version for cimbalom preceded the piano versions.

 

Source: Strawinsky modelled the songs on the words of Russian folk songs he had come across in the course of his preliminary studies for ‘Les Noces’ and for which he had not yet found a use.

 

Summary: The first song tells the tale of a drake sent out to look for his seven little ducklings and of his beautiful young duck wife. She is on a diving trip, here, there and everywhere. – The second song is an untranslatable counting rhyme containing double meanings where phrase endings rhyme and a rhythmical flow is central. – The third song tells of a little sparrow sitting on a hedge calmly watching what is happening around him. There is the scratching hen who finds a ring; the story-teller himself, moving his ten fingers; the wolf lying asleep on a woodstack, his tail swishing to and fro who cannot see the story-teller. – The fourth song depicts heavy snowstorms which have closed off all the ways of the story-teller who later turns to God in prayer who is in heaven and chooses all people out of love and spirit. The poet honours the Almighty God for ever and ever, says Amen and ends with his thanks.

 

Translations: There is only one original translation from the Russian into French. It was made by Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz with the help of Strawinsky and published in the Russian-French edition of the Songs in1920; later it was printed in the accompanying booklet of the CD edition. All other (anonymous) and in some cases extremely free renderings of the original did not rise to any importance during Strawinsky’s lifetime.

 

Construction and belonging to a genre: The Quatre Chants Russes are a collection of four original songs with strict metronome settings but without numbering for soprano voice and piano, which are unrelated in content or form. – The first song belongs to the ‘Trois Histoires Pour Enfants’ and is meant for very small children. – The second song belongs to the untranslatable counting rhymes or ‘pribautki’ of which Strawinsky had his own four-part suite of piano songs published (1917, Henn Publishers Geneva). – The third song belongs to the Russian folk song tradition of prophetic songs of which Strawinsky composed one each for women’s voices a cappella in 1914, 1915, 1916 and 1917, left unpublished by J & W Chester in London until Strecker discovered them there and had them published in 1930 as Unterschale by Schott Editors.

Now he composed a fifth song of this kind which he completed, it is thought, in March 1919 at the latest.

As the publishing dates varied greatly, the later song became known earlier than the ones actually composed earlier, and moreover there was no explanation of the origins of the song. – The fourth song: Neither the English (A Russian Spiritual) nor the German (Ein russisches Spiritual) translation have anything to do with the original title (Ñåêòàíòñêà) which Ramuz rendered much more aptly as ‘Chant Dissident’ (Uneinigkeitslied / dissident song) is completely unconnected with the preceding, easy-going children’s songs in content, mood or poetic form: It is a very personal song by the exile Strawinsky against the atheistic Russian revolution. Wherever the original comes from — the way in which Strawinsky uses it thematically it becomes the protest of a Christian (here: Strawinsky) whose return home (and therefore to God) is blocked by snowstorms (here: The Russian Revolution) understood in Solovjev’s equation of Russiandom and Christendom. The protest song experiences a sudden transformation into a hymn of thanks with an ‘Amen’ in the second-last line, as if to confirm that these wild storms will not prevent belief in God and it ends with a Christian Thanksgiving. – The four songs are so vastly different both poetically and musically, that strictly speaking they do not fit together at all and the combination is really accidental with a very strongly impressive last song. Obviously Strawinsky used material he had collected but not found occasion to use in his earlier series. The more important or ‘greater’ songs I and IV he later orchestrated.

 

Structure

[1.]

Ñåëåçåíü (Õîðîâîäíàß)

Canard. (Ronde)

[Der Enterich]

[The Drake]

Cåëåçåíü, ñåëåçåíü …

            Vieux canard, vieux canard, …

            [Enterich, lieber Enterich …]

            [Old drake, old drake …]

                        Crotchet = 116 (42 bars)

 

[2.]

Çàïâíàÿ

Chanson pour compter

[Abzähllied]

Íà êîìîìí, íà âîëîìí, …

            Un, moi qui l’ai, deux, toi qui l’as, …

                        [Eins, ich habe, zwei, du hast …]

                                    Crotchet = 168 (not divided into bars = 88 Quaver beats)

                                    Più mosso (nine 4/4-bars + three 5/8-bars)

                                    L’istesso tempo (not divided into bars 31 Crotchet = 62 Quaver beats)

 

[3.]

Ïîäáëþäíàÿ

Le moineau est assis …

[Der Spatz]

Cèäèòú âàðàáåé íà ÷óæîé ãàðàäüá.

            Le moineau est assis sur la haie d’autrui, …

                        [Der Spatz sitzt auf der nahen Hecke …]

                                    Crotchet = 112 (190 crotchet beats = 6 bars without a key signature [111] + 18

bars of changing meter [79])

 

[4.]

Cåêòàíòñêà.

Chant dissident

[Ein russisches Spiritual]

[A Russian Spiritual]

ßëèöà, ìÿòåëèöà, …

            Vient, neige, obscurité, …

                        Quaver = 168 (45 bars + 59 quaver beats without a key signature)

 

Corrections / Errata

Edition 312

[1st page = p. 3]

  1.) p. 3, 1st bar, Piano: only ¦ instead of m¦ [*].

  2.) p. 3, 3rd bar, Piano Bass: two-note chord quaver C-G should be three-note chord C-G-e.

  3.) p. 3, 3rd System, 3rd bar, above Piano: it should be added >pSub< [*].

  4.) p. 5, 16th bar, Piano, Bass written in treble clef: at the end of the bar should be added semiquaver triplet a-b-a1.

  5.) p. 9, 4th system, 4th bar, Piano discant, right hand: 4th (last but one) quaver g#2 instead of g2.

  6.) p. 11, 4th system, 2nd bar, Piano. bass written in treble clef: 1st quaver rest has to be replaced by quaver d2.

  7.) p. 11, 4th system, 4th bar, Piano. bass written in treble clef: 1st quaver rest has to be replaced by quaver c#2.

Edition 313

[1st page = p. 1]

  1.) p. 1, 3rd bar, Piano bass: two-note-chord quaver C-G has to be read as three-note-chord quaver C-G-e.

  2.) p. 1, 3rd System, voice: crotchet bb1 has to be dotted [**].

  3.) p. 3, 2nd bar, voice: the 2nd note should be read dotted crotchet instead of crotchet d2 [**].

  4.) p. 3, 3rd bar, voice: 3rd note crotchet f2 instead of crotchet g2 [**].

  5.) p. 3, 17th bar (4th system, last bar): metre 6/8 has to be added [**].

  5.) p. 8, 5th bar (2nd system, 2. bar): Correct assignation is demanded in the relationship Voice– Piano with two lines for orientation. The respective first notes of the second and third chains of semiquaver sextuplets should come to be positioned exactly over the second and third quaver notes in the bass respectively [**].

  7.) p. 9, 2nd system, 2nd bar, Voice: 6the semiquaver c#2 instead of c2.

  8.) p. 9, 4th system, 4th bar, Piano discant, right hand: 4th (last but one) quaver g#2 instead of g2.

* in 312 not corrected by Strawinsky. 

** In 313 not corrected by Strawinsky.

 

Style: The first three songs belong to the genre of popular Russian declamatory music of the kind of Les Noces with their clear and formal structure. The fourth song represents the break with the formalised diatonic scale derived from the text and by formal tightening of structure allowing personal sensations to come through. –

The quaver = 116 ‘Duck Song’ is in form and type a Russian ‘chorovod’; a roundel similar to the ‘Dance of the Princesses’ from his ‘Firebird’. The song displays a clear metrical structure with only few changes of rhythm  with the result that the 42 bars in all do not require any additional free metrical structures as is the case with the other songs. Both form and regular metrical flow are due to the words of the song. The realistic image of the duck dabbling here and there, serenely circling the pond, forbids excited declamatory musical language, aiming more at variations on a recurring theme. Thus the melodic line at its widest range includes a ninth (ab1 — a#2) starting from various central notes with the piano accompaniment formally repeating various typical runs. The ‘Duck Song’ is the only one of the series with instrumental prelude and interludes, general structural principles in an otherwise not easily determinable form. The first three bars introduce two of these figures, a lightly repeated two-tone interval underlying the entire prelude c1 — d2 and an upward movement of broken chords in calmly guided quavers. Both figures continue underneath the line of the singing voice, who is not given a single note to assist its entry (d2) in the final chord of the prelude (C-G-a1-d#2 — b2). The circular movement of the singing voice, leading from the minor key (no signature) through b flat minor to a flat major is taken over by the piano in bar 9 but imitated at the same time at a distance of a quarter tone. In the transition from bars 14 to 15 the enharmonic change from e flat to d sharp indicates the return to the polarity of the sharp scales. After an interlude of two bars (1718) the piano starts on the second rondo. The chords of the introduction remain in place, the melodic movement of the singing voice is transferred to the piano descant. In the following 14 bars (19 to 32) it steadily increases in range as far as e#2. The accordic piano accompaniment suddenly shifts from introductory descant figures to broken three tone chords and into the bass register, like in an invention. The second rondo ends with a rapid passage of a one-bar piano interlude, finishing on a chord. The last 9 bars (3442) form a kind of coda. The singing voice is led through increasing intervals, the melodic runs in the descant replace chord sequences and only the bass accompaniment is retained until 2 bars before the end. The composition ends with a chord of six tones, the uppermost this time also forming the final note for the singing voice, though in a different register and finally sounded for the sixth time as an ordering element: In five tones at the end of the piano introduction in bar three and finally in the six notes at the end of the material introduction in bar five before the piece enters the world of the b keys and before the extensive use of intervals begins near the end of the first interlude in bar nine at the end of the double chord accompaniment and before the inventionesque exchange of descant and bass in bar 27, at the end of the second interlude prior to the transition leading to the coda in bar 33 and now at the end of bar 42 as the final chord. –

The counting rhyme is given the metrical value quaver = 168 and is in two parts with a ternary interior structure, finishing with a piano postlude. Typical of the form, the structure answers to the pattern A1A2A3B1B2B3 — C of which only the B parts have bar lines and signatures thus making exact bar numbering impossible, moreover as the notation is ambiguous in places. Expressed in quaver values a range of 88 quavers for A, 87 for B and 62 for C, therefore 29 or 30  4/4 bars for the entire piece. The circling melody of the A parts stays within the narrow range of a major third between b1 and e flat 2. The only minimally changed formula in true Strawinsky manner is accompanied by precursing tone repetitions initiating the sounding of the full chord in d1. The chord with a termination on a single tone in the double sub-octave is sounded together with the tonal repetitions. After a sequence of 8 (9) quavers the voice sets in above the repetitions with the first stanza and develops the motif for a duration of 20 quaver beats (A 1). The sung text is divided by 2 crotchet rests, while the tone repetitions lead into the full chord altered by just one note, restarting immediately. The line motif is now extended, following the sung text by repeating parts thereof until 30 quaver values have been reached. Into the held final note (b1) and the last tone repetitions the piano plays a double glissando a2 — a and g — a2 of a total of 31 tones (A2). A3 begins with a chordal stab followed by another one like in A2. The vocal formula consisting of part of A1 and A2 begins in unison with the tone repetitions after a two crotchet rest, this time encompassing 18 quaver values. The identical double glissando is heard contemporaneously with the central part of the sung motif. Section A3 closes with the full chord and termination after the singing has stopped. As for part B, Strawinsky constructs a vocal motif in two parts of three bars each. It is sung three times with metrical shifts between bars and with crotchet rests between each motif. A single note is altered in the final clause. The piano repetitions are extended to two-tone chords alternating and extending both in the right and left hands, the range of the singing voice is raised by a semitone and at the same time extended by a whole tone to a tritone interval c2 to f#2. Part B3 closes with a 21 tone piano glissando h1 to g 4 and three 5/8 bars following, during which the voice recites its nonsense rhymes accompanied by piano glissandi in a free tone range. The piano postlude or C part is again written without bar divisions in time sequences of 31 crotchets. The pianist plays in the descant; both hands are in G-clef. The accelerando, at times ritardando descant run with its motoric insistence is repeated several times and moves within three octaves above middle C. It is derived from the melody line of the voice in part B. It is sounded above a three-tone chord repeated 16 times in ostinato form a1 – f#2 — a 2 in crotchets. The sixteenth repetition ist he final chord with an extra c3 in the descant without the crotchet rest. –

For the ‘Sparrow’s Song’ given the metronome values crotchet = 112 and consisting of six verses each ending with ‘hail’calls (Ñëàâíà) Strawinsky developed a double formula with a main part (A) and an after-call formula (B) that is repeated 6 times with each verse, so that the ensuing structure is A1B1A2B2A3B3A4B4A5B5A6B6. The main musical form closes with a chord and is expressed by the piano by way of almost identical passages is drawn up without bar lines, the after-call formula  being two to five bars long and is echoed by chords on the piano, consists of a metrical scheme that changes from bar to bar (with just one exception) making use of all interim steps from 3/8 to 5/8 time. In the first five main formulas the vocal range does not extend beyond the fourth interval a1 — d2, the last, higher intonation reduces it even to a major third d2 — f sharp 2. The call formula remains on d2 — e2 in the first two call sequences, in the extended, third call f2 and g2 are added and the range of a fourth is reached which remains till the end. — The piece begins with a full chord, the same that ends the main formula. Intonation alters very little throughout each repetition, between A1 and A2 there is no change at all, with the exception that A2 is not surrounded as it were by the chord, but ends with it. The structural reason for this lies in the fact that the call formula ends in a full chord with a single note termination. Accompaniment in the descant consists of a diatonic sequence of semiquavers rolling up and down between a1 and d 2, juxtaposed by a stereotype downward movement in the bass in the comparable range d2 – c#2 — b1 — a1 in quavers which remains unchanging and is prolonged or shortened by a quaver value or two. The crossing of hands does not permit legato playing, the legato being articulated ‘marcato’ by Strawinsky requiring a smoothly repetitive mechanism of the instrument. The note value of A1 is 18 quavers. The subsequent mainly accordic accompaniment of the after-call B1 follows the metrical pattern of 3/3 and 6/8 time and encompasses a measure of 12 quavers, so that A1 and A2 together make a compass of 30 quavers values. A 2 equals A1 without appoggiatura (17 quavers), B2 with 3/4 and 3/8 metronome settings shortens B1 by three quaver values  (9 quavers). B3 extends the sung formula recombined using identical material so that the similarly extended accompaniment now beginning in the descant on c2 with downward movement does not experience any changes and likewise begins without an appoggiatura, thus reaching a measure of 20 quavers. The call formula is doubled mediant-fashion with 5/8, 3/8, 6/8 and 2/4 time signatures and is extended by variation in bar 3. The time value corresponds to 18 quavers. A 4 corresponds A2 (17 quavers) both in the accompaniment and the vocal line. B4 this time commences with the extension by variation of the previously heard call in bar 3 and closes in the same way, except for the accompanying chords (9 quavers). A5 and B5 are quasi verbatim reprises of A4 and B4. A6 and B6 finally introduce the strongest change to this miniature imagery. The singing voice alternates between d2, e2 and f sharp 2 only. The descant accompaniment relinquishes its diatonic six-tone run and instead takes up a repeating accordic five-tone run f sharp 2 — d2 — a1 — c2 — e2; creating the auditive sensation of a retrograde stress pattern in the cadences; merely the accompaniment in the bass remains unchanged. The time value corresponds to 22 quavers. B6 concludes the piece with a respective build-up of chords and moreover receives a hitherto absent dynamic increase from piano to fortissimo over 5 bars (22 quavers with final fermata). The range is like that of B5 but is topped by a single g2. –

The metronome setting crotchet = 168 of the ‘Dissident Song’ with a vocal range of something more than an octave (f1 – f#2), differs strongly from the preceding songs in both style and content. Its structure is less formal, the mostly diatonic aspect of the composition retreats, the melodic line is no longer dependent merely on the meaning of individual words or contexts. The modus becomes more intense, strong personal emotions become discernible. The world of children’s songs and nonsense rhymes is left behind. The central section of the piece does not depend on declamatory elements as much as on the meaning of the words combined with alternating rhythms. The 45 bars in 2/8, 3/8, 4/8, 5/8, 6/8 and 7/8 time are extended by a free coda without time signature and without bar lines over a length of 59 quavers. There is no formal structuring of exchangeable patterns or figures in accordance with a lettered scheme. The only formal ordering element discernible is to be found in the sequences of textual extensions of range and melodic patterns and in the barless coda. The complaint of snowstorms and barred roads is depicted as a circular lamentation with triplets torn apart, first of all within the ambitus of a whole tone a1 — b1. This is juxtaposed by dampened, single, pedalled notes in the piano played staccato. During the last two bars of this imaginary first section the tonal range extends to a fourth g1 — c2, while the piano ceases its single note accompaniment in the descant and instead develops finely-wrought patterns in broken fifths and sevenths. This way Strawinsky succeeds in transiting from the hitherto calmly restrained 6/8 and 7/8 time sequences to the constantly changing rhythmical forms in the 29 bars to follow, thus metrically reconstructing the excitement that has overcome the story-teller at the thought of reaching the realm of the Almighty Father. The tonal range has now extended to a major sixth (a1 – f#2). The excitement is taken over by the accompanying piano. Expression thereof is the move away from the bass register and towards great punctual jumps extending further than an octave with chords of two tones at most. Calm returns the moment the story-teller starts praying and intones God’s praise. The metrical alternations lead into a regular 2/4 time pattern which after bar 45 does not even require an ordering system of bars, because in singing hymns of praise and thanking God, peace has returned. Lines of trills in the descant piano accompaniment with end ornamental melodic figures reminiscent of bells ringing speak of joy and hope. The piano fundament is again in the bass register with regular unbroken quaver figures in a wide, spatial movement. The vocal part reaches its lowest tone, an f sharp 1 and its widest range with a major seventh (e sharp 2) which is reduced again by degrees. The piece closes with a perfect third in major E — e1 – g#1 and an end trill from the piano on e1.

 

Dedication: >DÉDIÉ À / PAR MADAME ET MONSIEUR / MAJA ET BELA STROZZI-PE³I³ [Dedicated to Mrs. and Mr. Maja and Bela Strozzi-Pecic].

 

Dedicatees: see Remarks.

 

Duration: 445″.

 

Date of origin: Morges, according to the dating, between December 1918 and October 1919 (I: 28th December 1918; II: 16th March 1919; III: 23th October 1919; IV: March 1919).

 

First performance: 17th March 1919 in the Geneva Conservatory with Tatjana Tatjanow (Soprano) and (probably) José Iturbi (Piano).

 

Remarks: No more is known about the history of the songs than what Strawinsky himself has told us, namely that in the Winter of 1919 (really the Winter of 1918/19) a Croatian soprano with an unusually beautiful voice asked him to compose something for her. Strawinsky agreed, and the ‘Quatre Chants Russes’ came into being., most surely from materials collected earlier but not put to use. Why he agreed to this — probably well-paid — order, while working on other music is to be explained from the financial distress of those years, when eleven people were dependent on his income who himself had no regular proceeds. During this time he accepted several commissions which he normally would not have considered, among them the ballet music for Pulcinella, a situation that recurred when he decided not to return from the United States. When the songs were premièred in Geneva, Maja de Strozzi-Pecic was no longer residing there. Her sudden departure is much regretted in contemporary letters. Ernest Ansermet indirectly confirmed the high esteem in which he too held this singer, when he wrote to Strawinsky on 17th March 1919 stating that Madame Pecic was no longer present (s’en aille = in vernacular turn of phrase, she made off), and commented it with ‘mais quel dommage’ (what a pity, or verbatim: what a misfortune). His regret possibly referred both to the loss of a good vocal artist and the ensuing disorder in the Ansermet concert plan. The comment reads as if another, unspoken but intuited situation were referred to. It is surprising indeed that the soprano with an apparently excellent voice ordered a composition for herself (and most likely paid for it, otherwise Strawinsky would not have had the dedication printed) but did not herself première it, which she could easily have done. Ansermet and Strawinsky had evidently not been informed of the fact that Mrs. Strozzi-Pecic, who was in fact an above-average singer, had accepted an offer to perform opera in Germany and furthermore had achieved some great successes. She was born on 19th December 1882 in Zagreb, made her debut in 1901 and continued, via Wiesbaden and Graz, to a temporary period at Geneva, which she left in 1919. She died on 2nd February 1962 in Rijeka. While this is only speculation, she probably, as a singer accustomed to success, had imagined that the fruits of her and her husband’s commission would amount to more than a couple of short songs for children from Strawinsky and therefore left Genf disappointed and without saying good-bye.

* For background information, my thanks go to Mr Stefan P. L. Romansky † (Bonn).

 

Versions: The ‘Quatre Chants Russes’ appeared in the second half of the year 1920 at J & W Chesters in London in a Russian-French edition and were most probably not edited later to include a German or English translation. Only 35 years later Strawinsky separated the first and fourth songs from the group, orchestrated them with the cimbalom in mind for voice, flute, harp and guitar and combined them as nos. I and II with two songs from an original series of three entitled ‘Trois Histoires pour Enfants’ to make ‘Four Songs’ in 1953 and 1954, premièred in 1955, re-edited in the same year in an English version for the singer and a Russian phonetical line for English-speaking people at J & W Chester’s in London and Strawinsky made two model recordings in 1955 and 1965. Characteristically, the Russian Songbook reprint of 1968 included only the first three songs. The religious fourth song containing an accusation against the hateful enmity of anything religious in communism was not included in the illegal print. The version of the fourth song for voice, flute and cimbalom remained unpublished during Strawinsky’s lifetime. A facsimile may be found in Robert Craft’s First Volume of Selected Correspondence of 1982 on pp 427429.

 

Historical recording: Not traceable as a series of songs with piano; pieces 1 and 4 are only in the instrumental version of the Four Songs.

 

CD-Edition: Not taken on as a series of songs with piano; pieces 1 and 4 are only in the instrumental version of the Four Songs.

 

Autograph: The manuscript passed from the ownership of Chester into the British Library in London. Some scattered sketches, which above all suggest Strawinsky’s early intentions in terms of orchestration, passed from his estate to the Paul Sacher Foundation in Basel. There is also the corrected printed version for pianola.

 

Copyright: 1920 by J. & W. Chester in London

 

Editions

a) Overview

311 1919 Voice-Piano; preprint 3rd and 4th song; La Revue Romande 15th September 1919.

312 1920 Voice-Piano; R-F; Chester London; 13 pp.; J. W. C. 3831.

                        312Straw [1920] ibd. [with annotations].

313

                        313Straw [1920] ibd. [with annotations].

314 [+1945] Voice-Piano; R-F; Chester; 11 pp.; J.W.C. 3831.

b) Characteristic features

312 IGOR STRAWINSKY / QUATRE / CHANTS RUSSES / POUR VOIX ET PIANO / MIS EN FRANÇAIS [#] DÉDIÉ À / PAR [#] MADAME ET MONSIEUR / [#] MAJA ET BELA STROZZI-PE³I³ / C. F. RAMUZ / PRIX NET FR. 4.50 (3/_) / °J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. [#] °°SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA FRANCE / [#] °°ROUART, LEROLLE & Cie / °LONDON: [#] °°29 Rue D’ASTORG, PARIS. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W,-1. [#] / [#] °°SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA BELGIQUE / °GENÈVE: [#] °°MAISON CHESTER / °911 PLACE DE LA FUSTERIE [#] °°86 RUE DE LA MONTAGNE, BRUXELLES. / °DÉPOSÉ SELON LES TRAITÉS INTERNATIONAUX. / °PROPRIÉTÉ POUR TOUS LES PAYS. / °TOUS DROITS DE TRADUCTION, DE REPRODUCTION ET / °D’ARRANGEMENTS RÉSERVÉS. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / QUATRE / CHANTS RUSSES / POUR VOIX ET PIANO / MIS EN FRANÇAIS [#] DÉDIÉ À / PAR [#] MADAME ET MONSIEUR / [#] MAJA ET BELA STROZZI-PE³I³ / C. F. RAMUZ / PRIX NET FR. 4.50 (3/_) / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. [#] SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA FRANCE / [#] ROUART, LEROLLE & Cie / LONDON: [#] 29 RUE D’ASTORG, PARIS. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W,-1. [#] / [#] SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA BELGIQUE / GENÈVE: [#] MAISON CHESTER / 911 PLACE DE LA FUSTERIE [#] 86 RUE DE LA MONTAGNE, BRUXELLES, / DÉPOSÉ SELON LES TRAITÉS INTERNATIONAUX. / PROPRIÉTÉ POUR TOUS LES PAYS. / TOUS DROITS DE TRADUCTION, DE REPRODUCTION ET / D’ARRANGEMENTS RÉSERVÉS. / °°°ENGRAVED & PRINTED BY C. G. RÖDER, LEIPZIG // (Edition for chant and piano stapled 22.5 x 30.2 (4° [4°]); sung texts Russian-French; 13 [11] pages + 4 cover pages black on beige brown [front cover title, 3 empty pages] + 2 pages front matter [title page, empty page] + 1 page back matter [empty page]; song title Russian-French as title head; author specified flush right centred below translator specified 1st page of the score paginated p. 3 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1918<, p. 8 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1919< next to und below translator specified p. 6, 10 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1919<; translator specified 1st page of the score p. 3, p. 6, 8, 10 below title head flush left centred >Mis en français / par C. F. Ramuz<; legal reservation 1st page of the score p. 3, pp. 6, 8, 10 below type area flush left >Copyright 1920 by J. & W. Chester Ltd.< flush right partly in italics p. 3 centred >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved.<, p. 6 no centred >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved.<, p. 8 centred >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved<, p. 10 centred >Tous droits réservés / All rights reserved<; plate number >J.W.C. 3831<; without production indication; without end marks) // (1920)

° On the left side, the text is justified to the left with indents; this is also the case fort he title page.

°° On the right side, the text is justified to the left with indents; this is also the case fort he title page.

°°° Only the inner title page flush right between the last two lines flush left.

 

312Straw

The original edition served Strawinsky as the basis of his Pleyela version, which he noted on a separate sheet and dated as 1922. Strawinsky’s copy also contains corrections and many notes on performance. The outer title page is missing.

 

313 CHESTER / LIBRARY / IGOR STRAWINSKY / QUATRE CHANTS RUSSES / [°] / VOICE & PIANO / [°] / PRICE 3/- NET / REVISED PRICE / J. & W. CHESTER LTD // (Edition chant and piano stapled 24.1 x 30.8 (4° [4°]); sung texts Russian-French; 11 [11] pages+ 4 cover pages black on creme white [a full-page Chester Lyre surrounded by a coat of arms black on white with (presumably) the artist’s signature >H J M< # >1914< entered left and flush right at the bottom of the frame, index >CONTENTS<, empty page, page with publisher’s advertisements >EDUCATIONAL SERIES / OF / RUSSIAN MUSIC<* without production data] without front matter + 1 page back matter [empty page]; song title Russian-French as title head; author specified below song title flush right centred 1st page of the score paginated p. 1 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1918<, pp. 4, 6, 8 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1919<; translator specified pp. 1, 4, 6, 8 below song title flush left centred >Mis en français / par C. F. Ramuz.<; legal reservations below type area pp. 1, 4, 6, 8 flush left >Copyright 1920 by J. & W. Chester Ltd.< partly in italics flush right centred pp. 1, 6, 8 >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved.< not centred p. 4 >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved<; plate number >J.W.C. 3831<; production indication 1st page of the score flush left below legal reservation >Printed in England <; without end mark) // [1920])

° Dividing horizontal line of  1.4  cm.

* The advert lists contains compositions by increasing difficulty in two columns from >BOOK 1 — Easy Pieces< to >BOOK 7 — Concert Pieces<; Strawinsky not mentioned.

313Straw

The copy in Strawinsky’s estate contains corrections, but is neither signed nor dated.

 

 

31

Q u a t r e  C h a n t s  R u s s e s

pour voix et piano – Vier russische Lieder für Singstimme und Klavier – Four Russian Songs for voice and piano – ×åòûðå ðóññêèå ïåñíè äëÿ ãîëîñà ñ ôîðòåïèàíîQuattro canti russi per voce e pianoforte

 

 

Stimmumfang: f1 bis ais2 (1. Lied: as1-ais2; 2. Lied: h1-fis2; 3. Lied: a1-g2; 4. Lied: f1-fis2).

 

Aufführungspraxis: Die Lieder sind zwar für Sopranstimme und Klavier geschrieben, aber aus der Klangwelt des Zymbalons heraus erdacht. Dafür spricht nicht nur der Umstand, daß Strawinsky zwei dieser Lieder für eine instrumentale Miniaturbesetzung orchestrierte, die weitgehend auf den Zymbalonklang abstellte, sondern vor allem der Skizzenbefund. Im Nachlaß Strawinskys befand sich eine Fassung für Singstimme, Zymbalon und Querflöte, aus der sich möglicherweise schließen läßt, daß den jetzigen Klavierliedern Zymbalon-Urfassungen vorausgegangen sind.

 

Vorlage: Strawinsky benutzte als Vorlage russische Volksliedgedichte, die er bei seinen Studien im Rahmen der Vorarbeiten zu Les Noces entdeckt und für die er bislang keine Verwendung gehabt hatte.

 

Inhalt: Das erste Lied handelt von einem Enterich, der aufgefordert wird, hinauszugehen und seine sieben kleinen Entchen zu suchen und seine schöne junge Ente. Die befindet sich auf einem Tauchbummel, ist hier und dort und überall. – Das zweite Lied ist ein unübersetzbares Abzähllied mit Doppelsinnigkeiten, bei dem es lediglich auf gereimte Endungen und rhythmischen Fluß ankommt. – Das dritte Lied handelt von einem kleinen Spatzen, der auf einer Hecke sitzt und geruhsam das betrachtet, was um ihn her vorgeht. Da ist die scharrende Henne, die einen Ring findet; da ist der Erzähler selbst, der seine zehn Finger bewegt; da ist der Wolf, der auf einem Holzhaufen liegt und schläft, seinen Schwanz hin und her bewegt und den Erzählenden nicht sieht. – Das vierte Lied schildert wilde Schneestürme, die alle Wege des zunächst Erzählenden, dann Betenden zu Gott verschlossen haben, der im Himmel ist und alle Menschen in Liebe und im Geist erwählt. Der Dichter ehrt ihn, Gott den Allmächtigen, für immer und ewig, schließt ein Amen an und dankt ihm.

 

Übersetzungen: Es gibt nur eine originale Übersetzung aus dem Russischen in das Französische. Sie wurde von Charles-Ferdinand Ramuz mit Hilfe Strawinskys angefertigt und in der russisch-französischen Druckausgabe von 1920 veröffentlicht, später in die offizielle CD-Ausgabe übernommen. Alle weiteren (anonymen) und in einigen Fällen sogar extrem umdeutenden Übersetzungen spielten zu Lebzeiten Strawinskys keine Rolle.

 

Aufbau und Gattungszugehörigkeit: Die Quatre Chants Russes sind eine Sammlung von 4 original metronomisierten, aber nicht numerierten Sopran-Klavier-Liedern, bilden aber keine sachlich oder inhaltlich zusammenhängende Serie oder Suite. – Das 1. Lied gehört nach Form und Inhalt zu den Trois Histoires pour Enfants und ist seiner ganzen Anlage nach für noch sehr kleine Kinder gedacht. Das 2. Lied entstammt der Gattung der unübersetzbaren Pribautki, von denen Strawinsky 1917 bei Henn in Genf eine eigene vierteilige Klavierlied-Suite hatte erscheinen lassen. Das 3. Lied gehört in den Bereich der volkstümlichen russischen Wahrsagelieder, von denen Strawinsky 1914, 1915, 1916 und 1917 jeweils ein Stück für Frauenchor a capella komponiert hatte, die unveröffentlicht bei Chester in London lagen, bis sie Strecker dort entdeckte und 1930 als Unterschale im Schott-Verlag herausbrachte. Jetzt komponierte Strawinsky also ein 5. Lied dieser Gattung mit Entstehungsdatum spätestens März 1919 nach. Durch die Verschiebung der Erscheinungsdaten lernte man das spätere Lied eher kennen als die früheren und bekam außerdem keine Aufklärung über das, was das Lied herkunftsmäßig besagte. — Das 4. Lied endlich, dessen heutige englische (A Russian Spiritual) und deutsche (Ein russisches Spiritual) Übersetzung nun wirklich nichts mit dem russischen Originaltitel Ñåêòàíòñêà zu tun hat, den Ramuz wesentlich treffender mit Chant dissident (Uneinigkeitslied) übertrug, geht weder inhaltlich noch stimmungsmäßig noch vom dichterischen Format her mit den vorhergehenden leichten Kinderliedern eine Verbindung ein. Es ist ein sehr persönliches Lied des Exilanten Strawinsky gegen den Atheismus der Russischen Revolution. Woher auch immer die Vorlage stammen mag, in der von Strawinsky eingesetzten Weise im Jahre 1919 ist es ein Protestlied eines Christen (hier: Strawinsky), dem man durch wilde Schneestürme (hier: die Russische Revolution) den Weg in seine Heimat (hier: Rußland nach Art der Solowjewschen Identifizierung von Russentum und Christentum) und damit zu Gott versperrt hat. Das Protestlied schlägt in hymnische Gottesverehrung mit einem Amen am vorzeiligen Ende um, das bekräftigt, von diesen wilden Stürmen nicht vom Glauben abgehalten zu werden, und es endet mit einer christlichen Danksagung. – Die 4 Lieder sind sowohl vom Poetischen wie vom Künstlerisch-Musikalischen her so unterschiedlich, daß streng genommen keins zum anderen paßt und die Zusammenstellung eher zufällig mit einem starken Lied als Finale wirkt. Offensichtlich hat Strawinsky liegengebliebenes Material benutzt, das er in seine früheren Serien nicht mit hinein nehmen wollte. Die bedeutenderen Lieder I und IV hat er später instrumentiert.

 

Aufriß

[1.]

Ñåëåçåíü (Õîðîâîäíàß)

Canard. (Ronde)

[Der Enterich]

[The Drake]

Cåëåçåíü, ñåëåçåíü …

            Vieux canard, vieux canard, …

            [Enterich, lieber Enterich …]

            [Old drake, old drake …]

                                    Viertel = 116 (42 Takte)

 

[2.]

Çàïâíàÿ

Chanson pour compter

[Abzähllied]

Íà êîìîìí, íà âîëîìí, …

            Un, moi qui l’ai, deux, toi qui l’as, …

                        [Eins, ich habe, zwei, du hast …]

                                    Viertel = 168 (ungetaktet 88 Achtelwerte)

                                    Più mosso (9 Vierviertel-Takte + 3 Fünfachtel-Takte)

                                    L’istesso tempo (ungetaktet 31 Viertel– = 62 Achtelwerte)

 

[3.]

Ïîäáëþäíàÿ

Le moineau est assis …

[Der Spatz]

Cèäèòú âàðàáåé íà ÷óæîé ãàðàäüá.

            Le moineau est assis sur la haie d’autrui, …

                        [Der Spatz sitzt auf der nahen Hecke …]

                        Viertel = 112 (190 Achtelwerte = 6 Takte ohne Taktvorzeichnung [111] + 18 Takte

wechselnder Metrik [79])

 

[4.]

Cåêòàíòñêà.

Chant dissident

[Ein russisches Spiritual]

[A Russian Spiritual]

ßëèöà, ìÿòåëèöà, …

            Vient, neige, obscurité, …

                        Achtel = 168 (45 Takte + 59 Achtel ohne Taktvorzeichnung)

 

Korrekturen / Errata

Ausgabe 312

[1. Seite = S. 3]

  1.) S. 3, 1. Takt, Klavier: statt m¦ muß es nur ¦ heißen [*].

  2.) S. 3, 3. Takt, Klavier Baß: der Zweitonakkord Achtel C-G ist richtig als Dreitonakkord Achtel C-G– e zu lesen.

  3.) S. 3, 3. System, 3. Takt, oberhalb Klavier: es ist ein >pSub< einzutragen [*].

  4.) S. 9, 4. System, 4. Takt, Klavier Diskant, rechte Hand: die 4. (vorletzte) Achtel-Note ist richtig gis2 statt g2 zu lesen

  5.) S. 5 16. Takt Klavier Baß violingeschlüsselt: am Taktgende ist eine Sechzehntel-Triole a-h-a1 nachzutragen,

  6.) S. 11, 4. System, 2. Takt, Klavier. violingeschlüsselter Baß: die 1. Achtelpause ist durch eine Achtelnote d2 zu ersetzen.

  7.) S. 11, 4. System, 4. Takt, Klavier, violingeschlüsselter Baß: die Achtelpause ist durch eine Viertelnote cis2 zu ersetzen.

Ausgabe 313

[1. Seite = S. 1]

  1.) S. 1, 3. Takt, Klavier Baß: der Zweitonakkord Achtel C-G ist richtig als Dreitonakkord Achtel C-G– e zu lesen.

  2.) S. 1, 3. System, Gesangsstimme: die Viertelnote b1 ist zu punktieren [**].

  3.) S. 3, 2. Takt, Gesangsstimme: die zweite Note ist als punktierte Viertelnote statt als Viertel d2 zu  lesen [**].

  4.) S. 3, 3. Takt, Gesangsstimme: die dritte Note ist richtig Viertel f2 statt Viertel g2 zu lesen [**].

  5.) S. 3, 17 Takt (4. System, letzter Takt): es ist das Metrum 6/8 einzutragen [**].

  6.) S. 8, 5. Takt (2. System, 2. Takt): mit zwei Orientierungsstrichen wird eine richtige Zuordnung im Verhältnis Gesangsstimme-Klavier verlangt. Die jeweils erste Note der zweiten und dritten Sechzehntel-Sextolen-Ketten soll paßgenau über der zweiten beziehungsweise dritten Baß–Achtelnote zu stehen kommen [**].

  7.) S. 9, 2. System, 2. Takt Gesangsstimme: die 6. Sechzehntelnote ist statt falsch c2 richtig cis2 zu lesen [**].

  8.) S. 9, 4. System, 4. Takt, Klavier Diskant, rechte Hand: die 4. (vorletzte) Achtel-Note ist richtig gis2 statt g2 zu lesen.

* in 312 von Strawinsky nicht korrigiert. 

** In 313 von Strawinsky nicht korrigiert.

 

Stilistik: Die ersten drei Lieder gehören zum Umfeld der volkstümlichen russischen Deklamationsmusik nach Art von Les Noces und sind formal übersichtlich gegliedert. Das vierte Lied durchbricht die sprachabgeleitete formalisierte Diatonik, wird formal verdichtet und läßt persönliche Empfindungen frei. –

Das mit Viertel = 116 metronomisierte Entenlied ist formtypologisch ein russischer Chorovod, ein rondoartiger Reigentanz, wie ihn Strawinsky schon einmal mit dem “Tanz der Prinzessinnen” aus dem Feuervogel geschrieben hatte. Dadurch erhält das Lied eine klare metrische Gliederung mit nur wenigen Taktwechselspielen, so daß den 42 Takten anders als bei den drei nachfolgenden Liedern keine freimetrischen Strukturen zugerechnet werden müssen. Die Wahl des Formtyps und auch der Verzicht auf unstete Metrenwechsel waren textbedingt. Das realistische Bild von der hier und da gründelnden Ente, die unbekümmert mit Gleichmut ihre Kreise zieht, verbietet aufgeregten deklamierenden Sprachfluß und zielt eher auf eine Variativform des immer Gleichen. So kreist die Melodiestimme mit ihrem größten Ambitus in der ganzen Liedfolge im Umfang einer None as1 bis ais2 um wechselnde Zentraltöne, formalisiert das Klavier seine Begleitung auf verschiedene Typenfolgen. Das Entenlied ist das einzige Lied der Serie mit instrumentalen Vor– und Zwischenspielen, die gleichzeitig eine pauschale Gliederung in eine formtypologisch sonst nicht so leicht greifbare Musik hineinbringen. Die ersten 3 Takte stellen zwei dieser Figurentypen vor, den leichten, während des ganzen Vorspiels repetierten Zweiklang c1-d2 und eine aufwärts in ruhigen Achteln geführte Bewegung gebrochener Akkorde. Beides wird der Singstimme unterlegt, die im Abschlußakkord des Vorspiels (C-G-a1-dis2-h2) keinen einzigen Ton für ihren Einsatz (d2) vorgegeben bekommt. Die von vorzeichenlosem Moll über b-moll nach As-Dur führende Kreisbewegung der Singstimme wird in Takt  9 vom Klavier übernommen, aber gleichzeitig im Viertelwertabstand von der Singstimme imitiert. Im Übergang von Takt 14 zu 15 zeigt die enharmonische Verwechslung von es zu dis die Rückkehr zu Kreuztonartenpolen an. Mit einem zweitaktigen Zwischenspiel (Takt 1718) nimmt das Klavier den zweiten Rondodurchgang auf. Die Akkordik der Einleitung bleibt erhalten, die Melodiebewegung der Singstimme wird auf den Klavierdiskant übertragen. In den nächsten 14 Takten (Takt 1932) erweitert sie ständig ihren Ambitus bis zum ais2. Die kleinakkordische Begleitbewegung des Klaviers verlagert plötzlich nach Inventionsart ihre einleitenden Diskantfiguren als abwärts führende gebrochene Dreitonakkorde in den Baß und den einleitenden Zweitonakkord in den Diskant. Der zweite Durchgang klingt mit Laufwerk in einem eintaktigen neuerlichen Klavierzwischenspiel mit Akkordabschluß aus. Die letzten 9 Takte (Takt 3442) bilden eine Art Koda. Die Singstimme wird stark intervallisch geführt, das Diskantlaufwerk ersetzt die Diskantakkordik und nur die Baßbegleitung bleibt bis 2 Takte vor Schluß erhalten. Das Stück schließt mit dem Sechstonakkord, dessen oberster Ton lagenversetzt diesmal auch den Schlußton für die Singstimme bildet und der als finalgliederndes Merkmal nun zum sechstenmal erklingt: fünftönig am Ende der Klaviereinleitung Takt 3, endgültig sechstönig am Ende der Materialvorstellung Takt 5 vor der Fortführung in die Welt der B-Tonarten und dem Beginn der ausgreifenden Intervallik, am Ende des 1. Zwischenspiels Takt 19, am Ende der Doppelakkordbegleitung vor der inventionsartigen Vertauschung von Diskant– und Baßfiguren Takt 27, am Ende des 2. Zwischenspiels vor dem Übergang in die Koda Takt 33 und jetzt am Ende von Takt 42 als Schlußakkord. –

Das mit Viertel = 168 metronomisierte Abzähllied ist zweiteilig mit dreiteiliger Binnengliederung und schließt mit einem Klaviernachspiel. Formtypologisch ergibt sich ein Aufbau A1-A2-A3-B1-B2-B3-C, der nur die B-Teile mit Taktstrichen und Taktvorzeichnung versieht und daher Taktangaben unmöglich macht, zumal die Notenschreibweise auch noch uneindeutig ist. In Achtelwerten umgerechnet ergibt sich ein Umfang von 88 Achtelwerten für A, 87 Achtelwerten für B und 62 Achtelwerten für C, also rund 29 oder 30 Vierviertel-Takten für das ganze Stück. Die kreisende Melodieformel der A-Teile verläuft im engsten Ambitus einer großen Terz zwischen h1 und es2. Begleitet wird die in den drei Teilen nur minimal nach Strawinsky-Art veränderte Formel durch vorlaufende und akkordschlagbeginnende Klaviertonrepetitionen auf d1. Der Akkordschlag mit einem Einzeltonnachschlag in der doppelten Unteroktave setzt zugleich mit den Tonrepetitionen ein. Nach einem Zeitverlauf von 8 (9) Achtelwerten beginnt die Singstimme über den Tonrepetitionen mit dem 1. Textvers und der auf 20 Achtelwerte entwickelten Formel (A1). Der gesungene Text wird durch 2 Viertelpausen getrennt, während die Tonrepetitionen in den um einen Ton veränderten Akkordschlag hineinführen und nach dem Nachschlag sofort wieder einsetzen. Die Formel wird jetzt textbedingt durch Wiederholung von Formelteilen auf 30 Achtelwerte erweitert. In den ausgehaltenen Sopranschlußton h1 und die letzten Tonrepetitionen spielt das die Tonrepetitionen unterbrechende Klavier ein Doppelglissando a2-a und g-a2 von insgesamt 31 Tönen hinein (A2). A3 beginnt mit Akkordschlag und Nachschlag in der Zusammensetzung von A2. Die aus A2 und A1 zusammengeschnittene Singformel setzt zugleich mit den Tonrepetitionen nach einer Zweiviertelpause ein und umfaßt diesmal 18 Achtelwerte. Das mit A2 notenidentische Doppelglissando klingt in die Mitte der Singformel hinein. Der Abschnitt (A3) schließt mit dem Klavierakkord und dem Nachschlag bei verstummter Singstimme. Für den B-Teil konstruiert Strawinsky eine zweiteilig organisierte Singformel von jeweils 3 Takten. Sie erklingt dreimal metrisch zwischen den Taktstrichen verschoben, jeweils durch eine Viertelpause voneinander abgetrennt und mit einer Einzeltonveränderung jeweils in der Finalklausel. Die Tonrepetitionen des Klaviers sind in Akkordrepetitionen in Form von Zweitonakkord-Wechselschlägen in linker und rechter Hand erweitert, der Singstimmenambitus ist um einen Halbton angehoben und gleichzeitig um einen Ganzton auf ein Tritonusintervall c2 bis fis2 erweitert worden. Der B3-Teil schließt mit einem 21tönigen Klavierglissando von h1 bis g4 und drei nachfolgenden Fünfachteltakten, in denen die klavierglissandobegleitete Singstimme ihre Unsinnsreime tonhöhenfrei singend rezitiert. Der als Klaviernachspiel ausgelegte C-Teil ist wieder taktstrichlos im Zeitdauernwert von 31 Vierteln geschrieben. Er spielt im oberen Register mit beidhändig Violinschlüssel. Die sich beschleunigende, mehrfach wiederholte und auch retardierende motorische Diskantformel im dreigestrichenen Bereich ist aus der Melodiebildung der Singstimme im B-Teil abgeleitet. Sie erfolgt über einen ostinat mit Viertelpause sechzehnmal repetierten Dreitonakkord a1-fis2-a2 im Viertelnotenwert. Die 16. Repetition bildet den Schlußakkord mit übergelagertem c3 im Diskantbereich ohne Viertelpause. –

Für das mit Viertel = 112 metronomisierte und aus sechs jeweils mit Heilrufen (Ñëàâíà) abgeschlossenen Versen bestehende Spatzenlied entwickelte Strawinsky eine Doppelformel von Versvertonungshauptformel (A) und Nachrufformel (B), die textbegleitend sechsmal erklingt, so daß sich formtypologisch der Aufbau A1-B1-A2-B2-A3-B3-A4-B4-A5-B5-A6-B6 ergibt. Die mit Akkordschlag abgeschlossene, vom Klavier mit fast identischem Laufwerk bestrittene Hauptformel ist bei nur geringfügig veränderter Länge taktstrichlos entworfen, die zwei– bis fünftaktige vom Klavier nur akkordisch aufgenommene Rufformel trägt eine (mit nur einer Ausnahme) von Takt zu Takt wechselnde Metrik-Angabe, die von 3/8 bis 5/8 alle Zwischenstufen ausnutzt. In den ersten fünf Hauptformeln reicht der Ambitus der Singstimme nicht über das Quartintervall a1-d2 hinaus, die letzte, höhergelegte Intonation verringert dieses sogar noch auf das Intervall einer großen Terz d2-fis2. Die Rufformel verbleibt in den ersten beiden Rufen auf den Tönen d2-e2, im erweiterten dritten Ruf kommen die Töne f2 und g2 hinzu, so daß ein Quartambitus erreicht wird, der endgültig ist. — Das Stück beginnt mit einem Akkordschlag, der die Hauptformel auch beendet. Die Intonation wird in allen Formelwiederholungen nur geringfügig verändert, zwischen A1 und A2 überhaupt nicht, bloß daß A2 vom Akkordschlag nicht umschlossen, sondern lediglich beendet wird. Das hat seinen strukturellen Grund in der Beendigung der Rufformel mit einem Akkordschlag und nachschlagender Einzelnote. Die Diskantbegleitung besteht aus einer Folge von zwischen a1 und d2 diatonisch auf und ab rollender Sechzehntel, denen auf gleicher Tonraumhöhe der Baß eine strereotype Abwärtsbewegung d2-cis2-h1-a1 in Achtelwerten entgegensetzt, die im ganzen Strück nicht verändert, höchstens um einige Achtelwerte verlängert oder verkürzt wird. Das Übereinandergreifen der beiden Hände läßt das ohnehin von Strawinsky durch Marcatoakzente artikulierte Legatospielen nicht zu und setzt eine gute Repetitionsmechanik des Tasteninstruments voraus. Die Wertfolge von A1 beträgt 18 Achtel. Der sich anschließende überwiegend akkordisch begleitete Nachruf B1 ist mit 3/4 und 6/8 metrisiert und umfaßt somit einen Taktwert von 12 Achteln, so daß A1 und A2 auf 30 Achtelwerte Umfang kommen. A2 entspricht A1 ohne Akkordvorschlag (17 Achtel), B2 mit 3/4 und 3/8 metrisiert verkürzt B1 um 3 Achtelwerte (9 Achtel). B3 erweitert die mit identischem Material umkombinierte Singformel, so daß die ebenfalls erweiterte Begleitung, die jetzt im Diskant mit c2 abwärts beginnt, im übrigen keine Veränderungen zeigt und gleicherweise ohne Akkordvorschlag beginnt, auf einen Zeitwert von 20 Achtel kommt. Die Rufformel ist mediantenartig mit 5/8, 3/8, 6/8 und 2/4 verdoppelt und wird im 3. Takt variativ erweitert. Der Zeitwert beträgt 18 Achtel. A4 entspricht A2 (17 Achtel) sowohl in Begleitung wie Singstimmenmelodie, B4 beginnt diesmal mit der variativen Erweiterung des vorigen Rufes im 3. Takt und schließt wie dieser allerdingsmit anderer Akkordbegleitung (9 Achtel). A5 und B5 sind wörtliche Reprisen von A4 und B4. A6 und B6 bringen in dieses Miniaturbild finalisierend die stärkste Abwechslung. Die Singstimme bewegt sich nur zwischen d2, e2 und fis2. Die Diskantbegleitung gibt die diatonische Sechston-Laufbewegung auf und ersetzt sie durch eine repetierende akkordische Fünfton-Laufbewegung fis2-d2-a1-c2-e2, was zu einer rückwärts laufenden Betonungsrichtung führt, und nur die Baßbegleitung bleibt unverändert. Der Zeitwertumfang beträgt 22 Achtel. B6 schließt das Stück und wird entsprechend akkordisch aufgerüstet, erhält zudem eine bislang nicht eingeführte dynamische Steigerung von piano zu fortissimo bei einer Längung auf 5 Takte (22 Achtel mit Schlußfermate). Der Ambitus entspricht dem von B5, wird aber noch um ein einzelnes Höhepunkt-g2 gesteigert. –

Das mit Viertel = 168 metronomisierte Uneinigkeitslied mit einem Singstimmen-Ambitus von etwas über einer Oktave f1 bis fis2 unterscheidet sich inhaltlich und daher auch stilistisch sehr von den Vorgängerliedern. Der Aufbau ist weniger formalisiert, die bisherige überwiegend diatonische Singweise wird aufgegeben, die Melodieerfindung ist nicht mehr nur sprachabhängig textinhaltsunbezogen. Auch der Modus wird intensiver, starke persönliche Empfindungen schlagen durch. Die Welt der Kinder– und Scherzlieder ist verlassen. Das Stück ist im Mittelteil nicht deklamations-, sondern textabhängig taktwechselgeprägt und hängt den 45 Takten im Zwei-, Drei-, Vier-, Fünf-, Sechs– und Sieben-Achtel-Takt eine freie Koda ohne Taktvorzeichnung und ohne Taktstriche im Zeitdauernwert von 59 Achteln an. Eine Formgliederung mit austauschbaren Mustern nach einem Buchstabenschema gibt es nicht. Die einzige aus dem Musikbild herauszulesende Gliederung besteht in der Abfolge der textabhängigen Ambituserweiterungen und Melodieführungen und in der taktstrichlosen Koda. Die Melodie der Klagen über Schneestürme und verschlossene Wege ist als kreisende Lamentation mit nach Seufzerart auseinandergerissenen Triolengebilden zunächst im Rahmen eines Ganztons a1-b1 ausgebildet. Das Klavier setzt indes dämpfende, pedalisierte Staccato-Einzeltöne dagegen. In den letzten 4 Takten dieses imaginären ersten Abschnitts erweitert sich der Ambitus zu einer Quarte g1-c2, während die Klavierbegleitung die Einzeltonbegleitung nur in der Oberstimme aufgibt und dort filigrane Quintolen-und Septolenmuster entwickelt. Damit schafft Strawinsky den Übergang von den bisherigen ruhigen Sechs– und Siebenachteltakt-Folgen zu dem über 29 Takte hin ausgedehnten Taktwechselspiel, mit dem er metrisch die Erregung nachvollzieht, die den Erzähler mit der Vorstellung überkommen hat, in das Reich des Allmächtigen Vaters zu gelangen. Der Ambitus hat jetzt den Umfang einer großen Sexte a1-fis2 angenommen. Die Klavierbegleitung nimmt die Erregung auf. Sie hat als äußeres Zeichen der Aufregung das Baßregister verlassen und vollzieht sich mit großen punktuellen Sprüngen über eine Oktave hinweg und äußerstenfalls Zweitonakkorden. Die Beruhigung tritt in dem Augenblick ein, in dem der Erzähler zum Beter wird und das Lob Gottes anstimmt. Das metrische Wechselspiel leitet in ein gleichmäßiges Zweivierteltakt-Schema über, das nach Takt 45 nicht einmal mehr einer Taktordnung bedarf, weil im Hymnus von Lob und Dank der Friede des Hauses Gottes zurückgekehrt ist. Die Diskant-Trillerketten der Klavierbegleitung mit nachschlagenden Melodiefloskeln wirken wie Glockenläuten und künden von Freude und Hoffnung. Die Fundamentstimme ist wieder in der Baßregion angesiedelt und spielt gleichmäßige unzerrissene Achtelfiguren in weiter, raumgreifender Bewegung. Die Melodiestimme erreicht mit fis1 ihre äußerste Tiefe und mit einer Reichweite bis zum eis2 ihren größten Ambitus einer großen Septime, der sich nach und nach wieder verringert. Das Stück schließt mit der reinen Durterz E-e1-gis1 und einem auslautenden Klaviertriller auf e1.

 

Widmung: >DÉDIÉ À / PAR MADAME ET MONSIEUR / MAJA ET BELA STROZZI-PE³I³ [Gewidmet Frau und Herrn Maja und Bela Strozzi-Pecic].

 

Widmungsträger: siehe Bemerkungen.

 

Dauer: 445″.

 

Entstehungszeit: Morges, nach Datierung zwischen Dezember 1918 und Oktober 1919 (I: 28. Dezember 1918; II: 16. März 1919; III: 23. Oktober 1919; IV: März 1919).

 

Uraufführung: am 17. März 1919 im Genfer Konservatorium durch die Sopranistin Tatjana Tatjanow und (vermutlich) den Pianisten José Iturbi.

 

Bemerkungen: Über die Entstehungsgeschichte der Lieder ist nicht mehr als das bekannt, was Strawinsky selbst überliefert hat, daß er nämlich im Winter 1919 (er meint den Winter 1918 auf 1919) eine kroatische Sängerin mit einer besonders schönen Stimme kennengelernt und diese ihn gebeten habe, etwas für sie zu komponieren. Strawinsky sagte zu, und so entstanden die Quatre Chants Russes, die mit Sicherheit auf älteres vorliegendes, aber nicht mehr zur Verwendung gelangtes Material zurückgehen. Warum er trotz anderer Arbeiten diesen sicherlich gut bezahlten Auftrag annahm, wird aus der schlimmen Finanznot jener Jahre zu erklären sein, in denen er ohne feste Einnahmen elf Menschen ernähren mußte. In dieser Zeit hat er, wie nach seiner Nichtrückkehr aus den Vereinigten Staaten 1939, mehrere Aufträge angenommen, die eigentlich nicht seiner Art entsprachen, darunter vor allem auch die Ballett-Einrichtung Pulcinella. Zur Uraufführung der für sie geschriebenen Stücke weilte Maja de Strozzi-Pe4i4 schon nicht mehr in Genf. Ihr plötzliches Wegbleiben wird in der zeitgenössischen Briefliteratur sehr bedauert. Ernest Ansermet bestätigte die hohe Wertschätzung dieser Sängerin indirekt, als er Strawinsky mit Schreiben vom 17. März 1919 mitteilte, Madame Pe4i4 sei nicht mehr anwesend (s’en aille = was salopp soviel wie ‘sich davonmachen’ heißt), und dies mit Mais quelle dommage (‘wie schade’, wörtlich: ‘Was für ein Unglück’) bewertete. Das Bedauern bezog sich womöglich gleicherweise auf den Verlust einer guten Sängerin wie auf die durch die neuen Umstände durcheinandergebrachten Ansermetschen Konzertpläne. Die Zeilen klingen so, als stünde noch etwas Anderes, nicht Ausgesprochenes, intern Gewußtes dahinter. Erstaunlich ist es schon, daß die als hervorragend geschilderte Sopranistin eine Musik für sich bestellte und vermutlich auch bezahlte (sonst hätte Strawinsky die Widmung nicht in die Druckausgabe hineingeschrieben), aber nicht selbst uraufführte, was sie ohne weiteres gekonnt hätte. Ansermet und Strawinsky waren offensichtlich nicht darüber unterrichtet worden, daß Frau Strozzi-Pecic, tatsächlich eine überdurchschnittlich gute Sängerin, ein Opernangebot in Deutschland angenommen hatte und weiterhin große Erfolge feiern konnte. Sie war am 19. Dezember 1882 in Zagreb geboren, debutierte 1901 und kam über Wiesbaden und Graz vorübergehend nach Genf, das sie 1919 wieder verließ. Sie starb am 2. Februar 1962 in Rijeka. Möglicherweise, aber das bleibt Spekulation, hatte sie sich als erfolggewöhnte Sängerin mit ihrem und dem Auftrag ihres Mannes an Strawinsky etwas anderes vorgestellt als ein paar kleine Kinderliedchen und deshalb Genf verärgert und ohne weitere Verabschiedung hinter sich gelassen.*

* Für Hintergrundinformationen danke ich Herrn Stefan P. L. Romansky † (Bonn).

 

Fassungen: Die Quatre Chants Russes erschienen in der zweiten Hälfte des Jahres 1920 bei J. & W. Chester in London in einer russisch-französischen Ausgabe und haben wohl keine Ausgabe mit einer Übersetzung in das Deutsche oder Englische erfahren. Erst 35 Jahre später löste Strawinsky das erste und das vierte Lied ab, instrumentierte sie zymbalongerecht für Singstimme, Flöte, Harfe und Gitarre und kombinierte sie als Nummern I und II zusammen mit zwei Liedern aus der Dreierserie der Trois Histoires pour Enfants zu den Four Songs von 1953 und 1954, die 1955 uraufgeführt wurden, noch im selben Jahr in einer nur englischen Singsprachenfassung mit einer russischen Phonetik für Englischsprechende bei Chester in London erschienen, und die Strawinsky gleich zweimal, 1955 und 1965, modelleinspielte. Charakteristischerweise nahm der russische Liedband-Nachdruck von 1968 nur die ersten drei Lieder auf. Den religiösen vierten Gesang mit seiner Anklage gegen die gehässige Religionsfeindlichkeit des Kommunismus stellte man in den Raubdruck nicht ein. Die Einrichtung des 4. Liedes für Gesang, Flöte und Zimbalon blieb zu Lebzeiten Strawinskys unveröffentlicht. Ein Faksimile findet sich in Robert Crafts I. Band seiner Selected Correspondence von 1982 auf den Seiten 427 bis 429.

 

Historische Aufnahme: für die Klavierlied-Serie nicht nachweisbar; Aufnahme lediglich für Nr. 1 und 4 als Teil der Four Songs:

 

CD-Edition: als Klavierlied-Serie nicht aufgenommen; Stücke 1 und 4 lediglich in der instrumentierten Fassung der Four Songs.

 

Autograph: Das Manuskript ging aus Chester-Besitz in die Bitish Lbrary in London ein. Verstreute Skizzen, die vor allem auf frühe Instrumentierungsabsichten hinweisen, gingen aus dem Nachlaß in die Paul Sacher Stiftung Basel über. Dort befindet sich auch die für Pianola korrigierte Druckfassung.

 

Copyright: 1920 durch J. & W. Chester in London.

 

Ausgaben

a) Übersicht

311 1919 Ges.-Kl.; Vorabdruck 3. und 4. Lied; La Revue Romande 15. September 1919.

312 1920 Ges.-Kl.; r-f; Chester London; 13 S.; J. W. C. 3831.

                        312Straw [1920] ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

313

                        313Straw ibd. [mit Eintragungen].

b) Identifikationsmerkmale

312 IGOR STRAWINSKY / QUATRE / CHANTS RUSSES / POUR VOIX ET PIANO / MIS EN FRANÇAIS [#] DÉDIÉ À / PAR [#] MADAME ET MONSIEUR / [#] MAJA ET BELA STROZZI-PE³I³ / C. F. RAMUZ / PRIX NET FR. 4.50 (3/_) / °J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. [#] °°SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA FRANCE / [#] °°ROUART, LEROLLE & Cie / °LONDON: [#] °°29 Rue D’ASTORG, PARIS. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W,-1. [#] / [#] °°SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA BELGIQUE / °GENÈVE: [#] °°MAISON CHESTER / °911 PLACE DE LA FUSTERIE [#] °°86 RUE DE LA MONTAGNE, BRUXELLES. / °DÉPOSÉ SELON LES TRAITÉS INTERNATIONAUX. / °PROPRIÉTÉ POUR TOUS LES PAYS. / °TOUS DROITS DE TRADUCTION, DE REPRODUCTION ET / °D’ARRANGEMENTS RÉSERVÉS. // IGOR STRAWINSKY / QUATRE / CHANTS RUSSES / POUR VOIX ET PIANO / MIS EN FRANÇAIS [#] DÉDIÉ À / PAR [#] MADAME ET MONSIEUR / [#] MAJA ET BELA STROZZI-PE³I³ / C. F. RAMUZ / PRIX NET FR. 4.50 (3/_) / J. & W. CHESTER, LTD. [#] SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA FRANCE / [#] ROUART, LEROLLE & Cie / LONDON: [#] 29 RUE D’ASTORG, PARIS. / 11, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET, W,-1. [#] / [#] SEULS DEPOSITAIRES POUR LA BELGIQUE / GENÈVE: [#] MAISON CHESTER / 911 PLACE DE LA FUSTERIE [#] 86 RUE DE LA MONTAGNE, BRUXELLES, / DÉPOSÉ SELON LES TRAITÉS INTERNATIONAUX. / PROPRIÉTÉ POUR TOUS LES PAYS. / TOUS DROITS DE TRADUCTION, DE REPRODUCTION ET / D’ARRANGEMENTS RÉSERVÉS. / °°°ENGRAVED & PRINTED BY C. G. RÖDER, LEIPZIG // (Klavierauszug mit Gesang klammergeheftet 22,5 x 30,2 (4° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch; 13 [11] Seiten + 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf beigebraun [Außentitel, 3 Leerseiten] + 2 Seiten Vorspann [Innentitelei, Leerseite] + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Liedtitel russisch-französisch als Kopftitel; Autorenangabe rechtsbündig zentriert unterhalb Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 3 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1918<, S. 8 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1919< neben und unterhalb Übersetzernennung S. 6, 10 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1919<; Übersetzernennung 1. Notentextseite S. 3, S. 6, 8, 10 unterhalb Kopftitel linksbündig zentriert >Mis en français / par C. F. Ramuz<; # Rechtsschutzvorbehalt 1. Notentextseite S. 3, S. 6, 8, 10 unterhalb Notenspiegel linksbündig >Copyright 1920 by J. & W. Chester Ltd.< rechtsbündig teilkursiv S. 3 zentriert >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved.<, S. 6 nicht zentriert >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved.<, S. 8 zentriert >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved<, S. 10 zentriert >Tous droits réservés / All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >J.W.C. 3831<; ohne Herstellungshinweis; ohne Endevermerke) // (1920)

° linksseitig Flattersatz aufgemacht mit Einrückungen; gilt auch für die Innentitelei.

°° rechtsseitig linksbündig aufgemacht; gilt auch für die Innentitelei.

°°° nur Innentelei rechtsbündig zwischen den letzten beiden linksbündigen Zeilen.

 

312Straw

Die Urausgabe diente Strawinsky als Grundlage seiner Pleyela-Fassung, die er auf einem eigenen Blatt notierte und mit 1922 datierte. Das Strawinskysche Exemplar enthält Korrekturen und zahlreiche aufführungspraktische Einträge, die aber nicht alle eindeutig sind. Der Außentitel fehlt.

 

313 CHESTER / LIBRARY / IGOR STRAWINSKY / QUATRE CHANTS RUSSES / [°] / VOICE & PIANO / [°] / PRICE 3/- NET / REVISED PRICE / J. & W. CHESTER LTD // (Gesang-Klavier-Ausgabe klammergeheftet 24,1 x 30,8 (4° [4°]); Singtext russisch-französisch; 11 [11] Seiten+ 4 Seiten Umschlag schwarz auf cremeweiß [Außen-Ziertitelei in von Wappenrahmen umgebener seitengroßer Chester-Lyra schwarz auf weiß mit rahmenunterseits links– und rechtsbündig eingetragener (vermutlich) Künstlersignatur >H J M< [#] >1914, Inhaltsverzeichnis >CONTENTS<, Leerseite, Seite mit verlagseigener Werbung >EDUCATIONAL SERIES / OF / RUSSIAN MUSIC<* ohne Stand] ohne Vorspann + 1 Seite Nachspann [Leerseite]; Liedtitel russisch-französisch als Kopftitel; Autorenangabe unterhalb Liedtitel rechtsbündig zentriert 1. Notentextseite paginiert S. 1 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1918<, S. 4, 6, 8 >Igor Strawinsky. / 1919<; Übersetzernennung S. 1, 4, 6, 8 unterhalb Liedtitel linksbündig zentriert >Mis en français / par C. F. Ramuz.<; Rechtsschutzvorbehalt unterhalb Notenspiegel S. 1, 4, 6, 8 linksbündig >Copyright 1920 by J. & W. Chester Ltd.< teilkursiv rechtsbündig zentriert S. 1, 6, 8 >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved.< nicht zentriert S. 4 >Tous droits réservés. / All rights reserved<; Platten-Nummer >J.W.C. 3831<; Herstellungshinweis 1. Notentextseite linksbündig unter Rechtsschutzvorbehalt >Printed in England <; ohne Endevermerk) // [1920])

° Trennlinie 1,4 cm waagerecht cm.

* Die Werbung verzeichnet zweispaltig von >BOOK 1 — Easy Pieces< to >BOOK 7 — Concert Pieces< Kompositionen mit aufsteigendem Schwierigkeitsgrad; keine Strawinsky-Nennung.

 

313Straw

Strawinskys Nachlaßexemplar enthält Korrekturen, ist aber weder signiert noch datiert.

 

________________________________

K Cat­a­log: Anno­tated Cat­a­log of Works and Work Edi­tions of Igor Straw­in­sky till 1971, revised version 2014 and ongoing, by Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. 
© Hel­mut Kirch­meyer. All rights reserved.
www.kcatalog.org

© Web & Design Procateo KG
IMPRESSUM